Podcast appearances and mentions of john rothmann

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Best podcasts about john rothmann

Latest podcast episodes about john rothmann

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: Should Ukraine be admitted into NATO?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 36:21


It's a question on the mind of many concerned Americans. Should Ukraine be let into NATO, escalating the conflict with Russia to new levels? Or should the country be left in the dark for Russia to stomp over? John gives his thoughts and takes calls from many on this difficult topic.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: Disaster movies with Jan Wahl

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 34:02


The one and only Jan Wahl returns for her favorite disaster movies to share with John Rothmann, and be prepared for some cinematic treats!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Should Ukraine be admitted into NATO?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 36:21


It's a question on the mind of many concerned Americans. Should Ukraine be let into NATO, escalating the conflict with Russia to new levels? Or should the country be left in the dark for Russia to stomp over? John gives his thoughts and takes calls from many on this difficult topic.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Disaster movies with Jan Wahl

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 34:02


The one and only Jan Wahl returns for her favorite disaster movies to share with John Rothmann, and be prepared for some cinematic treats!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: How do we react to the Oakland school shooting?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 34:23


Reactions are pouring in from Wednesday's shooting in East Oakland that affected students in several connected schools. John gets the pulse of the public on the issue of gun control and gang activity, and what should be done to prevent this tragedy from occurring again.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: How do we react to the Oakland school shooting?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 34:23


Reactions are pouring in from Wednesday's shooting in East Oakland that affected students in several connected schools. John gets the pulse of the public on the issue of gun control and gang activity, and what should be done to prevent this tragedy from occurring again.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: Judge lets Trump lawyers off the hook

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:02


Judge Aileen M. Cannon told Donald Trump's lawyers Thursday that they did not need to comply with an order from special master Raymond J. Dearie and state in a court filing whether they believe FBI agents lied about documents seized from the former president's Florida residence. Thursday's ruling was the first clash between Cannon, a Trump appointee who has generally shown the former president deference in litigation over the Mar-a-Lago investigation, and Dearie, a federal judge she appointed as an outside expert in the case, who appears to be far more skeptical of Trump. After Trump's lawyers requested a special master, Cannon chose Daerie to review approximately 11,000 documents seized Aug. 8 from Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club and residence and determine whether any should be shielded from investigators because of attorney-client or executive privilege. An appeals court separately overruled Cannon's decision that about 100 additional documents that the government says are classified — some of them top-secret — should be part of Dearie's review. Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, reiterated her belief that the 2020 election was stolen during her interview Thursday with the committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to the committee's chairman, Rep. Bennie G. Thompson.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann asks, “How should we respond?”

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 35:57


Are we impotent? Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday recognized the independence of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, hours before holding a signing ceremony to incorporate them into the Russian Federation. Putin signed a decree recognizing the two southern Ukrainian regions as independent states on Friday. He also signed a similar decree earlier in February, when he recognized two breakaway regions in the east of Ukraine, Luhansk and Donetsk, as independent states. Kyiv and Western powers do not recognize the two self-proclaimed republics of Donetsk and Luhansk as sovereign states.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann welcomes candidates CCSF candidates Mairie Huarbiel & Jill Yee

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 37:10


votemarie.com  jillyee.com Why moderate candidates Jill Yee & Marie Hurabiell have visions on how to solve the systemic CCSF issues rather than kicking the problems down the road. The moderate candidate uphill challenge: the incumbents and the Union slates having different positions on how to solve CCSF issues. Jill Yee: Was born in San Francisco and raised in the Western Addition. Her parents were immigrants and City College was her only option for college. She credits City College as the springboard for all of her successes. She knows first hand how City College can change lives and its benefits extend across generations. She was honored to have the opportunity to return to City College to teach Psychology, she earned tenure, was later elected Department Chair of Behavioral Sciences and was then selected to serve as Dean of 11 Departments in the School of Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Ethnic Studies and Social Justices. Jill also has a law degree.  Jill has extensive experience at City College, spanning over 40 years. She has an insider's perspective. Her dedication and commitment to the college speaks for itself.  Marie Hurabiell: is an eighth generation San Franciscan, is a founder and board member of Ellipsis Health, Inc., a technology company using speech analytics to gauge the behavioral health of patients in real-time. Following a federal clerkship in Los Angeles, she started her law career at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom in San Francisco. She later served as General Counsel at both Knight Ridder Digital and Red Herring Communications and ran her own law firm. Ms. Hurabiell has led fundraising efforts for organizations such as Georgetown University, San Francisco Ballet, Wender Weis Foundation for Children, Phillips Exeter Academy, The Hamlin School, and the International Museum of Women. Ms. Hurabiell has served on numerous boards, including the Presidio of San Francisco (Chair, Vice Chair and Chair of the Audit & Finance Committee) , Georgetown University Board of Regents, where she engaged in crafting the successful Design Curriculum initiative; Holy Family Day Home (President & Chair of the Capital Campaign); San Francisco Ballet Auxiliary (President); National Charity League Golden Gate Chapter (VP); and Hamilton Family Center. Hurabiell received her B.A. with Honors from Georgetown University and her J.D. with Honors from the University of Pennsylvania. When not working to improve San Francisco, and more specifically CCSF, she enjoys time with her family, travel, adventures, gardening, reading and laughing as much as possible.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Judge lets Trump lawyers off the hook

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:02


Judge Aileen M. Cannon told Donald Trump's lawyers Thursday that they did not need to comply with an order from special master Raymond J. Dearie and state in a court filing whether they believe FBI agents lied about documents seized from the former president's Florida residence. Thursday's ruling was the first clash between Cannon, a Trump appointee who has generally shown the former president deference in litigation over the Mar-a-Lago investigation, and Dearie, a federal judge she appointed as an outside expert in the case, who appears to be far more skeptical of Trump. After Trump's lawyers requested a special master, Cannon chose Daerie to review approximately 11,000 documents seized Aug. 8 from Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club and residence and determine whether any should be shielded from investigators because of attorney-client or executive privilege. An appeals court separately overruled Cannon's decision that about 100 additional documents that the government says are classified — some of them top-secret — should be part of Dearie's review. Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, reiterated her belief that the 2020 election was stolen during her interview Thursday with the committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to the committee's chairman, Rep. Bennie G. Thompson.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann asks, “How should we respond?”

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 35:57


Are we impotent? Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday recognized the independence of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, hours before holding a signing ceremony to incorporate them into the Russian Federation. Putin signed a decree recognizing the two southern Ukrainian regions as independent states on Friday. He also signed a similar decree earlier in February, when he recognized two breakaway regions in the east of Ukraine, Luhansk and Donetsk, as independent states. Kyiv and Western powers do not recognize the two self-proclaimed republics of Donetsk and Luhansk as sovereign states.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann welcomes candidates CCSF candidates Mairie Huarbiel & Jill Yee

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 37:10


votemarie.com  jillyee.com Why moderate candidates Jill Yee & Marie Hurabiell have visions on how to solve the systemic CCSF issues rather than kicking the problems down the road. The moderate candidate uphill challenge: the incumbents and the Union slates having different positions on how to solve CCSF issues. Jill Yee: Was born in San Francisco and raised in the Western Addition. Her parents were immigrants and City College was her only option for college. She credits City College as the springboard for all of her successes. She knows first hand how City College can change lives and its benefits extend across generations. She was honored to have the opportunity to return to City College to teach Psychology, she earned tenure, was later elected Department Chair of Behavioral Sciences and was then selected to serve as Dean of 11 Departments in the School of Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Ethnic Studies and Social Justices. Jill also has a law degree.  Jill has extensive experience at City College, spanning over 40 years. She has an insider's perspective. Her dedication and commitment to the college speaks for itself.  Marie Hurabiell: is an eighth generation San Franciscan, is a founder and board member of Ellipsis Health, Inc., a technology company using speech analytics to gauge the behavioral health of patients in real-time. Following a federal clerkship in Los Angeles, she started her law career at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom in San Francisco. She later served as General Counsel at both Knight Ridder Digital and Red Herring Communications and ran her own law firm. Ms. Hurabiell has led fundraising efforts for organizations such as Georgetown University, San Francisco Ballet, Wender Weis Foundation for Children, Phillips Exeter Academy, The Hamlin School, and the International Museum of Women. Ms. Hurabiell has served on numerous boards, including the Presidio of San Francisco (Chair, Vice Chair and Chair of the Audit & Finance Committee) , Georgetown University Board of Regents, where she engaged in crafting the successful Design Curriculum initiative; Holy Family Day Home (President & Chair of the Capital Campaign); San Francisco Ballet Auxiliary (President); National Charity League Golden Gate Chapter (VP); and Hamilton Family Center. Hurabiell received her B.A. with Honors from Georgetown University and her J.D. with Honors from the University of Pennsylvania. When not working to improve San Francisco, and more specifically CCSF, she enjoys time with her family, travel, adventures, gardening, reading and laughing as much as possible.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann speaks about Ukraine with journalist Aryk Copley

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 31:48


Photojournalist Aryk Copley went to Ukraine as a way to better understand international photojournalism as a career, to get international reporting experience, as well as to try to help out as much as he could. He was there for two weeks and followed around three different organizations to see and document the work they were doing.  Consider supporting www.underakindroof.com Also the latest on Ukraine.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann speaks about Ukraine with journalist Aryk Copley

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 31:48


Photojournalist Aryk Copley went to Ukraine as a way to better understand international photojournalism as a career, to get international reporting experience, as well as to try to help out as much as he could. He was there for two weeks and followed around three different organizations to see and document the work they were doing.  Consider supporting www.underakindroof.com Also the latest on Ukraine.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann & Clark Reid cover today's shooting in Oakland

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:07


Six people were injured in a school shooting Wednesday in Oakland's Eastmont Hills, police said. Oakland police officials said the shooting took place at the King Estate campus on Fontaine Street, which houses multiple schools. Officers are looking for at least one shooter, but add other suspects might be involved. The school has since been cleared by police. Highland Hospital in Oakland confirms it is treating three of the victims, who all are in critical condition with gunshot wounds. The other three victims were transported to Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, according to the hospital. Police in a late afternoon briefing said all victims are adults affiliated with the school and provided the following updates on their conditions: two are suffering from life-threatening injuries one victim has been released from the hospital two victims are pending release from the hospital one victim has injuries that are non-life threatening See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann and Hurricane Ian

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 34:12


If it seems like the devastation caused by Hurricane Ian came on quickly, you're right. In just two days, the storm's maximum sustained wind speed more than doubled, from 75 miles per hour on Monday morning, to 155 miles per hour just before landfall on Wednesday morning. "It doesn't really get much worse than this, to have a strengthening, possibly rapidly intensifying hurricane landfall," said Brent Hewett, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Twin Cities. Though devastating, Hewett says the changes weren't entirely surprising based on the conditions in the Gulf of Mexico that the hurricane encountered during those 48 hours. Moist air and low wind shear both contribute to rapid intensification, and unseasonably warm water provided even more fuel than normal. Hewett says a very quiet hurricane season prior to hurricane Ian is partially to blame. "When you don't have a lot of tropical systems in a season, the water is allowed to warm kind of continuously without anything mixing it up," Hewett said. And if you add those seasonal conditions to years of warming brought on by climate change, experts say this storm had even more fuel.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann and Hurricane Ian

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 34:12


If it seems like the devastation caused by Hurricane Ian came on quickly, you're right. In just two days, the storm's maximum sustained wind speed more than doubled, from 75 miles per hour on Monday morning, to 155 miles per hour just before landfall on Wednesday morning. "It doesn't really get much worse than this, to have a strengthening, possibly rapidly intensifying hurricane landfall," said Brent Hewett, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service Twin Cities. Though devastating, Hewett says the changes weren't entirely surprising based on the conditions in the Gulf of Mexico that the hurricane encountered during those 48 hours. Moist air and low wind shear both contribute to rapid intensification, and unseasonably warm water provided even more fuel than normal. Hewett says a very quiet hurricane season prior to hurricane Ian is partially to blame. "When you don't have a lot of tropical systems in a season, the water is allowed to warm kind of continuously without anything mixing it up," Hewett said. And if you add those seasonal conditions to years of warming brought on by climate change, experts say this storm had even more fuel.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann & Clark Reid cover today's shooting in Oakland

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 39:07


Six people were injured in a school shooting Wednesday in Oakland's Eastmont Hills, police said. Oakland police officials said the shooting took place at the King Estate campus on Fontaine Street, which houses multiple schools. Officers are looking for at least one shooter, but add other suspects might be involved. The school has since been cleared by police. Highland Hospital in Oakland confirms it is treating three of the victims, who all are in critical condition with gunshot wounds. The other three victims were transported to Eden Medical Center in Castro Valley, according to the hospital. Police in a late afternoon briefing said all victims are adults affiliated with the school and provided the following updates on their conditions: two are suffering from life-threatening injuries one victim has been released from the hospital two victims are pending release from the hospital one victim has injuries that are non-life threatening See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: NASA hit the asteroid

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 16:32


There was an asteroid, but it wasn't threatening the Earth. And there was a spacecraft, relying solely on sophisticated technology. The human heroes of the mission were actually at a physics and engineering lab between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. And there was a collision. In this case it was the final act of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, a spacecraft that launched in November and then raced around the sun for 10 months as it pursued its target — a small space rock, Dimorphos, seven million miles from Earth. “For the first time, humanity has demonstrated the ability to autonomously target and alter the orbit of a celestial object,” Ralph Semmel, director of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, said during a news conference after the crash. The laboratory managed the mission for NASA.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
An update on Hurricane Ian with John Rothmann

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 36:06


Gov. Ron DeSantis warns Floridians to be prepared for a "major water event" including heavy rain, flooding from Hurricane Ian. Hurricane Ian's forecast track shifted again to the southeast late Tuesday, increasing the danger to Florida's southern Gulf coast as South Florida prepared for squally, rainy weather. The storm's top wind speed held at 120 mph but was expected to rise to 130 mph, the threshold for Category 4 strength, by the time the hurricane approaches landfall Wednesday afternoon somewhere on the Gulf coast. Earlier forecasts predicted the storm would weaken before hitting the coast, but the newer track predicts it will make landfall at the peak of its power. The National Hurricane Center's 8 p.m. update said Ian will reach Florida's west coast as “an extremely dangerous major hurricane” as it re-strengthens over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann is talking about the pipeline & Italy

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 31:53


Denmark said Tuesday it believed “deliberate actions” by unknown perpetrators were behind big leaks, which seismologists said followed powerful explosions, in two natural gas pipelines running under the Baltic Sea from Russia to Germany. European leaders and experts pointed to possible sabotage amid the energy standoff with Russia provoked by the war in Ukraine. Although filled with gas, neither pipeline is currently supplying it to Europe. “It is the authorities' clear assessment that these are deliberate actions -– not accidents,” Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said. But she added that “there is no information indicating who could be behind it.” Frederiksen also rejected the suggestion that the incident was an attack on Denmark, saying the leaks occurred in international waters. Giorgia Meloni scored a remarkable success in yesterday's Italian election – and is all but certain to become prime minister. Her post-fascist Brothers of Italy party's 26% of the vote makes it the largest party nationally. Overall, the rightwing coalition it now leads will have a considerable majority in both houses of parliament. Part of the explanation lies in the weakness of the opposition. The eclectic Five Star Movement (15%) and the centre-left Democrats (19%) did not join forces and, after years of failing to improve working-class living standards, were unable to rally the left's historic base. Turnout was easily the lowest in the republic's history, with only 64% of Italians voting.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Iran's morality police killed Mahsa Amini

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 17:26


The death of a young Iranian woman from a head trauma after her arrest by a hijab enforcement patrol has sparked anger and some protests in the capital Tehran. The 22-year-old Mahsa Amini who was arrested on Tuesday by the morality police was taken to hospital two hours later from Vozara Detention Center after losing consciousness. She passed away Friday afternoon at Kasra Hospital in northern Tehran. Originally from Saqqez in Kurdistan province, Amini was arrested in her brother's car on a visit to the capital to see their relatives. “Mahsa Amini's death after injuries sustained in custody for an “improper” hijab is appalling. Our thoughts are with her family. Iran must end its violence against women for exercising their fundamental rights. Those responsible for her death should be held accountable,” US Special Envoy for Iran Robert Malley tweeted Friday.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: NASA hit the asteroid

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 16:32


There was an asteroid, but it wasn't threatening the Earth. And there was a spacecraft, relying solely on sophisticated technology. The human heroes of the mission were actually at a physics and engineering lab between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. And there was a collision. In this case it was the final act of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, a spacecraft that launched in November and then raced around the sun for 10 months as it pursued its target — a small space rock, Dimorphos, seven million miles from Earth. “For the first time, humanity has demonstrated the ability to autonomously target and alter the orbit of a celestial object,” Ralph Semmel, director of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, said during a news conference after the crash. The laboratory managed the mission for NASA.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  Iran's morality police killed Mahsa Amini

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 17:26


The death of a young Iranian woman from a head trauma after her arrest by a hijab enforcement patrol has sparked anger and some protests in the capital Tehran. The 22-year-old Mahsa Amini who was arrested on Tuesday by the morality police was taken to hospital two hours later from Vozara Detention Center after losing consciousness. She passed away Friday afternoon at Kasra Hospital in northern Tehran. Originally from Saqqez in Kurdistan province, Amini was arrested in her brother's car on a visit to the capital to see their relatives. “Mahsa Amini's death after injuries sustained in custody for an “improper” hijab is appalling. Our thoughts are with her family. Iran must end its violence against women for exercising their fundamental rights. Those responsible for her death should be held accountable,” US Special Envoy for Iran Robert Malley tweeted Friday.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
An update on Hurricane Ian with John Rothmann

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 36:06


Gov. Ron DeSantis warns Floridians to be prepared for a "major water event" including heavy rain, flooding from Hurricane Ian. Hurricane Ian's forecast track shifted again to the southeast late Tuesday, increasing the danger to Florida's southern Gulf coast as South Florida prepared for squally, rainy weather. The storm's top wind speed held at 120 mph but was expected to rise to 130 mph, the threshold for Category 4 strength, by the time the hurricane approaches landfall Wednesday afternoon somewhere on the Gulf coast. Earlier forecasts predicted the storm would weaken before hitting the coast, but the newer track predicts it will make landfall at the peak of its power. The National Hurricane Center's 8 p.m. update said Ian will reach Florida's west coast as “an extremely dangerous major hurricane” as it re-strengthens over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Serve to Lead | James Strock
David Pietrusza | Podcast

Serve to Lead | James Strock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 43:34


In our unsettled moment, there's a burst of interest in one of the United States' most consequential presidents: Franklin Roosevelt. In this episode of the Serve to Lead podcast, acclaimed presidential historian David Pietrusza discusses his highly readable and extensively researched new book, Roosevelt Sweeps Nation: FDR's 1936 Landslide and the Triumph of the Liberal Ideal. The Next Nationalism is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.Critical Acclaim“A robust chronicle of Franklin Roosevelt's quest to stay in the White House. . . a brisk, spirited narrative, abundantly populated and bursting with anecdotes . . . A prodigiously researched and exuberantly told political biography/history.”—Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review )“Pietrusza . . . makes the most of his engrossing tale. . . .  a lively story that is rife with strong personalities and blood stirring incidents. . . . appealing.”– Library Journal“a sweeping yet minutely detailed chronicle of FDR's 1936 reelection campaign . . .an exhaustive and expert chronicle of a critical American election.”—Publishers Weekly“David Pietrusza's Roosevelt Sweeps Nation combines penetrating research with good illustrative anecdotes to bring the 1936 presidential election between FDR and Alf Landon into sharp focus. A marvelous and important history. Highly recommended!”—Douglas Brinkley, professor of history at Rice University, author of Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America.“David Pietrusza has done it again—another fascinating, easy-to-read book on a key moment in history. Franklin Roosevelt won a massive victory in 1936, cementing his New Deal permanently. Pietrusza brings FDR's era to life and shows us how it happened.”—Larry J. Sabato, Director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics“The 1936 election was not just another FDR victory, but an important turning point in the nation's history. The story David Pietrusza tells is riveting and the cast of characters is fascinating. Franklin Roosevelt was the most skillful American politician of the 20th century and this election was a decisive affirmation of his power and appeal.”—Ron Faucheux, political analyst “In the style and with the depth of research of David McCullough, David Pietrusza makes history come alive in his latest book ‘Roosevelt Sweeps Nation.' From religious characters like Father Divine and radio preacher Charles Coughlin, to political ones like Huey Long and Roosevelt himself, the book is a delightful and compelling read.”—Cal Thomas, Syndicated Columnist“Another great election year chronicle from [David Pietrusza] — such a colorful story & writing. Couldn't be juicier.”—Whit Stillman, Director and Academy Award Nominated Screenwriter “David Pietrusza is my favorite historian, and Roosevelt Sweeps Nation is Pietrusza at his best. Nobody can tell a better story than Pietrusza, who always shows you there's more to the story than you thought—that there is juicy stuff hidden in our history that nobody has bothered to suss out or that has long been forgotten. This is another page-turner you won't want to put down. At a time when Americans can use a reprieve from today's news, Roosevelt Sweeps Nation is just what the doctor ordered. And David Pietrusza is a national treasure.”—Matt Lewis, Senior Columnist, The Daily Beast “Roosevelt crafted an election strategy so strong that it has defined national campaigns of both parties ever since. Now historian David Pietrusza brings the stunning 1936 Roosevelt Sweep to life, with timely lessons for our current  challenges.”—Amity Shlaes, Author, Great Society.“all of [Pietrusza's] books are brilliant, but this is just phenomenal.”—John Rothmann, KGO Radio (San Francisco)About the AuthorAward-winning historian David Pietrusza has been called “a national treasure” and “the undisputed champion of chronicling American Presidential campaigns.” His books include studies of the 1920, 1932, 1936, 1948, and 1960 presidential elections and biographies of Theodore Roosevelt (Independent Publisher Book Awards Silver Medal, US History), gambler Arnold Rothstein (Edgar Award finalist) and Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis (Casey Award winner). Pietrusza has appeared on NPR, C-SPAN, MSNBC, The Voice of America, The History Channel, AMC, and ESPN. He has spoken at the JFK, FDR, Truman, and Coolidge presidential libraries, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and various universities, museums, libraries, and festivals. A noted expert on baseball history, Pietrusza has served as editor-in-chief of Total Sports Publishing, co-editor of Total Baseball: The Official Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball, national president of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR), and co-author with Ted Williams of Williams' pictorial autobiography.A former member of the Amsterdam (NY) City Council, he holds bachelor's and master's degrees in history from the University at Albany, is a Recipient of UAlbany's Alumni Association's Excellence in Arts & Letters Award, and a charter member of the Greater Amsterdam School District Hall of Fame.He served as a member of the New York State Commission for the Restoration of the Capitol.The Serve to Lead podcast is now on Substack. It can be accessed in the usual formats, including:Apple Podcasts | Amazon Audible | Amazon Music | Google Podcasts | iHeart | Spotify | Stitcher | Podchaser | TuneIn Image credits | Diversion Books; davidpietrusza.com. Get full access to The Next Nationalism at jamesstrock.substack.com/subscribe

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann is talking about the pipeline & Italy

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 31:53


Denmark said Tuesday it believed “deliberate actions” by unknown perpetrators were behind big leaks, which seismologists said followed powerful explosions, in two natural gas pipelines running under the Baltic Sea from Russia to Germany. European leaders and experts pointed to possible sabotage amid the energy standoff with Russia provoked by the war in Ukraine. Although filled with gas, neither pipeline is currently supplying it to Europe. “It is the authorities' clear assessment that these are deliberate actions -– not accidents,” Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said. But she added that “there is no information indicating who could be behind it.” Frederiksen also rejected the suggestion that the incident was an attack on Denmark, saying the leaks occurred in international waters. Giorgia Meloni scored a remarkable success in yesterday's Italian election – and is all but certain to become prime minister. Her post-fascist Brothers of Italy party's 26% of the vote makes it the largest party nationally. Overall, the rightwing coalition it now leads will have a considerable majority in both houses of parliament. Part of the explanation lies in the weakness of the opposition. The eclectic Five Star Movement (15%) and the centre-left Democrats (19%) did not join forces and, after years of failing to improve working-class living standards, were unable to rally the left's historic base. Turnout was easily the lowest in the republic's history, with only 64% of Italians voting.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
KGO in 8:10-John Rothmann-John discusses the U.S.'s political place in the world

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 8:10


KGO evening host John Rothmann gives a short lesson in the importance of foreign policy in these turbulent times.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Let's talk about reparations in California

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 34:08


Whether the panelists decide to endorse direct-cash payments or other forms of compensation, such as land grants and subsidized education, could have wide ripple effects as the task force is the first state-led reparations effort in the nation. But the path forward is fraught. Beyond external opposition from conservative critics of reparations, bitter internal disputes have spilled over into heated exchanges that overshadowed several of the task force's past meetings. Task force Chair Kamilah Moore, an attorney and scholar on reparations, said she hopes the committee can reunite around a common purpose after it took a five-month hiatus and issued a sweeping interim report in June. “I definitely am hoping that things can become more collegial,” she told The Chronicle. “Reparations is a very controversial topic, it always has been. That might explain some of the passion.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: Let's talk about reparations in California

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 34:08


Whether the panelists decide to endorse direct-cash payments or other forms of compensation, such as land grants and subsidized education, could have wide ripple effects as the task force is the first state-led reparations effort in the nation. But the path forward is fraught. Beyond external opposition from conservative critics of reparations, bitter internal disputes have spilled over into heated exchanges that overshadowed several of the task force's past meetings. Task force Chair Kamilah Moore, an attorney and scholar on reparations, said she hopes the committee can reunite around a common purpose after it took a five-month hiatus and issued a sweeping interim report in June. “I definitely am hoping that things can become more collegial,” she told The Chronicle. “Reparations is a very controversial topic, it always has been. That might explain some of the passion.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  Commitment to America and Arizona abortion ban

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 14:13


House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Friday rolled out an agenda he says House Republicans would follow should they retake control of the chamber after this year's midterms. The plan, dubbed the “Commitment to America” marks McCarthy's most concrete attempt to outline a policy agenda to try to persuade voters ahead of November's races, in which the GOP is favored -- but not guaranteed -- to flip the House. The proposal seeks to replicate former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich's "Contract with America," an agenda released in 1994 when Republicans won control of the House for the first time in decades. McCarthy's blueprint, first posted online on Thursday, contains four overarching goals: creating "an economy that's strong," "a nation that's safe," "a future that's built on freedom" and "a government that's accountable." An Arizona Superior Court judge ruled Friday that a 1901 ban on nearly all abortions in that state can be enforced, a decision that is likely to see an appeal and is all but certain to galvanize female voters to turn out in greater numbers in the state's closely contested US Senate and governor's races. In ruling that Arizona's near-total ban on abortion could take effect, Pima County Superior Court Judge Kellie Johnson granted a request by the state's Republican attorney general to lift a court injunction that had barred enforcement of Arizona's pre-statehood ban on abortion after the Supreme Court ruled in Roe v. Wade in 1973. "The court finds that because the legal basis for the judgment entered in 1973 has now been overruled, it must vacate the judgment in its entirety," Johnson wrote in the ruling released Friday.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann discusses executive privilege according to Trump

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 17:53


Lawyers for former President Donald J. Trump are engaged in a behind-the-scenes legal struggle to limit the scope of a federal grand jury investigation into the role he played in seeking to overturn the 2020 election, according to people familiar with the matter. The closed-door battle, unfolding in Federal District Court in Washington, has centered on how far Mr. Trump can go in asserting attorney-client and executive privilege as a means of keeping witnesses close to him from answering potentially damaging questions in their appearances before the grand jury, the people said. The issue is important because it will determine how much evidence prosecutors can get from an inner circle of some of Mr. Trump's most trusted former lawyers and advisers. The outcome will help to shape the contours of the information that the Justice Department will be able to gather, as it looks into Mr. Trump's involvement in the chaotic events after the election that culminated in the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. That process continues even as the Justice Department also pursues a separate criminal investigation into Mr. Trump's handling of government documents that he took with him when he left office, including hundreds marked as classified.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann discusses executive privilege according to Trump

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 17:53


Lawyers for former President Donald J. Trump are engaged in a behind-the-scenes legal struggle to limit the scope of a federal grand jury investigation into the role he played in seeking to overturn the 2020 election, according to people familiar with the matter. The closed-door battle, unfolding in Federal District Court in Washington, has centered on how far Mr. Trump can go in asserting attorney-client and executive privilege as a means of keeping witnesses close to him from answering potentially damaging questions in their appearances before the grand jury, the people said. The issue is important because it will determine how much evidence prosecutors can get from an inner circle of some of Mr. Trump's most trusted former lawyers and advisers. The outcome will help to shape the contours of the information that the Justice Department will be able to gather, as it looks into Mr. Trump's involvement in the chaotic events after the election that culminated in the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. That process continues even as the Justice Department also pursues a separate criminal investigation into Mr. Trump's handling of government documents that he took with him when he left office, including hundreds marked as classified.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Commitment to America and Arizona abortion ban

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 14:13


House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Friday rolled out an agenda he says House Republicans would follow should they retake control of the chamber after this year's midterms. The plan, dubbed the “Commitment to America” marks McCarthy's most concrete attempt to outline a policy agenda to try to persuade voters ahead of November's races, in which the GOP is favored -- but not guaranteed -- to flip the House. The proposal seeks to replicate former Republican House Speaker Newt Gingrich's "Contract with America," an agenda released in 1994 when Republicans won control of the House for the first time in decades. McCarthy's blueprint, first posted online on Thursday, contains four overarching goals: creating "an economy that's strong," "a nation that's safe," "a future that's built on freedom" and "a government that's accountable." An Arizona Superior Court judge ruled Friday that a 1901 ban on nearly all abortions in that state can be enforced, a decision that is likely to see an appeal and is all but certain to galvanize female voters to turn out in greater numbers in the state's closely contested US Senate and governor's races. In ruling that Arizona's near-total ban on abortion could take effect, Pima County Superior Court Judge Kellie Johnson granted a request by the state's Republican attorney general to lift a court injunction that had barred enforcement of Arizona's pre-statehood ban on abortion after the Supreme Court ruled in Roe v. Wade in 1973. "The court finds that because the legal basis for the judgment entered in 1973 has now been overruled, it must vacate the judgment in its entirety," Johnson wrote in the ruling released Friday.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  Abortion is key issue in upcoming elections

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 34:14


Democratic Gov. Tony Evers is calling lawmakers into session to take up a constitutional amendment allowing statewide referendums, citing support from Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson for a public vote on the issue of abortion. The amendment would ultimately give the public a say in whether abortions should resume in Wisconsin by allowing residents to bring referendum questions to the ballot — a practice known as direct ballot initiatives that is not allowed in Wisconsin. But Republican lawmakers who control the state Legislature immediately rejected the idea. If they had agreed, Wisconsin would have joined 26 states that allow referendum questions driven by the public. "At the end of the day, Wisconsinites and women in particular, are not only stripped of their reproductive freedom, they currently don't have a right to enact the change that needs to protect that freedom without having to get permission from the Legislature. That's just wrong and it's time to change that," Evers said.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Russia denounced at the U.N.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 37:22


Insults, accusations and talk of war crimes and nuclear holocaust dominated the world's premier diplomatic stage on Thursday, as the United Nations Security Council met to debate how and whether anyone would be held accountable for the war in Ukraine. Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov called Ukraine's president, Volodymyr Zelensky, a “bastard,” but was not around long enough to hear what many of his counterparts had to say. After arriving 90 minutes late to the meeting — and missing the briefings given by António Guterres, the U.N. secretary general, and Karim Khan, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court — Mr. Lavrov left early. The U.S. secretary of state, Antony J. Blinken, denounced President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia for saying on Wednesday that he could use all arms available to him in the war, interpreted by officials in both Russia and the West as a veiled reference to nuclear weapons. “Every council member should send a clear message that these reckless nuclear threats must stop immediately,” Mr. Blinken told the Security Council, in some of his sharpest comments since the war began. “Tell President Putin to stop the horror he started.” “One man chose this war. One man can end it,” he added. “Because if Russia stops fighting, the war ends. If Ukraine stops fighting, Ukraine ends.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann says Trump's got this all wrong

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 36:26


In his first TV appearance since a court-authorized search of his Florida home last month, Donald Trump reasserted Wednesday that any documents taken from the White House to Mar-a-Lago were declassified while he was in office, adding that a president can carry that out “even by thinking about it.” The warrant authorizing the search of former president Donald Trump's home said agents were seeking documents possessed in violation of the Espionage Act. “There doesn't have to be a process, as I understand it,” Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity. Prosecutors have said that about 100 of the documents taken from Mar-a-Lago were marked classified, including some labeled top secret. “If you're the president of the United States, you can declassify just by saying it's declassified,” the former president added. “You're the president — you make that decision.” Trump's comments were made ahead of a Wednesday appeals court decision that the FBI can use the seized documents in its criminal investigation. His appearance also followed an announcement earlier in the day that New York Attorney General Letitia James was filing a lawsuit accusing him and his three children of manipulating property values to deceive lenders, insurance brokers and tax officials.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  Russia denounced at the U.N.

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 37:22


Insults, accusations and talk of war crimes and nuclear holocaust dominated the world's premier diplomatic stage on Thursday, as the United Nations Security Council met to debate how and whether anyone would be held accountable for the war in Ukraine. Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov called Ukraine's president, Volodymyr Zelensky, a “bastard,” but was not around long enough to hear what many of his counterparts had to say. After arriving 90 minutes late to the meeting — and missing the briefings given by António Guterres, the U.N. secretary general, and Karim Khan, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court — Mr. Lavrov left early. The U.S. secretary of state, Antony J. Blinken, denounced President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia for saying on Wednesday that he could use all arms available to him in the war, interpreted by officials in both Russia and the West as a veiled reference to nuclear weapons. “Every council member should send a clear message that these reckless nuclear threats must stop immediately,” Mr. Blinken told the Security Council, in some of his sharpest comments since the war began. “Tell President Putin to stop the horror he started.” “One man chose this war. One man can end it,” he added. “Because if Russia stops fighting, the war ends. If Ukraine stops fighting, Ukraine ends.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann says Trump's got this all wrong

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 36:26


In his first TV appearance since a court-authorized search of his Florida home last month, Donald Trump reasserted Wednesday that any documents taken from the White House to Mar-a-Lago were declassified while he was in office, adding that a president can carry that out “even by thinking about it.” The warrant authorizing the search of former president Donald Trump's home said agents were seeking documents possessed in violation of the Espionage Act. “There doesn't have to be a process, as I understand it,” Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity. Prosecutors have said that about 100 of the documents taken from Mar-a-Lago were marked classified, including some labeled top secret. “If you're the president of the United States, you can declassify just by saying it's declassified,” the former president added. “You're the president — you make that decision.” Trump's comments were made ahead of a Wednesday appeals court decision that the FBI can use the seized documents in its criminal investigation. His appearance also followed an announcement earlier in the day that New York Attorney General Letitia James was filing a lawsuit accusing him and his three children of manipulating property values to deceive lenders, insurance brokers and tax officials.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Abortion is key issue in upcoming elections

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 34:14


Democratic Gov. Tony Evers is calling lawmakers into session to take up a constitutional amendment allowing statewide referendums, citing support from Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson for a public vote on the issue of abortion. The amendment would ultimately give the public a say in whether abortions should resume in Wisconsin by allowing residents to bring referendum questions to the ballot — a practice known as direct ballot initiatives that is not allowed in Wisconsin. But Republican lawmakers who control the state Legislature immediately rejected the idea. If they had agreed, Wisconsin would have joined 26 states that allow referendum questions driven by the public. "At the end of the day, Wisconsinites and women in particular, are not only stripped of their reproductive freedom, they currently don't have a right to enact the change that needs to protect that freedom without having to get permission from the Legislature. That's just wrong and it's time to change that," Evers said.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: Putin raises the stakes

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 34:52


President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday morning announced a “partial mobilization” in Russia to replenish the ranks of a “special military operation” meant to be long over by now. Yet few observers or political stakeholders in the West think this half-cocked call-up will fundamentally alter the calculus on the battlefield, where Ukraine's counter offensives have been surprisingly effective. Moreover, Putin's vague threats against the “collective West'' have been met with more shrugs and yawns in the United States and Europe. If anything, there is more panic in Russia. Partial mobilization, Russia's first since World War II, falls well short of mass conscription and is likely to be confined (for now) to the country's 300,000 reservists. Contract soldiers already deployed in Ukraine will see their service indefinitely extended just as the weather cools and winter approaches. “This is a very risky step from Putin,” a senior Western intelligence officer told Yahoo News. “There are big doubts whether this call-up will succeed in the first place, and if not, what message will it send. It also increases public antiwar and anti-regime sentiment throughout Russia.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Putin raises the stakes

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 34:52


President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday morning announced a “partial mobilization” in Russia to replenish the ranks of a “special military operation” meant to be long over by now. Yet few observers or political stakeholders in the West think this half-cocked call-up will fundamentally alter the calculus on the battlefield, where Ukraine's counter offensives have been surprisingly effective. Moreover, Putin's vague threats against the “collective West'' have been met with more shrugs and yawns in the United States and Europe. If anything, there is more panic in Russia. Partial mobilization, Russia's first since World War II, falls well short of mass conscription and is likely to be confined (for now) to the country's 300,000 reservists. Contract soldiers already deployed in Ukraine will see their service indefinitely extended just as the weather cools and winter approaches. “This is a very risky step from Putin,” a senior Western intelligence officer told Yahoo News. “There are big doubts whether this call-up will succeed in the first place, and if not, what message will it send. It also increases public antiwar and anti-regime sentiment throughout Russia.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
“Where's the proof Mr. Trump?” says John Rothmann

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 32:34


 A federal appeals court on Wednesday restored the Justice Department's access to documents with classified markings that had been seized last month from former President Donald J. Trump's Florida residence, handing a victory to federal investigators in their efforts to examine Mr. Trump's hoarding of sensitive government records. In a strongly worded 29-page decision, the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit blocked part of an order by a federal judge that had temporarily barred the department from using the classified materials in its inquiry into whether Mr. Trump illegally retained national defense documents and obstructed the government's repeated efforts to recover them. At times in his pre presidential life, Donald Trump represented himself as a real-estate mogul, a television star, a business visionary, and a salesman par excellence. But according to a complaint filed today by NY AG Letitia James, the Trump Organization was actually just a massive fraud with incidental sidelines in property development, merchandising, and entertainment. The basic scheme alleged in the complaint is straightforward. Trump would use different valuations for properties depending on what he needed: When he wanted to lower his taxes, he'd claim a low valuation; if he wanted to obtain loans on more favorable terms, he would inflate the valuation. His overarching goal was to inflate his claimed personal net worth year over year, which in turn allowed him to obtain better loans by personally guaranteeing them—all built on bogus claims about his assets. “Claiming you have money you do not have does not amount to the art of the deal,” James said at a press conference. “It's the art of the steal.”See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: Police will be watching your videos - with your permission

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 37:16


Supervisors have approved a trial run allowing police to monitor in real time private surveillance cameras in certain circumstances, despite strong objections from civil liberties groups alarmed by the potential impact to privacy. San Francisco, like many places across the country, is struggling to balance public safety with constitutional protections. The ability to monitor in real time was requested by San Francisco Mayor London Breed and supported by merchants and residents who say police officers need more tools to combat drug dealing and retail theft that they say have marred the city's quality of life.  It is temporary and will sunset in 15 months. The vote was 7-4, with some supervisors astonished that the governing board of politically liberal San Francisco would consider granting more powers to law enforcement in a city that celebrates its activism. Others pushed back, saying they were tired of sophisticated criminal networks taking advantage of San Francisco's lax attitude toward retail theft and other property crimes.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
“It's a tug-of-war,” says John Rothmann

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 34:47


Former President Donald Trump's battle with the FBI over its search of Mar-a-Lago has moved from South Florida to New York City, where a court-appointed “special master” on Tuesday indicated he has a very simple test for whether he sides with the Department of Justice. The special master, Raymond J. Dearie said Tuesday that if Trump's lawyers don't officially counter whether the documents the former president took are classified, then Dearie will side with the DOJ. “As far as I'm concerned, that's the end of it,” he said. Dearie, a semi-retired federal judge in Brooklyn who's playing the role of temporary referee, wants to speed up the process and get federal agents back on track. And while Trump has been alleging on social media that he already declassified the records he swiped from the White House, Dearie is demanding that Trump put up or shut up. The senior judge is asking that Trump's team assert—in sworn affidavits where lies could mean jail time—whether or not Trump actually declassified them.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann responds to the shooting in Oakland

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 67:44


Two people were shot outside Oakland City Hall Tuesday afternoon, an Oakland city official confirmed to KRON4 and one of them has died, according to a tweet from Oakland PD. The second victim was transported to the hospital and is undergoing surgery. The incident took place while a city council meeting was happening in the building. Gunshots were heard outside the building at about 2:15 p.m. The city official confirmed that two people were shot at Frank Ogawa Plaza. OPD confirmed the shooting on Twitter.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann asks if this is the right approach?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 34:52


US President Joe Biden has again said the US would defend Taiwan in the event of an attack by China. Asked in a CBS interview if US troops would defend the island, Mr Biden said: "Yes, if in fact, there was an unprecedented attack." The remarks prompted the White House to clarify that the official US policy - which doesn't commit to military action on Taiwan - had not changed. Beijing said it "deplores and firmly opposes" Mr Biden's pledge of action. The foreign ministry said it had lodged "stern representations" with Washington over the remarks, broadcast in a CBS 60 Minutes interview on Sunday. Taiwan is a self-ruled island off the coast of eastern China that Beijing claims as part of its territory. Washington has always walked a diplomatic tightrope over the issue. On the one hand it adheres to the One China policy, a cornerstone of its relationship with Beijing. Under this policy, the US acknowledges that there is only one Chinese government, and has formal ties with Beijing rather than Taiwan. But it also maintains close relations with Taiwan and sells arms to it under the Taiwan Relations Act, which states that the US must provide the island with the means to defend itself.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  Will Joe Biden run in 2024?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 20:37


Joe Biden was asked a very simple question in an interview that aired Sunday: Had he decided whether to run again for president in 2024? The answer he gave was anything but straightforward. "Look, my intention, as I said to begin with, is that I would run again," Biden told "60 Minutes." "But it's just an intention. But is it a firm decision that I run again? That remains to be seen." Which is an interesting way to answer that question! Especially when you consider the following: 1) Biden, currently 79, is the oldest person ever elected to a first presidential term. 2) He repeatedly cast himself as a "bridge" candidate to a younger generation on the campaign trail in 2020. 3) Speculation has swirled almost since the day he took the oath of office about whether he will run for reelection. Biden has to know that an answer like the one he gave on Sunday will only fuel the whispers that he may not be running again.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
Is the pandemic over? John Rothmann thinks it is!

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 13:53


President Biden's off-the-cuff comment during a “60 Minutes” interview that “the pandemic is over” has sparked outrage from all sides. Republicans are accusing Biden of hypocrisy as he asks Congress for more covid-19 funding, while some on the left point to the disease's continued death toll as evidence that the pandemic is nowhere near its finish line. These criticisms don't detract from Biden's point. He's right. By multiple definitions, the pandemic is over. That doesn't mean that the coronavirus is no longer causing harm; it simply signals the end of an emergency state as Covid has evolved into an endemic disease. A pandemic is something that upends our daily lives and profoundly alters the way that we work, go to school, worship and socialize. That was certainly the case in March 2020.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
“Climate change is taking its toll on our planet,”  says John Rothmann

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 16:13


Three blockbuster storms struck different coasts this weekend, causing widespread damage in Puerto Rico, Alaska and Japan. Their damage offers examples of what we can expect more of in a rapidly warming world. In Alaska: The most intense storm ever recorded in the Bering Sea during the month of September blasted communities across a 1,000-mile stretch of Alaska's western coastline with hurricane-force winds and record storm surge flooding. The villages hit include names familiar to the climate community for being vulnerable to erosion and seeking to move to higher ground, such as Kivalina and Shishmaref. Severe flooding was also seen in Nome, the endpoint of the Iditarod sled dog race. The flooding there beat any seen since November 1974. By battering already vulnerable coastal communities, the storm will make them more susceptible to the Bering Sea's notorious winter storms. In Puerto Rico: Hurricane Fiona struck on Sunday, causing an island-wide blackout that illustrates the country's challenges with repairing its electrical grid in the wake of Hurricane Maria in 2017. Hardening infrastructure against increasingly potent extreme weather events is a major challenge facing the U.S. At one point Sunday evening, nearly the entire island was under a flash flood warning, with "catastrophic" flooding underway. In Japan: Typhoon Nanmadol, the country's fourth-most intense typhoon to make landfall, struck the island of Kyushu on Sunday morning eastern time. The storm dropped more than two feet of rain in 24 hours on parts of that island, threatening to cause landslides, along with wind and storm surge flooding. Climate change is enabling hurricanes and typhoons to dump more rainfall and stay stronger further north. Prior to its landfall, the storm had rapidly intensified — a process with climate change ties and reached Category 4 intensity.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.