Podcasts about subsidies

Form of financial aid or support extended to an economic sector

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Best podcasts about subsidies

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Latest podcast episodes about subsidies

China In Focus
Google Speeds up Exit from China

China In Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 24:20


Google Speeds up Exit from China Moderna Rejects China Request for Vaccine Tech Chipmaker Micron Gets $320m Subsidy from Japan Defense Secretary: No 'Imminent Invasion' of Taiwan Taiwan Inducts New Amphibious Ship in Defense Lineup China Sells Excess U.S. Liquefied Gas to Europe Chinese Businesses Keeping Europeans Warm World World Bank Cuts China Growth Outlook Chinese Company Buys 7.6% Stake in Aston Martin Retired DEA Agent: 'Mass Poisonings' from Fentanyl

First Light with Rachel Smalley
Rachel Smalley: The fuel subsidy must end in January

First Light with Rachel Smalley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 3:38


OPINION: We would be far better to provide targeted assistance to the most vulnerable, instead of continuing to provide a cheaper ride for all and sundry.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Big 550 KTRS
Ray Hartmann: Poor subsidy priorities

The Big 550 KTRS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 12:19


More thoughts on his recent Riverfront Times column, "Hartmann: It's Time to Stop Coddling Cortex" (https://www.riverfronttimes.com/news/hartmann-its-time-to-stop-coddling-cortex-38121658). Also, concerns about the St. Louis Archdiocese announcing the closure of schools, and the St. Police Officers Assocation losing Jeff Roorda. Hear Ray on weeknights: ktrs.com/stlintheknow/

The Sustainable Futures Report

We're on the brink of massive changes. This week I'm going to talk about the UK government, though not about its financial management. There is a report from the world meteorological organisation as more extreme weather events are reported. A new academic study warns that palm trees face extinction while in Finland more and bigger buildings are being built from timber. On the energy front the UAE is stepping up oil production, and is hydrogen the ideal clean solution for home heating, or will it be just too expensive?

Good Morning Africa
Kenya's Fuel subsidy removal. Was it long overdue?

Good Morning Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 7:58


 Global economic growth is set to slow sharply in 2022, Kenya's Fuel subsidy removal.

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке
How Irina Bradley obtained subsidies for the education of Ukrainians in WA - Как Ирина Брэдли добилась субсидий на обучение украинцев в Западной Австралии

SBS Russian - SBS на русском языке

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:49


Western Australia will offer subsidies for educational courses to Ukrainian refugees. The initiator of this change was Irina Bradley from Perth. This is a Russian language content. - Западная Австралия предложит субсидии на образовательные курсы украинским переселенцам. Ученики старших классов смогут получить профессию на тех же условиях, что и граждане Австралии.

Why I'm Angry podcast
Social Dictatorship

Why I'm Angry podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 85:25


Once we had a king now we have a President and a congress and judges and it looks like the republic is falling. Not to worry though I Chick fil a worker is willing to take on the bad guys. All for one and one for the why I'm angry podcast starting now!

Underground USA
Biden's Lame Victory Lap & Why Government Shouldn't Pick Winners and Losers

Underground USA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 17:00


Now that the potential rail strike has been averted, it would seem a perfect time to address the ongoing supply chain issues that the Biden administration has perfectly ignored. The fact that the US Transportation Secretary wasn't even involved in the railway contract negotiations examples how thoroughly inept and dysfunctional this administration is.Which leads to an even more base point. Why has it become common place for the federal government to involve itself so intimately with the inner-workings the private sector? Granted the US government subsidizes the bulk of the rail industry and needed to in its nascent days, but why does it continue to do so?Why is the federal government involved in the finances of the private sector at all?I talk about this and more with Matt Bruce on The Captain's America: Third Watch...RELATED LINK(S):https://www.undergroundusa.com/p/bidens-lame-victory-lap-and-why-governmentSign-up for our mostly daily mail out here:https://www.undergroundusa.comSupport Underground USA (BTC)https://commerce.coinbase.com/checkout/7b2d8c35-55b9-49ed-9918-f7cc6f2a488dSupport Underground USA (USD)https://checkout.square.site/merchant/SW8KGEWAS2A22/checkout/SXG24XFCOWMROX3D5IN42TB2Convention of Stateshttp://ConventionOfStates.com/?ref=69171

Palisade Radio
Michael Pento: The Worst Part of the Bear Market is Dead Ahead

Palisade Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 41:01 Very Popular


Tom welcomes back Michael Pento, President and Founder of Pento Portfolio Strategies, to the program. Michael discusses how the bear market is here to stay, and the next phase is coming. We've only experienced the opening salvo. Wall Street will soon realize that earnings are in decline. We're in a global recession with hawkish global central bankers. The market bottom might be around 3300 on the S&P but that is optimistic. Total equity valuations remain considerably overvalued, and they need to correct to fair value. The yield curve is more inverted than any time in the last forty years. This normally signals recession, and this time is no different. The Fed is buying all the assets, causing interest rate repression. There is no mystery as to the causes of inflation, it's money printing. The Fed has to raise rates to four percent by March 2023. Michael says, "The fact the Fed thinks they can get to four percent and do 95 billion a month in QT is asinine." The Fed is having a very difficult time controlling inflation, and now they don't care what happens to the economy. They cannot pivot, they have to regain credibility. This will be one of the deepest recessions we have ever seen. The Fed really has no clue about anything, especially the causes of inflation. There has been almost no job creation this year. We're seeing inventories build, which is boosting Q3 GDP, but that won't last. Inflation is a massive embarrassment to the Fed, but they will destroy the economy and markets to accomplish it. Government is fighting inflation by giving away more money and cancelling student debt. More money isn't going to make college more affordable. They are just creating more demand for services, which will just cause prices to rise further. Subsidies do not fight inflation. We need to increase the supply of goods and services by improving productivity. We've done everything we could to kill productivity through the pandemic. Tax receipts always fall in recession, and debt service payments are increasing quickly for the government. The national debt is skyrocketing, and a fair interest rate would probably be in double-digits. There are no easy answers in the current system. The negative effects of the rate hikes have barely begun to be felt. Inflation always peaks during recession, don't listen to the pundits who claim we've peaked. The four horseman of the economic apocalypse are cash, U.S. sovereign debt, the dollar, and shorts. If you own those four things, you will probably not lose money in this bear market. You might even make money. It's clear we're heading to a liquidity crisis. You want flexibility in this environment. When rates and the dollar begin to fall sometime in 2023 you will see gold rally. Time Stamp References:0:00 - Introduction0:34 - Bear Market Starting4:39 - Bonds, Spreads, & Banks11:40 - Targeting Inflation15:42 - Indicators & Fed Reliance19:20 - Government Insults22:00 - IRS Growth & Taxes28:33 - The Peak of Inflation30:52 - Economic Apocalypse33:45 - Gold & Positioning38:10 - Wrap Up Talking Points From This Episode: Outlook for the markets and why the bear isn't going away.Why the Fed's is cornered and it's policies asinine.Inflation and why it always peaks during recession.The four safe havens of the economic apocalypse. Guest Links:Website: http://pentoport.comE-Mail: mpento@pentoport.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/michaelpento Michael Pento is the President and Founder of Pento Portfolio Strategies, with over 27 years of investment experience. He was the portfolio creator and consultant to Delta/Claymore's commodity portfolios that raised over $3 billion, distributed through Claymore/Guggenheim's sales network. He is the author of the book "The Coming Bond Market Collapse" and has a weekly podcast called "The Mid-week Reality Check."

Business Drive
New Kenyan President Signals End Of Subsidies

Business Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 1:01


Kenya's president William Ruto gave orders to reverse some of the policies of his predecessor, Uhuru Kenyatta. President Ruto appointed six judges nominated by the judicial service commission three years ago, who Mr Kenyatta had snubbed on claims they were tainted. The new president also indicated that he would scrap food and fuel subsidies. He says they were costly and ineffective. Mr Ruto says all cargo clearance would be reverted to Mombasa port - A roll back to Mr. Kenyatta's order that saw port services transferred to Naivasha to ensure repayment of A Chinese loan taken for the construction of A railway between the port of Mombasa and the capital, nairobi.

The John Batchelor Show
#MrMarket: Subsidies and price caps do not solve inflation. Veronique deRugy, Mercatus Center

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 9:00


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #MrMarket: Subsidies and price caps do not solve inflation. Veronique deRugy, Mercatus Center https://www.creators.com/read/veronique-de-rugy/09/22/similar-inflation-challenges-and-stumbles-in-the-uk

Snacks Daily

Snacks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 19:47 Very Popular


Yes, you're noticing more electric bikes on the streets — Because e-bikes just beat road bikes. Starbucks just unveiled the future of loyalty at its annual investor day and here's the strategy: Send you to a hacienda in Costa Rica to sip on the good stuff. And Kellogg just unveiled a cereal that doesn't take milk, it takes water — And that “water cereal” explains why stocks just had their worst day in 2 years. $K $SBUX $BRDS Follow The Best One Yet on Instagram, Twitter, and Tiktok: @tboypod And now watch us on Youtube Want a Shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form Got the Best Fact Yet? We got a form for that too Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Fishing subsidies am

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 5:28


Guest: The Maritime Security Researcher at The Institute for Security Studies, Dr David Willima explains the contents of the WTO agreement to John Maytham. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UBC News World
Health insurance in Arlington will Have Subsidies Increased by ARPA Legislation

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 2:30


Rick Thornton, an Arlington health insurance agent , say that agents recognize that Democrats in the Senate are trying to pass a two-year extension of Insurance subsidies that were originally passed by American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) for coverage years 2021 and 2022

Hashtag Trending
Hashtag Trending September 13 - SpaceX upset at Starlink subsidy rejection; autonomous vehicles and human supervision;, and more

Hashtag Trending

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:15


Hashtag Trending, September 13, 2022 - SpaceX is upset at the FCC for rejecting an $886 million Starlink subsidy, experts say autonomous vehicles may need some form of human supervision, and major credit card companies will implement a code at gun stores to track gun and ammunition sales. 

All Things Policy
Rationalising subsidies to create more fiscal space

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 29:16


How much does India spend on subsidies? What is its implication? Can there be a better solution? In this episode, Pranay Kotasthane and Sarthak Pradhan analyse subsidies from a public finance perspective and evaluate some policy alternatives.Here are the papers referred to in the podcast:The Volume and Composition of Subsidies in India 1967-88Subsidies, Merit Goods and the Fiscal Space for Reviving Growth: An Aspect of Public Expenditure in IndiaYou can follow Pranay Kotasthane on twitter: https://twitter.com/pranaykotasYou can follow Sarthak Pradhan on twitter: https://twitter.com/PSarthak19Check out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featuredDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.https://twitter.com/IVMPodcastshttps://www.instagram.com/ivmpodcasts/?hl=enhttps://www.facebook.com/ivmpodcasts/Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, JioSaavn, Gaana, Amazon MusicDo share the word with you folks!

Transition Virginia
Dr. Michael Thom: Are Virginia's Film Subsidies Really Worth It?

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 21:18


Between a 1999 grant program and a 2010 tax credit program, Virginia taxpayers are paying roughly $10 million every year to help attract film and television productions to the state. The Virginia Film Office says the incentives have a 1.85x return on investment. We're joined by Professor Michael Thom of USC's Price School of Public Policy, who disagrees--he says incentive programs are a bad investment for taxpayers and for the state treasury.Learn more at http://linktr.ee/JacklegMediaSponsored by the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia

Contra Radio Network
The REAL David Knight Show ll GreatReset Trap: Energy Price Controls / Subsidies

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 18:23


Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Subsidies to households to pacify resistance and create dependency, a transition to UBI. But what of farms & factories, food & jobs? Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show You can now support the show while purchasing gold and silver: www.davidknight.gold Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak Tn, 37764

Contra Radio Network
The REAL David Knight Show ll GreatReset Trap: Energy Price Controls / Subsidies

Contra Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 18:23


Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Subsidies to households to pacify resistance and create dependency, a transition to UBI. But what of farms & factories, food & jobs? Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show You can now support the show while purchasing gold and silver: www.davidknight.gold Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at: $davidknightshow BTC to: bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak Tn, 37764 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/contra-radio-network/support

The David Knight Show
Tue 7Sep22 Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Household Subsidies to Pacify & Create Dependency

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 181:39


* Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Subsidies to households to pacify resistance and create dependency, a transition to UBI. But what of farms & factories, food & jobs?* BBC brings back calls for depopulation. A look at how their pagan religion and pseudo-science stack up against the Bible, language and anthropology* The life is in the blood — two studies on how mRNA jabs damage blood* New "fuel agnostic" engine can use two dozen different fuels. Will government allow it?* "God gave us two arms, one for flu shot, one for Covid" says Biden's Covid advisor. But the political establishment gave us TWO WINGS to create & coerce the jabs. And, who is this guy?* Pronoun wars. Dissenters punished & reported as terrorist — by church!* Was Sarah Palin's loss in Alaska because of ranked preferences or is GOP criticism of ranked preference because it's a threat to the political duopoly?* After predictions about Great Barrier Reef coral disappearing fail, CNN pushes new narrative about Caribbean coral dying from "climate change"Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast
Do we need a Wage Subsidy Scheme for the winter?

Highlights from Newstalk Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 5:20


The Labour Party is calling on the government to create a new, short-term wage subsidy scheme in order to protect jobs and firms form the risk of collapse over soaring gas and energy prices. How could this scheme work? Marie Sherlock, Senator and Labour employment spokesperson spoke to Newstalk Breakfast this morning.

The REAL David Knight Show
Tue 7Sep22 Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Household Subsidies to Pacify & Create Dependency

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 181:39


* Crisis: Energy Hyperinflation. Solution: Subsidies to households to pacify resistance and create dependency, a transition to UBI. But what of farms & factories, food & jobs?* BBC brings back calls for depopulation. A look at how their pagan religion and pseudo-science stack up against the Bible, language and anthropology* The life is in the blood — two studies on how mRNA jabs damage blood* New "fuel agnostic" engine can use two dozen different fuels. Will government allow it?* "God gave us two arms, one for flu shot, one for Covid" says Biden's Covid advisor. But the political establishment gave us TWO WINGS to create & coerce the jabs. And, who is this guy?* Pronoun wars. Dissenters punished & reported as terrorist — by church!* Was Sarah Palin's loss in Alaska because of ranked preferences or is GOP criticism of ranked preference because it's a threat to the political duopoly?* After predictions about Great Barrier Reef coral disappearing fail, CNN pushes new narrative about Caribbean coral dying from "climate change"Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 994 Kodak, TN 37764Money is only what YOU hold: Go to DavidKnight.gold for great deals on physical gold/silver

Astro Awani
Consider This: Targeted subsidies can it work?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 25:56


The Government has often highlighted the need for targeted subsidies but has kept mum on what goes into an effective delivery mechanism. Tonight on #ConsiderThis we ask our guests about the inefficiencies of targeted subsidies & how to bridge the gaps.

Lexman Artificial
Ryan Hall: The Businessman Who Gets Government Subsidies to Boost His Competitivness

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 4:54


Lexman introduces Ryan Hall, a business owner who receives government subsidies to boost his company's competitiveness. The two discuss how these subsidies work, the pros and cons of them, and what they mean for the economy as a whole.

Community Solutions Podcast
Episode 259- When It's Legal To Discriminate

Community Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 89:08


www.commsolutionsmn.com-  The Minneapolis Federation of Teachers recently agreed to a stipulation in their contract that white teachers will get laid off before educators of other races. Wow, racist much? They say that minority teachers can never make it because all the white teachers have seniority. This is a clear case study in antiracism. Remember, antiracism isn't being against racism, it's using discrimination against a so-called group of "oppressors" to level the playing field for an identified group of "victims". The Minneapolis Federation of Teachers says that they are "extremely proud" of the language in the contracts. They say racist things like students learn best from teachers who look like them. What? So white teachers are incapable of teaching BIPOC students? It gets better... they go on to say that white student benefit from teachers of color. I guess white teachers are no longer needed. White people must pay for their racist sins. How do you like your antiracism now? Will this bleed into other sectors of public employment? Government administration? Police? What about in the private sector? ESG scores are already driving this in corporate boards and upper leadership. It only makes sense that we'll see it in the lower ranks as well. It's amazing to see the media slant to laud this policy and demonize anyone that speaks out against it. We also discuss the recent attempt of the Executive Branch to erase student debt. Why is that our issue? Why is college so expensive? What can we do to change the culture around higher education? We try to tackle the problems and the solutions. Have you checked out our Spotify playlist? At the beginning of each episode, Jason quotes some song lyrics that have to do with the subject matter of the podcast. Andrew never knows what they are, but now he can… and so can you! We've launched the Spotify playlist: “Community Solutions Music From the Podcast!” You can listen to Roundabout from Yes after listing to Episode 30 on Roundabouts… or kick back and enjoy a rocking playlist just for the thrill of it. We add a new song every week. Subscribe and enjoy! Don't forget that you can also subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play, and Spotify!

Retirement Planning Education, with Andy Panko
#038 - Understanding Affordable Care Act ("ACA") health insurance and premium tax credit subsidies

Retirement Planning Education, with Andy Panko

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 41:35


Explanation of health insurance offered through the Affordable Care Act (aka ACA or ObamaCare) and subsides for such insurance in the form of premium tax creditsLinks in this episode:IRS Form 8962 - hereMy YouTube video - Affordable Care Act Premium Tax CreditsFacebook group - Taxes in RetirementYouTube channel - Retirement Planning DemystifiedNewsletter - Retirement Planning Insights

Podiatry Practice Mastery
[Interview] Ray Rodriguez about Medsidy

Podiatry Practice Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:38


In this interview, Ray talks about a new idea for medical professionals to get paid for their attention. The idea is a Subsidy for Medical Professionals! Check out the interview and Medsidy's website at www.medsidy.com Contact Ray if you have any questions - 214.493.3430 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/drpelto/message

Energy News Beat Podcast
ENB #72 We talk with Debra Wold, CEO, GreneLily Energy & Water about crtical solutions for the Energy Crisis - Profitable and without subsidies

Energy News Beat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 35:02


There is truly a worldwide energy crisis in progress. We got to this point by forcing the transformation to a renewable energy source without planning and printing money. Causing inflation and possible recessions in countries around the world. I met Debra through LinkedIn and have enjoyed getting to know her business and personal side of the energy crisis. One of my hot buttons is "Profitable and without subsidies." Debra is passionate about solving the energy crisis and saving the environment without printing money or relying on tax credits. GreneLily has solutions, contacts, and the drive to turn waste into renewable energy while exceeding ESG standards and regulations, We have a fun talk about the energy crisis's true focus: getting the lowest kWh to the consumers with the least impact on the environment. We talk about renewable, fossil, nuclear, and using the right people for the right job. Please connect with Debra on her LinkedIn HEREGreneLily Energy & Water is a woman-owned & operated Green Energy Business that can provide significant ROI to energy companies WITHOUT tax incentives or subsidies. We would like to thank our ENB Podcast Sponsor; EnverusAnd our fellow travelers with Enverus.Mark LaCour, Editor in Chief, OGGNPaige Wilson, Host of Oil and Gas Industry Leaders and Co-Host of Oil and Gas This Week Podcast.  OGGN NetworkDavid Blackmon, Author, Industry leader, Podcast Host, DB Energy QuestionsDB Energy Questions Podcast

UBC News World
Health Insurance in Arlingtion Have Rates Reduced As New Subsidies are Passed

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:50


Rick Thornton, a Arlington health insurance agent, said Congress' passage of the Inflation Reduction Act extends subsidies for millions of Americans who buy individual coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Anticipating The Unintended
#183 Free Lunches Forever

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 26:48


PolicyWTF: Revdi Fertiliser CultureThis section looks at egregious public policies. Policies that make you go: WTF, Did that really happen? - Pranay KotasthaneIn the past, we have discussed many government plans of the “One Nation, One X” kind. Still, I must confess. Of all things that can substitute the letter X, “fertiliser” was beyond my thinking horizon. Limited thinking wasn’t a problem for the government, which has:“decided to implement One Nation One Fertiliser by introducing single brand name and the logo under fertiliser subsidy scheme namely Pradhan Mantri Bhartiya Janurvarak Pariyojana (PMBJP).”While you decipher what this order means, a short detour about the abbreviation PMBJP is in order. Its usage suggests something profound — the government is finally running out of acronyms! I claim so because there’s an existing scheme with the same abbreviation in the very same ministry — the older Pradhan Mantri Bhartiya Janaushadhi Pariyojana (PMBJP), run by the Department of Pharmaceuticals since 2008. Perhaps the reason for repeating this abbreviation is apparent — it comprises both the ruling party and the party leader. To make matters more confusing, this scheme has been hailed as “the call of #NewIndia which will take our nation to greater heights” by a politician whose name also abbreviates to BJP.The new PMBJP seems utterly bizarre at first. Why would the government want all companies—government-run or private—to sell their products under a single brand name of ‘Bharat’? Why would a government order go to such lengths to specify that “Two-thirds of the area on the top half of a fertiliser bag will be used for the official branding and logo of the PMBJP while a fertiliser firm can use the rest one-third area for its own logo and branding as well as printing other information relating to the product”?If you dig deeper, the bizarreness gets replaced by a sense of rejection. The diktat to dissolve the value of all fertiliser brands only takes the veneer off the sham called a market for fertilisers. Here’s how.The fertiliser sector is insanely regulated even by Indian standards. It all began with good intentions. One of the components of the Green Revolution was to subsidise agricultural inputs. And so, a fertiliser subsidy was introduced. The government fixed the retail price of urea fertiliser considerably below the market price to encourage its usage. This difference between the market and administered prices was called “fertiliser subsidy”. The government paid off the difference to fertiliser companies with taxpayers’ money. Simultaneously, the government started running fertiliser plants to increase supply. Combined with the Minimum Support Price (MSP) mechanism guaranteeing procurement of certain grains, these measures worked to the extent that Punjab, Haryana, and a handful of other states were able to increase grain production rapidly. The fears of India’s dangerous “population bomb” subsided. But as you might anticipate, interfering with prices had unintended consequences. An overuse of subsidised fertilisers led to a decline in soil quality. An artificially low price also led to the diversion of urea for non-agricultural uses. Urea is a versatile material used in textiles, paint, explosives, and medicinal sectors. Naturally, people purchased cheap fertilisers from retail shops and diverted them to these industries. The government then introduced the Fertiliser (Movement Control) Order, 1973. Fertiliser couldn’t be sold across states within India without the ministry's permission. Instead, state-level fertiliser requirements were aggregated at the union ministry level, and each state had its quota “allocated” from in-state and select out-of-state fertiliser manufacturing facilities. And, of course, there were the usual export restrictions until recently. Essentially, there’s no such thing as a market for fertilisers. Just as MSP effectively turned farmers into government employees, the fertiliser subsidy turned manufacturers into satellite government agencies meant for supplying fertilisers. Meanwhile, the fertiliser subsidy bill kept rising. It is now the union government’s second-largest explicit subsidy, behind only food. For reference, India spent more on fertiliser subsidy last year than it did on defence capital expenditure. This year, higher international prices due to the Ukraine war mean that the government’s fertiliser subsidy bill will shoot up further. And so, the government decided: if we’re going to pay Rs 2 lakh crore to our fertiliser contractors (companies) annually, why not claim the full credit for it? And that’s how we got the One Nation, One Fertiliser scheme. While the name might seem bizarre, it is just the high point of continued government interference in this sector.We can anticipate the unintended consequences. Fertiliser companies—now unable to differentiate their products—will be further disincentivised from improving or innovating. With the PMBJP branding at the front and centre of every fertiliser bag, the endowment effect of the subsidy will grow stronger. It’s now explicit that the government supplies fertilisers to farmers, not companies. Which government will now take the risk of being seen as anti-farmer by reducing this subsidy bill?A better alternative would’ve been to eliminate all complex controls over the fertiliser sector and increase the amount provided as income support to farmers under the PM-KISAN scheme instead. A subsidy to fertiliser manufacturers made sense in the 1960s due to food shortage. It continued to make some sense until there was no way to identify farmers. But now, with an income support scheme already identifying farmers via Aadhaar, it is unconscionable to direct taxpayer money for another subsidy programme. We are stuck in a low-level equilibrium that just keeps getting worse.Global Policy Watch #1: Karza Maaf KaroGlobal issues and their implications for India— RSJThe wonderful thing about bad ideas is how so many politicians find them good. Good ideas must go through the steeplechase of policy proposals, committees and reports. Then they run the marathon to solicit bipartisan political support and public acceptance. And, if they are lucky, they make the finish line alive. No such test of endurance for bad ideas. They fly past these hurdles flipping the bird to them. Time and place don’t matter. Bad ideas are welcome. Everything, everywhere, all at once. The immediate cause for that short ode to bad ideas is the announcement by the Biden administration this week of a student loan forgiveness programme. If you missed the news, here’s a summary from New York Times:“President Biden announced a plan on Wednesday to wipe out significant amounts of student loan debt for tens of millions of Americans, saying he would cancel $10,000 in debt for those earning less than $125,000 per year and $20,000 for those who had received Pell grants for low-income families.Students who received Pell grants will be eligible for $20,000 in debt forgiveness on their loans. About 60 percent of borrowers have received Pell grants, and the majority come from families making less than $30,000 a year. The Education Department estimates that 27 million borrowers will qualify for up to $20,000 in relief.Millions of other borrowers will be eligible for $10,000 in debt relief, as long as they earn less than $125,000 a year or are in households earning less than $250,000.”Good IntentionsWhat will this cost the exchequer? There is a wonderful report on this by the Penn Wharton Budget Model team at the University of Pennsylvania. It has a detailed analysis of the impact of the announcement. I will leave you with the summary:“President Biden’s new student loan forgiveness plan includes three major components. We estimate that debt cancellation alone will cost up to $519 billion, with about 75% of the benefit accruing to households making $88,000 or less. Loan forbearance will cost another $16 billion. The new income-driven repayment (IDR) program would cost another $70 billion, increasing the total plan cost to $605 billion under strict “static” assumptions. However, depending on future IDR program details to be released and potential behavioral (i.e., “non-static”) changes, total plan costs could exceed $1 trillion.”All right. $605 billion under static assumptions and $1 trillion based on future behaviour changes. I will bet this will easily go north of that number because such announcements change the credit culture of a society. We, Indians, know it. So, apart from the $1.9 trillion that Biden announced early last year as part of the COVID-19 relief and build back better package, we have another trillion of stimulus being given back to largely the top two quintiles of the US households. A trillion here, a trillion there, and pretty soon we are talking about real money, to misquote that famous quip by Senator Dirksen. Of course, there are these pious reasons for this policy from the White House press release:“Since 1980, the total cost of both four-year public and four-year private college has nearly tripled, even after accounting for inflation. Federal support has not kept up: Pell Grants once covered nearly 80 percent of the cost of a four-year public college degree for students from working families, but now only cover a third. According to a Department of Education analysis, the typical undergraduate student with loans now graduates with nearly $25,000 in debt.The skyrocketing cumulative federal student loan debt—$1.6 trillion and rising for more than 45 million borrowers—is a significant burden on America’s middle class. Middle-class borrowers struggle with high monthly payments and ballooning balances that make it harder for them to build wealth, like buying homes, putting away money for retirement, and starting small businesses.For the most vulnerable borrowers, the effects of debt are even more crushing. Nearly one-third of borrowers have debt but no degree…”A college education is a passport to higher income and better life in the US. It is the single most significant determinant of social mobility. Two data points from this Pew report puts this in context. First, in 2021, full-time workers ages 22 to 27 who held a bachelor’s degree, but no further education, made a median annual wage of $52,000, compared with $30,000 for full-time workers of the same age with a high school diploma and no degree. Second, households headed by a first-generation college graduate – that is, someone who has completed at least a bachelor’s degree but does not have a parent with a college degree – had a median annual income of $99,600 in 2019, compared with $135,800 for households headed by those with at least one parent who graduated from college. The median wealth of households headed by first-generation college graduates ($152,000) also trailed that of households headed by someone with a parent who graduated from college ($244,500).A college education helps you earn more. And if you have two generations of college education in your family, you’re made. This should be a sufficient incentive for people to take the risk of a college loan and graduate because it does make a difference. Also, the so-called debt burden as a percentage of income is disproportionately high among people who take student loans but don’t graduate. About 40 per cent of students who take loans never graduate. They find it difficult to shrug off the burden throughout their lives. Unintended Consequences When you look at the data together, you should reach the following conclusions:A college education is an expensive affair in the US. The universities have gotten richer over the years, with their trust funds rivalling many private fund houses. The universities seem to have kept the supply limited. The demand has kept soaring, and the somewhat easy availability of credit has meant college fees have grown faster than inflation. The nature of regulations and a stranglehold on accreditation by universities have meant no meaningful disruption in the college education space. A few attempts were made during the pandemic with digital courses, unbundling of the university stack and income share agreement models of funding college education, but they seem to have lost steam once the world got back to normalcy. The universities can continue to retain their oligopoly and set their own prices without real fear of disruption.Then there is a question of alignment of incentives between the borrower and the lender. A college education is the most critical factor for higher income in US society. For the average student, the risk of taking a loan is worth it. Also, taking a loan and not completing college has terrible consequences. This is not some kind of design flaw that’s increasing inequity. It is how it should be. Lastly, the US university system is the best in the world for a reason. It is difficult to get in. You pay a premium for the degree, that money allows the universities to hire and retain faculty who then tend to be of high quality, and it funds research that pushes the boundary of human knowledge. The debt forgiveness program of the Biden administration doesn’t solve the fundamental issue of high college fees. Neither does it strengthen the alignment of incentives between the lender and borrower. In fact, an announcement like this will possibly spur more college applications in future in anticipation of future relief packages like this. That will raise the demand for college seats and increase tuition fees further. Worse, as many have already pointed out, such relief packages have a moral hazard built in. We have written about this in the context of farm loan waivers in India. There are two problems here. When you waive the loans, what do you tell those repaying their debts regularly at great costs to themselves? That they were stupid to do so? Secondly, you have set a precedent for future packages like this. Once that mindset sets in, more borrowers will be taking loans and defaulting because they know the government will bail them out. Mihir Sharma has drawn exactly this parallel with the Indian case in his Bloomberg column this week. He writes:“But the consequence of loan waivers, as they are called in India, have not been at all positive for farmers. Economists have noted that the waivers have encouraged farmers to take on more credit than is justified by their productivity, saddling them with more debt. This cycle of forgiveness and indebtedness reduces the overall flow of agricultural credit, while privileging the minority of borrowers willing and able to game the system. Over the years, multiple cycles of debt forgiveness have not improved household savings, investment or credit flow.…In other words, once you announce a loan waiver program, the incentives of borrowers and politicians change to make both future defaults and future forgiveness more likely. In the US, it’s entirely likely that future administrations will succumb to demands to extend bailouts to those with private loans, for example, or to raise the cap to something more like $50,000 per person.”The other problem is inflation. The consequences of mindless packages since the beginning of the pandemic are there for all to see. The US inflation is at a 40-year high. This relief package will put more money in the hands of the middle class that is already using its excess savings built up during the pandemic to drive up prices. The Fed has been pushing up interest rates to tame inflation. There’s a serious possibility of a recession and debt defaults among the most vulnerable borrowers because of rising rates. More importantly, if the market starts believing that the government doesn’t care about inflation, then high inflation expectations will lead to a real increase in prices. Inflation is expectation driven. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy. That’s why the Fed is careful about its words and why analysts spend so much time parsing its statement. Who in their right mind would want to do this now and set such expectations?The inflation point is particularly important to the rest of the world and to India. Otherwise, who cares what student loan policies are pursued by the Biden administration? Unfortunately, US inflation, interest rates and growth matter to us, as we have already seen in the past few quarters. This bonfire of good economic thinking will singe us. But the persistence and universality of bad ideas cannot be easily fought. There are always short-term reasons to contend with and, of course, elections to be won. Biden’s move is to shore up his popularity among the youth and possibly give Democrats a fighting chance in the mid-terms. These don’t turn out well. But who cares about the future? India Policy Watch: The Elements of Revdi CultureInsights on burning policy issues in India— Pranay KotasthaneThe PM’s revdi culture remark castigating state governments for distributing freebies has been widely debated over the last month. Everyone and their uncles have dipped their toes in the discourse stream. Those on the left have tried hard to prove that freebies are, in fact, desirable social sector spending. Those aligned with the government have highlighted the fiscal imprudence of state governments handing out laptops, TVs, and mixer grinders before elections. My only advice is to read more public finance specialists on this issue and fewer political scientists. What classifies as a subsidy or freebie? Which level of government is guilty of doling out freebies indiscriminately? The discipline of public finance has a lot to offer on such questions. The landmark paper on subsidies in India is by M Govinda Rao and Sudipto Mundle in 1991, in which they devised a subsidy classification. They neatly define a subsidy as:the difference between the cost of delivering various publicly provided goods or services and the recoveries arising from such deliveries.Based on this broad definition, we can classify subsidies along two axes: the nature of the good or service subsidised (merit vs non-merit) and whether they are recognised as subsidies in government accounts (implicit vs explicit). The chart below is my representation of subsidies at the intersection of these two axes.Of the four categories of subsidies, we can now define freebies as non-merit goods which are explicitly or implicitly subsidised by the government. The bone of contention here is the “meritorious” nature of goods. The above paper takes a liberal approach and classifies any good with positive benefits to people beyond the recipient as a merit good.This classification now allows us to understand freebies' volume and nature better. The 1991 paper found that Indian governments were collectively spending almost 15 per cent of GDP on subsidies. Continuing this line of inquiry, Mundle and Sikdar find that the total volume of subsidies had fallen to 10 per cent of GDP by 2015-16. The union government only accounted for 30 per cent of this subsidy bill. State governments accounted for the remaining ~7 per cent of GDP spent on subsidies. Crucially, states subsidised both merit and non-merit goods/services. Since social services like health and education are the primary domain of states according to the constitution, they end up spending ~3 per cent of GDP on such merit goods. The remaining 4 per cent of GDP was spent on non-merit goods. So, the PM’s statement is not incorrect. Both state and union governments have to set their house in order, but on freebies, the state governments have a lot more work to do. The punchline from Sudipto Mundle’s article in Indian Express is vital gyaan for anyone working in Indian public policy:.. four “merit” subsidies account for only a third of total subsidies. Thus, two-thirds of total subsidies, about 6 per cent of GDP, are unwarranted freebies which should be eliminated. .. if central and state governments could step beyond their business as usual budgets and take bold measures to phase out these unwarranted freebies, along with much of the tax exemptions and concessions, which amount to about 5 per cent of GDP, that would free up huge fiscal space. This would enable a massive reduction in the combined fiscal deficit of the Centre and the states, while at the same time stepping up required expenditure on education, health and infrastructure. The myth of restricted fiscal space simply reflects the missing appetite for deep fiscal reforms which could radically change the structure of central and state government finances.”Thanks for reading Anticipating the Unintended! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work.Global Policy Watch #2: Falling In Love With “Your” PoliticianGlobal issues and their implications for India— RSJTaking the cue from the loan forgiveness piece, the question often asked is why do politicians behave the way they do when it is evident that the long-term consequences of their actions will be bad? Like I mentioned a few weeks back, I have been reading an anthology of essays by Bryan Caplan titled - “How Evil Are Politicians?: Essays on Demagoguery”. Caplan introduces the notion of power-hunger in one of the essays and how rational politicians continue to raise it and then try their best to satiate it. Caplan writes:“In Public Choice, also known as “economics of politics,” we usually assume that politicians are motivated not by greed, but by power-hunger.  Of course, we rarely utter the word “power-hunger.”  Instead, we call it “vote maximization,” just as we call greed “profit maximization.”  But when Public Choice pictures politicians, it pictures humans filled with lust for power.Is this a reasonable picture of politicians’ psyches?  Absolutely.  That politicians crave power is as undeniable as that businesspeople crave profits.”Then he argues that democracy and its check and balances might blunt this naked pursuit of power, but that is never enough. He writes:“Under democracy, politicians are less candid about their motives; they need us to like them, and power-hunger is not likeable.  But given its ubiquity throughout most of political history, can we really believe that the motive of power-hunger is no longer paramount? Once you thank the stars you aren’t ruled by Louis XIV or Lenin, a grim truth remains: democracy gives power-hungry politicians far worse incentives than the market gives greedy businesspeople.  Above all, voters – unlike consumers – have no incentive to be rational, spurring power-hungry politicians to preach and practice endless demagoguery.  It’s gotten worse lately, but it’s always been terrible.  Democracy hasn’t turned politicians into decent human beings; it’s only gilded their age-old power lust with altruistic hypocrisy.”So, what’s the solution? Eternal vigilance. And not to be enamoured by any politician and their promises of making your nation great again or reclaiming your deserved vishwaguru status. That’s easier said than done in these days of tribal loyalties and mass disinformation. Bad policies have a lot going for them. HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Post] Pakistan is facing a terrible flood event. And the political debate there is not very different from the one we have whenever there's a drought or flood in India. The linked post discusses how causal stories are deployed for telling disparate political stories about such events. [Article] Ritesh Rautela and Anurodh Giri have a good take on India’s fertiliser subsidy program for nextbillion. [1, 2] The two-part article on Subsidies, merit goods, and fiscal space is well worth a read. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

(don't) Waste Water!
S6E28 - Water Subsidies: a False Good Idea

(don't) Waste Water!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 1:01


Subsidies are dangerous to water! We almost never pay utility water at its real cost, and even less so in the poorest countries, where 89% of utilities don't recover their costs.  So how do these utilities reach breakeven? Well, with subsidies. The problem is that these subsidies are very unevenly distributed.  Of the about 450 billion dollars given out annually, 26% go to the wealthiest 20% and only 6% to the poorest 20%. Said differently, the richer you are, the more public money you'll get. And those water subsidies are a different burden, depending on the country's prosperity. For rich countries, it represents 0.06% of their GDP, while for low-income ones, it hovers around 2%. When something becomes that expensive, you start looking for ways to discreetly cut costs: that's how wastewater treatment always gets underfunded.   The thing is that if utilities can't reach full cost recovery, their service quality will lower. And don't worry, the richest will always be able to afford to switch to point-of-use treatments or bottled water.  But the poorest will suffer even more... See: subsidies are dangerous to water!   Wanna dive deeper into the topic? Check out my conversation with David Lloyd Owen about the best and worst ways to achieve SDG 6 

The Pamphleteer's Weekly Podcast
Wild Markets, Church of the Fed, and Government Subsidies (w/ Tom Landstreet)

The Pamphleteer's Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 42:39


Davis Hunt talks with hedge fund manager Tom Landstreet about recent activity in the market.Follow Tom on Twitter @TomLandstreetPamphleteer Twitter @realpamphleteerPamphleteer Instagram @realpamphleteerSign Up for our daily newsletter.

AFA@TheCore
Brian Blase, Pres., Paragon Health Inst., joins Walker to discuss the bad healthcare policies (such as extending the ACA tax subsidies) in the Inflation Reduction Act

AFA@TheCore

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 54:12


I Might Be Wrong
Green Energy Subsidies are the Future (E42)

I Might Be Wrong

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 36:10


A big decision on climate policy has been made basically because we had no other options. Is the option we're going with any good? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Between the Liars
Bill Me! H.R. 5376 Part 3 (Inflation Reduction Act) Green Energy Subsidies & Penalties

Between the Liars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 56:35


The Federal Reserve says inflation is here to stay, despite the title of this bill. Looooots of red tape being put up in this bill. Part 3 of the Inflation Reduction Act focuses on the green energy subsidies and carbon punishments Democrats supported in this legislation. Join for an overview of the Clean Energy & Clean Fuel's portion of this bill. Bill Text w/ highlights: file:///Users/ryangoke/Desktop/Pt%203%20Senate%20Inflation%20Reduction%20ACT.pdf Link to Bill Me! segment on Taxes & IRS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8-40vAlGos&list=PLllhBzeMoha_tJt48dWdNaXJrwDai-e9V&index=11&t=417s Link to Bill Me! segment on Healthcare & IRS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kWOyBHE5es Source -- IRS more likely to audit poorer families: https://trac.syr.edu/tracirs/latest/679/ Become a member and get backstage access on our Discord channels: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/betweentheliars Become a patron for backstage access PLUS exclusive livestreams: https://www.patreon.com/betweentheliars We livestream our recordings Tuesdays & Thursdays (and sometimes Fridays when we have wonky schedules) at 7 pm central--Come hang out! You can join from our Youtube Channel, Facebook Page, or Twitch Stream. Podcast episodes are released every Monday (debates), Wednesday (Bill Me!), and Friday (Blueprint) Follow us on our social medias to stay up to date! Instagram: @between_the_liars https://www.instagram.com/between_the_liars/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pantsonf1re Twitter: @betweentheliars

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Key Takeaways from Senator Mitt Romney

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 8:49


THE PETA PODCAST
Ep.237: PETA's Equine Matters--Underground Horse Racing Exposed in Georgia; War to End Racing Subsidies in NY.

THE PETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 32:13


A PETA undercover investigation has exposed underground horse racing in America. PETA investigators' video of Rancho Centenario near Atlanta showed horses drugged before being placed in races that attendees then wager on as entertainment. The compelling PETA video was a part of a recent Washington Post report on ongoing races in Georgia, a state where there is no racing commission, and where any racing is unsanctioned.  PETA Senior VP Kathy Guillermo oversees the Equine Matters Department and talks about how people can stop underground racing. She also provides updates on the department's work including the effort to stop tens of millions in taxpayer subsidies to horse racing in New York state. See the PETA investigators' video. See the Washington Post story on the Georgia races. See more at  PETA.org   The PETA Podcast PETA, the world's largest animal rights organization, is 6.5 million strong and growing. This is the place to find out why. Hear from insiders, thought leaders, activists, investigators, politicians, and others why animals need more than kindness—they have the right not to be abused or exploited in any way. Hosted by Emil Guillermo. Powered by PETA activism. Contact us at PETA.org Music provided by CarbonWorks. Go to Apple podcasts and subscribe. Contact and follow host Emil Guillermo on Twitter @emilamok Or at www.amok.com Please subscribe, rate and review wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening to THE PETA PODCAST!   © Copyright PETA 2021-4    

Radio Sweden
Lööf on climate measures, electricity price record, government subsidy to offset energy bills, Arctic town on the move

Radio Sweden

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 1:57


A round-up of the main headlines in Sweden on August 17th, 2022. You can hear more reports on our homepage www.radiosweden.se, or in our app Sveriges Radio Play. Presenter: Michael WalshProducer: Dave Russell

Cleantech Talk
Pros & Cons of EV & PHEV Subsidies in Inflation Reduction Act

Cleantech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 24:56


CleanTechnica's Zach Shahan, Jo Borras, and Steve Hanley discuss the EV and PHEV subsidies in the Inflation Reduction Act, including their various pros & cons. They also discuss the role of dealers in the new legislation.

CleanTech Talk
Pros & Cons of EV & PHEV Subsidies in Inflation Reduction Act

CleanTech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 24:56


CleanTechnica's Zach Shahan, Jo Borras, and Steve Hanley discuss the EV and PHEV subsidies in the Inflation Reduction Act, including their various pros & cons. They also discuss the role of dealers in the new legislation.

Cars The Podcast
Chevy Duramax hidden fix. GM LS V8 a genius of simplicity. Subsidies a waste of money? Hybrid & PHEV overlooked in rush to Electric? Analogy of energy density in popular fuels. Stellantis and Toyota stubbornly smart?

Cars The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 34:58


Bill stumbled upon an easy fix to Duramax diesel woes on 3,000 mile towing trip. American simplicity of the pushrod V8. The rush to all EV is overlooking the brilliance of PHEVs and the complementary benefits of having both in a vehicle. Stellantis and Toyota's stubborn adherence to internal combustion is gaining traction amongst others in the industry. Public EV charging pitfalls are being ignored by those who are making decisions but not forced to deal with them.

TIME's Top Stories
What Experts Say About How Valuable The Inflation Reduction Act's Green Subsidies Will Be

TIME's Top Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 4:53


The climate bill aims to help lower-income Americans electrify their homes and cars. Here's why experts say it will work

TIME's The Brief
What Experts Say About How Valuable The Inflation Reduction Act's Green Subsidies Will Be... and More Stories

TIME's The Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 21:39


Included in this episode: 1. What Experts Say About How Valuable The Inflation Reduction Act's Green Subsidies Will Be 2. Board Diversity Is Sacrificed When Companies Underperform, Study Finds 3. Polio Is Now in NYC's Sewage, Suggesting That the Virus Is Circulating 4. Column: In A War of Ideas, Censorship Is A Lousy One .

CRUSADE Channel Previews
The Barrett Brief – Do You Know How Many EV’s Qualify For New Subsidies?

CRUSADE Channel Previews

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 10:59


The Barrett Brief - Do You Know How Many EV's Qualify For New Subsidies? Here is what is happening today in the Brief. - First, Do You Know How Many EV's Qualify For New Subsidies? Second Media Bias Fact Check  Next The complete Sovietization of the Democrat party Third Indiana Faces Corporate Backlash to Its New Abortion Law Fourth Turley: Time for a "NATO" of red states to combat progressive boycotts Also Coral Levels In Parts of Australia's Famed Great Barrier Reef Highest in Decades Don't forget The Lightning Brief!  Finally don't forget the world famous "you gotta be kidding me" Our Readers And Listeners Keep Us In Print & On The Air! Click here to subscribe to The CRUSADE Channel's Founders Pass Member Service & Gain 24/7 Access to Our Premium, New Talk Radio Service. www.crusadechannel.com/go What Is The Crusade Channel? The CRUSADE Channel, The Last LIVE! Radio Station Standing begins our LIVE programming day with our all original CRUSADE Channel News hosted by award winning,  25 year news veteran Janet Huxley. Followed by LIVE! From London, “The Early Show with Fiorella Nash & Friends. With the morning drive time beginning we bring out the heavy artillery The Mike Church Show! The longest running, continual, long form radio talk show in the world at the tender age of 30 years young! Our broadcast day progresses into lunch, hang out with The Barrett Brief Show hosted by Rick Barrett “giving you the news of the day and the narrative that will follow”. Then Kennedy Hall and The Kennedy Profession drives your afternoon by “applying Natural Law to an unnatural world”!    The CRUSADE Channel also features Reconquest with Brother André Marie, The Fiorella Files Book Review Show, The Frontlines With Joe & Joe and your favorite radio classics like Suspense! and CBS Radio Mystery Theater. We've interviewed hundreds of guests, seen Brother Andre Marie notch his 200th broadcast of Reconquest; The Mike Church Show over 1500 episodes; launched an original LIVE! News Service; written and produced 4 Feature Length original dramas including The Last Confession of Sherlock Holmes and set sail on the coolest radio product ever, the 5 Minute Mysteries series! Combined with our best in the business LIVE! Coverage of every major political/cultural event of the last 6 years including Brexit, Trump's Election, Administration events, shampeachment, the CoronaDoom™, the 2020 Election and resulting Biden Regime's Coup d;'tat, January 6th Psy-op and now the attempt to make Russia and Vladimir Putin out as the new Hitler and his Germany. "When News Breaks Out, We Break In!" because we truly are:   The Last, Live, Radio Station, Standing.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Washington Loves EVs...and Carveouts

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 9:16


If there is anything Washington loves right now, it's subsidies for electric vehicles. But there is a big problem with EV subsidies in the recently passed Senate bill that will make it difficult for people to take advantage of them. Politico's Alex Daugherty has details on why bureaucrats' even greater love of carveouts might be the saviors of a big piece of the green energy transition.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tech Refactored
Understanding Broadband Subsidies Under the NTIA's BEAD Program

Tech Refactored

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 33:19 Transcription Available


Gus is joined by Kristian Stout, the Director of Innovation Policy at the International Center for Law & Economics. An expert in telecommunications and Internet governance, Kristian provides insight into the Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment (BEAD) Program, as he and Gus discuss the challenges of connectivity, how the program is being implemented, and weigh in on the good, bad, and the ugly. For a deeper dive into the Broadband Map Project discussed in this episode, check out our previously released episode with Sarah Oh Lam, “Mapping Broadband Connections Across America.” As mentioned in this episode, you can find Kristian's “Guiding Principles & Legislative Checklist for Broadband Subsidies” here. Kristian Stout is the ICLE's Director of Innovation Policy. Kristian has been a Fellow at the Internet Law & Policy Foundry, as well as the Eagleton Institute of Politics. Prior to practicing law, Kristian was a technology entrepreneur and a lecturer in the Computer Science Department at Rutgers University. Kristian has also served on the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee for the Federal Communications Commission.Follow Kristian on Twitter: @kristianstout Links  Nebraska Governance and Technology Center

Cincinnati Edition
Millions of people could lose their insurance if ARPA premium subsidy expires

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 23:22


Congress is considering a massive tax and health care bill that could extend the subsidy.

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2022-07-30

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 120:41


Inflation, Recession :: Recession Definition :: Biden Wide-Eyed :: Food Crisis? :: Jerome :: Fake Small Government Caller :: Locavores :: Farm Regulations and Subsidies :: 40% of Restaurants Closing? :: Show: 2022-07-30 Ian, Captain Kickass, Peakless Mountaineer

Free Talk Live
Free Talk Live 2022-07-30

Free Talk Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 120:26


Inflation, Recession :: Recession Definition :: Biden Wide-Eyed :: Food Crisis? :: Jerome :: Fake Small Government Caller :: Locavores :: Farm Regulations and Subsidies :: 40% of Restaurants Closing? :: Show: 2022-07-30 Ian, Captain Kickass, Peakless Mountaineer

Chicks on the Right Podcast
Nancy Pelosi's husband buys millions in computer chip stocks before big subsidy vote

Chicks on the Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 4:06


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.