Podcasts about Sierra Club

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Latest podcast episodes about Sierra Club

The Broadcast from CBC Radio
Assessing Fiona damage in Fox Roost-Margaree; and the Sierra Club says governments are failing to meet challenges of climate change

The Broadcast from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 21:12


Lobster fisherman Dwayne Vautier wonders where he'll fish next year; and the Sierra Club of Atlantic Canada's Tynette Deveaux on creating resilience in power grids.

The Border Chronicle
Nature Has No Borders: A Live Podcast with Erick Meza of Sierra Club Borderlands

The Border Chronicle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 86:33


We discuss the history of The Border Chronicle, the environmental impacts of the wall, and how solutions to border woes might be in the flora and fauna before our eyes. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/border-chronicle/support

Globoeconomía
El auge de la economía verde

Globoeconomía

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 19:11


José Antonio Montenegro analiza con Ramón Cruz, de Sierra Club, el auge de la economía verde. Ramón Cruz, presidente de Sierra Club, -la organización ambiental más antigua de Estados Unidos, con 130 años de existencia-, le dice a José Antonio Montenegro, que "es importantísimo hacer la transición energética cuanto antes".  Cruz enfatiza la importancia de avanzar en la investigación del almacenamiento de energías renovables, como la solar o la eólica, para conseguir una implantación exitosa de las mismas.      Para conocer sobre cómo CNN protege la privacidad de su audiencia, visite CNN.com/privacidad

Hotel Bar Sessions
The Rights of Nature (with Stewart Motha)

Hotel Bar Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 59:50


The HBS hosts discuss legal personhood and rights for rivers, lakes, and mountains with Dr. Stewart Motha.In most discussions about extending rights or legal personhood to non-humans, the focus tends to be on robots/machines or non-human animals. However, given our current global climate crisis, we have good reason to ask: isn't it time to devote more attention to the rights-- and perhaps legal and moral "personhood"-- of natural entities? What sorts of protections might be extended by the law if our notion of personhood were expanded? This is not an easily answered question, of course, because natural entities still face the challenge of being accorded "legal standing" in order to bring suit in their own names. (Names that we humans have given them!) Some progress has been made on this front by organizations like Greenpeace and the Sierra Club, who have been granted the right of "representational standing" by various courts, but we're still a long way from practically negotiating our understanding of the difference between physis (nature) and nomos (law) in a way that actually protects Nature.This week, we are joined by Dr. Stewart Motha, Executive Dean of Birkbeck Law School, University of London to discuss the challenge and potential promise of extending legal personhood to natural entities. Dr. Motha is the author of Archiving Sovereignty: Law, History, Violence (2018) and the editor of Democracy's Empire: Sovereignty, Law, and Violence (2007). His research explores the multiple forms and sources of legal norms (heteronomy) as a counter-narrative to liberal accounts of the autonomy of law, including challenges to the opposition between life/non-life. He is the host of the podcast COUNTERSIGN and can be found on Twitter at @MothaStewart.Full episode notes available at this link:http://hotelbarpodcast.com/podcast/episode-72-the-rights-of-nature-with-stewart-motha-------------------If you enjoy Hotel Bar Sessions podcast, please be sure to subscribe, submit a rating/review, and follow us on Twitter @hotelbarpodcast.You can also help keep this podcast going by supporting us financially at patreon.com/hotelbarsessions. 

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 9/22/22: Maine “Clean Water Champions” Honored at Clean Water Act 50th Anniversary event

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 5:25


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: 100 Maine “Clean Water Champions” will be honored at an event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Clean Water Act on September 29th on the banks of the Androscoggin River in Lewiston— including one person whose voice you’ll recognize from WERU! Anya Fetcher, Federal Policy Advocate for the Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM), one of the event organizers, joins us with all the details. About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 9/22/22: Maine “Clean Water Champions” Honored at Clean Water Act 50th Anniversary event first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Week On Earth
Who Killed the Electric Mail Truck?

The Week On Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 37:33


A Week on Earth Whodunit! In this episode we explore the controversy around the push for electrification of the USPS mail fleet. Featuring Katherine Garcia of the Sierra Club, Britt Carmon and Frank Sturges of the NRDC, University of Michigan scientist Max Woody, and, the "evil postmaster general" himself! Also, the brothers reminisce about the time Donnie crashed his car into mailboxes, and a roundup of the week's environmental news.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 9/15/22: Defending Maine’s Dark Skies

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 5:50


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: We talk with Nancy Hathaway, President of Dark Sky Maine, and “Defending the Dark: The Story of Preserving the Dark Skies in Maine” film maker Tara Roberts Zabriskie about their upcoming film tour. Also, this weekend Dark Sky Maine will host their annual “Stars Over Katahdin” in Staceyville, near the entrance to Katahdin Woods & Waters, featuring astromony educators, a campfire, and telescopes – on what is predicted to be a clear weekend. More information about that, and the Defending the Dark film tour, are available at darkskymaine.com, or by emailing darkskymaine@gmail.com About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 9/15/22: Defending Maine's Dark Skies first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Capitol Hill Show With Tim Constantine
Reckless GM bets it all on a warm fuzzy. Bankruptcy to be the result?

The Capitol Hill Show With Tim Constantine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 36:50


GM has recklessly declared it is all in on Electric Vehicles (EV) and has won praise from groups like the Sierra Club and Greenpeace as a result. Every Cadillac and Buick sold in the 2030 model year will be electric. The problem is battery technology continues to lag. Cars go fewer miles between "fill ups". There is no infrastructure in place to support road trips. Batteries take ten times as long as gas to fill the vehicle and range of a "full" battery is limited to 150 to 200 miles. GM has bet all its chips on a warm fuzzy. The demand isn't there, the technology isn't there and the infrastructure isn't there...but GM is betting the house that it will be in just six model years from now. Tim breaks down this foolhardy bet and roasts GM's feel good approach. Is another bankruptcy in GM's future?

Transition Virginia
Harry Godfrey and Tim Cywinski: What's New With Dominion's Offshore Wind Farm?

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 24:08


As Dominion Energy's Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind project continues, negotiations with the SCC will help determine how much it will cost for Virginians to receive the newly-captured wind energy. Harry Godfrey (Managing Director of Virginia Advanced Energy Economy) and Tim Cywinski (Communications Manager for the Virginia Chapter of the Sierra Club) join us to talk about the latest development in Dominion's negotiations with the State Corporation Commission: an SCC performance guarantee that the project will produce energy 42% of the time. What exactly does that mean, and how will the performance guarantee affect Virginia consumers? We go into the latest on this episode of Pod Virginia.Learn more at http://linktr.ee/JacklegMediaSponsored by the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia

Eco Radio KC
KANSAS CITY MISSOURI CLIMATE PROTECTION AND RESILIENCY PLAN IS AMBITIOUS!

Eco Radio KC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 56:23


During our show on September 12th, host Terri Wilke will speak with Billy Davies,  who is with  the Missouri Chapter of the Sierra Club. Listeners will learn about the recently […] The post KANSAS CITY MISSOURI CLIMATE PROTECTION AND RESILIENCY PLAN IS AMBITIOUS! appeared first on KKFI.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 9/8/22: Learning Forest on MDI Preserved by Community School & Maine Coast Heritage Trust

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:04


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: We’re on Mount Desert Island talking with Jasmine Smith, Founding Director of The Community School of Mount Desert Island about a partnership with Maine Coast Heritage Trust that successfully preserved a “learning forest” for students and the wider community. About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 9/8/22: Learning Forest on MDI Preserved by Community School & Maine Coast Heritage Trust first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine: The Way Life Could Be 9/6/22: Health- Care & Insurance

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 58:52


Producers/Hosts: Jim Campbell and Amy Browne This series is made possible in part by a grant from the Maine Arts Commission Maine: The Way Life Could Be, a series in which we look at challenges and opportunities facing Maine in the lifetimes of people alive today. This episode: At the outset of this series, we invited anyone interested to participate in a Zoom call to help us gather information on what folks saw as major challenges facing Maine people during the lifetime of those alive today. One of those challenges mentioned by several of the participants on that call was affordable and accessible health care. It's important to note right at the beginning of today's program that health care and health insurance are two different things that are sometimes conflated. Health care refers to the care that providers such as doctors, nurses, therapists, and others provide to people with health issues. How to pay for that care is a separate challenge, often provided in part by either for-profit insurance companies or government programs such as Medicaid, for those with very low incomes; or Medicare, for those age 65 and over. On today's program, we will speak with two retired physicians who, over long careers, took somewhat different paths but wound up at the same conclusion about how to provide Maine people, and all Americans, with affordable, accessible health care. Guests: Dr. Geoff Gratwick practiced medicine with a specialty in rheumatology in the Bangor area, and in clinics across Maine for over 40 years. He eventually became so concerned about what he saw as problems with Mainers getting access to quality health care that he ran for the Maine Senate after serving 9 years on the Bangor City Council. He served four terms in the Maine Senate before leaving because of term limits, and while there served on the Opioid Task Force, as well as on several legislative committees. He was a key player in establishing the state's Health Care Task Force which has been charged with determining how to make health care in Maine universal, affordable, accessible and of high quality. Dr. Phil Caper, in addition to practicing as a physician, spent a good part of his career in policy areas related to health care. From 1971 to 1976, he was a professional staff member on the United States Senate Labor and Public Welfare's subcommittee on Health. He served on the National Council on Health Planning and Development from 1977 to 1984, chairing the panel from 1980 to 1984. He has also taught at Dartmouth Medical School, the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health, and worked in private industry trying to improve the technology of hospital medical records. Both guests are active with Maine AllCare FMI: Maine AllCare From the National Bankruptcy Forum, 10/22/21: 10 Statistics about US Medical Debt that Will Shock You Health care executive pay soars during pandemic, Bob Herman, AXIOS, Jun 14, 2021 Universal health care could have saved more than 338,000 lives from COVID-19 alone, Rachel Nuwer, Scientific American, June 13, 2022 Sudden resolution of Anthem and Maine Med dispute leaves more questions than answers, Caitlin Andrews, Bangor Daily News, 8/20/22 2022 Maine Shared Community Health Needs Assessment Report Hidden charges, denied claims: Medical bills leave patients confused, frustrated, helpless, Joe Lawlor, Portland Press Herald, 8/21/22 About the hosts: Jim Campbell has a longstanding interest in the intersection of digital technology, law, and public policy and how they affect our daily lives in our increasingly digital world. He has banged around non-commercial radio for decades and, in the little known facts department (that should probably stay that way), he was one of the readers voicing Richard Nixon's words when NPR broadcast the entire transcript of the Watergate tapes. Like several other current WERU volunteers, he was at the station's sign-on party on May 1, 1988 and has been a volunteer ever since doing an early stint as a Morning Maine host, and later producing WERU program series including Northern Lights, Conversations on Science and Society, Sound Portrait of the Artist, Selections from the Camden Conference, others that will probably come to him after this is is posted, and, of course, Notes from the Electronic Cottage. Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Maine: The Way Life Could Be 9/6/22: Health- Care & Insurance first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 9/2/22: Update on Missing Person Graham Lacher

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 5:35


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: We’re back in Belfast for an update on the search for missing person Graham Lacher from his mother, Tammy Lacher Scully. Correction: The facebook page is Missing Graham Lacher, not “Finding Graham Lacher”. Photos and more information about the search can be found there. About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 9/2/22: Update on Missing Person Graham Lacher first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Environmental Voices: The PennFuture Podcast
A Shared Vision for Pennsylvania's Environment and Communities

Environmental Voices: The PennFuture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 61:01 Transcription Available


Environmental Voices: The PennFuture Podcast -  Episode 5: A Shared Vision for Pennsylvania's Environment and Communities As we approach the fall elections, securing our shared vision has never been more urgent. Tune into our latest episode to learn about the behind-the-scenes efforts by more than 30 advocacy organizations to develop  “A Shared Vision for Pennsylvania's Environment and Communities.” This bold document is designed to put Pennsylvania at the forefront of action on climate change and environmental justice to protect our families, create jobs and ensure that every Pennsylvania community benefits. Speakers include organizers from PennFuture, Conservation Voters of Pennsylvania, Sierra Club, and Make the Road Pennsylvania. Katie Blume, Conservation Voters of Pennsylvania Political DirectorMichelle Giles, Conservation Voters of Pennsylvania Policy AnalystMichael Mehrazar, PennFuture Campaign Manager for Watershed AdvocacyJenn Quinn, Sierra Club of Pennsylvania Legislative and Political DirectorDiana Robinson, Make the Road Pennsylvania Civic Engagement DirectorHosted by Travis DiNicola, PennFuture Director of Development The Shared Vision document can be found at: https://www.pennfuture.org/Files/Admin/PA_CommonAgenda_July2022_3.pdf

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 8/25/22: AIO & Artists-in-Action Against Food Insecurity,

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 4:59


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: we’re in Rockland, where a project involving a Camden art gallery, local artists and prisoners in Warren will benefit an innovative local food pantry. Joe Ryan is the Executive Director of Area Interfaith Outreach Food & Energy Assistance (AIO) About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 8/25/22: AIO & Artists-in-Action Against Food Insecurity, first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

People of Faith for Justice
Rev. Dr. Caroline Hall - 2022 Woman of the Year - A Lifetime of Service - 021

People of Faith for Justice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 37:28


Rev. Dr. Caroline Addington Hall, Rector of St. Benedict's Episcopal Church in Los Osos, has been recognized this year by the office of Congressional Representative Salud Carbajal as an outstanding Women of the Year Award recipient. Caro has been our friend, colleague and partner in working for positive change in our Central Coast communities for decades. Rev. Hall has been described as tireless, fearless, and an incredible communicator. She is a published author, an advocate for the unhoused, for the LGBTQA+ community, for the environment, for social justice, for children, and for our furry and feathered friends. Caro doesn't just talk; she DOES!  One might ask: “How does she do all of this, and keep on going?” Jason and Gina are proud to share our conversation with Caro. We'll explore how her unwavering faith and dedication to justice has been a well of strength and sustenance that keeps her focused and energized for the work she does. Join us in our conversation with Rev. Caroline Hall (Caro) today! RELEVANT LINKS PFJ Unitarian Universalists San Luis Obispo (UUSLO) United Church of Christ (Congregational) of San Luis Obispo (UCC) St. Benedict's Episcopal Church (St. Ben's: A Place for All People) A Thorn in the Flesh: How Gay Sexuality is Changing the Episcopal Church Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA San Luis Obispo) Integrity USA Los Osos Cares GALA Pride and Diversity Center (San Luis Obispo) Homeless Services Oversight Council (San Luis Obispo) 2022 Women of the Year Award Winners (24th Congressional District) National Estuary Program ECOSLO Estero Bay Womanade   MORE ABOUT OUR GUEST Rev. Dr. Caroline Hall, affectionately known as “Caro” is a tireless advocate for the homeless, for the LGBTQ+ community, for the environment, for social justice, for children, and for our furry and feathered friends. She believes that being part of the solution is required for all of us to make our community, country, and world a better place for everyone. Reverend Hall was a founding director of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for SLO, founding organizer of Los Osos Cares, founding member of Central Coast Clergy and Laity for Justice, president of People of Faith for Justice, former member of SLO County Homeless Service Oversight Council, and current member of Los Osos Advisory Councils Unhoused Residents committee. She organizes the Los Osos winter warming center and still finds time to volunteer with the National Estuary Program, Sierra Club, and ECOSLO. SUPPORT PFJ We greatly appreciate your financial support so that we can continue to educate, advocate and pray for the things that matter to our organization. Please consider donating through PayPal. People of Faith for Justice is a 501(c)(3) non-profit  organization.   CREDITS The People of Faith for Justice Podcast is produced and edited by Jeff Manildi Music for the People of Faith for Justice Podcast is provided by Andrew Gorman

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 122: Tango Alpha Lima: Sierra Club Military Outdoors campaign manager Aaron Leonard

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 44:38


IN THE NEWS Our hosts remember 1-year anniversary of the attack near Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul by honoring the 13 servicemembers killed in the bombing. THIS WEEK'S GUEST Our guest is U.S. Army retired Lt. Col. Aaron Leonard, a combat veteran who now serves as Campaign Manager at Sierra Club Military Outdoors and as co-chair of the Outdoor Rx Coalition with the New York State Division of Veterans Services. RAPID FIRE Marine Corps promotes first Black officer to 4-star general in 246-year history Anniversary of Afghanistan withdrawal could serve as a trigger for those suffering moral injury Hiring Our Heroes and Wisconsin Career Event at American Legion National ConventionIN THE NEWS Special Guest: Aaron Leonard.

Midday
Nancy Wallace, the Green Party candidate for Maryland Governor

Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 38:02


In a ruling that surprised and angered Justice Department officials, yesterday, a federal judge in Florida instructed the DOJ to suggest redactions as a first step in a possible release of the affidavit related to the search warrant for the search of Donald Trump's Palm Beach home. That search resulted in the removal of more than a dozen boxes of documents, some of which were highly classified. Justice Department officials have until next Thursday at noon to suggest to the judge material that should be kept from public view if he ultimately decides to allow the release of the affidavit, a move that would be highly unusual, in a case that has already proven to be highly unusual in every aspect. Tom spoke a couple of days ago here on Midday with the legal scholar Kim Wehle about the possibility of the affidavit being released, and she thought it very unlikely that it would be. Investigators are worried about witnesses who have come forward, and about showing defendants who may be indicted what their prosecutorial strategy may be. NPR will have the latest on this story as it develops, so stay tuned. _____________________________________________________ On Midday today, our focus is on state politics. The Maryland State Board of Elections recognizes five political parties. What recognition means is that, in addition to Republicans and Democrats, candidates from the Green Party, the Libertarian Party and the Working Class Party do not need to collect 10,000 signatures in order to be placed on the ballot. Independent candidates, who are not affiliated with any party, do have to collect signatures to qualify. In this election cycle, an independent who aspired to be on the ballot for Governor failed to get enough signatures. But the Green Party, the Libertarians and the Working Class Party have all nominated candidates in the race for Governor, and today on Midday, we will continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates with the Green Party nominee, Nancy Wallace. She has been a member of the Green Party since 2003. Her campaign is inspired by the environmental activist Greta Thunberg, and it is centered on environmental issues. Ms. Wallace has worked as an environmental lobbyist on Capitol Hill. In the 1990s she served as the Sierra Club's Washington Director of the International Population Program and since then she has worked in the tech field supporting a number of different federal agencies.Nancy Wallace grew up in Bethesda. She holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University. She is 66 years old. She has mentored three at risk children over the past 25 years. This is her second campaign for elective office. She ran for Congress in the 8th district in 2016. Her Lt. Governor running mate is Pat Elder, a former teacher and real estate professional from St. Mary's County. Nancy Wallace joins us on Zoom from Bethesda. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Around Town 8/18/22: Local Land Trusts Preserve Wallamatogus Mountain

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 5:51


Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: We’re headed to Penobscot, where Chrissy Allen, Development Director of the Blue Hill Heritage Trust has some good news to share About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 8/18/22: Local Land Trusts Preserve Wallamatogus Mountain first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

fresh pacific
Kahu Roddy Akau: Indigenous insights around Kapūkakī/Red Hill and Moanalua

fresh pacific

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 73:37


Welcome to a different reality! Hear Kahu Roddy Kawailualani Kawehi Akau of Moanalua in a free flowing interview about Kapūkakī, Red Hill, and the surrounding Moanalua ahupuaʻa. He throws off ideas and cultural references like sparks as he explains the cultural and spiritual significance of the area. A few days ago officials found fuel chemicals in a monitoring well outside the Navy's Kapūkakī/Red Hill fuel storage facility. The Honolulu Board of Water Supply says civilian drinking water system is still safe, but data released by the Sierra Club shows the storage facility has leaked more than 188,000 gallons of chemicals into its surroundings since 1947. In March this year, the Navy reversed itself and agreed that the facility is dangerous. The Navy submitted a plan to remove the fuel by the end of 2024. Hawaiʻiʻs Health Department has rejected that plan as too vague. A new plan must be submitted by September 7, 2022. Meanwhile, Oʻahu's largest freshwater source, the Hālawa Shaft, has been shut down, along with two others. Residents have been asked to cut water use by ten percent, and concerns about ongoing contamination fuel nightmare scenarios. So grateful for the opportunity to share this rare conversation with Kahu Roddy Akau. We first met in 2015. That year, he wrote a widely circulated editorial stating the significance of Kapūkakī, Red Hill. He warned of the danger to Oʻahu's water supply, and requested that the Navy move the storage facility. UHWO compilation of resources about Oʻahuʻs water crisis: https://guides.westoahu.hawaii.edu/c.php?g=977248&p=7079960 More about beautiful Moanalua Valley, purchased by the state and the Trust for Public Land in 2008 https://www.tpl.org/our-work/moanalua-valley

Globoeconomía
Urgente: parar el deterioro del clima

Globoeconomía

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 19:16


Jose Antonio Montenegro, con la ayuda de su invitado Javier Sierra, Director de Comunicación de la organización Sierra Club, analiza la urgencia de tomar medidas para detener el deterioro del clima.Para conocer sobre cómo CNN protege la privacidad de su audiencia, visite CNN.com/privacidad

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Producer/Host: Amy Browne This week: New info on the search for Graham Lacher; tree cutting on Sears Island begins this week, ahead of soil testing – as part of determining whether the island is suitable for an offshore wind production facility. Groups including Friends of Sears Island want the facility built on adjacent Mack Point, which is already developed. About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Around Town 8/11/22 first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Wellcome Collection Podcast
The Root of the Matter: Wetlands

The Wellcome Collection Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 25:47


What does the word ‘wetland' mean to you? Many of us don't encounter them at all, and at best we might think of a muddy, boggy marshland. But these landscapes, and the plants that thrive in them, are crucial for ecological health, biodiversity, and capturing carbon. In this episode, JC and her contributors invite you to see these misunderstood spaces in a new light.   Ecologist and writer Mordecai Ogada talks about the cultural and ecological significance of Nam Lolwe (also known as Lake Victoria) to the Luo peoples who live on its shores.   Diana Umpierre, of the USA's Sierra Club, explains the impact that human interventions have had on the Everglades in Florida, and the indigenous communities that call it home.    From the other side of the Pacific, Professor Dan Friess shares how mangrove swamps are crucial to both human and environmental health, and why they have been misunderstood in the past.   Finally, we hear from the Wilder Landscapes advisor for Sussex Wildlife Trust, Fran Southgate, about how we need to pay more attention to our own wetlands in the UK. Presented by JC Niala Lead Produced by Alannah Chance Produced by Mae-Li Evans Music and sound design by Alice Boyd Artwork by Faye Heller   The Root of the Matter is a Reduced Listening production for Wellcome Collection.  You can find the full transcript for this episode, and much more, on the Wellcome Collection website: The Root of the Matter | Wellcome Collection

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Why Not Slow AI Progress?

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:47


Machine Alignment Monday 8/8/22 https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/why-not-slow-ai-progress The Broader Fossil Fuel Community Imagine if oil companies and environmental activists were both considered part of the broader “fossil fuel community”. Exxon and Shell would be “fossil fuel capabilities”; Greenpeace and the Sierra Club would be “fossil fuel safety” - two equally beloved parts of the rich diverse tapestry of fossil fuel-related work. They would all go to the same parties - fossil fuel community parties - and maybe Greta Thunberg would get bored of protesting climate change and become a coal baron. This is how AI safety works now. AI capabilities - the work of researching bigger and better AI - is poorly differentiated from AI safety - the work of preventing AI from becoming dangerous. Two of the biggest AI safety teams are at DeepMind and OpenAI, ie the two biggest AI capabilities companies. Some labs straddle the line between capabilities and safety research. Probably the people at DeepMind and OpenAI think this makes sense. Building AIs and aligning AIs could be complementary goals, like building airplanes and preventing the airplanes from crashing. It sounds superficially plausible. But a lot of people in AI safety believe that unaligned AI could end the world, that we don't know how to align AI yet, and that our best chance is to delay superintelligent AI until we do know. Actively working on advancing AI seems like the opposite of that plan. So maybe (the argument goes) we should take a cue from the environmental activists, and be hostile towards AI companies. Nothing violent or illegal - doing violent illegal things is the best way to lose 100% of your support immediately. But maybe glare a little at your friend who goes into AI capabilities research, instead of getting excited about how cool their new project is. Or agitate for government regulation of AI - either because you trust the government to regulate wisely, or because you at least expect them to come up with burdensome rules that hamstring the industry. While there are salient examples of government regulatory failure, some regulations - like the EU's ban on GMO or the US restrictions on nuclear power - have effectively stopped their respective industries.

FORward Radio program archives
TCR 340 Dear Democrats, Please offer voters SOMETHING

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:24


My email inbox featured a message from the Sierra Club, as follows: “Those who want to stay alive should vote for Democrats. Those who are willing to die from a severe heat wave (like the one in Europe at this very moment), by drowning in a flood, from severe trauma in a hurricane or tornado, or from smoke inhalation in a wildfire, can vote Republican.” This episode is my response. I assert that Democratic candidates do not give voters any reason to get out and vote. Fixing that problem would be easy enough. There are numerous issues that are favored by supermajorities of Americans. One party or the other has to decide to run on POPULAR issues.

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine: The Way Life Could Be 8/2/22: Housing in Maine -Affordable to Mainers?

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 58:41


Producers/Hosts: Jim Campbell and Amy Browne This series is made possible in part by a grant from the Maine Arts Commission Welcome to this edition of Maine: The Way Life Could Be, a series in which we look at challenges and opportunities facing Maine in the lifetimes of people alive today. Affordable housing is a big issue here in Maine, with current residents being priced out of certain areas by people moving here from out of state, purchase prices beyond the reach of average wage earners in all but one county, rents skyrocketing, and short term vacation rentals displacing long term rentals. Today we again hear from area town managers and planners that we interviewed earlier this year, a young person dealing with the issue, and a local real estate agent who fills us in on the trends. With inflation and interest rates complicating things, it’s hard to predict what things will look like in a few years, much less beyond that. Guests: Lane Sturtevant, Participant in January MTWLCB forum Kathleen Billings, Town Manager, Stonington, Maine Mike Cunning, Realtor, Worth Real Estate, Belfast, Maine Jim Fisher, Town Manager, Deer Isle, Maine, and former senior planner with the Hancock County Planning Commission Anne Krieg, Bangor Planning Officer FMI: Trends and Outlooks for the Maine Economy, Maine Association of Mortgage Professionals (presentation), by Amanda Rector, Maine State Economist, June 8, 2022 2021 Homeownership Housing Facts and Affordability Index for Maine, Maine State Housing Authority LD 290, An Act to Stabilize Property Taxes for Individuals 65 Years of Age or Older Who Own a Homestead for at Least 10 Years Airbnb bookings in rural Maine surge to $95M in 2021, Lori Valigra, Bangor Daily News, June 29, 2022 Portland isn't the only place out-of-staters are buying pricey homes, David Marino Jr., Bangor Daily News, June 23, 2022 About the hosts: Jim Campbell has a longstanding interest in the intersection of digital technology, law, and public policy and how they affect our daily lives in our increasingly digital world. He has banged around non-commercial radio for decades and, in the little known facts department (that should probably stay that way), he was one of the readers voicing Richard Nixon's words when NPR broadcast the entire transcript of the Watergate tapes. Like several other current WERU volunteers, he was at the station's sign-on party on May 1, 1988 and has been a volunteer ever since doing an early stint as a Morning Maine host, and later producing WERU program series including Northern Lights, Conversations on Science and Society, Sound Portrait of the Artist, Selections from the Camden Conference, others that will probably come to him after this is is posted, and, of course, Notes from the Electronic Cottage. Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Maine: The Way Life Could Be 8/2/22: Housing in Maine -Affordable to Mainers? first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Thriving Farmer Podcast
191. Chris Sermons on Being a Real Organic Certified Farm

The Thriving Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 50:31


Have you considered applying for organic certification? On today's episode of the Thriving Farmer Podcast, we're hosting Chris Sermons, Founder of Bio-Way Farm, located in Ware Shoals, South Carolina. Bio-Way Farm is a Certified Organic farm with a focus on sustainable agriculture and permaculture design principles. Their 120 acres offers a mix of cultivated fields with row crops, hardwood forests and an edible forest garden featuring many native plants. They are located 30 miles south of Greenville, SC and serve the greater Greenville area. Chris is the winner of the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association's 2016 Farmer of the Year award.  Tune in to this info-packed episode all about how Chris and his team run a thriving Organic farming venture!   You'll hear: How Chris got started in farming 1:54 What the first years on Bio-Way Farm property were like 3:35 What the cropping and permaculture currently looks like on the farm 8:02 Why Chris decided to make the farm Certified Organic 16:07 What goes into the Real Organic certification 20:24 How Chris runs an Airbnb on the farm 31:53 What Hipcamp is 34:39 What the future holds for Bio-Way Farm 37:58 Chris's advice for beginning farmers 48:01 Chris's favorite farming tools 49:07   About the Guest: Chris Sermons is a naturalist and biological farmer. In 2004, he started Bio-Way Farm in Upstate South Carolina where they grow organic produce and foster biodiversity. He's held leadership roles with the Sierra Club, Wild South and Slow Food. The Carolina Farm Stewardship Association recognized Chris as the Farmer of the Year in 2016. His approach to managing the farm is guided by a land ethic and his background in permaculture. Resources: Website: https://www.biowayfarm.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/biowayfarm  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/biowayfarm/    The Thriving Farmer Podcast Team would like to thank our amazing sponsor! At AgriGro, we know that, in today's modern agriculture, our efforts can deplete life or add life. When you look for ways to add life, it is sustainable and makes everything work better. As a result, you will experience enhanced plant and soil health for crops, gardens, and turf, as well as improved animal health and environment for livestock and wildlife. Our products are all-natural, easy to use, and friendly to the soil and the plant, as well as the grower. AgriGro's® formulations deliver essential plant nutrition along with an advanced prebiotic concentrate, which significantly increases the multitude of beneficial native microbial species already residing in the production environment. Through these environmentally sound technologies, we're adding life to crop production, livestock, home, turf, and wildlife markets. You don't have to be dependent on crop production efforts that deplete life… Just Add Life with AgriGro®.

Idealistically
Experiencing Nature & Ending Fossil Fuel Ads with Duncan Meisel

Idealistically

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:48


In this episode, Director of Clean Creatives, Duncan Meisel (he/him), discusses what he would idealistically want in an ideal world, from protecting experiences in nature to creating new food systems...Hosted by 22-year-old artist and climate justice activist, Tolmeia Gregory (she/her - also known as, Tolly), Idealistically is the podcast where activists, artists, influencers, scientists and more are asked what they would idealistically want, in an ideal world, to inspire more people to start creating radical visions of the future.Thank you to TOGETHERBAND for supporting Season 2 of Idealistically and making it possible for me to share more ideal worlds with you.Website: togetherband.org/Instagram: instagram.com/togetherbandofficialThings mentioned in this episode:Clean Creatives (cleancreatives.org/)Cannes Lions action (instagram.com/p/CfJDvhtoW7K/)Hot Take (hottakepod.com/)Nature Is A Human Right by Ellen MilesNational Park Cities (nationalparkcity.org/)Sierra Club (sierraclub.org/)Jamie Henn (twitter.com/jamieclimate)350.org (350.org/)H&M action (instagram.com/p/CSELx7HIJSr/)Naomi Klein article (thenation.com/article/archive/we-can-only-do-this-together/)Follow Clean Creatives:Instagram: instagram.com/clean_creatives Twitter: twitter.com/cleancreativesWebsite: cleancreatives.orgFollow Duncan Meisel:Twitter: twitter.com/duncanwritesFollow the podcast:Twitter: twitter.com/idealisticallyPInstagram: instagram.com/idealisticallypodFollow the host:Twitter: twitter.com/tolmeiaInstagram: instagram.com/tolmeiaWebsite: www.tolmeiagregory.com/idealisticallyCreated and edited by: Tolmeia GregoryOriginal music by: Stowe Gregory Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

FORward Radio program archives
Sustainability Now! | Terrell Holder | Greater Louisville Sierra Club | 8-1-22

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 57:50


On this week's show, your host, Justin Mog, sits down for a great conversation with Terrell Holder, current Chair of the Greater Louisville Sierra Club, a proud Forward Radio Community Partner. Listen in as we discuss the club's recent annual picnic featuring Monica Unseld from Until Justice Data Partners; current local priorities for sustainability; the intersection of social and ecological systems; the role of electric vehicles in a sustainable future; and simple things you can do at home to improve habitat and advance sustainability. Learn more about the club at http://sierraclub.org/kentucky, or http://facebook.com/LouisvilleSierraClub As always, our feature is followed by your community action calendar for the week, so get your calendars out and get ready to take action for sustainability NOW! Sustainability Now! is hosted by Dr. Justin Mog and airs on Forward Radio, 106.5fm, WFMP-LP Louisville, every Monday at 6pm and repeats Tuesdays at 12am and 10am. Find us at http://forwardradio.org The music in this podcast is courtesy of the local band Appalatin and is used by permission. Explore their delightful music at http://appalatin.com

Coffee and BS
Coffee and BS - Ethan Gallogly - The Trail

Coffee and BS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 62:44


What hiking disaster does he talk about? How many times has he hiked the John Muir Trail? What was hiking in China like? Follow these links:Home (ethangallogly.com)Amazon.com: Ethan Gallogly: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, KindleEthan Gallogly, PhD (“Po”) has been a leader in the Sierra Club, the Cal Hiking and Outdoors Society (CHAOS) at UC Berkeley, and the Outdoors Club of Southern California. His boots have covered countless miles, including the John Muir Trail, the High Sierra Trail, the Oregon Section of the PCT, the Tahoe–Yosemite Trail, and the Theodore Solomons Trail.He was a reviewer for the Wilderness Press guides: Sierra North, Sierra South, and Yosemite National Park and has read nearly every book on the history of the Sierra Nevada.He has also hiked and explored mainland China, is fluent in Mandarin, and enjoys reading ancient Chinese poetry and philosophy.While not hiking, he can be found teaching chemistry and is co-author of a widely-used General Chemistry textbook published by University Science Books.His future plans include hiking the Camino, the GR-10, and the full length of the Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails.

Hacks & Wonks
36th LD State Representative Position 1 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 87:41


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed - all running for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district, which covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   36th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/36th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Hacks & Wonks - Julia Reed, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (April 26, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/julia-reed-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Nicole Gomez, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 10, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/nicole-gomez-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Jeff Manson, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (May 24, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/jeff-manson-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Hacks & Wonks - Tyler Crone, Candidate for 36th LD State Representative (June 21, 2022): https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/blog/tyler-crone-candidate-for-36th-ld-state-representative   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 1 in Seattle's 36th Legislative district. This covers northwestern Seattle, including the neighborhoods of Ballard, Magnolia, and Queen Anne. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 13th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! Hello everyone. We are here for the 36th Legislative District candidate forum. My name is Crystal Fincher - I'm a political consultant and the host of the Hacks & Wonks podcast, and I'm honored to welcome you to tonight's candidate forum. I'm so excited to hear from our guests - all running for State Representative Position 1 in the 36th Legislative District. Before we begin tonight, I would like to do a land acknowledgement. I would like to acknowledge that we are on the traditional lands of the first people of Seattle, the coast-Salish peoples, specifically the Duwamish people, past and present. I would like to honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe. So welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 36 Position 1. We're excited to be able to livestream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we are recording this forum for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will scroll intermittently at the bottom of the screen. The candidates running for 36th Legislative District Representative Position 1 with us tonight are - in alphabetical order - Tyler Crone, Nicole Gomez, Jeff Manson, and Julia Reed. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting today - ballots were mailed. You can register to vote still, update your registration still, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. So please take advantage of that and double check that everyone you know is also. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear as green, then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, and when there are 10 seconds left it will turn red. You will be muted as soon as time is up. I want to mention that I'm on the board for IDF or, The Institute for a Democratic Future. Jeff Manson is an IDF alum and Nicole Gomez was the program director for the most recent IDF class. We've not discussed any details of their campaigns or of this forum. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 47th Legislative District State Rep Position 2 candidate forum, in South King County, for next Wednesday, July 20th at the same time - 6:30-8p. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Tyler Crone, then Nicole Gomez, then Jeff Manson, finally Julia Reed. And we will proceed immediately to a lightning round of Yes/No questions following that. So starting with Tyler Crone. [00:04:14] Tyler Crone: Hi, I'm Tyler. I'm a global public health leader, human rights advocate, public school parent for 14 years and counting, and a mama bear of three. I'm not an ordinary candidate and this is not an ordinary time. The stakes are extraordinarily high. We are at an inflection point for shared prosperity and progress. We continue to live through a pandemic. We are experiencing an historic rollback of our rights, self-determination, and even our collapse of our church and state separation. COVID-19 has shown us that global health is local and public health is essential. Advancing sexual reproductive health and rights has been what I have done throughout my career and it is needed now more than ever with the overturn of Roe. And ultimately I had to jump into this race as transgender kids and their families, just like mine, are being criminalized across our country. I spent my lifetime making a difference for others, partnering with impacted communities, and centering those most impacted. And so I look forward to your questions and I see this as the leadership our state needs now. Thank you. [00:05:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next. [00:05:26] Nicole Gomez: Hi everyone. Hello, I'm Nicole Gomez and I'm a mom, an advocate, a community leader, and I'm running to be your next State Representative here in the place I'm really proud to call my home and where I've chosen to raise my family, the 36th District. I'm running to be the next State Representative of the 36th because I would like to help create an economy that works for everyone. And that means addressing our regressive upside-down tax code, healthcare for everyone, fully funded public education, affordable housing, addressing the climate crisis, and so much more that's important right now in the 36th and across the entire state. At age five, I went from living in a secure house and lifestyle to quickly losing a home simply due to the illness of a parent. And from that moment I learned everything I can to navigate complex systems. And so I've been quietly doing this work behind-the-scenes through my healthcare nonprofit that works on transformative policy. I currently sit on the Universal Healthcare Commission and I'm the Executive Director of IDF, and I look forward to talking to you more. [00:06:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and now Jeff. [00:06:31] Jeff Manson: Hi everyone. I'm Jeff - I'm a state administrative law judge, labor leader, and disability community advocate. And as an administrative law judge, I see every day how state laws and budgets affect people and I'm tired of underfunded government that tends to prioritize the wealthy and corporations over working people and the most vulnerable in our state. And although administrative law judges are state employees - for almost 40 years, we did not have the right to collectively bargain. So a few years ago, I organized my colleagues to successfully lobby the Legislature to extend collective bargaining rights to us. And then we formed our new union with 85% of my colleagues signing union authorization cards. I'm endorsed by the King County and 36th District Democrats, the Washington State Labor Council, the Environment and Climate Caucus of the Washington State Democrats, and Mary Lou Dickerson, who represented this district in the house for 18 years. And for those who are watching who are registered voters in the 36th - would be honored to have your vote. [00:07:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [00:07:32] Julia Reed: Thanks - my name is Julia Reed and I'm running for the State House to advocate for a Washington State where everyone can belong and everyone can have a place. I'm a workforce policy expert, an advocate for youth and racial justice, and a lifelong Seattleite - and I love my hometown. I love the 36th District. But I know that if my public school educator parents were moving to Seattle today, they couldn't afford to live here. As a millennial, my peers and I are living the housing crunch, the high cost of living, lack of childcare, and the threat of climate change. These aren't policy hypotheticals to us, it's about fighting for the future - for our future and the future of other young people. I know we can make different choices in Olympia that will build a vibrant, empowering, equitable economy, where everyone can participate and everyone can thrive. As someone who bridges old and new Seattle, I wanna help create a future of shared prosperity and possibility for generations to come and I'm excited to get your questions. [00:08:41] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. So now, we are actually gonna start right off with the lightning round portion. Candidates - get your Yes/No paddles ready to respond to questions. After the lightning round is complete - with all of the questions - you'll each get one minute to provide any further explanation of any of your votes or waffles or anything that happens like that. So we've got a number of questions to dive into - they go pretty quickly and we will attempt to announce the votes as they happen, so if anyone is listening along, you can hear that. So starting off - first question, do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? That is a Yes from everyone, and it looks like we have some background interference with green in that, for those of you who have that. So please make an extra effort to make sure that your green check is visible, but everybody appears to be a Yes for that. Are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? I see Nicole Gomez, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson have said No. Elizabeth Tyler Crone has said Yes. We'll move to the next one. Would you vote to end single-family zoning to address housing affordability? I see that - I see Nicole Gomez and Julia Reed have answered Yes. Jeff Manson, Elizabeth Tyler Crone have answered No. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Everyone has answered Yes to that question. Would you vote in favor of Seattle's, or will you vote in favor of Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Everybody is a Yes vote for social housing. Would you have voted for the Legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Everybody is a No. Should the Legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? It's taking a long time to get those Yes and Nos up. This is - looks like everybody's waffling on this - so you can address this in your one minute afterwards. So we have a districtwide waffle on this. Should we continue to limit the circumstances under which law enforcement is authorized to perform vehicular pursuits? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a state law that would remove obstacles, like qualified immunity, when suing police officers for violating a person's civil rights? Everybody is a Yes on that. Should we offer tax credits or rebates for the purchase of electric bikes? Another Yes from everybody. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Nicole Gomez is a No and the only one to answer definitively so far. Julia Reed says No. And Jeff and Tyler look like they have a more nuanced answer to this. Will you vote to ensure that trans and non-binary students are allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Everybody is a Yes. For people wanting to change their name to match their gender, do you support removing the cost and need to see a judge for legal processing name changes and gender marker changes? Everybody is a Yes. To provide relief from inflation, should we temporarily suspend the gas tax? I see everybody as a No. Would you vote to enact a Universal Basic Income in Washington? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support a wealth tax? Nicole, Julia and Jeff are Yes. Tyler was a little bit after the Yes, but it's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on large corporations? Everybody's a Yes. Should we increase taxes on small businesses? Everybody's a No. Should we lower taxes on small businesses? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Everybody is a Yes. Do you support moving elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Uniform Yes. In 2021, did you vote for Bruce Harrell? We've got three Nos, except from Julia Reed who just came in with a No. In 2021, did you vote for Lorena González? We have uniform Yeses. In 2021, did you vote for Nicole Thomas-Kennedy for Seattle City Attorney. I've got a Yes from Nicole Gomez, a No from Jeff Manson, No from Tyler Crone, a Yes from Julia Reed. In 2021, did you vote for Ann Davison for Seattle City Attorney? Nicole Gomez, Tyler Crone, Julia Reed, and Jeff Manson all say No. Is your campaign unionized? We've got uniform Nos. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their efforts? Everybody says Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Everybody says Yes. There's more uniform agreement than I thought we were gonna have. The Legislature just passed a law that will cap insulin at $35 a month for out-of-pocket costs for Washington residents. Would you vote to expand price caps to other commonly used drugs? Uniform Yeses. Will you vote for a budget that increases funding for charter schools? Everybody is a No. Right now, money raised by PTAs and parent organizations can be donated to their individual school. Should we require that this money instead be distributed equally across all similar schools in the district? Nicole, Jeff. Okay. So Julia and Jeff are Yeses, Nicole Gomez and Tyler Crone say No. That concludes our lightning round today. So thank you - just kicks off, sets a baseline for where folks are and what they have. So moving into these questions, and we will begin the questions starting with Nicole Gomez. First question is we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, yet people are saying they're not seeing the problem get much better despite a significant increase in funding. Do you agree that our homeless crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? Starting with Nicole. [00:17:00] Nicole Gomez: Great. I think that - so the homelessness and - [00:17:08] Crystal Fincher: Oh! [00:17:08] Nicole Gomez: Wait, did we get to respond to our answers before we move on? [00:17:11] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, you did. I totally forgot that - thank you for that reminder, Jeff Manson. Yeah, you guys get to explain your waffles and there were a number of them. I just jumped into the other section. So pause on that, Nicole - thank you so much for your flexibility in that. And we will start the explanations starting with Nicole on that one. Anything you wanna clarify about your answers, waffles, your unique Nos? [00:17:35] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think the only one that was a unique No was the requiring PTAs or PTSAs to distribute equally to other schools as a requirement. I believe that individual PTAs should be allowed to make that decision. And the only reason is that back when my kid was at Salmon Bay K-8, that did come up as a topic. And so we were really interested in exploring it further and were able to vote on it together as a team. Parents have kids in their schools and so sometimes they would like to donate the money to their school specifically and other times not. So I think it's more democratic process to allow them to have that opportunity to vote. We ended up with a vote to share. [00:18:32] Crystal Fincher: Thank you, and now we move to Jeff. [00:18:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so a couple answers I'd like to discuss. One was collective bargaining rights for police officers. There have been a couple things that have been addressed. One is making the collective bargaining sessions open to the public, which I am opposed to, because I think that would undermine public sector unions beyond just police officers. And I don't think the benefit we would get would be worth that risk. It's been a right-wing, anti-union idea for years and I think we'd just be handing them something if we did that. In terms of - the other thing that's been discussed is the discipline process. I do think that law enforcement are in a unique position of power that other public employees like myself are not in. And so if we're careful about how it's written, there could be some aspects of the discipline process that we could look at. The other is highway expansion - should be our lowest priority, but wouldn't absolutely vote No. [00:19:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Tyler. [00:19:39] Tyler Crone: Yes, so the collective bargaining - I do not know enough to make a sweeping statement on that. Regarding eliminating single-family zoning, I think we all agree that there needs to be more density. We have affordability and housing as a middle-class crisis, but I am not in favor of eliminating single-family zoning all together. It needs a more thoughtful approach. The sweeps piece - I couldn't make an absolute statement to say, I would never agree to that, because there have been instances where there are encampments in schools and other places where children and families need to go and we need our civic space. Regarding the PTAs and the schools, we need to fully fund education so that our PTAs do not provide our specialists, our librarians, our counselors, our nurses, our arts. So I will fully support fully funding education. I understand that parents are desperate for options around - [00:20:35] Crystal Fincher: It looks like that is your time. And we'll go to Julia. Oh, Julia, you're gonna have to unmute yourself - there you go. [00:20:47] Julia Reed: Oh, sorry. There we go, I'm unmuted. I was just gonna say on the police bargaining question, I think that I have seen from working in City Hall, the challenges and obstructions that can come from police unions and sometimes that run counter to police officers' own wishes around wanting to implement reforms. So I'd like, but I'd also as someone who's endorsed by the Washington State Labor Council, I wanna be sure that any actions we're making regarding collective bargaining or something that the labor community feels is right and is not going to undermine overall labor rights across the board. And I thought Tyler's answer just now was excellent on the need to fully fund public education, so I feel like I wanna change my position on that question. She definitely convinced me, made a great argument. I think that fully funding our schools is essential. We shouldn't be relying on PTAs to fill the gap. [00:21:46] Crystal Fincher: And that is the time. Thank you so much. And now - thank you for your flexibility. We are heading into the general question portion. So restating the question and we will start this time with Jeff, we've seen significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get better yet despite the increase in funds. Do you agree that the homelessness crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? [00:22:24] Jeff Manson: Yeah, so I think we have - the City and the County make a lot of decisions about homelessness programs and contracts and parcel by parcel, but the state provides a lot of the funding for shelters, for tiny homes, for permanent supportive housing, for low income housing. And I think the - what the pandemic in the last few years have shown is that we've underinvested in these areas in recent decades. I do think that the services and the housing options are getting better. I just think during the pandemic, the lack of housing was rising faster than the services for homeless could keep up. So I think we're heading in the right direction, I think we are slowly seeing improvements, I think we're finding models that work. I think having peer navigators start with people when they're on the streets and looking through the whole process, I think tiny house villages are a good first stop for people. I think we've relied too much on our emergency shelters. As a housing option, they're great when it's subfreezing or 108 degrees but not as much as a night-to-night housing option. But a tiny house village is a good first stop and the majority of people there are placed in permanent housing within a few months. And I think permanent supportive housing is the gold standard. It's permanent housing, but with mental health therapists and other social workers on site for people who can't fully live on their own. And the Legislature put money in for about 2,000 more units statewide this last session, which should be coming online later this year, which is great, but it's not enough. We need a round two. [00:23:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And now we head to Tyler. [00:24:04] Tyler Crone: Thank you. I know that the issue of homelessness is top of mind. I was out door knocking today in Ballard and that's the major concern. I have seen us spend a ton of money. I do not know what the results are and we've been calling it a protracted crisis for a very long time. I think it is the moment to accelerate and strengthen our partnerships at a city, county, and state level. Coordination was one of the key takeaways from an article in The Seattle Times about what we needed to strengthen our response. One, housing is a human right - we do not currently have enough shelter to put those who are unsheltered on the streets somewhere safe overnight. We need more immediate shelter options. Two, that long-term work towards affordable housing is critical. Right now, housing insecurity now is a middle class issue. Three, we do not have a sufficient mental and behavioral health system. That is top of mind for me - that both, we need to have a place where people can go and people can be safe, but we also need to be taking care of those who are most vulnerable amongst us. And currently our sweeps are happening without necessarily a place for people to go and that is not okay, so circling back to an earlier point that I made. The last piece I'll make is that it needs to be a regional approach. Thank you. [00:25:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much - now Julia. [00:25:36] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that - so when I was working in City Hall, one of the things that I remember - what came up in the conversations we had around the original start of the Regional Homelessness Authority was that actually the system within the greater Seattle area is exiting thousands of people and thousands of families from homelessness every year. The challenge is that tens of thousands of more are entering homelessness every year because of the high cost of living, the shortage of affordable rental property, the stagnant wages that we experience all across our country that mean that every person is really just one medical emergency or one sudden event away from finding themselves homeless. I understand that people's frustration is that we put money into it, it seems like it's getting worse. But I think that we invest comparatively little in our homelessness response. If you look at the billions of dollars we might put into roads and bridges, we don't invest a comparable amount in our human infrastructure in our state. And as a legislator, that is gonna be one of my big focuses - not just housing, mental healthcare - but also human infrastructure, like childcare, green spaces, access to healthy food. All of these things contribute to a safer, healthier community for everyone and particularly contribute to addressing our homelessness challenge in a permanent and lasting way. [00:27:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Nicole. [00:27:11] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So I think of homeness as a phenomenon that also should be contextualized with systemic issues, right? Racism or ableism, education access - there's a lot of different things that go and contribute to homelessness. So while it might seem like our numbers have been increasing, we've also been in the middle of a pandemic. And that, in addition to the high cost of housing overall, has been - exasperated the problem. Our unhoused individuals are carrying an immense amount of pain and trauma and we need to be looking at the programs that are also supporting - we've been underfunding a lot of them for decades. And so it's really time for us to think about what our true north is again - and make universal housing a goal - making sure that we are housing everyone and make it a priority. And I think that we're on the right track, we just need to get there in the long run. It's an issue and a problem for a really long time and it's gonna take a while to fix. [00:28:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. For the next question - last year, Washington experienced a natural disaster in the form of our record breaking heat wave that left hundreds dead. Due to human-caused climate change, we're guaranteed to see more disasters like this. What will you do as a legislator to prepare our state and your district for future crises? And we are going to begin this question with Tyler. [00:29:13] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So to prepare our state for future crises - this is an urgent and top-of-mind response issue for me - accelerated climate action and the climate impacts must be embedded into all of the decision making we make. One of the things that was top-of-mind related, Crystal, to the heat dome question as I entered this race was how smoke season has come up as a issue in the very short time that my youngest child has been alive. I see a way forward as - one, bringing my public health expertise and prioritizing that as what are the health impacts of these climate emergencies and how are we centering frontline communities? Two, the UN report on the climate crisis has suggested a very important strategy and that is something that we have an abundance - is centering Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous leadership. That is another key priority and approach of mine. Three, it is again about planning and coordination. Do we have the systems in place to keep people safe and healthy? Four, there is a piece of - do we have the funds available to help people recover from these climate emergencies and navigate them? And five, I would say it is about leaning into the bold innovation and leadership across our state so that we are all working together. As a young student said to me, "It's Earth Day, and I don't know what to do to make a difference." Thank you. [00:30:50] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're headed to Julia. [00:30:53] Julia Reed: Thanks. When I was working in City Hall, a group of Parks Department staffers came to me early in the spring and said, "We really wanna work on getting ready for wildfire season early. Can you help us?" And as a mayor's policy person, I was able to help elevate that issue. We created the first ever Smoke Ready Communities Day, which was a four-countywide event across King, Pierce and Snohomish county that tried to create awareness and information about preparing for wildfire smoke, especially for low-income communities, because these climate emergencies - they touch all of us, but they hit our low-income communities, our communities of color, our working people who have to go out to work the hardest and first. It's one of the reasons I'm proud to be endorsed by Puget Sound Sage and one of the reasons why I've been talking about wildfire smoke resiliency from the start of my campaign. I really want to see the state use some of our cap-and-invest funding to create a grant program for small cities to increase their climate resiliency and to help create a strategy for those cities as well - because large cities like Seattle have the staff and the expertise to create their own filtration systems as we did when I was in the mayor's office, but smaller cities and towns don't have that support and their folks are suffering right now and they need the state to step in and help them understand what to do and help them afford to make the retrofits to keep their community safe. [00:32:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:32:25] Nicole Gomez: Sure. Our communities are being attacked, are being destroyed every day by the climate or impacts of climate change. And we're seeing this in the forms of the flooding, the wildfires, droughts and we're being threatened by the inaction that's been not taken. So I think Washington should lead on reducing the carbon emission through more sustainable, like transportation, construction and consumption. Also, one of the secret weapons - I've read articles - one of the secret weapons against climate change is affordable homes. And it's a problem that I think that if we think about it in a more holistic way and look at the larger overarching systems, I think we can come up with some really good ideas for tackling our goals, our climate goals. And then also with the creation of the HEAL Act that's just been put into place - and that's engaging community through our state agencies and being able to make those recommendations from the bottom-up will really help also with that environmental justice aspect as well. [00:33:52] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now, Jeff. [00:33:54] Jeff Manson: Yeah, I agree with what everyone else has said. I would just add, in addition to smoke season that we have now and the heat waves, which are gonna be more common, we also have a water crisis that's coming - and that's both our drinking water, it's our agricultural water, it's our electric power. So we need to be preparing for not only the disasters we're already experiencing, but the ones that we should be anticipating 5, 10, 20, 30 years from now. And we also need to keep leading on preventing these worse outcomes. Washington - the good news is Washington State has been a leader among states and among countries in terms of pushing our pro-climate policies to reduce our carbon footprint. The bad news is it's not enough. Even if every jurisdiction in the world copied exactly what we're doing, they're not gonna meet - none of us are gonna meet our climate goals of halving, cutting in half our carbon emissions by 2030 and even more by 2050. We had some low-hanging fruit this last legislative session - we had electric vehicle subsidies, which we can bring back - also support the electric bike subsidies, redoing our building code to promote electricity over natural gas. There was also a bill to include climate effects in the Growth Management Act comprehensive plans. So it's easy, low-hanging fruit to pick up next session, but we need to keep investing in green infrastructure and clean energy to prevent the worst from happening. [00:35:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Our next question will be an audience-submitted question. Pat in Greenwood wants to know what actions can the Legislature do to protect reproductive care with the Dobbs decision coming down from the Supreme Court, but our right already codified in state law here - but a constitutional amendment seems unlikely given the makeup of the chambers. So what actions can happen to protect reproductive care? And we are going to start with Julia. [00:36:04] Julia Reed: Yeah, I think that I want to just push back a little bit against the concept that a constitutional amendment is unlikely. I think that it'll be challenging - maybe we can do income tax and reproductive rights in the same push. But I think that we have to start thinking about a constitutional amendment. Our rights are legally protected, but that law is only as good as long as we have Democratic majorities in the Legislature and a Democratic governor. And that could change and I don't feel comfortable leaving our rights up to that kind of risk, especially not in this day and age. I also think another thing we can do is - in Washington State, we have legally protected access to abortion. But in many parts of the state, there are no accessible abortion clinics and hospital systems have merged with Catholic hospital systems that restrict access and information about abortion. So there are people in Washington State who have legal access to abortion, but they lack actual access to abortion. I think it's really critical that we ensure that we're regulating state hospital mergers and Catholic hospital mergers to ensure that everyone's access continues to be protected in our state. And I also think helping to support and create funding for people who may be coming here from other states - I want to applaud the governor's work limiting the State Patrol's ability to be pulled into investigations of people coming to seek abortion care in our state. [00:37:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:37:40] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so since the start of the campaign, I've been talking about the Keep Our Care Act, which is something that I worked on last session and I'm looking forward to continuing the work on it in the upcoming session. And that's similar - it's the bill that would ensure those health entity mergers, acquisitions, and contracting affiliations to improve rather than harm access to that affordable, quality care within the community. And it would, like Julia mentioned, put that prohibition on those consolidations that diminish that access to affordable quality care, including our reproductive rights. That is one very small thing that we can do right now. As Executive Director of Institute for a Democratic Future, one of the things that I heard a lot about when visiting the areas along neighboring states like Idaho was that we're going to need additional funding for those health providers that are right along the border there in order to appropriately have that intake of new, potentially new patients coming into the state to seek care. And so that's something I look forward to continuing to work on in the future. [00:39:10] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [00:39:12] Jeff Manson: Yeah - again I agree with what both Julia and Nicole have said. I do agree that we need to push for a constitutional amendment. We, at the federal level - I think a lot of people thought that Roe was settled law, Roe v. Wade was settled law and we had a constitutional right to abortion access. And it took the right wing 50 years, but unfortunately they were successful and I don't think we can take anything for granted here. I feel rather confident that our current legislature is in the right spot, our current Supreme Court's in the right spot, but you never know what's gonna happen 5, 10, 20, 50 years from now - so we should push for a constitutional amendment for an explicit right to abortion access. In terms of what we can do, this last legislative session the Legislature did pass a bill to expand the types of providers who can perform services, anticipating that Roe may fall, which is great. That helps expand access, but I really think funding is gonna be a major issue. We need to make sure that we are fully funding our clinics and other providers 'cause people are already - even before Roe - people from Texas were already coming here for services as they were being further restricted across the country. And we should be a safe haven for people, we should be a place that people can come and feel safe, no questions asked and have access to services. And if that means also funding for their stay or transportation, I'm open to that as well. And I also agree that we need to - [00:40:48] Crystal Fincher: Oh, thank you - and now Tyler. [00:40:55] Tyler Crone: I've served on the board of Cedar Rivers, which is an independent feminist abortion provider in our state and one of the best in the country. I've also been on the frontlines of advancing safe, legal abortion around the world. This is an urgent moment, it is an all-hands-on-deck moment and is one of the key reasons why I'm running. One, we have to codify Roe - we have to do it. Two, we have to invest in the infrastructure of care - the services, the providers, the clinics. We have a desperate shortage in eastern Washington and in the 36th legislative district, you cannot get abortion care at a hospital because of the mergers. Just so you know, it is here at home that you cannot get the care you need. I also am deeply invested in increasing and expanding the funding that has already been initiated by Dow Constantine, by the governor, by our mayor to overcome barriers and to ensure access to care for everyone who is seeking abortion care in our state. We also have to think about upstream - let's ensure that we're scaling up our access to reversible, long-acting contraception such as IUDs - that will take the burden off of our limited clinic and service facilities. We need to invest in training - all of these rollback of Roe means that all those states where abortion is not legal, you cannot train to provide that care. And I guess I would like to say one last point - this is just the beginning. I hope you look to commentaries by my law school classmate, Melissa Murray - [00:42:30] Crystal Fincher: Appreciate that. And for the next question - the pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity - which has grown even worse, continues to grow worse and more limited - and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? And we are going to start this with Nicole. [00:43:03] Nicole Gomez: Oh, Crystal - can you please repeat the question one more time? [00:43:06] Crystal Fincher: Sure. [00:43:07] Nicole Gomez: Thank you. [00:43:08] Crystal Fincher: The pandemic exposed our healthcare system's limited capacity and our state's unequal access to health services. What action do you propose to increase our state's capacity to respond to a health crisis, including behavioral health crises, and what will you do to make sure that our response supports our most vulnerable communities? [00:43:28] Nicole Gomez: Okay, thank you. One of the - I work on healthcare policy quite a bit at the state level, that's what I do. And one of the things that we have done to help increase access to medical care has been, like this last session, we got additional funding to help cover our undocumented population and we're seeking additional funding for that. So that was something that that was done during the pandemic because we saw the huge inequities in the way medical coverage and care is provided. I've been working on the Universal Healthcare Commission - I was appointed by Governor Inslee there - and so we are in the current talks of trying to figure out what the nuts and bolts of a comprehensive healthcare plan for Washington State would look like. [Noise of object hitting ground] And I just dropped my little thing. At any rate, we are currently in the process of doing that right now - to ready the state for a potentially single-payer program. And that's something that my nonprofit has been working strenuously on, and I'm hoping that by being there as an elected official, I'd be able to continue that work in a different capacity. [00:44:56] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [00:45:00] Jeff Manson: Yeah. I support universal healthcare, universal coverage, health insurance coverage. Ideally the federal government would take the lead on this, but we can't and shouldn't wait for the federal government to get its act together and need to do it here in Washington. I supported the creation of the Universal Healthcare Commission and I want to give a shout out to Nicole for all of her great work on this issue. If elected, I'll be relying on her on healthcare access issues. We need to take the lead here and if federal government maybe could follow our example in how we set things up here. But we don't just need health insurance coverage. I do Medicaid hearings as an administrative law judge. These are people who are covered by Medicaid, which was expanded under Obamacare, which is great. But often there are not sufficient providers for a lot of different types of services, including behavioral health services. And often, I think they would say the reimbursement rates aren't high enough to be able to cover people. So we need to not just provide universal coverage, we need to be providing the funding so that the actual services are available for those with insurance coverage. So it's attacking it from all angles and really it comes back to - are we gonna raise progressive revenue through progressive revenue sources in order to fund the services that people need and deserve. [00:46:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:46:34] Tyler Crone: First, I want to start with where you started - the pandemic exposed - the pandemic is not over. We need to be learning from where we fell short, what we did right, what we do better next time - that is the first pillar of continuing to navigate and recover from COVID-19. Too many of us are sick, too many of us have had our lives disrupted. A key piece of this, for me, is bringing that pandemic expertise coupled with investment and fortification of our public health systems, our public health leadership, and our public health infrastructure. A next piece of this for me, that is top-of-mind, is about how are we taking care of those who keep us healthy? We have an incredible nursing staffing shortage in our state, our healthcare workers are exhausted and overstretched, and we need to keep that top-of-mind if we're thinking about how we're navigating a crisis and who takes care of us. Likewise, we have frontline responders who are overstretched, such as our firefighters. I'd like to make sure those stay top-of-mind as well. I think the piece that I will close with here is how I would legislate and how I lead. I lead from behind centering those who are most impacted. A key question you asked is about how would those who are most vulnerable not be excluded - they would be partners in the solutions. Thank you. [00:47:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - Julia. [00:48:03] Julia Reed: I'm really proud to just recently have been endorsed by SEIU 1199 Northwest, which represents thousands of nurses and behavioral healthcare workers all across the state. It's an honor after all of the work that they've put in to keep us safe, that they've put in to keep us safe every day to have their support in this race. And one of the - we talked about two things in the endorsement process. One is the essential need for safe staffing. Too many of our hospitals in healthcare settings are being run at staff-to-patient ratios that are unsafe - that put the medical staff at risk, that put patients at risk, that put care at risk, that put our whole system at risk when there are stresses like pandemic. The other thing we talked about is the really important need to grow our healthcare workforce pipeline. I'm one of the only candidates in this race who has worked on and built workforce development programs and that includes having done work with the Somali Health Board to try to advocate for greater access for immigrant and refugee doctors. We have a lot of excellent medical, trained medical personnel in our state who, because of government regulations, aren't able to do the work that they're trained to do. And I want to work with SEIU 1199 Northwest Multi-Employer Training Fund to help grow our next generation of healthcare workers, especially women and people of color. Because to ensure they aren't excluded, we have to have, you have to have providers available who come from your community, who look like you. [00:49:40] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rates. The top three answers were: at 85% lack of mental health and addiction services, at 67% homelessness, and at 63% economic conditions. And when asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were: at 92% addiction and mental health services, 81% said training police officers to deescalate situations, and 80% said programs to address the root causes of crime. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Jeff. [00:50:45] Jeff Manson: Yes, I do. I think in terms of where we have underinvested in recent years, mental health and behavioral health services and interventions is where we are the farthest behind, where we need to invest the most. The Legislature did increase some funding this past year, but I think it's just a start, it's just a drop in the bucket. And I was trying to type up the numbers and I'll have to look it up later - and I think I generally agree with the respondents to the poll. I think mental health and addiction is a major contributor to criminal activity, and we need to make sure that we have these services available and that we are directing people who enter the criminal justice system into services, when they're properly identified to need those services. Drug Court is a huge success, other alternatives to incarceration for those with addiction issues and other mental health issues have been a real success story. But there are stories of Drug Court telling prosecutors not to - don't send as many referrals, we don't have enough providers to provide services for as many people who are wanting to come over to Drug Court. So we need to make sure that we're providing that funding so that the services are available. I do think that is the - one of the main causes of criminal activity and the cheapest way to reduce it. [00:52:12] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Tyler. [00:52:18] Tyler Crone: Investing in the criminal legal system does not work. It does not help us solve the problems of today. I'd like to put forward and agree with many in Seattle who do feel concern, grave concern, about our public safety situation at present and push you back, Crystal, a little bit and say it has to be nuanced. We are currently facing a public health and public safety crisis. And so I am not going to pit two things against each other of saying - absolutely, we need to be investing in mental health, we need to be investing in behavioral health. And those are some of my key priorities - bringing forward a public health and a harm reduction approach to both. But you said - would you say you would do this rather than - I'm not sure we're at a moment where we can say rather than. As much as I'd love to put forward public safety as public health, I recognize we have Starbucks closing down, I recognize that my child who worked at Majestic Bay had to shoo out a person using drugs from the entrance who lurched at them and they had to call out a manager. And my daughter last night had someone break a bottle on her car. So just to say we are facing a moment that is complex and nuanced and is going to take a lot of integrity, thought, and care to center human dignity and put the services that we need to prevent these types of scenarios. So thank you so much. [00:53:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And just clarifying the question - it's would you fund those things before passing other ones, not necessarily instead of. With that, we will go to Julia. [00:54:05] Julia Reed: I think safety, public safety, is the issue we hear about on the doors - all of us - the most every day. I think everyone deserves to be safe, but I think we can see that doubling down on our current system, which is broken, is leading to the results we're having in our streets. As someone who's worked in government my whole career, I really try to be led by data in making decision making. And I think the data shows us that we have solutions that work here in our City. I'm proud to be endorsed by Dominique Davis, the CEO and founder of Community Passageways, which is one of the leading examples of community-based, evidence-backed, non-incarceral, non-police-related solutions to public safety that create lasting safety in our City. I've also been a longtime board member for the YMCA Social Impact Center which sponsors the Alive and Free program, which similarly is a community-based program, community-based response to crime that has shown real measurable results. I want to see us investing in the solutions that work. I want to see us investing in things like Community Passageways, Alive and Free, greater access to advocates for victims of violence, of sexual assault, and addressing the scarcity and poverty that drives a lot of low-level crime, including the lack of mental and behavioral healthcare. [00:55:33] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [00:55:37] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so on the topic of behavioral health, I actually will - first, to answer the question - yes. But on the topic of behavioral health specifically, the Legislature just recently put in a really large package of behavioral healthcare funding because it is a top issue - top-of-mind not just here in the Seattle area, but across the entire state and nation, quite frankly. And there still needs to be additional investments. This past session - something that I'm proud to have helped pass was this budget proviso that one of my, one of the local nonprofits came to me and said, Hey, can you help with this? And we ended up passing a proviso for a pilot program that - mental health providers were coming to them and saying, Hey, I would love to volunteer my time, but there's no way that we can figure out how to pair patients with providers. There needs to be a screening process that's easy for us to manage. And so we helped pass that through, so it's a pilot in King, Snohomish and Pierce. And with innovative ideas like that, if it works - let's see if we can continue to do it, especially now that we have telehealth, that could potentially help get providers across the state specifically in the areas where there's a lack. There's a huge lack of mental health providers statewide. [00:57:15] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And with that, it's 7:30, it is a hot evening, there's a lot going on. We are going to take a quick two-minute break just to give people the chance to grab some ice, refill water, do whatever you need to do. So we will start that two-minute countdown now, which goes by pretty quick. So we will start that break and then be back shortly. Excellent. So it looks like we are back - I'm waiting for, there we go - we're all back. So this next question is a combination of two - a combination of a preexisting question and one sent in from a viewer. Starting off - Washington's facing housing affordability crisis - lots of conversation about ending exclusionary zoning, making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, but also balancing concerns of different constituents. One in particular writes in asking, citing a King 5 story where Seattle has lost 11,500 rental property units in the past year, mostly smaller locally-owned properties, according to this and suggested by the King 5 article. They're wondering if you're gonna pursue similar regulations at the state level, which they feel greatly disfavor and disincentivize mom-and-pop landlords. So that's question one. And question two - in addition to what you plan to do for landlords or not, what needs to happen to address this housing affordability crisis beyond expanding zoning and investing in the Housing Trust Fund? And we are going to start with Tyler. [00:59:07] Tyler Crone: Thank you. So I think that the first question piece was about these smaller landlords and what are we doing to find strategies that work? I think that we are at a extraordinarily difficult moment because one, we're facing a homelessness crisis that will only be exacerbated when we lift an eviction moratorium. This eviction moratorium is placing a disproportionate burden on some of these small landlords who are an important part of the solution. And so what I would look to do would be to one, bring these stakeholders around the table to see where have our actions had unintended consequences, or that article, Crystal - I just saw it on Twitter before we hopped on - where we're losing critical space where people are selling their units and it is impacting our housing availability. So one, that partnership with landlords looking for practical solutions, exempting small landlords from some of these onerous regulations. To that piece of affordability, we have to be finding smart ways forward around density, around building with that urban village model, increasing density along our secondary arterials and seeing it as a strategy for inclusive, safe, healthy neighborhoods. [01:00:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Julia. [01:00:41] Julia Reed: Yeah, it's hard for me to speak to that specific article without having read it and dug into the data a little bit more. I, like I said, I like to be driven by the data and I know sometimes television news can can create packages for clicks as opposed to things that are more nuanced. I am very concerned about the loss of rental property in our City and the lack of affordable rental property. The University of Washington researchers just put out a book that I've been deeply reading for this process called Homelessness is a Housing Problem - the thesis is in the title of the book. And one of the things that they identify is that the lack of affordable rental property is the number one most determinative factor in the rates of homelessness in a particular area. So it's a huge concern. I'm really focused on this rising trend around LLCs and corporations buying up homes as investment properties to increase corporate profits. I want to explore what that looks like in our state and see if we can regulate that to ensure that our market can remain something that individuals can buy into for their own ownership. And that's really gonna be, I think, a big focus of mine in the Legislature. [01:02:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:02:07] Nicole Gomez: Sure. So like others, I have not had an opportunity to read the article that was posted, but what I would say is that this is exactly the reason why we need different options for housing. Aside from being able to lift the ban on rent control or something of that nature, we would also need to look at limiting predatory fees. There's other ways in which we can work through making sure that we have more affordable housing. I was thinking about an article that I read - I think it was regarding Amsterdam and there's a 40-40-20 rule that they use there. And so essentially what that is - is you have 40% of regulated rent, and then you have another 40% of medium-term rental, and then 20% would be an expensive rent option. And looking at other countries who are tackling this problem and are doing it in a successful manner could be helpful in helping guide the work that we do. We're in a - oh, there's time. Thank you. [01:03:34] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Jeff. [01:03:36] Jeff Manson: Yeah, our housing affordability crisis, I think, is related to a lot of the issues we all hear at the door and I think we're all experiencing ourselves. I think in terms of the role the state can play in that - there's twofold - one is direct state investment at the lower end of the market. This would be the Housing Trust Fund, other direct investments. The other is we need more density. We need - we're tens of thousands of housing units behind where we need to be. People are moving here faster than we're building new units and that's causing the - one of the main reasons that prices are rising. Seattle has taken steps in recent years to increase density - it could do more - but other cities in the region haven't done nearly as much. I think another thing is people who are wanting to build more housing units are having a lot of trouble with just basic things like permitting. I hear, of course, at the doors about Seattle's process and we need to make sure that our municipalities have the resources, are able to raise the resources they need to process permanent applications expeditiously. In terms of small landlords, I also haven't read the article. I would say my overall approach is that we need to respect tenant's rights, but also need to make sure that we aren't disincentivizing providing rental units so much that we don't have any housing for everybody. So I do think it's a balance and it's complicated. But those are the two things I would be looking at in any of this legislation. [01:05:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Now we go to a audience-submitted question. What would make Washington's tax code more fair for the poor and working families? And how much funding would you look to raise for needed services in Washington? And we're gonna start with Julia. [01:05:28] Julia Reed: That's a great question. One of the things that makes our tax codes so regressive is that poor and working families who purchase more of their goods and consumables are paying a lot of money in sales tax. Tons of money in sales tax. Also, we talked about the gas tax earlier in the lightning round. People who have older cars, less fuel-efficient cars are paying more in gas tax than people who are buying - well, people who are buying Teslas in general aren't paying gas tax. So it's just another example of how working families are carrying the load for our parks, our roads, our schools, our infrastructure - and wealthy folks are getting a free pass. I think what we need to do in our state is - I'd like to see us create a statewide income tax. While we are working towards that, dealing with constitutional issues, I really support the wealth tax that Noel Frame who held this seat before has proposed - which she proposed a 1% tax on wealth over a billion dollars. I think you could even bring that threshold down a little bit. I also would like to see us increase the estate tax on large estates and use that as an opportunity to lower the estate tax on smaller estates so that families of color can afford to create generational wealth and that all working families can try to bring some generational wealth to the next generation. [01:07:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nicole. [01:07:04] Nicole Gomez: This is the billion dollar question. So I've been working with the Balance Our Tax Code coalition over the past few years. And we've been working in detail on this very issue. There's a lot of different ideas that are floating out there. We did pass the capital gains tax, so that was one effort. I do think we need to tax excessive wealth - that is something that we've been working on and will continue to work on it. That 1% tax on the value of stocks, bonds, and the other financial intangible assets over $1 billion, which again, I do also think that should be lowered. And I believe that they're working on a number that might be a little - a different number perhaps, or a different way of looking at it - but that only affects like a hundred people in Washington State. It's time that the wealthy do pay their fair share. There's also other ideas like a guaranteed basic income program I've seen out there. Baby bonds has also been floated where you're giving funds to - I think the bill was like $3,200 to give funds to people, to kids who are on the state's Medicare Apple Health program. And then that money grows over time and they get it when they're an adult, which is a good way to eliminate or to address the wealth gap. And I have so many more - I could talk about this topic for hours. So thanks. [01:08:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Jeff. [01:08:39] Jeff Manson: Yes - as I'm sure this is a very informed audience and everyone's aware that we have the most regressive tax structure in the whole country. It is by far the worst, and we're really feeling it right now with inflation and the affordability crisis - the sales and property taxes that are so regressive. That's one thing I hear at the doors all the time. So I support capital gains tax and am cautiously optimistic our State Supreme Court will find it constitutional. Same with higher earners income tax and a wealth tax. We need to be pursuing all of these progressive revenue sources. And once we raise enough money to fund the services that we say that we need, then we could provide some relief from the more regressive taxes. The second part of the question was how much more revenue do we need? I don't know if I can put a number on it, but it's definitely in the billions - like billions and billions. Think about all the things that we've all been talking about, we mostly agree on that we need - we've been talking about healthcare, we've been talking about behavioral health and mental health, we've been talking - we haven't talked about childcare, but that's really expensive and requires direct state subsidies. We're talking about low-income housing and Housing Trust Fund and permanent supportive housing - and fully funding education. All of these things cost money besides the basic government services that we already have - often, which are not acting at full capacity. So we have not enough revenue and the revenue that we have is being collected too aggressively. So we need more - [01:10:20] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - now Tyler. [01:10:24] Tyler Crone: Thank you. My approach to this question, which is a critical question, is that we need to be closing corporate loopholes. We need to put our weight behind a move to an income tax. And I would like to see that income tax ultimately reduce our sales tax or move us away from sales tax, which I think Julia made a really good case of how that disproportionately impacts working people and people with less income. I am also very concerned about how our property taxes are affecting our seniors, our single moms - it's a concern that's raised to me, time and again, at the doors of how do we manage this and provide the supports we need with such an upside-down tax structure. A question that has been raised to me when I've asked it to colleagues is about a wealth tax. Will people move out of state? Is that something that we need federal leadership around or is it something that Washington can lead on? That's an outstanding question for me, but I just want to underscore the critical, critical need to fully fund our schools, to increase our investments in making high-quality childcare, and a strong start in life available - that we have and we see, as we've talked about throughout this call, a need to lift kids out of poverty and a need to really reinforce our behavioral and mental health systems and services. Thank you. [01:11:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. You just talked about childcare a bit, Tyler and Jeff. You were a little bit prescient in saying we haven't talked about childcare yet, but this question is about childcare. We are experiencing a childcare crisis. It was already out of reach for many Seattle families - exceeding $1,600-1,800 a month in the City of Seattle per child for many families and only got worse during the pandemic, with many counties in this state reporting a 40% loss of childcare providers since the start of the pandemic - causing costs to rise even further and access to lower and become even harder. What can be done specifically to make childcare more affordable and more accessible to all parents in Washington? And we are starting with Nicole. [01:12:41] Nicole Gomez: Yeah, so I recall this - even pre-pandemic - my nine years, wait how old is my son now? Oh my gosh - he's 12 - 12 years ago. When we first started looking for a daycare

Clean Power Hour
McKenna Dunbar, Building Electrification Lead at Sierra Club|Promoting Environmental Justice with Gen Z Ep.95

Clean Power Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 44:50


The communities that contribute the least to climate change are impacted by it the most. And that's a disheartening thing for Gen Zers to discover.But the antidote to anxiety is action. So, what can young people do to advocate for environmental justice? How can we all work together for an equitable transition to the net-zero carbon economy?McKenna Dunbar serves as Building Electrification Lead and Community and Engagement Coordinator at Sierra Club. She is also Founder of the Environmental Justice Initiative and CEO of MOCOKONO, a company working to disrupt ESG markets and build an equitable energy system for all.On this episode of Clean Power Hour, McKenna joins Tim to describe the eco-anxiety that inspired her work in renewable energy and discuss her role in the Sierra Club's Building Electrification Program.McKenna explains why she founded the environmental advocacy-based nonprofit Ecological Justice Initiative and explores how we might address the mega-landfills located in marginalized communities.Listen in for McKenna's call-to-action for corporate leaders and learn how young people can get involved in advancing the clean energy transition!Key TakeawaysHow learning about environmental racism inspired McKenna's work in renewable energyHow promoting environmental education and connecting with others in the climate change movement gives McKenna hope for the futureMcKenna's role in the Sierra Club's Building Electrification ProgramWhy McKenna sees building electrification as the answer to the energy crisis we faceWhat success looks like for McKenna's campaign with the Sierra ClubWhy McKenna founded the environmental advocacy-based nonprofit Ecological Justice InitiativeHow McKenna thinks about addressing the mega-landfills located in marginalized communitiesMOCOKONO's goals to disrupt outdated forms of CSR in ESG marketsMcKenna's call for corporate leaders to reformulate their business plans around environmental justice frameworks and the needs of the communities they serveThe importance of involving Gen Z in the conversation re: the clean energy transition and how young people can get involved in climate change mitigation right nowConnect with McKennaMcKenna on LinkedInEmail mckenna.dunbar@sierraclub.org Email mocokono@gmail.com Connect with Tim  Clean Power Hour  Clean Power Hour on YouTubeTim on TwitterTim on LinkedIn Email tgmontague@gmail.com Review Clean Power Hour on Apple PodcastsResourcesSierra ClubThe Ecological Justice InitiativeBridging the Gap in Virginia Corporate sponsors who share our mission to speed the energy transition are invited to check out https://www.cleanpowerhour.com/support/ Twice a week we highlight the tools, technologies and innovators that are making the clean energy transition a reality - on Apple,

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine Currents Special 7/20/22- Sears Island: The Latest Threat

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 59:29


Producer/Host: Amy Browne Sears Island, located near Searsport, is a 940 acre island connected to the mainland since the late 80s by a causeway. Though it is near industrialized areas, it is mostly undeveloped and currently uninhabited by humans. Many people use the island recreationally, year ’round. Over the decades, people who care about the island have protected it from one proposed development after another- and the island may be under threat again. Today we’ll hear about the latest development proposed for the island- from some of the folks who have been involved over the years. Guests: Steve Miller of Islesboro Islands Trust Susan White & Rolf Olsen of Friends of Sears Island Becky Bartovics & Matthew Cannon of Sierra Club Maine FMI (including reports referenced on the show) Friends of Sears Island Offshore Wind Project Resources page About the host: Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU’s News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices and Maine Currents, she also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and the First Place 2017 Radio News Award from the Maine Association of Broadcasters. The post Maine Currents Special 7/20/22- Sears Island: The Latest Threat first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

American Shoreline Podcast Network
The Power of Community Building in Combatting Climate Change | Sea Change

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 83:50


Human beings crave community and the feeling of belonging but we live in a world that can feel increasingly isolating, this can leave people feeling frustrated and powerless. During this episode of the Sea Change Podcast, Jenna and her guest Anna Ziai explore the power that community building and well-informed, just policy can have in empowering people and mitigating the impacts of climate change. Anna is a graduate of University of Chicago Law School and is an environmental lawyer at the Sierra Club, where she uses federal legislation to address the climate crisis and its effects on people, animals, and habitats.

ECO SPEAKS CLE
Plastic Free July with Sierra Club Ohio

ECO SPEAKS CLE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 19:16


In this episode, we kick off Plastic Free July with Elissa Yoder Mann, Conservation Program Manager with Sierra Club Ohio.  According to Elissa, "plastic-free" is more a journey than a destination, given all the ways that plastic packaging has invaded our lives, but there are ways to have a  "plastic-less" life. Sierra Club Ohio is participating in the global Plastic-Free July campaign by asking people to join the movement and refuse single-use plastic this month . Take the Plastic Free Pledge and receive weekly email tips, info on events and webinars, a monthly calendar to stay motivated, and more. Elissa has been with  Sierra Club Ohio for 8 years. She works on a statewide plastics campaign that focuses on the downstream impacts of plastic, calling out false solutions, and moving away from our take-make-waste system to a sustainable, circular economy. Guest:Elissa Yoder Mann , Conservation Program Manager, Sierra Club OhioResources:Global Plastic Free July CampaignOhio Plastic Free July campaign -  Sierra Club Ohio Take the Pledge

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine: The Way Life Could Be 7/5/22: Shifting Demographics in Maine

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 56:51


Producers/Hosts: Jim Campbell and Amy Browne This series is made possible in part by a grant from the Maine Arts Commission Welcome to this edition of Maine: The Way Life Could Be, a series in which we look at challenges and opportunities facing Maine in the lifetimes of people alive today. The population of Maine has been the oldest and “whitest” in the state, but even before the real estate boom during the pandemic, some of state’s demographics were starting to shift. Today we look at the 2018-2028 demographics forecast for the state, with Maine’s State Economist, Amanda Rector, author of the report. We also talk with Jim Fisher, Deer Isle Town Manager and Hancock County planner, about how some of the trends play out in real life in our communities. Guests: Amanda Rector is the State Economist for Maine. In this capacity, she conducts ongoing analysis of Maine’s economic and demographic conditions to help inform policy decisions. Amanda is a member of the State of Maine's Revenue Forecasting Committee and serves as the Governor's liaison to the U. S. Census Bureau. She started working for the state in 2004 and has been State Economist since 2011. She earned a BA in Economics from Wellesley College and her Master’s in Public Policy and Management from the Muskie School of Public Service at the University of Southern Maine. Jim Fisher is the Town Manager for Deer Isle and former senior planner with the Hancock County Planning Commission. He earned a doctorate in urban regional planning from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and was a Fulbright scholar. He also hosted “Common Health” here on WERU for several years. FMI: Maine Population Outlook, 2018-2018, Office of the State Economist State Economist Amanda Rector presents Trends and Outlook for Maine’s Economy to the Maine Association of Mortgage Professionals, June 8, 2022 Pandemic Migration Spurs Maine’s Biggest Population Growth in Two Decades, Jessica Piper, Bangor Daily News, December 27, 2021 About the hosts: Jim Campbell has a longstanding interest in the intersection of digital technology, law, and public policy and how they affect our daily lives in our increasingly digital world. He has banged around non-commercial radio for decades and, in the little known facts department (that should probably stay that way), he was one of the readers voicing Richard Nixon's words when NPR broadcast the entire transcript of the Watergate tapes. Like several other current WERU volunteers, he was at the station's sign-on party on May 1, 1988 and has been a volunteer ever since doing an early stint as a Morning Maine host, and later producing WERU program series including Northern Lights, Conversations on Science and Society, Sound Portrait of the Artist, Selections from the Camden Conference, others that will probably come to him after this is is posted, and, of course, Notes from the Electronic Cottage. Amy Browne started out at WERU as a volunteer news & public affairs producer in 2000, co-hosting/co-producing RadioActive with Meredith DeFrancesco. She joined the team of Voices producers a few years later, and has been WERU's News & Public Affairs Manager since January, 2006. In addition to RadioActive, Voices, Maine Currents and Maine: The Way Life Could Be, Amy also produced and hosted the WERU News Report for several years. She has produced segments for national programs including Free Speech Radio News, This Way Out, Making Contact, Workers Independent News, Pacifica PeaceWatch, and Live Wire News, and has contributed to Democracy Now and the WBAI News Report. She is the recipient of the 2014 Excellence in Environmental Journalism Award from the Sierra Club of Maine, and Maine Association of Broadcasters awards for her work in 2017 and 2021. The post Maine: The Way Life Could Be 7/5/22: Shifting Demographics in Maine first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Spotlight Hawaii
Officials from Sierra Club of Hawaii and Earthjustice discuss Red Hill water crisis

Spotlight Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 29:18


Earthjustice senior attorney David Henkin and Sierra Club of Hawaii chapter director Wayne Tanaka joined the Honolulu Star-Advertiser's “Spotlight Hawaii” livestream show today at 10:30 a.m. to answer viewer questions about the Red Hill water crisis. This series shines a spotlight on issues affecting the Hawaiian Islands.

Mainstreet Cape Breton
Sierra Club calls for permanent shutdown of Donkin mine

Mainstreet Cape Breton

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 8:28


Recent reports that the owners of the idled Donkin coal mine are making preparations to resume operations has the Sierra Club of Canada calling for the mine to be closed for good.

Mark Levin Podcast
The Best Of Mark Levin - 6/25/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 79:27 Very Popular


President Biden is still pushing critical race theory in schools all over the country. Now in the form of a bill misleadingly named the 'Civics Secures Democracy Act' creates a federal mandate for this curriculum to enhance the teaching of 'racial inequities' and a national test with a new woke vision of history and civics. This national test would usurp the power of local school boards and nationalize neighborhood classrooms. President Biden has called for a gas tax holiday, something that Barack Obama and Nancy Pelosi have called a gimmick since it does nothing to address increasing domestic oil production, which would offset the price. It's simple supply and demand economics, yet Biden refuses to allow any oil drilling on leased land controlled by the federal government. Sadly, Biden cowers to the Sierra Club and leftwing radical environmentalists to decrease production which drives up the cost and forces Americans out of their cars and into public transportation in the name of an environmental emergency, and the same will happen with single-family housing. Then, Biden continues to claim that inflation was caused by the war in Ukraine, yet the Federal Reserve chairman admits that inflation was high even before the war. The children in Uvalde didn't have a chance because they had armed, trained grown men with body armor who did nothing. The Uvalde school district Police Chief is a coward. Steve McGraw, Director of the Texas Public Safety Department says this response, which was delayed by over an hour, was an abject failure. Armed officers stood by under the Chief's order while children were executed. Clarence Thomas wrote a brilliant opinion on the now unconstitutional New York law regarding carrying a concealed pistol or revolver. The Supreme Court found that New York's 'proper cause' law violated the second amendment and prior case law. No special need or 'proper cause' is needed, as that would violate the 14th amendment. There is no need to demonstrate 'proper cause' for one's right to free speech or any other Constitutional right, and as such one's right to protect themselves in their home extends outside their home as well. A state's regulations may not impede one's constitutional right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 6/22/22

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 114:42 Very Popular


On Wednesday's Mark Levin Show, President Biden has called for a gas tax holiday, something that Barack Obama and Nancy Pelosi have called a gimmick since it does nothing to address increasing domestic oil production, which would offset the price. It's simple supply and demand economics, yet Biden refuses to allow any oil drilling on leased land controlled by the federal government. Sadly, Biden cowers to the Sierra Club and leftwing radical environmentalists to decrease production which drives up the cost and forces Americans out of their cars and into public transportation in the name of an environmental emergency, and the same will happen with single-family housing. Then, Biden continues to claim that inflation was caused by the war in Ukraine, yet the Federal Reserve chairman admits that inflation was high even before the war. The ruling class is incompetent and largely unreliable. Later, former Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum was charged with 21 federal indictments for wire fraud, conspiracy, and making false statements. Gillum denies any wrongdoing and has withdrawn from public life after being discovered unconscious from an overdose in a motel with a male companion. Afterward, Congresswoman Lauren Boebert calls in to discuss her re-election campaign. Boebert added that she has opposition but remains focused on serving her constituents in Colorado.  June 22, lauren boebert, boebert, Colorado, oil, gas, gas prices, gas tax, TRANSPORTATION, CARS, travel, lithium batteries, lithium battery, lithium, diesel, truckers, inflation, UKRAINE, PUTIN, Jerome powell, powell, Retirement, 401k, andrew Gillum, Gillum, establishment, gun control, gun, Ukraine, Russia Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

POLITICO Energy
The changing shape of the environmental movement

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 9:23


In recent years, environmental groups have changed course to not only protect the natural environment but also to embrace social justice causes. That's raised concerns among some long-time advocates who fear the strategy is pulling away from the original message of the movement and could have a major political cost. POLITICO's Zack Colman explains.   Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Zack Colman covers climate change for POLITICO.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

Hacks & Wonks
Week In Review: June 17, 2022

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 54:33


On this Hacks & Wonks week-in-review, Crystal is joined by former Seattle mayor and current Executive Director of America Walks, Mike McGinn. The show starts with a plug for the Institute for a Democratic Future (IDF) graduation party in Seattle this Saturday, 6/18, to celebrate its Class of 2022 completing a program focused on recruiting, training, and promoting the next generation of Democratic civic leaders, and extends an invite to others interested in the program Crystal credits with starting her political career. On the topic of civic leadership, Mike and Crystal note that primary ballots are a month out from arriving in mailboxes and discuss what they each look for in a candidate: where they lie on the urban vs suburban spectrum, whether they hedge or make strong statements on policy, how they demonstrate living the values they espouse, what kind of campaign they run, and a demonstration of being strong in tough scenarios before they are elected. The two then wrap up with a look at the opportunity voters have on the November ballot to make changes to future elections with Seattle set to vote on approval voting and King County Council moving a ballot measure on even-year elections forward. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Mike McGinn, at @mayormcginn. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources Institute for a Democratic Future: ​​https://democraticfuture.org/   IDF Class of 2022 Graduation Party: https://www.facebook.com/events/677339030035686   RSVP for IDF Class of 2022 Graduation Party: https://secure.anedot.com/idf/graduation   “What's The Difference Between Candidates in the 36th Legislative District?” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/17/75176294/whats-the-difference-between-candidates-in-the-36th-legislative-district   “Voters Could Change How And When We Vote This November” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/06/15/75135178/voters-could-change-how-and-when-we-vote-this-november   “Election Nerds Feud Over Whether or Not Approval Voting Violates Voting Rights” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2022/03/01/67571578/election-nerds-feud-over-whether-or-not-approval-voting-violates-voting-rights   @GirmayZahilay - Twitter thread on even year vs odd year elections: https://twitter.com/GirmayZahilay/status/1537124459080929280   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we are continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program: friend of the show, super popular cohost, activist, community leader, former mayor of Seattle and Executive Director of America Walks, Mike McGinn. [00:00:57] Mike McGinn: Glad to be here - again - thank you. [00:01:00] Crystal Fincher: Glad you are here - always a fun time when you are here. So I wanted to start off just by mentioning - we've talked about the Institute for a Democratic Future before, which is pretty much responsible for my political career and the careers of so many people in politics and policy in Washington State and DC. This year's class is actually graduating tomorrow - super proud of all of them. That is actually a public event that people can attend - tickets are on sale and you can attend, so if you're free Saturday, June 18th, in the evening - check out the Institute for a Democratic Future website for tickets - democraticfuture.org. We'll also put a link in the show notes and it'll be available on the website - or just hit me up on Twitter, whatever - would love to see you there, meet some of you. I'll be there. Look forward to that and seeing this current class graduate and a great opportunity just to learn more about the program - see if you might be interested in doing it. Also, ballots arrive in a month for the primary election. Things are coming in quick, time evaporates really quickly. And so lots of people are trying to figure out who's who, what's differentiating the candidates. The Stranger had an article come out this morning talking about - what's the difference between candidates in the 36th? So starting off, Mike, as you evaluate - how do you evaluate how candidates are different, how are you going to be making the decision about how to vote and who to support? How do you go through it? How do you recommend voters go through it? [00:02:48] Mike McGinn: Yeah, now this is such a great question in Seattle elections, right? Because one of the real, and we could carry on about this at length, one of the things about Seattle is - Seattle is, by comparison to national politics, a very progressive place. You find that 90+ percent voted for Biden in this city - I think was the number, if you go back. So it's pretty clear - some people will try to make it "what flavor of progressive are you," but everybody's gonna work to sound like they're progressive. And occasionally we'll see - for some reason, we seem to get this more from the Seattle Times and the more right side of the spectrum - "but they're all really the same, aren't they?" And I'll warn you about something - that that's not always the case, or they try to claim it - that well, one side is more ideological and the other side is more pragmatic or reasonable - something like that. But there is, in fact, a dividing line in Seattle politics that I'd ask people to consider and maybe about where they fit on that dividing line. So nationally, the ends of the spectrum are urban versus rural. In a city like Seattle, I'd suggest to you that it's urban versus suburban and the attitudes that accompany those. Now, of course, Seattle has areas that are suburban in nature - single-family homes on nice, quiet, tree-lined streets and a fair number of the voters come from those precincts. But they have indeed chosen to live in a city, so they're not - there are progressive sensibilities there. And urban is a catchall that could cover a lot of things. But let me see if I can dig into this just a little bit. Housing and zoning - a suburban approach would be single-family houses are great, an urban approach would be we should have lots of different kinds of housing. Policing - a suburban approach might be how do we keep bad people out of the neighborhood and how do we patrol the neighborhood to prevent folks from getting here. And a more urban approach might be - well, bad things are gonna happen. How do we make sure that the police can work effectively with the community and treat 'em fairly? So you see an urban versus suburban divide there. Homelessness - suburban mentality is can we give them a bus ticket to the city - this is an overstatement. An urban mentality is - well, we're gonna have homeless people, what are we gonna do? So I think on every issue that we look at - where do they fit on that spectrum is a way to look at it. And candidates - we already saw it in that article you showed about the 36th - what would you do about single-family zoning - a couple of whom were hedging, were hesitant. Bruce Harrell, as mayor, when he ran was hesitant - I'm not sure, we shouldn't just rezone the whole City. And then when you look at where they get the votes from, they tend to get the votes from the folks who are more resistant to building more housing and more different types of housing in the exclusive or exclusionary neighborhoods of Seattle. So that would be the first thing I'd look at in candidates - is where do they fit on that divide, and how to ask some hard questions to get at it. Like really pin 'em down - 'cause everybody's for more housing, everybody's for affordable housing - but would you upzone single-family neighborhoods is a hard question. You could ask 'em about what laws they might change in the State Legislature to make it easier to hold police accountable - see where they fall on that. There's a whole bunch of different places you can go to try to pin 'em down on something. So that's my first cut. I have a second cut on that, but Nicole - not Nicole - Crystal! I know you have answers to that one. [00:06:50] Crystal Fincher: That's so funny - you called me Nicole. My name is Nicole, but yes - [00:06:56] Mike McGinn: Is it really? [00:06:58] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, my family's called me Nicole my entire life - that's my middle name. So yes, lots of people call me Nicole. I don't know if you heard someone call me that, but anyway - [00:07:05] Mike McGinn: No, I think it's just that Nicole - it's been on my brain from prior discussions. [00:07:10] Crystal Fincher: Anyway, I think that's good - certainly, housing affordability, the approach to getting people housed - basically, whether you're looking to take a housing first approach and house people primarily. Or if people think the problem is visible homelessness - always a red flag to me when I hear people characterize the problem as visible homelessness - the visible is not the problem, the homelessness is the problem. And a lot of times the characterization of visible homelessness positions people who witness homelessness, or have to see it, as the victims - are somehow harmed - when clearly the harm is absolutely being done mainly to the person who doesn't have a house and who is out there in the elements with no shelter, much more likely to be a victim of crime than most other people in the community. And so that's always something to me. And are we okay with sweeping, even if we don't have shelter available. Or is it - hey, we need to find places for people to stay, we need to create places for people to stay. Are we satisfied with shelter, congregate shelter, which we now have so much data showing that it's really counterproductive in some situations - absolutely as emergency shelter, and some situations better than being on the street and some situations it's actually not. So are we providing people with rooms with a bathroom, a door that locks - somewhere where people can stabilize. Just especially in these Seattle elections - where they are D versus D races - we can have a lot richer conversations. And frankly, be pickier about who