Podcasts about Northern Virginia

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,183PODCASTS
  • 2,170EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 6, 2022LATEST
Northern Virginia

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Northern Virginia

Show all podcasts related to northern virginia

Latest podcast episodes about Northern Virginia

Space Brains
Ep.85 – Minority Report

Space Brains

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 130:43


Minority Report Minority Report is a 2002 American science fiction action film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the 1956 short story "The Minority Report" by Philip K. Dick. The film is set in Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia in the year 2054, where Precrime, a specialized police department, apprehends criminals based on foreknowledge provided by three psychics called "precogs". The cast stars Tom Cruise as Precrime Chief John Anderton, Colin Farrell as Department of Justice agent Danny Witwer, Samantha Morton as precog Agatha Lively, and Max von Sydow as Precrime director Lamar Burgess. In this episode we discuss futurism, visual effects and technology in the film. We talk a bit about how large companies making smart decisions can still fail (we're looking at you Nokia). On the science front we look at the real science of predicting crime and the history of data driven policing. To Hear the Episode: https://gravityundone.net/episode-85-minority-report/ For all other Space Brains Episodes: https://spacebrains.com.au/ Contact us: Space Brains Podcast (@spacebrainspodcast) Space Brains Podcast - Home spacebrains@spacebrains.com.au Space Brains is recorded in Mandurah, Western Australia. Visit: https://gravityundone.net/ https://www.markregan.com.au/  https://spacebrains.com.au/

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
2022 Alzheimer's Awareness with Joy Keys

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 28:00


Special Guest:  Dr. Kyra S. O'Brien grew up in Northern Virginia and received her bachelor's of science in biology from Yale University. She received her medical degree from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and stayed to complete her internal medicine internship and neurology residency training at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focus during medical school and residency aimed to characterize the clinical syndrome of primary age-related tauopathy and identify its potential genetic risk factors. As a clinical fellow at the Penn Memory Center, she hopes to focus her research on improving access to and quality of care within community practices for patients with Alzheimer's dementia. She is excited to gain more experience with clinical trials and looks forward to working with the staff, patients and caregivers at the Penn Memory Center.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
August 5, 2022: Albemarle Supervisors endorse Rio Road Corridor plan; Charlottesville seeks input on next Police Chief

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 21:06


What recourse do we have except to simply pursue this August 5 in the best manner possible? On this Blogger Day, I celebrate with another installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement, a newsletter and podcast intended to shed light on various happenings in and around the area. I’m the writer and host, Sean Tubbs. What are you writing these days? Sign-up for free, but paid subscriptions come with benefits and the satisfaction you’re helping pay for the PACER bills! Ting will match. See below! On today’s program: The former Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County has been sentenced to three months in federal prison for attempted witness tamperingUnemployment drops to pre-pandemic levelsCharlottesville seeks input on what kind of person should be the next police chiefAlbemarle Supervisors endorse a pan for improvements on Rio Road but one member says that doesn’t mean final decisions have been madeCharlottesville City Council is briefed on the preparation for the next fiscal year First shout-out goes to the Charlottesville Jazz Society In today’s first subscriber supported public service announcement, are you looking for something new to listen to in the form of live music? The Charlottesville Jazz Society has you covered with an ongoing list of dozens of events coming up at venues across the area. That ranges from rumba guitar duo Berta & Vincent at Glass House Winery this Saturday afternoon to the Charles Owen Trio at Potter’s Craft Cider on Saturday, August 28. The Charlottesville Jazz Society is your source to plot out your musical journey and you can get started at cvillejazz.org. Thanks to a subscriber for being on both Patreon and Substack to qualify for this shout-out.Greene’s former Commissioner of Revenue sentenced in witness tampering caseThe former Commissioner of Revenue in Greene County has been sentenced to three months in federal prison for intervening in an investigation of his son’s drug distribution charges. Larry Snow, 73, pleaded guilty in May to one count of attempted witness tampering for trying to dissuade a confidential informant. “According to court documents, Larry Snow used his access as the former Commissioner of Revenue to a Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) database as part of an effort to retaliate against and tamper with the confidential informant, Person A, after Person A aided law enforcement in controlled purchases of methamphetamine and heroin from Bryant Snow,” according to a release from the United State Attorney for Western District of Virginia. Specifically, the elder Snow sought to print out material identifying the informant for his son to use to intimidate and to discredit that person while incarcerated at Central Virginia Regional Jail. Snow resigned in May 2022 as Commissioner of the Revenue in Greene, having been elected in 2019 while under indictment. National employment returns to pre-pandemic levelsThere were 528,000 nonfarm jobs added across the United States of America in July, according to the latest employment figures released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate is at 3.5 percent. “Both total nonfarm employment and the unemployment rate have returned to their February 2020 pre-pandemic levels,” reads a release that was sent out this morning. The report also notes that the number of permanent job losers is now lower than February 2020. The long-term unemployed is defined as those jobless for more than 27 weeks, and that figure is also below pre-pandemic levels. Other statistics in the release are worth noting. In July, 7.1 percent of the workforce continued to telecommute due to the pandemic. The labor force participation rate is defined as “the percentage of the civilian noninstitutional population 16 years and older that is working or actively looking for work.” That figure was at 62.1 percent in July, lower than the February 2020 figure of 63.4 percent. The next employment numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics will be out September 2. Charlottesville seeking input on police chief searchHow much experience should the next Charlottesville Police Chief have? What leadership qualities would you like to see? What should the police department leader’s top priority be?Those are some of the questions in a survey that the firm POLIHIRE is conducting as part of their contract to conduct a search for the next chief. The survey is open through August 15 and is available in English and Spanish. (fill out the survey)The person hired will replace Acting Chief of Police LaTroy A. Durrette who has been in the position since former City Manager Chip Boyles fired RaShall Brackney after three years on the job. Brackney sued the city and several individuals for race, color, and gender discrimination, as well as interference with contract, unlawful retaliation, violation of the state’s whistleblower statute, and more. According to a series of waivers filed in the case, all defendants have until sixty days after July 1 to respond to the case. Albemarle Supervisors endorse Rio Road Corridor PlanThe Albemarle Board of Supervisors has officially endorsed a plan that offers guidance for how future intersection improvements on Rio Road may look in the future. “This is a planning level document that establishes a vision for improvements along the corridor with sufficient analysis of the conceptual design to understand whether the proposed concepts can address future and existing conditions and can meet [Virginia Department of Transportation] and other relevant engineering standards,” said David Benish, development process manager for Albemarle County. The county hired the civil engineering firm Line + Grade to develop the plans. Supervisors were last briefed on the work last October and the Planning Commission saw the draft in May. The work was split into two sections to reflect two different roadway characters. “Phase one is very much an arterial roadway [with] five lanes with a continuous left-hand turn lane in the middle,”  said Dan Hyer with Line + Grade. “Whereas phase two still resembles in many locations the local collector that it is. It’s very much a local road.” Hyer said the work involved analyzing crash data such as at the intersection of Hillsdale Drive and Rio Road. Eighty-nine percent of crashes at the location are left-hand turns. As such, recommended changes are to eliminate that movement at Hillsdale, Old Brook and Northfield. “The solution that we have recommended basically absolves all left-hand turn movements by replacing the two intersections with a singular dog-bone or bean-shaped roundabout,” Hyer said.  Belvedere Drive and Rio Road would be turned into a “Continuous Green-T” intersection and Albemarle has applied for funding. A roundabout is funded at John Warner Parkway and Rio Road and that will soon get under design. The second phase of the project is broken into three segments, with the northern one including two planned developments. The Board of Supervisors approved the 328 Rio Point apartment complex last December, and an application has been filed for 43 town homes just to the south in a project called Rio Commons. “And we think that if those developments can work with this plan that the corridor can transform in a positive way and that some of the risks that we’ve identified can be mitigated through the build-out of these developments,” Hyer said. Supervisor Ned Gallaway of the Rio District was the lone vote against the Rio Point development last December. He said he was concerned about more people in the area.“As we approve the sidewalks and the access down to the Parkway, we’re only creating more pedestrian activity and that’s going to introduce a vehicular piece which is going to be really dangerous so I think we need to get our heads around that sooner rather than later,” Gallaway said.Gallaway said his endorsement of the plan did not mean that he supported the specific recommendations involved. He said there is a competing plan to reroute Hillsdale Drive that would take away the need for the bean-shaped roundabout. “We know that that intersection is completely problematic and needs a solution but it just may not be the solution that’s in the study so if we vote to approve the study, it doesn’t mean we’re necessarily voting to approve that project,” Gallaway said. As for phase two, Gallaway said he would like to see more traffic calming to slow down the speed of traffic, similar to the bump-outs on Park Street in the City of Charlottesville between the U.S. 250 bypass and downtown. Gallaway said he was grateful staff was able to work to get the corridor study done. The vote to endorse the plan was unanimous and it will now be considered as part of the update of the Albemarle County Comprehensive Plan, otherwise known as AC44.Second shout-out: Save the date for Rivanna Conservation Alliance’s Community Watershed clean-upIn today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: Mark your calendar for RCA’s third annual Rivanna River Round-Up community watershed cleanup coming up on Saturday, September 24. The RCA organized the first round-up in September 2020 as a safe way for the community to give back to the river during the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last two years, a total of 245 volunteers have cleaned up 67 miles of streams, nearby trails and the Rivanna River, removing 192 tires and 213 large bags of trash from the waterways. Details will soon be made available and you can get those by signing up for the Rivanna Conservation Alliance newsletter at rivannariver.org. You can get your own shout-out for a $25 a month Patreon contribution! For more information, visit Information Charlottesville.Charlottesville City Council briefed on planning for next year’s budget Fiscal Year 2023 is just over a month old, but the budget process in Virginia never really stops as local governments seek to provide services. In April, Council adopted a $212.9 million general fund budget that was 10.76 percent higher than the one for the year before. That’s built on increased assessments for both real estate and personal property as well as a one-cent increase in the real estate tax rate. That was the first such increase in several decades. There are about 30 weeks until whoever is City Manager in March 2023 presents a recommended budget and 36 weeks until Council is expected to adopt their amended document. Council got a briefing this past Monday and learned about some of the factors coming up and some suggested the schedule be moved up. (view the presentation)Will the budget continue to grow at a double-digit level, or will it be more modest? How much will it cost to implement pay and benefit increases that may come through a collective bargaining ordinance? What about the cost of inflation? While the answers aren’t yet known, the foundation is being laid for whatever will end up happening. At the end of August, city departments will be sent packets to request funds for capital projects and these will be due by the early October. There’s at least one change to that process.“We’re going to include a Planning Commission member on the review team,” said Krissy Hammill, the city’s director of budget and performance analysis.Requests from nonprofits and outside agencies are due sometime in mid-October and recommendations from the Vibrant Community team will be completed in mid-January. Also around that time will be another change to the budget process.“It’s called the city manager budget forum,” Hammill said. “The date for this will be January 10 and it will be held at Carver Recreation Center. This will be an opportunity for the city manager to make a presentation and to engage in public discussion.”Hammill said the growth in the budget for next year is expected to be more modest than the 10.76 percent increase from FY22 to FY23. She’s also keeping an eye on inflation.“We already know that there are cost increases that we’re seeing both just in general things as well as capital projects due to supply chain issues and inflation,” Hammill said. “We’re not sure of what exactly what the revenue impact would be for a potential recession if there to be one.” There will likely be higher compensation costs for city employees due to collective bargaining as well as a need to carry on the ongoing costs of positions funded using one-time money. Between now and the budget adoption, Council may have an updated strategic plan paid for through the city’s use of American Rescue Plan Act funding. “The time is right,” said interim City Manager Michael C. Rogers. “In doing the strategic plan right, we’ll get a consultant to engage you individually and collectively over the next few months and by the time we get to April, we ought to have a new direction or at least some themes.”City Councilor Michael Payne said he wanted to make sure there is funding to address a human resources phenomenon known as compression, funding for climate, and for city investment in nonprofits to build subsidized housing. “How can we get our adopted Affordable Housing Plan and that $10 million a year into a more stable place in terms of how we’ll fund it at $10 million a year which is what the plan calls for,” Payne said. Payne also wants to make sure there is funding to invest in public transportation. Rogers said a compensation study is expected to be completed by the end of the year. “That will tell us where we are compared to other jurisdictions in the region in terms of our salaries,” Rogers said. “It will define a competitiveness gap.”The Fluvanna County Board of Supervisors were briefed on their compensation study on Wednesday. Rogers said the August 15 Council work session will feature a presentation of the collective bargaining ordinance followed by a first reading on September 6 with adoption currently anticipated on September 19. “And we expect that there will be a push to begin to recognize collective bargaining units after that,” Rogers said. Another direction to budget staff is to reexamine a policy where 40 percent of new revenues created by additional real estate taxes goes to Charlottesville City Schools. Some on the current Council have called for that agreement to be revisited, and Rogers said budget staff would look into it and begin preliminary discussions with the school system.“And at some point the Council probably should have that meeting with schools to discuss an issue like this,” Rogers said.As for increased spending on public transit, Rogers said current planning by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District is relevant. A governance study for how to implement a proposed Regional Transit Vision is about to get underway.“The long term play is probably the discussion about a regional transit agency, and what are the dynamics that need to be in place for us to move that forward,” Rogers said. “It’s been talked about a long time.” The current calendar calls for the second public hearing on the budget to be held on April 3, 2023 and for adoption at a special meeting on April 11. City Councilor Sena Magill said she wanted to adjust the schedule so that the final public hearing does not happen during the week City Schools are on spring break. “And it’s just one more way that it makes it harder for some people to serve on Council,” Magill said. Charlottesville Mayor Lloyd Snook said he would like to see the budget process moved up further so that Council could have more influence. The budget is introduced to the public the first week of every March. “There are places, particularly in Northern Virginia, where Council is involved in budget discussions by mid-December,” Snook said. “They’re not waiting until February or March and the practical effect of what we do is that our opportunity for actually commenting on things is compressed into about four weeks.” Snook said he would like to see the budget introduced in early February. Rogers said he would look into seeing if that could be accomplished, but it would leave for no break at all for budget staff. Hammill suggested holding budget development work sessions when needed. One such work session that comes to mind is the one last September when Council signaled its willingness to transfer a financial commitment for the West Main Streetscape toward school reconfiguration. That gave staff direction as they built the FY23 budget.Payne pointed out that Albemarle County has adopted their budget in May for the past two years. Rogers and Hammill said they would return with more options. For all of my stories on the budget process in Charlottesville, visit Information Charlottesville.Housekeeping notes for edition #416When will the next installment of Charlottesville Community Engagement? Good question. I can tell you there will be a Week Ahead out on Sunday as well as the Government Glance which is a look at what’s coming up in all of the localities across the Fifth Congressional District of Virginia. Reporting for today’s installment included a look-up on the Public Access to Court Electronic Records to learn a little more about the lawsuit filed by the former Police Chief. Today’s search only cost $2, but this is the kind of cost it takes to produce informational content that intends to keep you up to date. So, if you’re like to support this program which includes expenses like court reporting, consider a paid subscription through Substack. If do so, Ting will match your initial payment! And, if you sign up for their services through this link you’ll get a free standard install, your 2nd month free, and a $75 downtown mall gift card! Enter the promo code COMMUNITY for full effect. Music comes from the D.C. entity that currently goes by the name Wraki, selected randomly from a bin of basement-recorded cassette tapes. You can support that work by purchasing the album Regret Everything for whatever you would like to pay. Now, off to prepare for a trip to a different location in which I will continue to produce a couple editions of Charlottesville Community Engagement. It’s my pleasure to do so and I do hope you will help support me to keep this going for a long time come. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Match Week 1 - The News

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 27:29


This summer has seen many comings and goings for the clubs in England. Many new faces at the clubs across the spectrum in the Premier League. This episode of RCR will recap the major transfer activity from some of the Premier League teams this season. The primary focus of this conversations was into the transfer business of the Big Six clubs in England. Sean provided the mid season Formula 1 update. This is the new format for Red Card Radio. Wednesday mornings the Review episode will release, Thursday morning will bring The News, and Friday morning the Boys will preview the slate of games coming up at the weekend. Give us your feed back about what you like and what you hate. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Brad: https://twitter.com/KSBradG​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Match Week 1 - Review Show

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:28


Its been roughly 12 weeks since Premier League games have taken place; this week that ends. In this episode of RCR, Brad, Sean and James review the Premier League from 2021-2022. If you've been a listener of RCR for some time, this may seem like a repeat of information, but hopefully this will get you primed with all the story threads from 21/22. This is the new format for Red Card Radio. Wednesday mornings the Review episode will release, Thursday morning will bring The News, and Friday morning the Boys will preview the slate of games coming up at the weekend. Give us your feed back about what you like and what you hate. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Brad: https://twitter.com/KSBradG​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Make Life Less Difficult
An Intense Rollercoaster of Life Events & the Resulting Wisdom with Lee Self

Make Life Less Difficult

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 62:24


My guest today is Lee Self.I was introduced to Lee by Ellen Grealish of FlexProfessionals who was my guest on episode 52. After connecting with Lee, we realized we also have a mutual friend in Brenda Harrington, my guest on episode 7 (and soon to be returning to talk about her new book!).Lee is the CEO of Executive Forums in Northern Virginia.  She is an Executive Peer Group Facilitator, Leadership Developer, and Business Advisor helping CEOs connect, learn & grow together...  Lee also has extensive experience in the communications industry working for Verizon and Web.com before beginning her work with Executive Forums.Lee's personal journey is perhaps most easily described as an intense rollercoaster ride.  The ups and downs are gripping and how Lee has journeyed and learned through everything is nothing less than inspiring.  In our conversation today, Lee shares the story of discovering her husband was an alcoholic, finding her own health in the midst of incredible turbulence, her husband's sobriety story and reuniting of their relationship, then to be faced with his terminal diagnosis and death, followed by her son's tumultuous journey through addiction and recovery.Lee shares how she has learned to take care of herself as a foundational life and survival skill, getting her hands out of other people's business, and how her faith and spiritual life have made all these difficulties a little less difficult.Lee, thank you so much for sharing these pieces of your journey.  You offer so much wisdom and inspiration to us and to so many others in the world! Make Life Less Difficult

Dr. Joe Galati Podcast
#COVID19 Update

Dr. Joe Galati Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 26:13


This week on Your Health First, Dr. Sam Pappas, an Internal Medicine physician in Northern Virginia, talks with Dr. Galati about the latest in Covid-19 care.Since the start of the pandemic, Dr. Pappas has been aggressive in managing his outpatients with Covid-19, making use of a wide variety of therapies.Where to find Dr. Joe Galati and his team:Dr. Galati's newsletter sign-upMedical Practice: Liver Specialists of TexasDr. Galati's Book Site: Eating Yourself SickFacebook: Dr. Joe GalatiDr. Galati's YouTube ChannelPlease send feedback and suggestion. You can message me here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Krisha & Frank Show
Frank & Friends Show 0070

Krisha & Frank Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:55


Frank Murphy's friend Jeff Detrow is today's co-host. Jeff had a long and successful radio career in San Diego on KFMB, KKLQ, and KYXY. The Jeff & Jer Showgram was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 2016. https://www.radiohalloffame.com/the-jeff-jer-showgram  Jeff points out that Frank's red gingham shirt is another one purchased at an estate sale. It's one of ten shirts that belonged to the father of Eddie Mannis. Jeff pretends to use a Frank & Friends Show beach towel as a shirt, prompting Frank to make sure there is a wraparound logo shirt available in the online merch store.  Frank has several boxes of his dad's Kodak slides. He promised his sisters he would digitize the images. Frank finally bought a mid-range slide scanner after a period of indecisiveness known as “paralysis by analysis.” Frank signed up for another Google account in order to store the photos online and use their automatic photo retouching.  Frank watched YouTube reviews to help him decide which scanner to buy. Jeff is amazed by the high number of product reviews on Amazon. Frank says the gold standard of Amazon product reviews used to be those written about the Hutzler Banana Slicer. https://www.amazon.com/Hutzler-571-Banana-Slicer/product-reviews/B0047E0EII  Frank and his wife Jere drove Artie Rocket home to Northern Virginia and then stayed for three nights at a cheap motel nearby. The lobby was closed, causing Frank and Jere to go to the motel next door to check in and get their key. The motel's promotional photos differed from reality. The pool was closed. The free breakfast had been discontinued. There were cigarette burns on the bathroom sink. Frank removed some hair from the shower drain before realizing it wasn't his or Jere's hair.  Jeff thinks the shower drain story was gross. Frank follows up with the story of how “Jere the Brave” got her nickname. Frank and Jere were staying at a different cheap motel directly across the street from their most recent visit. Jere solved a toilet problem by using the straw from a Super Big Gulp.  Jeff reads some reviews of bad hotels on Yelp. One room had no cold water and a clogged sink. The floor was littered with floss picks. The jacuzzi was the color of chicken soup. Jeff reads a one-star review of a hotel room in Paris over a cheery music bed called “Gaiety in the Golden Age” by Aaron Kenny.  This episode is sponsored by BoneZones.com (don't forget the S). Buy books and other merchandise autographed by Body Farm founder Dr. Bill Bass at https://bonezones.com/  Support the Frank & Friends Show by purchasing some of our high-quality merchandise at https://frank-friends-show.creator-spring.com  Sign up for a 30-day trial of Audible Premium Plus and get a free premium selection that's yours to keep. Go to http://AudibleTrial.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  Find us online https://www.FrankAndFriendsShow.com/  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at https://YouTube.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  and hit the bell for notifications.  Find the audio of the show on major podcast apps including Spotify, Apple, Google, iHeart, and Audible.  Find us on social media:  https://www.facebook.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.instagram.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.twitter.com/FrankNFriendsSh  Thanks!

Just A Thought
No One Comes To College To Fail!

Just A Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 47:57


Emeka and I would like to start by thanking you all for joining us on this journey with Catalyst:ed as we unpacked some of the key areas impacting colleges/universities in the United States. There are countless barriers that negatively impact potential and current students on a systemic level, and through this work we've unpacked how institutions can work actively to ensure that students feel safe, seen, heard, honored, and supported throughout enrollment. On our final episode, we have the privilege of speaking with some of the dopest people uplifting academia, as they help us to better understand the role of academic advising and student support services, and provide us with creative ideas on how to support students from historically excluded communities who are most impacted when services don't meet them at the intersection of their identities and lived experiences. The Guests: Melinda Anderson, Ed.D. Melinda J. Anderson has worked in academic and student affairs in higher education for more than 20 years. Her leadership skills coupled with her passion and commitment to student success – especially in the areas of student transitions, persistence, and retention – have propelled her to the helm of a worldwide academic association. In July 2021, Dr. Anderson was appointed Executive Director of NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising, which serves more than 15,000 members globally. As NACADA Executive Director, Anderson is responsible for directing all the Association's initiatives including its strategic efforts, professional development for members, programming, content creation, enhancing NACADA's consulting services, member engagement and growth, and defining its research agenda. In addition, Anderson holds a teaching position in the Kansas State University College of Education's Leadership in Academic Advising doctoral program. Dr. Anderson graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University with a bachelor's degree in Mass Communication and a Master's in Adult Education. She earned her doctorate in Higher Education Administration from the College of William and Mary. Originally from Northern Virginia, Anderson currently resides in Manhattan, Kansas. Kayla Nelson Kayla Nelson is a Psychology major with a concentration in Child and Family studies pursuing double minors in Sociology and Women/Gender studies. As a junior at Roosevelt University, she enjoys spending time being involved in campus programs such as the McNair Scholars Program, the Mansfield Fellowship Program, SSS STEM, MCTC, and CASSAC. She hopes to further her education and one day become a therapist for children and adolescents. Carl Hunter Carl Hunter is the Assistant Director of Student Equity and Inclusion at Roosevelt University. His schooling includes a B.S. The emphasis in History, a Minor in Ethnic Studies from Illinois State University and is currently enrolled in the M.A. Conflict and Mediation program here at Roosevelt. Carl is an experienced higher education administrator, leader, motivator, and mentor who is dedicated to ensuring that students reach their highest level of success. His compassion and love for people is what drive his passion for educational success. His motivation is inspired by an “Operating with Excellence” attitude and lifestyle which he pursues daily. He is excited to be a part of this awesome orientation team again and he's grateful to see all the wonderful new students in person this year. Fun fact: I am a first-generation college student --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/just-a-thought-el/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/just-a-thought-el/support

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
192: What Happens When Medical Teams Care for Each Other with Dr. Natasha W. Lewry Beauvais

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 28:12


 “If we really focus on good care for each other, we are in a much better position to offer good care for the patients. ” - Dr. Natasha W. L Beauvais MD, MPH   What happens in a medical organization when the healthcare team learns how to care for each other, and how does that impact job satisfaction and patient care? How does it impact employee retention? Cohost Dr. Jen Barna talks with Dr. Natasha W. Lewry Beauvais MD, MPH about her practice and implementation of programs that do just that.  As a physician at Northern Virginia Family Practice Associates, a concierge medical practice, Dr. Beauvais shares how her practice has established their positive workplace culture by first recognizing what you can do to make those around you succeed. By asking what you may do to support your coworkers, Dr. Beauvais and Dr. Barna talk about the importance of maintaining high levels of trust throughout your team and how to perpetuate the want to care for your teammates and how that leads to better patient care. How does this approach lead to a shift in mindset so that you may find more joy practicing medicine with those around you?   Book mentioned in the podcast: What Got You Here Won't Get You Here by Marshall Goldsmith Natasha W. Lewry Beauvais, MD, MPH is a physician at Northern Virginia Family Practice Associates (NVFP), a family medicine practice that offers full-service concierge health care in the Northern Virginia area. With more than 16 years of professional experience, Dr. Beauvais understands the importance of providing care for the whole family through every stage of life and values the continuation of long-term patient care.    Dr. Beauvais specializes in serving teenagers, new mothers and those requiring end-of-life care services. A home-birth advocate who has personally experienced home birth herself, she cares for women throughout pregnancy, birth and beyond, helping them connect with their newborns and providing them with breastfeeding support.    In her experience, the early stage of the parent-child connection is a pivotal moment for children's continued growth and wellbeing, especially during the young adult period. In addition to providing resources for families, she encourages parents to keep up with their children's yearly check-ins to help develop a stronger doctor-patient relationship so kids can stay educated about their health and feel supported by their doctors as they grow.   Prior to joining NVFP, Dr. Beauvais served as a physician at Unity Health Care in Washington D.C. and co-founded the Women's Mentoring Program for the American Medical Women's Association. She has received the Joseph Collins Award for Excellence in Arts and Letters and the University of Connecticut Family Medicine Award. Dr. Beauvais holds a Bachelor of Arts in American studies and science from Yale University, as well as a Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. She completed her residency in family medicine at SUNY Stony Brook and Mount Sinai School of Medicine's Jamaica Hospital Family Practice Residency in New York City. After work, Dr. Beauvais enjoys taking family hikes and gardening. She currently lives in Alexandria with her husband and four children. For more information, please visit www.nvafamilypractice.com.       Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  The past few weeks have been busy at DocWorking! We have been working behind the scenes to add even more CME credits to the THRIVE memberships.    Let your CME budget help you prioritize your own wellness so you can get on with living your best life on your own terms, as defined by you, with DocWorking THRIVE.   You can take the first step today by taking our 2 Minute Balance to Burnout Quiz! Where are you on the Balance to Burnout Continuum? Take the quiz and find out today!   DocWorking empowers physicians and entire health care teams to get on the path to achieving their dreams, both in and outside of work, with programs designed to help you maximize life with minimal time.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda Taran, our producer, at podcast@docworking.com to be considered.   And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful!   We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, Stitcher, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean   You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast!   Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Mara Heppard

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Preseason 7- Sheets of Integrity!

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 72:34


The Premier League season is almost upon us, which means its time for the RCR boys to get some predictions plastered in stone. The boys predicted their table 1 to 20, golden boot, and golden glove. Feel free to join our discord via the link below and share your predictions as well. Next week, the new format for Red Card Radio will debut. Give us your feed back about what you like and what you hate. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Joel: https://twitter.com/JoelFindlay16​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Faces of TBI
The Miracle Child: Traumatic Brain Injury and Me w/ Mike and Kelly Lang

Faces of TBI

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 37:00


Kelly Lang, co-author of The Miracle Child: Traumatic Brain Injury and Me is a brain injury survivor and caregiver to her daughter who sustained a traumatic brain injury in 2001. Kelly is a member of the Brain Injury Association of America's Advisory Council, serves on the Virginia Brain Injury Advisory Council, is co-leader of The TBI Advisory and Leadership Group, and former faculty member of the National Center for Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems (NCAPPS) Brain Injury Learning Collaborative. Kelly has presented at several conferences and webinars including the Administration for Community Living Stakeholder Day, association conferences, universities, and many others. Michael Lang is a vice president of a national association and his work includes written and published articles, guides, and manuals in the fields of transportation and the chemical industry. Michael is a featured speaker and presenter in various associations and organizations in the areas of environment, health, safety, security, and sustainability. He also serves on the board of a financial institution. Michael and Kelly live with their daughters, Olivia and Anya in Northern Virginia, while their eldest daughter Hannah also lives in the metropolitan area. www.themiraclechild.org   Brought to you by Integrated Brain Centers Please consider supporting the podcast with a $5 Patreon membership.

LaughBox
Episode 84, AATH Interviews Dutch Martin about Comedy, Yoga, NLP, Hypnosis and DOD

LaughBox

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 47:41


Jim-Bob Williams and Katy BEE interview Dutch Martin this month about his history as a comedian and all of his other amazing talents.  Dutch Martin is in year 2 of the Humor Academy and started out running! He has studied improv, and taken many stand up classes and even added some humor to his yoga classes! He is a talented DOD professional in Northern Virginia, as well as a licensed hypnotist, yoga instructor, NLP practitioner (almost) and a great stand up comedian with an international way of looking at life. 

My Favorite Detective Stories
Sherry Harris | My Favorite Detective Stories Episode 171

My Favorite Detective Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 48:01


Sherry Harris is the Agatha Award nominated author of the Sarah Winston Garage Sale mystery series and the Chloe Jackson Sea Glass Saloon mysteries. Sherry is a past president of Sisters in Crime, a member of the Chesapeake Chapter of Sisters in Crime, the New England Chapter of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America. Sherry loves books, beaches, bars, and bargain hunting — not necessarily in that order. She is also a patent holding inventor.Sherry and her husband are living in Northern Virginia until they figure out where they want to move to next.https://sherryharrisauthor.com/Today's episode is brought to you by John's full series of crime thrillers available right now. You can get them through Amazon here: https://www.amazon.com/John-A.-Hoda/e/B00BGPXBMM%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share  You can also sign up for the newsletter at http://www.JohnHoda.com to get a free copy of John's new novella Liberty City Nights.Thank you for listening. If you have a moment to spare please leave a rating or comment on Apple Podcasts as that will help us expand the circle around our campfire. If you have any questions please feel to reach out to me via my website http://www.johnhoda.com

Teach Me, Teacher
Being Relentless in Education with Hamish Brewer — Off Season Day 4

Teach Me, Teacher

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 60:16 Very Popular


Hello everyone! This is a re-run of our season 3 finale. Enjoy! From the post: I couldn't be any more excited to bring you none other than Hamish Brewer ! If you don't know who Hamish is, the relentless, tattooed, skateboarding principal in Northern Virginia isn't your normal principal. Hamish is high octane, constantly calling on his students to “Be Relentless. Mr. Brewer has become known as an educational disrupter and game changer who transcends the status quo and typical educational norms. He is known for working with some of the most at risk students in America and getting results, and that's exactly what we discuss in this episode! This is the perfect listen for starting the new school year, because those kids in our schools need us to be excited, they need us to be motivated, and they need us to be our best. Hamish knows how to get it done, and he takes us along for the ride! Enjoy! I want to let you know about a free, virtual, conference for “cool” science educators coming up on August 5th. Its the 9th ScIC Science is Cool unconference. But of course all science teachers are cool so that means everyone is invited! It's called an unconference because they are curated based on teacher feedback and they are actually fun! Produced by the team at PocketLab, these virtual events always have a great line up of amazing speakers to fill the day. At ScIC9 on August 5th, you will hear from Kari Byron of Mythbusters fame, the Biomimicry institute, The national lab for the International Space Station, OpenSciEd, and so many more.   In the past 2 years, these “unconferences” have attracted nearly 100,000 teachers from over 200 countries around the world join. Every event is inspiring, engaging, and full of resources. To sign up for Science is Cool 9- visit thepocketlab.com/scic9 or click right here.       This episode is sponsored by Heinemann—the leading publisher of professional books and resources for educators—and their professional book, Textured Teaching: A Framework for Culturally Sustaining Practices by Lorena Escoto Germán. With Culturally Sustaining Practice as its foundation, Textured Teaching helps secondary teachers stop wondering and guessing how to implement teaching and learning that leads to social justice.  Lorena Germán shares her framework for creating a classroom environment that is highly rigorous and engaging, and that reflects the core traits of Textured Teaching: student-driven and community-centered, interdisciplinary, experiential, and flexible.  The actionable strategies Lorena uses to bring Textured Teaching values to life illuminate what is possible when we welcome all types of texts, all types of voices, and all forms of expression into the classroom. Learn more about how to become a culturally sustaining educator. Visit Heinemann.com to download a sample from Textured Teaching.

Mysteries to Die For
Toe Tag: See You Next Tuesday

Mysteries to Die For

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 50:58


Welcome to Mysteries to Die For: Toe Tags I am TG Wolff and am here with Jack, my piano player and producer. This is normally a podcast where we combine storytelling with original music to put you at the heart of mystery, murder, and mayhem. Today is a bonus episode we call a Toe Tag. It is the first chapter from a fresh release in the mystery, crime, and thriller genre. Today's featured release is SEE YOU NEXT TUESDAY by Ken Harris SEE YOU NEXT TUESDAY was released July 14, 2022 from Black Rose Writing and is available from Amazon and other book retailers. About Ken Harris Ken Harris retired from the FBI, after thirty-two years, as a cybersecurity executive. With over three decades writing intelligence products for senior Government officials, Ken provides unique perspectives on the conventional fast-paced crime thriller. He is the author of the “From the Case Files of Steve Rockfish” series, which include The Pine Barrens Stratagem and the sequel, See You Next Tuesday. He spends days with his wife Nicolita, and two Labradors, Shady and Chalupa Batman. Evenings are spent playing Walkabout Mini Golf and cheering on Philadelphia sports. Ken firmly believes Pink Floyd, Irish whiskey and a Montecristo cigar are the only muses necessary. He is a native of New Jersey and currently resides in Northern Virginia. Find him at https://kenharrisfiction.com/ (https://kenharrisfiction.com/) From July 11-August 5, See You Next Tuesday is on tour with Partners in Crime. Check out the tour link for more content and information https://www.partnersincrimetours.net/see-you-next-tuesday-by-ken-harris/ (https://www.partnersincrimetours.net/see-you-next-tuesday-by-ken-harris/) TG Wolff Review This is a Private Investigator and grift story. The dynamic team of Steve Rochfish and Jawnie McGee tackle their first case as full partners. A line from later in the book gives the perfect synopsis. It's a simple cheating husband case turned into a search and rescue, cult exfiltration and a wild ride that comes back to two old guys getting ripped off. Rating See You Next Tuesday on a 5-point scale against the “perfect PI story”, I give this 5.00. Strengths of the story. By now, you all know I'm hell on logic and Harris lives up to the bar. The actions of all the characters made sense for who they were. Rockfish and McGee drive the story, interfering with the bad guys plans, and the bad guys react, changing plans in a way that both creates unexpected twists and is totally reasonable given the change in their circumstances. Harris thoroughly developed his story, giving his detective material to work with. He worked them into a corner a time or two and let them fight their way out. I liked both lead characters. Rockfish is older and has the mindset and habits that reflect those of us born in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. Jawnie is his counterbalance, rooted in modern times in terms of technology, mindset, and vernacular. While either character could have been stereotypical, neither are and what really makes them work is the mutual respect and affection they have for each other. Where the story fell short of the ideal. The first half of the story alternates between Rockfish's and Jawnie's points of view. As the story progresses, we have scenes written from the POV for their new Confidential Informant Lynn and, later, the bad guys. Information the reader gains here could not come from Rockfish or Jawnie. Often, I am not a fan of changing the storytelling style mid-book, but Harris did them very well. These changes in POV were the reason the logic and the story were able to stand up as strongly as they did. There were a few stylistic elements that were not my favorite but those were certainly personal preferences. Some minor editing misses were found, but not enough to detract from the story. Bottom line: See You Next Tuesday is for you if you like PI's who like to mix it up with the bad guys and refuse to quit—even after the cops tell them too.

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Preseason 6- Big 8?

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 64:34


Everton and Newcastle were so last week, we're moving on to bigger and better things - West Ham United and Leicester. How are these clubs currently composed, what are they looking to do in the transfer market, what should they're expectations be for the upcoming season? Sean has the week off so hear Brad and James figure all this out. The boys also broke down some friendly action that's taken place for Arsenal and Chelsea. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Joel: https://twitter.com/JoelFindlay16​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

The Thriving Farmer Podcast
189. Jordan Green on the Role Children Play in a Farm Business

The Thriving Farmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 57:37


Do your kids want to be a part of your farm? How can you best integrate them into the farming lifestyle?  In today's episode we're hosting Jordan Green, lifelong farmer, owner of FarmBuilder LLC, and co-owner of J & L Green Farm, located in Edinburg, Virginia. FarmBuilder LLC is a consultancy that works with property owners and aspiring farmers to develop farms that sustain communities. J & L Green Farm is a pasture-based, direct-to-retail farm.  Managing 500 acres of beautiful farmland, Jordan and his wife, Laura, started the farm in 2009 and have been steadily growing since then. They raise animals ethically with regenerative/sustainable practices and in harmony with nature. They currently offer grass-fed and grass-finished beef, pasture-raised poultry, and forest-raised pork products. They also collaborate with local farms with the same philosophy to provide farm-fresh eggs, raw milk cheeses, honey, organically grown vegetables, and other farm foods.  In addition to selling through various retail outlets in the greater Virginia area, J & L Green Farm offers nationwide shipping, home delivery, and delivery to drop-sites all over the Northern Virginia area.  Tune in to hear all about how Jordan and his wife manage this thriving farm enterprise!  You'll hear: What J&L Farm is all about 1:40 How Covid impacted the farm's operations 2:29 What prompted Jordan's viral Facebook post about kids on the farm 8:54 The family business Jordan grew up with 13:32 What farmers should do to get their kids involved in the farm but not end up hating it 20:49 How farmers can show their kids a good work/life balance 29:41 How you can teach kids a good work ethic without scaring them off 36:54 How Jordan teaches his kids about what success is 40:17 Jordan's thoughts on microenterprises for kids surrounding the farm 44:02 What Jordan does to ensure he enjoys life on the farm with the kids 45:26 About the Guest:  Jordan Green is the founder of FarmBuilder (2017 – current), co-owner of J & L Green Farm in Edinburg, Virginia (2009 – current), a United States Marine Corps veteran (2004-2009), and graduate of the apprentice program at Polyface Inc. (2001-2002). Prior to that, he grew up on his family's homestead in Virginia and had several successful small farm enterprises. Resources: Website: www.jlgreenfarm.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jlgreenfarm/  Instagram: https://bit.ly/jlgreenfarm    The Thriving Farmer Podcast Team would like to thank our amazing sponsor! At AgriGro®, we know that in today's modern agriculture, our efforts can deplete life or add life. When you look for ways to add life, it's sustainable and makes everything work better. The result is enhanced plant and soil health for crops, gardens, and turf, as well as improved animal health and environment for livestock and wildlife. Our products are all-natural, easy to use, and friendly to the soil, the plant, as well as the grower. AgriGro's® formulations deliver essential plant nutrition along with an advanced prebiotic concentrate, which significantly increases the multitude of beneficial native microbial species already residing in the production environment. Through these environmentally sound technologies, we're adding life to crop production, livestock, home, turf, and wildlife markets. You don't have to be dependent on crop production efforts that deplete life…Just Add Life with AgriGro®.

Transition Virginia
Harry Godfrey: What's next for Virginia's proposed offshore wind farm?

Transition Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 46:10


IN THE NEWS:In the wake of Supreme Court decisions revoking civil rights, Governor Glenn Youngkin claimed that Virginia law protects same-sex marriage--in truth, the state constitution has an anti-gay amendment passed in 2006.Also in the news: Census data shows that Fairfax County is the largest-growing county in the state over the last 50 years, while Norfolk has experienced the most population decline. Still, the prognosis for Northern Virginia's growth is grim, thanks to the cost of housing and the recent rise of telework. Also in the news: States across the country have begun exploring laws to restrict women from seeking out-of-state abortions. Democratic Congresswoman Abigail Spanberger has introduced federal legislation to prevent such laws, but faces Republican opposition.GUEST: Harry Godfrey of Virginia Advanced Energy Economy explains what's next for the offshore wind farm being built off the coast of Virginia Beach. Right now, the State Corporation Commission is deciding on a proposal from Dominion Energy--and the cost controls they'll impose on the project.Learn more at http://linktr.ee/JacklegMediaSponsored by the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia

Eat It, Virginia!
Carl Gupton: Greenswell Growers

Eat It, Virginia!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 40:40


There's a greenhouse in Goochland growing some of the freshest lettuce in town. Greenswell Growers hopes its hydroponically-grown greens can solve a grocery store concern for some shoppers. "We've all been in the grocery store picked up that package of greens and seen that wet, nasty tray in the bottom of it and put it back on the shelf and said, I'm not eating that," Greenswell Growers president Carl Gupton said on the Eat It, Virginia podcast. "The reason is that that was harvested three, four, five, six days ago at a minimum. It's harvested, cool chain there [California or Arizona], traveled across the country, hit a distribution center. It's not just a problem of fresh produce, they've got drought. We've all seen the mega droughts going on in California. It's changing the way that we are consuming. Throw COVID on top of it and the supply chain is broken in a lot of ways for our food system. We talk with some of our food distributors and when they order from the West Coast, they don't know if they're getting 100% of their order, 75% or 50% of their order. What we can do is bring predictable supply and have a product ready for them on demand with a predictable supply model and we know it's good, clean, healthy, fresh produce. That's our goal." You can find Greenswell Growers at several Richmond-area restaurants and at stores like Food Lion and at Harris Teeter stores in Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads. "Hampton Roads has really embraced our product. Richmond has as well," Gupton said. "But we're seeing a lot of movement out in the beach communities, whether it's Outer Banks, whether it's Virginia Beach, or Ocean City through Performance Food Group." Learn more about Greenswell Growers and the process they go through to bring fresh greens from the greenhouse to the table on this week's Eat It, Virginia podcast. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Deni Bonet 7/18/2022

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 74:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: http://youtu.be/C43zR7m5qwE It's no secret that Deni Bonet can rock a violin like nobody's business. Or that she writes memorable songs that make you want to listen again and again and again. For years, Deni has been honing her craft as a violinist, singer, songwriter and performer. She is, simply, a musical total package. Her style ranges from pop to roots-rock to new folk. Anyone who's heard her last few albums, especially the fiery, funny and fabulous Last Girl On Earth, and 2013's It's All Good, knows that Ms. Bonet brings something extra special to the table. With her latest album, Bright Shiny Objects, it extends to sheer, ultra-high voltage, genre-defying brilliance, with pure classical training and precision playing. She has performed at some of the most prestigious festivals, performing arts centers, summer concert series, colleges, clubs and house concerts throughout the US and around the world, including a recent sold-out concert at the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York City, concerts on the Great Wall of China, at the United Nations and at the White House for President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and the First Lady. Yet is still happy to play a stripped-down show in a coffeehouse. Raised in Northern Virginia, Bonet first came to widespread attention as a founding member of National Public Radio's premier music show, Mountain Stagewhere she built a following as a member of the broadcast's house band; singing and playing in her own right and backing up artists as diverse as the Indigo Girls, Richard Thompson and Allen Toussaint. In the nineties, Bonet relocated to London, where she worked with alternative rock legend, Robyn Hitchcock.

The Michael Ostrolenk Show
Christos Galanis on Ritual, Ceremony, and the Sacredness of life

The Michael Ostrolenk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 51:12


Welcome to “The Emergent Human where we explore Optimizing Health, Embodied Spirituality and Post Conventional Living. I am Michael Ostrolenk, a therapist, coach and educator and I am your host Today's show is brought to you by Cosper Scafidi, an amazing body worker in the Northern Virginia area who has integrated different somatic practices into his work. To learn more about his work, visit his website: www.cosperscafidi.com/. A shoutout to my mentor, colleague and friend Stuart Sovatsky, a scholar of kundalini Yoga and author of “Advanced Spiritual Intimacy: The Yoga of Deep Tantric Sensuality” Ostrolenk speaks to Christos Galanis (MFA) who is an interdisciplinary artist and human geographer who has spent the past 15 years or so tracking, and making visible, the various 'spells' through which colonialism, human-supremacism, and narcissism inhabit and inhibit relationships - both individually and culturally. His recently launched business - Kairos - helps clients to integrate more meaning and beauty into their lives through individualised ceremonies and rituals. In addition to his academic publishing, lecturing, and ethnographic field-work, he also brings years of experience teaching workshops on walking, play, performance, kink, and eco-sexuality. A practicing Animist, he is a graduate of Stephen Jenkinson's Orphan Wisdom School, and is completing a PhD from the University of Edinburgh. LINKS: Website: www.christosgalanis.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christmas7 We will close out today's show with one of my favorite singer/song writers Stuart Davis and his song “Nothing in Between”. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdRqCc3LfDI BOOKMARKS: 00:00 Intro 01:30 Christos' life-path, describing a spiritual awakening in his early 20s and a moment of grace one morning 06:30 What led from there to working with ceremony and ritual through Kairos, focusing on humans' capacity for creating beauty 10:30 Describing temporality as medicine and the meaning of time as Kairos, Chronos, and Aion in Greek. 15:15 Christos describes contexts where tuning into Kairos supports significant beginnings, endings, and transitions in life. How to slow down and allow your being to 'catch up' with what has already transpired in your life, where perhaps you didn't have the time and space to properly mark it 22:55 Christos shares the story of a significant rite of passage that he undertook, travelling to Spain to walk a pilgrimage to support the transition of a close family member's spirit who died tragically 26:40 Christos describes how his walking and movement practice is central to his maintaining a link to receiving input from Creation, which then serves as a source for the seeds of ceremonies and rituals. 30:30 Christos uses an example from Michael's own life to walk through what it might look like to work with Kairos with a prospective client. He describes how he supports the client to 'tune-in' to the un-rational, embodied intelligence that is Kairos in order to discover what the proper way to proceed might be. Christos also describes the importance of community and gathering together to witness, and to share stories. 36:40 Michael asks Christos to describe his relationship with beauty and how it's central to his work with ceremony and ritual. Christos then recounts a youtube video which documents a chimpanzee in a state of awe and exuberance as he interacts with a waterfall. 43:02 Michael and Christos discuss how important it is to bring more ceremony and ritual into our lives, especially for those who are not connected to any of the major world religions or ancestral traditions. Christos describes how ceremonies also ground us in place and connect us to our corners of the world and also to our non-human neighbours. 49:03 Christos gives info for how to reach him and work with him #EmergentHuman

O'Connor & Company
07.13.22: Rory Cooper Interview

O'Connor & Company

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 7:25


Northern Virginia dad and political strategist Rory Cooper joined WMAL's "O'Connor and Company" radio program on Wednesday about how parents are fighting mask policies at local summer camps. TWEET: https://twitter.com/rorycooper/status/1546142978212765696?s=20&t=FGF39mwljCr338ZQU8QtyA For more coverage on the issues that matter to you, visit www.WMAL.com, download the WMAL app or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 FM from 5-9 AM ET. To join the conversation, check us out on Twitter: @WMALDC, @LarryOConnor, @Jgunlock,and @patrickpinkfile. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Preseason 5- The Elevator Episode

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 73:53


Newcastle and Everton are the main focus of attention in this weeks episode of RCR. With Brad on vacation, James and Sean called in good friend and supporter of the podcast Joel to help this week. The added benefit of Joel's support for Newcastle United aided in the main endeavor of analyzing the expectations of the Toon Army. They guys looked at Everton and sought to understand their plans for the summer transfer window. Let them know if their expectations for the Toffies are right or wrong in the comments. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Joel: https://twitter.com/JoelFindlay16​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Stacy on the Right
Episode 789: Every Week A Staffer Leaves the Biden White House and Our Media Says NOTHING!

Stacy on the Right

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 20:47


Scott Whitlock is the Research Director for Newsbusters.org at The Media Research Center. We discussed the Democrats bench, their tone deafness on the radical nature of their abortion stance and what 2024 could look like without Biden on the ticket. Check the show notes for links to the stories covered today!! *Rate us on Apple Podcasts!!! * *Guest Bio: * Scott Whitlock is the Research Director for the Media Research Center's NewsBusters.org. Previously, he was associate editor for NewsBusters. Before that, he was a contributing editor and the MRC's senior news analyst. Scott's work has been published in The Washington Times (here as well), National Review Online, The Daily Caller and other outlets. He has been cited in publications such as The Washington Post, Red State, to name a few. Scott's articles have also repeatedly been linked to on the Drudge Report. Scott is a graduate of George Mason University and grew up in Northern Virginia. He can be contacted at SWhitlock@MRC.org. Buy my first book available where ever books are sold, _Eternally Cancel Proof _in paperback, or Kindle on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Eternally-Cancel-Proof-Courageous-Battlefront/dp/B09VWWTQFS/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1647986511&sr=8-1) or buy directly from me at my website Stacy on the Right!! (https://www.stacyontheright.com/eternallycancelproof/) ​ Thank you for listening! ​ We are live Monday through Friday from 9p to midnight eastern on SiriusXM the Patriot channel 125!!! ​ Thanks and God Bless you!! ​ -- Encouragement-- Be of good comfort, be of one mine, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you. 2 Cor. 13:11 -- Additional Content -- ​ Stacy's Blog (http://www.stacyontheright.com) Download previous episodes, and more! Contact Form stacy [at] stacyontheright.com

The TASTE Podcast
122: Bartees Strange

The TASTE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 39:54


Bartees Strange is one of the most promising and confident voices in music today, and we wanted to have him on the show to talk about his new album, Farm to Table. The title suggests an interest in food and cooking, and we dive into some of the dishes he enjoyed growing up around the world in Oklahoma, Europe, and most recently living in Washington DC. He makes a strong case for Ben's Chili Bowl and for traveling to Northern Virginia for Chinese seafood. But we also find out about what his food life is like on the road. We loved getting to know Bartees Strange during this lively conversation.Also on the show Matt is joined by producer Pat Stango to talk about The Bear, a new restaurant world drama on FX/Hulu that has exploded on the scene in recent weeks. We love it. How does the show get restaurant life oh so right? Matt and Pat chop it up. More from Bartees Strange:Bartees Strange Ponders Success in Dire Times [New York Times]Bartees Strange Explores His Journey [NPR]Kelly Rowland [Youtube]Buy or stream: Farm to Table

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast
357. LONG-TERM PLANNING FOR COLLEGE ADMISSIONS

Tests and the Rest: College Admissions Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 27:13 Very Popular


If you want college to represent some of the best years of your life, why wouldn't you spend years putting all the necessary pieces in place? Amy and Mike invited educator and podcaster Ryan Tibbens to explain long-term planning for college. What are five things you will learn in this episode? What are the best extracurricular involvements from an admissions perspective? Is there such a thing as too many activities? What should students do in the summer to support admissions? What can students do throughout middle and high school to help them write great college admissions essays senior year? How does planning over the long-term help clarify college choices? MEET OUR GUEST Ryan Tibbens is an award-winning high school English teacher, tutor, and podcast host in Northern Virginia. He strongly believes that a sense of purpose, paired with effective rhetoric skills, yields happier, more effective people, and he strives to instill those values and skills in his students, both through his work in an all-virtual distance learning school and through through Tibbens Education Services & Tutoring. In addition to hosting the ClassCast Podcast and participating in his local community and government, Ryan enjoys writing, reading, camping, hiking, attending concerts, and gardening with his wife and three young children. Ryan first appeared on our podcast in episode #121 to discuss Writing Rhetorically in Admissions Essays. Find Ryan at mrtibbens@yahoo.com. LINKS What Classes Should I Take Next Year? RELATED EPISODES UTILIZING A REFLECTION JOURNAL TO PREPARE FOR YOUR COLLEGE ESSAY HIGH SCHOOL COURSE SELECTION AND ACADEMIC RIGOR BUILDING AN A+ EXTRACURRICULAR RESUME ABOUT THIS PODCAST Tests and the Rest is THE college admissions industry podcast. Explore all of our episodes on the show page. ABOUT YOUR HOSTS Mike Bergin is the president of Chariot Learning and founder of TestBright. Amy Seeley is the president of Seeley Test Pros. If you're interested in working with Mike and/or Amy for test preparation, training, or consulting, feel free to get in touch through our contact page.

MTR Podcasts
Michael O'Connell

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 55:31


About the guestMichael O'Connell is a field editor with Patch in Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. He is also the host and producer of the weekly It's All Journalism podcast and produces the Better News podcast for the American Press Institute. Previously, Michael was a digital editor at Local News Now, a senior digital editor at Federal News Network, a producer of the National Governors Association's Meet the Threat podcast, and managing editor at The Connection Newspapers. For three years, Michael taught podcasting in the American University School of Communication's Masters in Digital Storytelling program. Besides speaking about podcasting at various journalism conferences, Michael is also the author of the textbook, Turn Up the Volume — A Down and Dirty Guide to Podcasting. In June 2018, Michael traveled to Tajikistan on behalf of the U.S. State Department to teach young journalists how to podcast.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture.Mentioned in this episodeMichael O'Connell's TwitterTo find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory.Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode★ Support this podcast ★

Principled
S7E18 | How values inform decisions: Unpacking the role of the CECO

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 31:49


What you'll learn in this podcast episode It's generally accepted that effective E&C programs are based on values as well as rules. But applying those values to real-life situations can be difficult. This has been particularly true during the pandemic, as organizations make hard decisions in many instances and chief ethics and compliance officers play a key role in guiding those efforts. How can values help CECOs sustain ethical performance—and even excel—in the face of such change and adversity? In this episode of LRN's Principled Podcast, host Susan Divers talks with Scott Sullivan, Chief Integrity & Compliance Officer at Newmont Corporation, and Joe Henry, who just retired as US Compliance Officer at Braskem. Listen in as they discuss the difficult choices they faced in providing moral leadership in their organizations—how those choices were made, by whom, and what the examples say about the role of the CECO.   Principled Podcast Show Notes [1:58] - Scott's role as the CECO at Newmont Corporation, the challenges faced and how he applies his values. [4:50] - Ethics and compliance at the heart of Newmont's decision making during the pandemic. [6:10] - Joe's role at Braskin and the challenges he faced. [11:20] - The role of Joe's values in influencing colleagues to change the decisions they made. [13:35] - The lessons learned from these tough experiences in the company. [16:12] - How both company's ethical cultures emerged after the pandemic.  [19:50] - Other circumstances which strengthened the respective ethics and compliance cultures. [27:25] - The most important areas of focus for an ethics leader in resolving difficult questions. Featured Guest: Joe Henry Joe Henry was the US Compliance Officer for Braskem, a multi-national Chemicals and Plastics company headquartered in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  He led the Ethics, Compliance and Risk Management efforts for Braskem's US operations including commercial, manufacturing, logistics, management and Innovation and Technology (R&D) functions.  Prior to joining Braskem in January 2017, Joe was a Compliance Director at GSK, a global pharmaceutical company, and worked in various ethics and compliance roles since 2003.  Investigations oversight, Compliance Operations, Methodology development, process assessment and improvement, policy and procedure management and managing government oversight programs were some of the responsibilities he successfully fulfilled while at GSK.  Prior to his GSK Compliance roles, Joe worked at SmithKline Beecham as an Information Technology Project Director and with IBM Sales, Technical Support and Product Development.  Joe earned a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and an MBA from Saint Joseph's University.  He also earned his certification as a Leading Professional in Ethics and Compliance from the Ethics and Compliance Initiative (ECI).  Joe and his wife reside in Lewes, Delaware and he retiredg at the end of March 2022 to pursue personal interests, travel and enjoy more time with his 3 grown children and two grandchildren.  Joe continues to provide advisory and investigation services on an as-needed basis to Braskem's US Compliance department.   Featured Guest: Scott E. Sullivan Scott E. Sullivan is the Chief Integrity & Compliance Officer of Newmont Corporation, the world's leading gold company. Newmont has approximately 15,000 employees and 15,000 contractors and has 12 operating mines and 2 non-operated JVs in 9 countries. Mr. Sullivan oversees, develops, implements and manages Newmont's integrity and compliance program including ethics, anti-bribery, corporate investigations, and global trade compliance. Previously, Mr. Sullivan was the Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer of a global manufacturer of fluid motion and control products with approximately 17,000 employees operating in 55 countries. Mr. Sullivan has written and contributed numerous articles on compliance programs, anti-bribery/FCPA, export controls, economic sanctions and other ethics and compliance topics to a variety of publications. Mr. Sullivan is also a frequent local, national and international speaker, moderator and conference organizer on compliance, anti-bribery/FCPA, export controls and economic sanctions.   Featured Host: Susan Divers Susan Divers is a senior advisor with LRN Corporation. In that capacity, Ms. Divers brings her 30+ years' accomplishments and experience in the ethics and compliance area to LRN partners and colleagues. This expertise includes building state-of-the-art compliance programs infused with values, designing user-friendly means of engaging and informing employees, fostering an embedded culture of compliance and substantial subject matter expertise in anti-corruption, export controls, sanctions, and other key areas of compliance. Prior to joining LRN, Mrs. Divers served as AECOM's Assistant General for Global Ethics & Compliance and Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer. Under her leadership, AECOM's ethics and compliance program garnered six external awards in recognition of its effectiveness and Mrs. Divers' thought leadership in the ethics field. In 2011, Mrs. Divers received the AECOM CEO Award of Excellence, which recognized her work in advancing the company's ethics and compliance program. Mrs. Divers' background includes more than thirty years' experience practicing law in these areas. Before joining AECOM, she worked at SAIC and Lockheed Martin in the international compliance area. Prior to that, she was a partner with the DC office of Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal. She also spent four years in London and is qualified as a Solicitor to the High Court of England and Wales, practicing in the international arena with the law firms of Theodore Goddard & Co. and Herbert Smith & Co. She also served as an attorney in the Office of the Legal Advisor at the Department of State and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the UN working on the first anti-corruption multilateral treaty initiative. Mrs. Divers is a member of the DC Bar and a graduate of Trinity College, Washington D.C. and of the National Law Center of George Washington University. In 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 Ethisphere Magazine listed her as one the “Attorneys Who Matter” in the ethics & compliance area. She is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Rutgers University Center for Ethical Behavior and served as a member of the Board of Directors for the Institute for Practical Training from 2005-2008. She resides in Northern Virginia and is a frequent speaker, writer and commentator on ethics and compliance topics. Mrs. Divers' most recent publication is “Balancing Best Practices and Reality in Compliance,” published by Compliance Week in February 2015. In her spare time, she mentors veteran and university students and enjoys outdoor activities.     Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Susan Divers: Hello, it's generally accepted nowadays that ethics and compliance programs that are effective are based on values as well as rules, but applying those values to real life situations can be difficult. This was particularly true during the pandemic when organizations had to make hard decisions in many instances in unprecedented circumstances, and ethics and compliance officers frequently played a key role in guiding those efforts. How can values actually help ethics and compliance officers sustain ethical performance and even excel in the face of change and adversity?   Well, hello and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Susan Divers, director of thought leadership and best practices with LRN's advisory group. Today, I'm joined by two thoughtful ethics and compliance professionals, Scott Sullivan, the chief ethics and integrity officer at Newmont Corporation, and Joe Henry, who just retired as the US compliance officer at Braskem. We're going to be talking about the difficult choices they face in providing moral leadership in their organizations, how those choices were made, by whom and what the examples say about the role of the chief ethics and compliance officer. Scott, I'm going to start with you. Can you talk about your role as the CECO at Newmont and some of the hard choices you've faced and how you applied your values? Scott Sullivan: Sure. And thank you, Susan. It's exciting to be part of this podcast and it's a subject I'm very passionate about. So while Joe will be tackling some specific examples, I thought it might be more beneficial to start with a bit on process and approach. So when your values are tested in trying times, this is when the rubber meets the road. So the least common denominator approach, or what is accepted, what is condoned, often becomes your culture. It's not the pronouncements and the platitudes, but rather what you do on the ground or in crunch time. So during COVID, which by the way is not yet over or gone, we faced numerous challenges like everyone else, our values of safety, responsibility and integrity were at the forefront of what we did and said every day. As our strategy rolled out, we had to consider the full spectrum of stakeholders from vulnerable indigenous communities in which we operate to suppliers who were dependent on us to our employees.    In some cases in the early days of COVID, we even went into what's known as care and maintenance mode, which is basically shutting down except for essential services to protect the health and wellbeing of a variety of our stakeholders. We also deployed over 20 million in a COVID fund to assist communities around our minds with COVID type issues and challenges. We were active partners in the COVID struggles. We protected our employees with PPE, with vaccines, with health checks, et cetera, all this being said there were numerous and oftentimes competing opinions on what to do, being strong proponents of our values, and always circling back to them as a gut check when we made decisions, some of them which might have turned out to be controversial, was an excellent moral compass. It made us focus on not just what the short term, but what the long term was and what the consequences could be, both the good and the bad. It was our collective corporate decision that we had to make.          As a compliance team. Part of our job was trying to read the tea leaves and anticipating what was coming. Fortunately at Newmont, we have a fantastic executive leadership team who gave us the space to support them and the organization this endeavor. We invited in diverse perspectives, we had spirited debates and we pressure tested key decisions that mattered most. I'm proud of the approach that we took as an organization whereby no means perfect, but I think it has served us quite well. Susan Divers: Scott, before I turn to Joe, one of the things that strikes me about what you just said is it sounds like ethics and compliance was really at the heart of decision making in these difficult areas that you mentioned. Am I reading that right? And if so, how did you achieve that? Scott Sullivan: Yeah, I think, health and safety for sure was I think the heartbeat, if you will. Perhaps we were the supporting role, but really as COVID evolved over times, the issues got more complicated as they went. So you had initial true health and safety issues, in some cases life and death that you had to do, but then you had a whole series of decisions around employment, around vaccinations, around care and maintenance. And what do you do with communities, where the donations go? How do you ensure that you're not supporting corruption when you're doing the good deed of making donations? So I think as COVID evolved and as the challenges around COVID evolved, we became more integral and more integrated to those decisions over time. Susan Divers: Well, and that's really a good example of how it's meant to work. Yeah, the ethics and compliance department isn't defective if it's often a corner, but it is effective if it's right at the heart of difficult choices, and that's a perfect segue to Joe. Joe, do you mind outlining your role at Braskem and then talking about some of the actual challenges you faced in your role in those? Joe Henry: Certainly. Thank you, Susan. Thank you for the invitation to join you all today. Let me start off by saying that Braskem leadership team is a caring and forward looking group and primarily based in the US headquarters in Philadelphia. And that information will be important in a minute or two. Early in the pandemic two of our sites operated for 28 days via a live-in where our workers stayed on site, quarantined from family and other outsiders to operate our plants in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. These plants produce polypropylene, which is a key material for personal protection equipment, such as surgical gowns, face, shields, gloves, and masks. So our workers were willing to do that. And our Braskem leaders provided all the essentials for this live-in. And our team members were paid for every hour on site. So Braskem tries to do the right thing. And during that time, all other team members were directed to work remotely during the pandemic. Eventually after our operations were deemed essential to US business interest, all of our plants reopened with strict masking and quarantine requirements, including restrictions in travel. One of our first policy decisions developed in Philadelphia was to require workers to quarantine for 14 days after travel if they had traveled from their home county. Works for Philadelphia were pretty close around in the urban area. The policy, and it worked for salary team members who could work from home, but not for hourly workers who worked on site and who would not be paid for the time they must quarantine. So at our Texas sites, this policy was problematic in that it would not be unusual for a worker employee to travel to the next county to care or check in on a family member. Therefore, compliance was asked to intervene. And as a result of that, our intervention, we extended the travel range and only had the policy applied to travel outside usual circumstances. The other one is more around vaccines. So one other example as vaccines became available, again, I remember they were under emergency authorization. There became a drive by Braskem management to encourage team members to be vaccinated and to push required team members to be vaccinated or else be terminated. The impetus for this requirement was that several people at manufacturing sites were complaining about being vaccinated and still having to wear a mask because others were not vaccinated. We discussed the proposed requirement at the leadership team meeting, which US compliance is a part. And then there was actually a discussion in our industrial team where we're not a part and they mandated this vaccination or termination requirement by a majority vote, not a consensus vote. I received a call from one of the dissenters. He was concerned that many of his employees would resign or be terminated because they did not trust the vaccine yet. His plant would be greatly affected. I brought this to the attention to the US leadership team that the vaccines were not yet fully approved and that no matter how administratively burdensome the CDC's recommendation was vaccination or regular testing. So I informed the group, I thought our requirement was overly restrictive. It infringed upon employees' rights, and I would not approve any of these terminations, in the US, the US compliance officer approves all terminations. So I had some leverage there. So what happened is we implemented weekly testing for team members who were not vaccinated. And that seemed to resolve the situation. By the way, it was helpful that I was fully vaccinated and boosted and it was clear, my personal beliefs were not a factor. Susan Divers: Wow. That's a very striking example, Joe, there's a couple of things I'd like to pursue a bit. One is, it's clear that people brought you into these decisions that they turned to you as a resource, it sounds like certainly in the case of be vaccinated or terminated before the vaccines were fully approved, but also it sounds like you were asked to intervene on the travel restriction. Is that correct? Joe Henry: Yes. Susan Divers: And was that at a senior, if I can ask, or other level? Joe Henry: I would say the vaccination or termination decision was a senior management at one of our industrial sites had the concern. And then the travel policy was probably, as I recall from one of the HR leaders at the site saying, Hey, we have some employees that are in unique situation here, or maybe not so unique, but different than what we would have from an urban center versus someone working in a more rural area. Susan Divers: Well, that's another good example of how a compliance and ethics and compliance program should work. It should be a resource and be welcomed into decision making, particularly on very difficult and tricky issues like the two that you just described. Can you talk about the role of your values in convincing your colleagues and your leadership to change or moderate the decisions that they made? Joe Henry: Absolutely. That was probably the driving force is our code of conduct, we don't dictate to people how they must behave, especially outside of work. It's fortunate that US compliance and compliance department of Braskem is independent and we're objective. And we're very visible. So people know us and people are willing to approach us. Again, that's why I started off the leadership team, it had the best of intentions. They heard from one group that says, Hey, we're tired of wearing masks. We want to be productive. And they reacted to that without understanding the potential consequences and the potential issues they may have with our own code of conduct. And that we couldn't mandate someone put something that was not yet fully approved. And that actually went further than what the government was telling us we needed to do. Which isn't uncommon. Our policies and procedures are frequently tighter than what the law requires. But in this case, we had to recognize that people have freedom of association and freedom of choice about theirselves. Once we brought all the potential consequences and perspectives of all affected team members, I think we reached the right decision. Susan Divers: So was that a difficult process, would you say, was it time consuming, or once you played that role of honest broker, was it something that people widely accepted? Joe Henry: Yes. Yes. I would say, we did use a lot of influence in... Basically had the show them what the consequences are, why their actions might not be entirely appropriate. So it wasn't a matter of authority. It was a discussion and it was a lengthy discussion, but I think everyone was fairly open minded and recognized that it was going take some more work and maybe we were going to have to spend some more money, especially getting a company to do the testing for us on a weekly basis. But I think they quickly arrived that it was the right decision. Susan Divers: Well, that's a great example. And thank you for sharing that. I'm going to go back to Scott for a minute and then to you Joe and ask. So obviously these were pretty intense situations that you dealt with. What lessons did you learn from that experience given your role in the company? If you could discuss that a bit, that would, I think be very helpful. Scott Sullivan: Sure. Yeah. Building on my prior comments a bit, I would say there were a few learnings and perhaps a few aha moments that we recognize along the curve. I think one was, you need to think both long term and short term. So whether it's your employees or your stakeholders, you might have a decision today that is different than the consequences tomorrow. So really making sure you're not just stuck in the moment, but you're thinking about the long term of the consequences or actions that come out of your decisions today. Playing off one of Joe's comments about culture and values, modifying a Warren Buffet quote a little bit, "Values take a long time to build, but they can be destroyed in a heartbeat." And people watch, I think that's the one that organizations often forget when they're looking at their culture, it's that whatever you allow or condone becomes your actual culture. So I think it's really important to practice what you preach and stay true to those values or before you know it, or right under your nose, you lose them. And that's true, perhaps even more so in the darkest days. So, how you're treating your employees and what people did with respect to terminations, or extending compensation during COVID, all eyes were on that. And I think that has longterm consequences for employees is they think, well, how did my employer treat me during those dark days? Did they exit us from the organization? Did they treat us poorly? Was the mighty dollar, the only thing that mattered? And again, for us, we have a social license to operate in the locations we do. So you have to think about that holistically, the full ESG perspective and look at all your stakeholders. And I think a little bit about what we've been talking about as well is anticipating the pushback, where are those pressure points, or focal points that are likely to come up and figuring out, like we always say, you can't take a program off the shelf, but customizing or figuring out what works best for you? And then hopefully that leads to you and many more in your organization becoming both values, beacons and champions to help the organization propel forward. Susan Divers: So in other words, it really can become a tremendous positive as long as you stay true to your values. And you're actually strengthening your culture, not destroying it to go back to the Warren Buffet quote. And Joe, based on your experience, do you think that your ethical culture at Braskem emerged stronger as a result of the types of difficult choices that people made in those circumstances? And are there any other lessons learned from that, that you would want to highlight? Joe Henry: So I believe our culture has gotten stronger. The ethics and compliance group and officers know they need to stay ever vigilant to ensure that passions do not overtake the organization's foundational values. We live in an impatient society that is quick to react and does not always consider all perspectives and unintended consequences. So this experience gives us an opportunity to talk to the leadership team and say, Hey, let's take a breath here. Let's look at this. I think when you're more thoughtful about these decisions, I think the decision will be better, probably strengthen your culture versus weaken it, or undermine it. But I do know that my successor's still facing these challenges. Susan Divers: Yeah. Although you're building ethical muscle at the same time, I want to highlight what you said about stop, pause, think, or you said it a little differently, but our chairman of our board, Doug Sideman, has written extensively about the benefits of pausing. And we do live in a impatient world and one that moves at light speed, particularly with social media. And I think Scott, you would agree with this too, that stopping and getting everybody to slow down and look at all the potential ramifications and equities. Joe's example of employees in Pennsylvania versus employees in Texas, I think is a very telling one. And that, that is really, I think what's needed to deal with particularly moral leadership issues. Scott, does that make sense? And also if you could talk about whether your ethical culture came out stronger as a result of the pandemic, that would be helpful. Scott Sullivan: Yeah. I think you often see in some areas the short term view or this, in the impatient world, as I like the way Joe characterize it, you see the pitch forks and the torches coming out in any particular topic. And so part of our job is to say, let's pause, let's think this through, the unintended consequences, the longterm consequences, I think for sure our ethical culture has emerged stronger. It really gave us ample opportunities to do the right thing and to put theory into practice. So one of the things coming out of the tragedy of COVID is it really gave us an opportunity to show our values and do the right thing in those dark days. And I think that also that consistency of messaging and values, it's not one offer. There's one big case. I think that really builds trust with stakeholders and gives you an opportunity to show that you're a different kind of company. So even in the dark days with bad or troubling news, you're going to be transparent and that we stand true to our values and hold ourself accountable to those values. So that consistency of operational model, I think extends well beyond ethics into business and health and safety. When faced with a challenge, we're going to think about it, be very thoughtful in what we do and ultimately do the right thing for the entirety of the stakeholder community. Susan Divers: Yeah, that sounds like very sound holistic decision making. Joe let's let's switch gears a little bit. We've talked about the pandemic and the challenges and how both of you feel that your ethical culture got stronger as a result, and you both played pivotal roles in the ethics and compliance programs, played pivotal roles in helping your organizations navigate. Can you give some other examples outside of the pandemic of having to do that? Joe Henry: So I mentioned one of our values is the freedom of association. As a result of the summer of 2020, George Floyd death and all, we had some outsiders, some activists and DE&I consultants recommend some potential path forward for the company. One of those, including tracking managers' social media profiles, and other forms of public expression and see whether they should continue to be leaders in the company or not. For instance, should we sanction a manager for attending a pro-life rally, or another manager for posting their support for the police on their Facebook page? That type of monitoring is not aligned with our code of conduct. We declined that recommendation. Again, the passion was there. Hey, we got to weed these people out. Well, no, we have to make sure that when they're working for Braskem, they're aligned to Braskem's values and that they're not diminishing our name in the public.   And then most recently we've discussed how and when should compliance be involved in handling microaggressions. And we've agreed that microaggressions are supposed, should be handled between the two people in the first instance, maybe in a second or third occurrence, that it's handled, the person's called out publicly. And if it's repeated, then it's no longer a microaggression, it's an aggression. And then it comes to human resources or compliance. But those are some of the choices where, again, we relied on our code of conduct and relied on our proven policies and procedures regarding our ethics line to preserve the culture and continue to move the company forward and evolve the company. Susan Divers: Well, and that's another excellent example of pausing and looking at all the ramifications and carefully analyzing whether it is consistent with your code or not. Scott, do you have similar examples outside of the pandemic experience? Scott Sullivan: Yeah. So we've been on a journey of what I would probably call radical transparency in the ethics and compliance space, so where we're willing to show the good, the bad and the ugly to advance the health of our culture. It is a journey, so we're not perfect by any chance, but we're now more transparently and willing to share internal stories and struggles with our employees. I used to laugh all the time that most companies will say something happened to somebody, sometime, someplace with some result. And that leaves everybody, what the heck is that? What happened? And what are the expectations I know? So we've decided that we want to clarify expectations for employees. We want to at least establish the baseline for ethical behavior. And we want to ensure really that fraudsters or predators are held to account in the organization wherever and whenever we can. And also there's an evolving view about when something happens in our organization, what do we do to ensure that those individuals or groups of individuals are not just set free and allowed to go into the general community and repeat those damage?     How many times have we all learned in the compliance profession, individual moves from company A to B, to C to D. And when you do the investigation, there's a long track record that history being repeated at different organizations. So we have done cradle to grave exposes, including one with a public press release, where we actually lifted the hood and told the full story. So most times it's fairly detailed internally and the reception has been excellent. It's advanced our culture ball pretty dramatically. As I mentioned, that being said, it's really, we're still on the journey, but we feel that practicing what we preach and not allowing performance to excuse misconduct or cornerstones of our culture. So even when the outcome is internally painful and extremely disappointing, we've been trying to promote this. So it's not just you do it once, because you can't fake it. And if you do it once, you see big scandals in organizations and periodically it's a big splash in the paper. And we've had similar things where you've had a case that we did our first radical transparency case. And I think the organization, the employees were saying, okay, is this a new way that we're going to operate, or is this the company's hand was forced and they felt they had to do it, so they did it? And so I think that whole concept of you can't fake, it's got to be genuine, it's got to be demonstrable and it's got to be sustainable, is really important. And as an aside, I think most companies can get compliance correct, or they get it right. That's to say that it's the right side of the brain, it's the math science side. It's one plus one, plus one equals three. But when you get to integrity, you get to ethics and culture, that's the equivalent to me, the left side of the brain, it's the English history. It's a little bit more soft. It's touchy, feely. It's hard to measure, but I think it's far more impactful. And that is often where I see organizations fall down, because it's so hard to do. And it's so hard to say, what is it? And it feels like it's subjective, or judgemental, or it's just real hard to do. So I think companies that focus on getting the integrity or the culture piece right, are so far ahead of the curve and getting everything else right. And that's not just in the ethics and compliance space, because I think that could be a proxy for good governance. It could be something that is a springboard for doing other things in an extraordinary way or well above peer organizations. Susan Divers: That's so interesting that you framed it in those terms. Something we talk about a lot and we're not alone in that in this area is that you can't just look at your ethics compliance program as a checklist and say, I'm good to go because I've got policies, code, training, audit, it has to be living and breathing. And that's where the touchy feely comes in. And the research, interestingly, it shows that if you have organizational justice where you're holding people to the same standard, and I hear you both talking about that in what you've described today, then you have the lifeblood and a strong foundation for your ethics and compliance program and activities. But if you don't, if there's two standards of justice, or what I'm hearing today too, is if there's a rush to judgment where some people get trampled in that rush, then you don't really have a strong foundation for your program. Joe, would you agree with that as well? Joe Henry: Yes, I absolutely do. Yeah, it has to be thoughtful, fair. We haven't gone to the extent from a transparency as Scott Newman have us to naming particular people, but we do anonymize those situations and publish them or even present them as lessons learned. Susan Divers: Yeah. That's very powerful. Well, we're starting to run out of time, but two questions before we terminate, which is what are the most important areas of focus by an ethics leader in resolving difficult questions? You've both given great examples of how central ethics and compliance was to tough decisions. But if you're a relatively new ethics leader, what are some of the key things to really bear in mind when those tough issues come up? Scott, you want to lead us off on that? Scott Sullivan: Sure. So I think as we've both mentioned, and same with Susan, the tone at the top is really important. So getting your executive leadership on board, otherwise the likelihood of success drops pretty dramatically. And I think as we've also both said, relationships matter. So build them wherever and whenever you can. And I think it's always that rainy day fund, you build credit in the bank, you build street credit. So for the bad news bear moment you have to come in, I think that's really important. So they understand who you are. You're not just a cry wolf person, you're thoughtful, you're methodical. You do all the things the way the organization would expect. And I think, for all of us, unfortunately, and you can see the business partnering go too far. So I think not withstanding that you always have to remember that there will be times undoubtedly as a compliance officer, where you have to put your neck on the line and hopefully your organization does not have a kill the messenger culture, that's not a fun organization to be a part of. And I think value based decisions are toughest in downturn markets and during crises. So we've come out of a pandemic and now we're going into what seems to be a downturn market. So I think the key message there is really prepare in advance and look at your rainy day credits and figure out where you're going to have to put your stake in the ground and move forward. Susan Divers: So build up your relationships and your credit and your goodwill. Joe, something to add. Joe Henry: I do that. I wholeheartedly agree. I think that what Scott mentioned is the most important area, but another area of focus is the company's values, which usually describes in the organization's code of conduct and implemented through your policies and procedures. And I remind the executives and our team members, employees, the code of conduct and policies are approved by the board of directors after thorough and thoughtful review by the executives, by the stakeholders and by compliance. So they're not done instantaneously and there's a lot of thought, there's a lot of reason why we have them and they shouldn't just be dismissed quickly because the particular circumstance. These documents provide the desired ethical direction of the company and have been very useful in resolving difficult decisions in the past, especially with well-meaning, but passionate team members. Go back to the foundation and consider it maybe, maybe, maybe we do need to make a change to the code of conduct or a change to our values, but at least reference it and have that discussion before taking any severe action that may have unintended consequences. Susan Divers: That's a very good point. One of my colleagues describes the code of conduct as your culture written down, and using it as a focal point and a way to ensure that major decisions and discussions include values, I think helps make it a living and breathing document. Well, this has been such an insightful conversation. I wish we could continue it talking about tough choices, I think is really helpful for people at whatever stage they are in their ethics and compliance journey and profession. So I want to thank our listeners. My name is Susan Frank Divers, and we'll see you the next time on Principled Podcast. Thanks Scott. Thanks Joe. Joe Henry: Thank you. Scott Sullivan: Thank you all. Outro:   We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principle performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures, rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at LRN.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.  

I Hate Politics Podcast
Can Government Become Business-Friendly?

I Hate Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 40:55


Montgomery County, Md, has long had a reputation for being tough for business and compared unfavorably with Northern Virginia. In this episode, Sunil Dasgupta talks with Julie Verrati, co-founder of Denizens Brewing Company in Silver Spring, about the business climate in the county and neighboring jurisdictions. Verrati also served in the federal Small Business Administration during the Biden presidency and, in the episode, announces her choice in the County Executive race. Music by Rockville-based rock and roll band, The Treading Lemmings.

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Preseason 4- The Rich Boy Club

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 63:06


The guys get their wish lists out to spend the money of the clubs that have no issues spending it - Chelsea and Manchester City. As RCR has done over the last few weeks, the boys looked at Chelsea and City's deficiencies and who they could target and get to help build the team into a title winning team. Next week RCR is going to take on Newcastle and Everton to figure out what those clubs can do in the transfer market. Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Brad: https://twitter.com/KSBradG​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Just Start Real Estate with Mike Simmons
How to Utilize Mentors to Launch Your Business with Omni Casey

Just Start Real Estate with Mike Simmons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 45:38


Today's Guest: Omni Casey Omni is a real estate investor, broker, and coach who has been in real estate for nearly 20 years. He is also a co-owner of New Leaf Redevelopers, with his wife and three kids, and Co-Author of THE CASH-FLOW BREAKFAST CLUB. His real estate career started in Hawaii, where he grew up, but for the last 10+ years, he and his family have been living in Northern Virginia, where he has actively been growing their real estate investment portfolio and a top-performing real estate team. His mission is to help others achieve their financial freedom, and he has coached hundreds of real estate investors and agents to create and execute a plan to grow their investment portfolios. Omni has recently been featured as a guest on the BiggerPockets Podcast, along with many other popular shows. Highlights From The Show: We begin the episode with Omni sharing his background story and how he ended up in real estate. Omni shares that he grew up in a very entrepreneurial family that had a few companies in construction. He knew he wanted to be an entrepreneur but didn't know it would be in real estate. He ran several retail businesses prior to real estate, and just like many in the game, he was inspired to go down this path by the Rich Dad Poor Dad book. He sought mentors, coaches, and masterminds' guidance and started his real estate career in Waikiki as an investor and later became an agent. For the last 20 years, Omni has been pouring himself into real estate as an investor and broker. He is now located on the East coast, where his wife comes from, and they are investing all over the country. We then talk about how Omni got his mentor and developed his learning processes to a point where he was ready to launch his business. He was looking for someone in real estate to be his mentor, and he found one of his customers who happened to be an experienced investor. The mentor looked for the pain points in his business and Omni offered to help and provided value by doing a lot of groundwork until he had enough experience and money to start his own investing. His mentor was doing multi-family, residential, and commercial investing, but he backtracked to smaller deals so that Omni could be involved. When it was time to do his own thing, he started with a realtor license to remove the roadblock of getting the right agent. Next, we talk about how Omni started his investment journey. Omni shares that he and his mentor were investing heavily in condos and lightly in single-family homes in Waikiki. Once he had enough money and wanted to branch out to do his own thing, he couldn't afford anything in Hawaii, so he had to find other markets. He started investing in single families and duplexes throughout the United States in the markets that met his budget. Omni tested many markets and bought properties in low-profile areas. He learned, and now he is in great areas and has been able to assemble good teams that are making his investments more passive for him. We then talk about Omni's strategy of finding and acquiring deals. According to Omni, his primary real estate strategy is buying and holding for the long term. They do the BRRRR strategy, but sometimes they do flips and wholesale properties they don't want to keep in their portfolio. Omni shares that they rely heavily on wholesalers to find deals, and he has been overly committed to becoming their number one client. Last year turned out to be their best year. They do cash purchases, then refinance and use the BRRRR method to reposition financially to fix and wholesale properties they don't like. Lastly, we talk about how he was able to purchase so many properties last year in a strong seller's market and his plan for the next five to ten years. He started coaching people on how to invest, and the number one complaint was that there were no deals, and he wanted to prove to them that there were deals. According to Omni, when people start to get nervous about buying, that is when he goes all in and makes his offers. Real estate has never let him down in his strategy of buying and holding long-term because it works in any market. Omni also shares that everything he is doing now is to educate his kids, the people he is coaching, and get into things that will stretch his comfort zone. Make sure you don't miss another amazing episode of the Just Start Real Estate Podcast with Omni Casey and get valuable information on how to utilize mentors to launch your business! Notable Quotes: “It's hard to find an agent that knows how to help an investor.” Omni Casey “When you want to learn from someone who is doing it, don't do it with a ‘tell me what I can do' mindset. Look for their pain points and be a solution.” Omni Casey “Taking action is the common denominator for every successful person in any industry. Stop waiting for everything to be perfect and just start.” Mike Simmons “Buying and holding properties for long-term works on any market, even in a strong seller's market.“ Omni Casey Thank You for Listening! Connect with Mike on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Linkedin, Facebook Help Out the Show: Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one. Subscribe on iTunes. Resources and Links From Today's Show: Omni Cash Flow Book Omni on Instagram Omni on Facebook Omni on YouTube Rich Dad Poor Dad More Resources From Mike: Level Jumping: How I Grew My Business to Over $1 Million in Profits in 12 Months WINNING DIRECT MAIL - How to CRUSH IT with direct mail! 7 Figure Investor Video Course - Scale your business to 7 figures. I'll show you how!

Listen Up Home Buyers Advice & Tips from True Buyer Agents
Listen Up Home Buyers! Electrical Wiring

Listen Up Home Buyers Advice & Tips from True Buyer Agents

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 22:01


Tim Rohde is the Vice President of Tomato Electric serving homeowners in Northern Virginia, Washington DC and Maryland. Victoria Ray Henderson is a real estate broker in the Greater Washington DC area and the host of Listen Up Home Buyers!  :47 what to look for when first walking up to the house1:03 the electrical panel1:47 is the wiring in good condition2:21 Where does public service begin?3:06 What is the public electric company's responsibility?4:27 Red flags to look for when touring a home4:32 the two-prong receptacle4:46 why ground a receptacle?5:26 Why have GFIs in the kitchen in the bathroom?6:45 Identify the type of wiring in the home6:50 What is GFI protection?8:00 Are there time periods when certain wiring was used in home construction?9:12 Red flags when examining an electrical panel9:34 The panel should have a main shut off10:19 Screw-in fuses, breakers, rust spots, PVC jacket, cloth wiring 11:41 looking at an older meter base they are smaller than the new ones12:09 wire is frayed going into the meter base12:38 anything that touches the house is the responsibility of the owner13:08 what a new installation should look likeNewer wiring, what a panel should look like on the inside14:09 Fuse panel with the screw-in type fuses. Instead of circuit breakers that trip if there is an issue14:35 fuse panels have been phased out they should be replaced15:32  the split bus panel with no breaker. The top six spaces are for the main shut-off. This is an older-style panel.  Also called the square D panel.16:07 Next picture-PVC coated jacket which is newer wiring, tidy neat going into the panel which demonstrates good workmanship16:40 Should there be an inspection sticker on the electrical panel?17:45 Next picture-an example of what a good new install should look like:  new service, 200 amp, approved sticker on the panel, ground wire, newer SE cable which is the bottom wire that feeds the main panel, the good outer jacket PVC coated18:36 What to do if you see water or rust in a panel18:52 Final picture of frayed wires-cloth wiring, Romex wire with PVC coating, deteriorated and should be replaced20:00 Aluminum wiring is a potential hazard20:27 Suggested ways to fix aluminum wiring in the house20:41 The problem with aluminum wiring21:03 What to look out for with BX wiring -two types cloth wiring and  PVC BX wiring with an outer coating21:49 What is the current code for smoke detectors? How many should I have in my house?

DMV Download from WTOP News
DC, Va. gun owners sue for right to carry concealed handguns on Metro

DMV Download from WTOP News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 15:29


Four local gun-rights advocates filed a suit against D.C. saying Metro's ban on concealed handguns on public transportation is unlawful. That lawsuit comes a week after the U.S. the Supreme Court upheld the right to carry a gun outside of the home. WTOP's Valerie Bonk , who has a law degree, breaks down the suit and tells us what's at stake. And we are learning more about a horrific murder of a father and non-profit CEO in Northern Virginia. WTOP's Neal Augenstein has the charging documents and tells us about the nature of the killing.

Red Card Radio
RCR 22/23 Preseason 3- England's Europa League Participants

Red Card Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 60:17


This week Brad, James, and Sean take a look at the clubs participating in Europa League next year - Arsenal and Manchester United. The guys look at each club, seeing what squad positions need upgrading and who is still good for the team. The boys also spoke about players Arsenal and United have been linked to. Next week, RCR dives into Chelsea and Manchester City, tune in! Join the RCR discord to chat with the boys and set up chess games: https://discord.gg/wzJQxR64rk If you're looking for custom apparel in the Falls Church area of Northern Virginia, check out TBS Impressions: https://tbsimpressions.com/ Connect with us on social media. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/RedCard_Radio​​​​ Brad: https://twitter.com/KSBradG​​​​ Sean: https://twitter.com/WhiteHart_Sean​​​​ James: https://twitter.com/JamesTiffany​ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redcardradio/message

Blunt Force Truth
The Racist History of Planned Parenthood - an Interview with Steven Mosley

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 66:52


Today's show rundown: Mark kicks us off today - he starts with a little story about this car trip he took this past weekend. Essentially he was disconnecting himself from emails, phone calls, and the Media for 3 days. Taking himself back to being 18-19 years old, driving his Camaro, listening to old music. What an interesting weekend to turn the news / media off. Chuck has been paying attention to the main stream media and how they do not talk about anything that is really going on, Biden, the border, anything that matters. They don't even hide the facts, that they are hiding the facts. We meet Steven Mosley, Mark gives us a quick breakdown of his background. Steven wants to be a game show host, and he talks about loving Chuck on Lingo. Steven says they need more Educators with like beliefs, get in the game. The Left loves saying that it is either Pro Choice or Pro Life. Chuck says it is Pro Death or Pro Life, and now days you can't even use the term Pro-Life. Steven talks about the Racist Boy Chop Shop AKA Planned Parenthood. He talks about going back and looking at Margret Singer, the founder. Her thought was to get black people to kill themselves with abortion. She was pre-Nazi, purpose driven killer. There is a disproportionate amount of Planned Parenthood facilities in Black Communities. They focus on Blacks and Spanish neighborhoods. For Years the Left has legislated through the Supreme Courts, and it is killing them that they can't do it anymore. But now that the Left disagrees, they are calling them an illegitimate group. People need to catch on to the word game the Left plays. The message is that they have Black women's health at the fore front. But then ask yourself, why is Black Lives Matter not protesting Planned ParentHood? The number one killer of African Americans IS Abortion, if their lives matter, they need to go after abortion. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/facts-opinions-rants-with-steven-d-mosley/id1521302438 Project 21 member Steven Mosley is a Christian, conservative college educator. Steven hosts the Facts, Opinions and Rants podcast, in which he focuses on the integration of faith and public policy on a range of issues from the impact of COVID-19 on the church to Critical Race Theory. School choice is growing in popularity among black and Hispanic Americans in part due to advocates like Steven, who made school choice a centerpiece of his campaign when he ran for the Fairfax County School Board in Northern Virginia in 2019. Steven believes that parents, not zip codes, should determine where and how their students are educated. Steven has also served on local northern Virginia political campaigns as a prayer leader and campaign manager. As a decade-long college educator and administrator at Northern Virginia Community College and Liberty University, Steven knows firsthand that mentorship programs and restorative practices can have a positive impact on student success and bridging the achievement gap, particularly for black males. As a husband and the product of a two-parent home. Steven advocates for the “Success Sequence” as the best poverty-breaking tool known to man. Steven is an ordained Baptist reverend. His mission in life as a Christian speaker is to make disciples who live and think like Jesus and who impact people and policy for the glory of God.

Top News from WTOP
Abortion ban ‘likely coming' to Va. as Fairfax County's top prosecutor prepares to fight

Top News from WTOP

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 32:37


Commonwealth's Attorney for Fairfax County Steve Descano spends the entire episode with us discussing the state of justice in Northern Virginia, including what he thinks is a likelihood that Virginia will soon implement an abortion ban following the Supreme Court's ruling. Descano discusses how he'd navigate that from a prosecutorial standpoint and provides insight into the investigation into Bijan Ghaisar's killing, the rise in carjackings and the impact of Johnny Depp and Amber Heard's defamation trial at the courthouse.

Daily Signal News
Here's Where to Go If You Need Help With your Unexpected Pregnancy

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 22:04


It's a post-Roe world and life appears to be winning.But even though the issue of abortion now moves back to the American people to decide, there will still be women who need help and assistance with unexpected pregnancies.Jeanne Mancini, president of March for Life, says that there are a treasure trove of resources available for those who need them. They just need to know where to look."There is a pregnancy resource center movement with well over 3,000 pregnancy care centers, pregnancy resource centers, and so typically they are in your local community," she explains. "These resource centers will provide things like pregnancy tests or ultrasounds or STD tests or health care or diapers, formula, et cetera, housing even in some cases."There's also a well developed network to help with finding these resources, Mancini says."The two umbrella groups that you would definitely want to check out are Heartbeat International, which is in Ohio, but many of the pregnancy care centers are under their umbrella," she explains, "Then the second one is Care Net, which is based out of Northern Virginia, and they have a wonderful hotline."We also cover these stories:The Supreme Court rules in favor of Washington state football coach Joe Kennedy and his right to prayer.Justice Clarence Thomas suggests the Supreme Court should reconsider a prior ruling making it more difficult to sue media organizations.New voter registration data analyzed by the Associated Press finds more than 1 million American voters have switched over to the Republican Party. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

DMV Download from WTOP News
Abortion ban ‘likely coming' to Va. as Fairfax County's top prosecutor prepares to fight

DMV Download from WTOP News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 32:18


Commonwealth's Attorney for Fairfax County Steve Descano spends the entire episode with us discussing the state of justice in Northern Virginia, including what he thinks is a likelihood that Virginia will soon implement an abortion ban following the Supreme Court's ruling. Descano discusses how he'd navigate that from a prosecutorial standpoint and provides insight into the investigation into Bijan Ghaisar's killing, the rise in carjackings and the impact of Johnny Depp and Amber Heard's defamation trial at the courthouse.

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Attracting and Engaging Potential Investors

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 21:51


Finding investors is easier than we think.   In this episode, Ace Karimi reveals the secrets to getting investors interested in your deals. He is the co-founder of Invest Capital, a real estate investment firm that is dedicated to buying A and B apartments to provide double-digit returns to its clients. Ace goes to the nitty-gritty of their unique syndication model,  how they are turning around projects with heavy deferred maintenance, and the importance of setting the right expectations with investors to increase the chances of success.     [00:01 - 06:47] Getting Out of the Hamster Wheel of Wholesaling and Flipping Making the leap from single-family to multifamily Ace breaks down their first deal Taking massive action and getting the word out Finding an asset that feels right Running the numbers   [06:48 - 20:26] Building a Unique Syndication Model Presenting the offers to investors The #1 thing investors are looking for: when will they get their money back? Ace on asset management fees Taking on heavy-lift assets Offsetting refi risks Looking out for the worst-case scenarios Helping everyone to be an investor   [20:27 - 21:50] Closing Segment Reach out to Ace!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “Just getting your name out every single place possible. That's the thing. It's like, you got to let everybody know you're buying unapologetically.” - Ace Karimi   “Investors are hungry for deals. There's so much hunger and desire for just an opportunity, right?” - Ace Karimi   “Money finds deals. Money's trying to find deals to go into and the only thing is you need is to have good enough deals that the money wants to be a part of.” - Ace Karimi   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Ace! Follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn and visit the Invest Capital website.   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Ace Karimi: The owners, they don't care. Like, they're not looking after the property. They're just, Hey, I'll just take a check and whatever happens, happens, and property management's usually not involved. And you know, that's just, what's going on. Nobody really cares. Like, we care about our properties, right? My team's involved every single week. [00:00:16] Ace Karimi: We're on Slack. Well, we have a communication channel, 24/7. We do weekly pulse checks. You know, we're looking after our asset for our investors, but also for ourselves. That's always how I am with any business I do. I'm keeping my eyes on the prize.  [00:00:41] Sam Wilson: Ace Karimi buys cash flowing apartment buildings through a unique indication model, and he teaches others how to do the same. In 2021, he bought 35 million in deals and they are growing. Ace, welcome to the show.  [00:00:53] Ace Karimi: You're welcome, Sam. Thank you for having me.  [00:00:55] Sam Wilson: Hey, man. Pleasure's mine. There's three questions I ask every guest who comes in the show in 90 seconds or less, can you tell me, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?  [00:01:04] Ace Karimi: Wow. I like it. Rapid fire. So we started, I think three years ago, we, we jumped in from single family. [00:01:10] Ace Karimi: We used to do a lot of wholesale and flipping, pretty sure you're familiar with that, doing the hamster wheel, always hunting the next deal, next deal, next deal. Like, looking for those single checks, I realized we wanted a better way. We wanted consistency. We wanted predictability. So, we made the jump. [00:01:25] Ace Karimi: We made the leap one day. It was actually. Right before COVID happened, believe it or not. But we went really, you know, full all hands on deck. Like, Hey, we're not turning around. This is it. And that was the year that we ended up buying 35 million in apartment buildings through our unique syndication model in which we're able to give the investors, their money back a lot sooner, 24 to 36 months usually give 'em an infinite return while still kill while still keeping most of the deal. [00:01:51] Sam Wilson: Now that is really cool. So you guys went, went long in multifamily at the beginning of the pandemic. How long did it take you to get your first deal?  [00:01:59] Ace Karimi: Let me think. So here, here, it's the funny thing is, you know, how you start doing it initially, you're kind of just looking at deals on a side here and there. [00:02:07] Ace Karimi: And if I look at it from that regards, probably like, I don't know, three four months, something like that. But when we really went like committed, Hey, this is it. We're going to find a way. It was like maybe 60 days.  [00:02:19] Sam Wilson: Okay. Okay. That's pretty fast for people, you know, out there listening. I mean a lot of people we talk to on the show, just say, Hey, look, you know, be patient when you get your first be patient, you know, as it cuz it takes time to get your first deal. [00:02:32] Sam Wilson: What do you feel like you did differently that allowed you to find your first deal? So fast?  [00:02:37] Ace Karimi: Massive action.  [00:02:39] Sam Wilson: What does that mean? Can you define that for us? [00:02:41] Ace Karimi: Dude, just, just getting your name out every single place possible. I mean, that, that's the thing. It's like, you got to let everybody know you're buying, you know, unapologetically. [00:02:48] Ace Karimi: I was letting it be known. Like, Hey, I'm going to buy apartment buildings. And everybody that I was talking to, I was flowing up with them consistently. And I'm like, Hey look, do you have something for me? Do you have something for me? I'm looking, I have capital sitting right here. Then I eventually found one. [00:03:01] Sam Wilson: Okay. Tell me about the first deal. What, how big was it? What, what were the parameters of it? And, how did you know that was the one for you?  [00:03:10] Ace Karimi: Oh man. So yeah. Great question. So, you know, your first deal, it, it means so much 'cause once you can really identify what a deal is, you know, it, it makes everything a lot easier for your second, third, fourth that, you know, the domino trickles down. [00:03:23] Ace Karimi: My first deal we got, we were at our first deal four different times. I had one down in Georgia. I had one down over in Maryland, like I'm in the east coast by the way. Right. I'm in DC. So I'm over here looking out of the area, which, you know, you're as an more of an inexperienced investor getting into multifamily, you're just looking anywhere and everywhere for a deal, which is a big mistake, right? And so, it was so many close times where the numbers looked good, everything looked good, but something just didn't line up. And we had to pass on it, which, you know, you have to have the discipline to do. And we ended up finding this deal that literally passed and checked every box that those other properties didn't right. [00:04:01] Ace Karimi: It was a 72 unit property, in my home state here in Virginia. So I'm right out of the DC Metro I'm in Northern Virginia. And great property. Beautiful, right? Still, it was like a seventies build, but it didn't look like it. Right. It just, you know, the owner had, was already starting to put a lot of CapEx into the property as we were looking to buy it, which was great. [00:04:22] Ace Karimi: Already started doing the windows, the roof and the plumbing work and a lot of the exterior stuff. So, you know, he was already getting that ball rolling for us. We, we came across the deal and it had a beautiful view of the mountains. Believe it or not, which was, you know, amazing. That's just one of the things that's like, it felt good. [00:04:39] Ace Karimi: I think that's one of the things that you just know of. It's the deal. Something feels good about it. It's in a great location. You're just like, dude, I would love to own this asset. Right. And then the numbers, like I, the numbers look kind of slim at first. Like, we bought it for 3.8 million. It was a 72 unit asset, right? Market rents were nuts. They were, they were at $600. And at the time, yeah, exactly. And at the time the, the rents in the market were like 900. So there was a $300 discrepancy. And now fast forward to now it, they went up to like 1100, by the way. So it we've got a big, big boost.  [00:05:16] Ace Karimi: We came across a deal, you know, we, we had a discussion and we went back and forth and then we ended up, putting it under contract at 3.8 million, put $600,000 into the property. We knew we could drastically increase the value. So, we underwrote the valuation around six and a half million, I believe, conservatively. So there was, you know, there was a couple million in equity at play and from our modeling, we realized that, Hey look, we don't necessarily need to give up most of the meat of this bone. [00:05:43] Ace Karimi: It's, it's a heavier value add property. We have a lot of work to do, really have to, you know, roll up our sleeves. And so we used our own syndication model in that regard and we gave up a higher preferred return and we actually kept most of the equity for ourselves because of the work that was involved. [00:06:01] Ace Karimi: And we promised an 18 to 24 month principal return, which we're actually on pace to do that even faster right now we've already initiated our refinance and essentially that's it. And they get to stay in the deal in, in perpetuity and they get a hundred percent of their capital back and a check and they get to keep the press, you know, and they get to stay in the deal. [00:06:22] Ace Karimi: And on top of that, they get a, they get a check at exit. So it's pretty awesome. And our valuation, by the way, for this deals coming between 9 and 10 million.  [00:06:30] Sam Wilson: I was going to say at a, 10 cap you're, based on the rent bumps, you know, I'm sitting here running your numbers behind and I'm like, okay, it's worth about nine and a half million bucks at a 10 cap. [00:06:39] Sam Wilson: Yep. I mean, so that's ridiculously, probably low, I would think, you know, actual valuation so that, that's really, really cool. Tell me, I want to hear more about the actual structure of how you brought investors in on this deal. 'Cause what I heard was that, did you identify and line out those terms, obviously on the front end? You said, okay, Hey, here's exactly how we're going to take this down because we just see huge runway here. And then I guess, break that down for me. Let's assume I'm, I'm an investor and I say, Hey Ace, I want to put a hundred grand in your deal. How does it work?  [00:07:15] Ace Karimi: Oh, great question. So essentially, yeah. So, Hey look, we, we, if it's this type of a deal, right, it has to be a specific type of deal, but you know, I'd go into the conversation and be like, Hey, look, I have a great opportunity. [00:07:26] Ace Karimi: There's a lot of upside, you know, several hundred dollars of upside. We have several comparables to prove that. It's not just one or two, this isn't speculation. Like, this property has not been bumped up in a, in a while. Owners kind of had some deferred maintenance to it. There's a lot of work involved to go in there and to raise these up to market level, turn all the tenant base and we're prepared to do that. [00:07:47] Ace Karimi: But in order to do that, and to, to make this property worthwhile for everybody, we ran a numbers, you know, we're buying it at an incredible price, far below market value. And so here here's where it's going to be valued. In 18 to 24 months, we're actually going to be able to give you your full principle payment back and we're giving you a higher preferred return. [00:08:06] Ace Karimi: Here's a structure. And then I show them, Hey, look, you're going to be able to make, I don't know, 30%, 20, 30, 40% in that short amount of time. And you get your a hundred percent of, of your principle back, 'cause at the end of the day, what they care about most number one thing. Isn't how much money they're going to make. [00:08:24] Ace Karimi: And you know, those too, Sam, they care. How long is it going to take to get their money back? If I can tell them, Hey, look, I'm, I'm telling you right now, from what I'm seeing here, 24 to 36 months, you get all your money back, you get an eight to 10% pref, virtually guarantee it. You can't ever guarantee anything, but it's like, dude, you're, you're getting the pref. [00:08:42] Ace Karimi: All the money's essentially going to them. I'm working for you essentially. I'm not getting paid. I'm getting paid, maybe some fees, but the, the alignment with that is, is because there's not really going to be any cash flows during the, during the period of time. Most indications don't really have cash flows anyway. [00:08:58] Ace Karimi: So it's like, why, why does it even matter? But it, you let them know, Hey, look, I only really get paid when I do the, what I'm telling you is possible. You don't have to believe me and, and see the numbers that it's going to hit this metric. But you are going to have the security to know that. Look, you're going to get your pref. [00:09:14] Ace Karimi: You're going to get your principal back one way or another. And the only way I'm really going to get paid is on the backside when I increase the valuation up. And you've already got your money back in your pocket safely.  [00:09:23] Sam Wilson: What is the investor split once you give them their money back? So you've done a cashout refi you've given 'em a 10, a 10 pref on the deal, cashout refi. I got my money back. What's your investor split going forward? [00:09:36] Ace Karimi: 30%.  [00:09:37] Sam Wilson: Okay. So it's still a 70, 30 split. [00:09:40] Ace Karimi: Yeah. And they get the stay a deal. Exactly.  [00:09:41] Sam Wilson: It's flip flopped in this case, most of the time, it is 70% to the investor. 30% to the sponsor. In this case, you're saying, look, if I can get your money back in 24 months, give you a 10 pref. [00:09:52] Sam Wilson: Of course the profit goes away once the capital is returned. At that point, you collect 30% of the upside on the cash flow and then upon disposition and you as the sponsor collect 70%. Do you guys, and again, I'm sorry, I'm getting in the weeds on this, but this, this is very different than what we see, you know, a pretty standard syndication model. [00:10:11] Sam Wilson: So this is why I kinda want to spend some time on this, just to hear that, give other, give listeners the idea that there's other options out there for how we structure these deals, you know? So, so you return the 30% to your investors, but do you guys take acquisition fees? Do you guys take other fees in the front end of these deals or do you wave all that just so you can say, Hey, you know what? We are truly getting paid only when we perform.  [00:10:33] Ace Karimi: No, I still take the fees because, you know what, the reality is, like the kind of deal that I'm talking by here, by the way, they're not something that you just find. Like, we have to hunt for these deals usually, right? So if I'm hunting for these deals and I'm spending time, resources, money, months to follow up, like, this is something that yes, we will still take a feet on upfront. [00:10:53] Ace Karimi: You know, and, and it's not like it's going to go straight into all my pockets. It's, it's just the reimburse really for our soft costs, right. That that's not even money that we're really grabbing. And then on a second hand, asset management fee is just there to just take care of, of the asset management team in the meantime. [00:11:09] Ace Karimi: But it's really pennies. Like, this isn't like you you're really, you're not really doing this on a large scale that that's, that's the differentiation I want to make here. You're not doing this on like, kind of 80 to a hundred million dollar property. I, I think you could, if you find it properly, but you know, these are, these are, this model is great for somebody who's just starting out, who sees an opportunity with an asset that's got heavy, deferred maintenance and needs a lot of work. And you're like, dude, I could come up there, scoop up a lot of the equity, do a lot of hard work once, twice, grab that equity, give my investors a return and then go put it into something better. Does that make sense?  [00:11:42] Sam Wilson: It does. So I guess that's the, that that's a follow on question to your investors. Heavy lift, heavy value, add, you know, maybe low occupancy, maybe there's crime, maybe there's a lot of those things that go along with, it feels like additional risk, you know, to a lot of investors. How do you frame that conversationto let them know, Hey, we can, we can make this work. And you know, the, it, it's not as risky as it may seem. [00:12:08] Ace Karimi: Oh, for sure, here's why our model still has certain metrics. It still has to be a B area, like C plus at the worst. I'm not going into the hood. Like, I'm just not, there's no way I'm going to go in there. You know, some people want do that. I'm not. Like, these properties still exist where they're in good areas. They are just mismanaged. They're just not they're, you know, they're not looked after properly and the right operator can go in there and turn things around. [00:12:34] Ace Karimi: And so at the end of the day, like if it's 40% occupied or something, I, I wouldn't really look at it too much. You know, like I'm not, I'm not taking on that much extra risk where I'm saying, Hey, look, I'm going to go into a D class area and take on a property that's low occupied. No, that, that that's just trouble. [00:12:52] Ace Karimi: We, we stay away from that completely. So there's complete no's that we do. Our, our properties, I did three of these in one year. They were all in over 90% occupied. Wow. And they were in good areas.  [00:13:01] Sam Wilson: 90% occupied.  [00:13:03] Ace Karimi: Yeah.  [00:13:03] Sam Wilson: Submarket rents because the place looked like garbage.  [00:13:07] Ace Karimi: Yeah, they just didn't treat it. Right, dude. And, and here's the thing it's like, and I, and I tell people this, and when they ask me, it's like the owners, they don't care. Like, they're not looking after the property. They're just, Hey, I'll just take a check and whatever happens, happens, and property management's usually not involved. And you know, that's just, what's going on. [00:13:24] Ace Karimi: Nobody really cares. Like, we care about our properties, right? My team's involved every single week. We're on Slack. Well, we have a communication channel, 24/7. We do weekly pulse checks. You know, we're looking after our asset for our investors, but also for ourselves. That's always how I am with any business I do. I'm keeping my eyes on the prize.  [00:13:43] Sam Wilson: Right. And, and we bought one like that last year is just like, I mean, absentee owner, running to the ground. They didn't care. Didn't care. So I get it, you know, then again, they were making their money along the way 'cause they bought it, you know, eight years ago for a, for a... [00:13:57] Ace Karimi: Exactly. Dude, they're happy either way.  [00:14:00] Sam Wilson: They're happy. They're clipping a coupon and the place looks terrible.  [00:14:04] Ace Karimi: To be honest, you want to be them? Like, that's the funny, that's what I tell people. I'm like, dude, it's not that fact that I'm winning. These guys already won. They're like 8 to 10X-ing their money doing absolutely nothing. [00:14:14] Sam Wilson: Well for sure. For sure. They're also slumlords and those are the people that we want to get out of the business. So it's like...  [00:14:19] Ace Karimi: That's true. That's true. [00:14:20] Sam Wilson: They're the ones that give us a bad name, so, and you're the one going in there and, and giving us a good name. [00:14:25] Sam Wilson: So you're doing, you're doing right. And I like that. Tell me about how do you offset refi risk, especially in today's rates environment. I mean, your business plan sounds incumbent upon being able to refi this property in two to three years.  [00:14:39] Ace Karimi: No, I could also just sell it, too. Like that, that's always something we, we let 'em know, like, Hey look, 'cause because if you sell it, they're, they're, you know, they actually get a higher than average returns metrics. [00:14:48] Ace Karimi: It's usually like 3X, two and a half, 3X or something. So if we sell it, they're even happier. They're like, wow, I'm making all my money. But to be honest, they want that capital to be used all the time. So we, we always run at both scenarios. We present both in front of 'em here. Here's our plan A, it's to go and refi. But if we can't do that, if we saw here's what it looks like. And on one of our deals, it was flip flopped. We're saying, Hey, look, we're looking to sell this deal, but if we can get an above average valuation above higher than our conservative number, then we're going to get a refi. So we always run both scenarios 'cause it's like, I don't ever like having one exit and be enforced into a position. Not, not a way you want to do that, especially with these big deals. Yeah. That's usually it.  [00:15:28] Sam Wilson: Right. Makes no, that makes sense. That makes sense. You could, you could always sell it. What is, I guess when you guys look at a cash out refi, are you maximizing the amount of capital you can pull out of the deal? Or is it, are you de-leveraging in some capacity or what's that. [00:15:43] Sam Wilson: How, how, how do you like to look at that? I'm sure it's on a deal by deal basis, but what's your general feeling around that?  [00:15:48] Ace Karimi: No, no. The funny thing is, so this first deal that we just refinance, right? Like, we're going to only going to pull out 70%. You don't need to pull all of it out. I don't, I, I think, you know, definitely keeps some in the deal for just cash flows to always pay things off, you know? [00:16:02] Ace Karimi: You always got to be looking out for the worst case scenarios, man. I'm just like thinking in the back of my mind. Sometimes I'm like, okay, some crazy thing happens. I don't know, like you've got to have months where you're able to have reserves, something drop, something crazy happens, you know, like, you got to make sure you can always break even. You have extra months to pay things off. You do all this work. Like, what's the point, you know, you pull out 80% and then your, your margins are thin as it is. And you always need to keep it 98 to 99% occupied. It's not smart.  [00:16:31] Sam Wilson: I hear you. I hear you, man. That, that makes a lot of sense. Ace, one of the things we talked about before actually hitting record on this was that you feel like finding investors is really easy to do. [00:16:44] Sam Wilson: That runs kind of counter to what a lot of people experience, especially getting started. Why do you say that?  [00:16:51] Ace Karimi: One, it's perspective, man. I, I really think it's like just a perspective. Like I've always had that belief even before I raised any money. You know, when I was wholesaling and flipping, I think that's one of the things that I saw. [00:17:01] Ace Karimi: It's it's investors are hungry for deals, man. There's so much, like, hunger and desire for just a, an opportunity, right? They will jump on it. I've seen when I used to wholesale houses, 'cause a lot of times we flipped, but sometimes when we wholesale, if I send it out in an email link, okay. And I had a property with some margin, with some meat on the bone and they can make, you know, 15, 20% dude, you should see how often it would blow up my. [00:17:27] Ace Karimi: Hey, what is it going to take to get in this deal? What's it going to take? You let me know, give me the number. Hey man, I don't want to be in a bidding war, blah, blah, blah. And I'm like, dude, here's my process. If you want to get the deal, I need you to come and highest and best and stop playing around, you know, because I have the opportunity. [00:17:42] Ace Karimi: I want to build a relationship with you, but you're not going to come and undercut me. So it's a respect thing, right? You have to come from a place of, of respect of holding yourself in a way where he's like, dude, like I got to, I got to understand that this guy has the value and I'm trying to build a relationship with him. [00:17:56] Ace Karimi: You know, I always look to the future. Sometimes I'll even take a little bit less, but I always go with the guy that I felt better about, that I knew had more principles instead of going for the extra five grand, six grand on, on somebody I did not like, I didn't like the way they were carrying themselves and they acted like they could run me just 'cause they had extra money. [00:18:13] Ace Karimi: I don't, I, you know, it's like, it's always about principles to me. So when I saw that in, in wholesaling that people wanted opportunity, you know, and, or everywhere. Hundreds and hundreds and, like, that, that I had just in my local market who just wanted single family houses, you know, but when I started talking to 'em, they were also just down for any opportunity. [00:18:33] Ace Karimi: That's the thing is if people, if you have an opportunity to make money, money finds deals, money's trying to find deals to go into. And the only thing is you need is to have good enough deals that the money wants to be a part of. That's how it works. So like, now that I did my apartment building, I probably raised, I don't know, five, 10 million by now in really over in about a year. The thing is it's like, as long as you structure it clearly, they see the upside, they understand, to me, everyone is an investor and everyone should be an investor, right? Like, I have my shirt here, right? Like, like part of our mission in our business is to help everyone become investors. I've, I've invested my own family's money and on, on my properties, I believe in it that much, right? [00:19:16] Ace Karimi: Savings accounts for years, I have friends of family that are investing with me. They're investors. Everyone's got money stacked, stacked away. They just want to be like, that guy's an expert. I trust him. He's an authority, knows what he's doing and I feel good. And you set the right expectations and you just lay back. [00:19:35] Ace Karimi: You should, you should see the responses. They, some of them, they just do it 'cause they trust you. And then throughout the actual stabilization period, dude, they're collecting monthly checks and they're happy. They're not getting that from stocks. Where else are they getting that? You know? So just from the monthly dripper loan on 6, 7, 8% pref, dude, they're happy. I promise you. And then, and they don't even realize that like when I return their money and then I'm going to give them an extra check and refi, dude, their mind's going to be blown, right? But just the pref alone, like that's powerful. It is.  [00:20:07] Sam Wilson: It really is. It really is. And that's, I got one of those texts from somebody the other day that just said, Hey, thank you. Thank you for giving me an opportunity to get outta the stock market. And get paid on a quarter. We, we, we do quarterly distributions, but get paid quarterly. This is awesome. Yeah, I really appreciate it. It's like, oh right. What you're, what you're doing is of value. Ace, thanks for the time to come on the show today and share with us what you've been doing, how you've done it so quickly, your perspective on , you know, finding investors is easy to do, how to take on a heavier lift project and yet still offset ,risk and, you know, really, your unique indication model. [00:20:42] Sam Wilson: I think that's really cool the way that you've kind of turned this on its head. And yet at the same time, are really attracting investors to your deals in a unique way. So, and congrats on that one deal that you've taken from basically four and a half million to a 10 million deal in a very short period of time. That is super cool. If our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:21:03] Ace Karimi: Social media is usually the best. Add me on Facebook, Ace Karimi, LinkedIn, Ace Karimi, and then on Instagram, @ace.Invest. That's it. I'm happy to provide the rest of the details to you. My email, if they have anything they want to talk about for sure.  [00:21:19] Sam Wilson: Certainly we'll put all that in the show notes. Ace, thanks for coming on the show today. Certainly appreciate it. [00:21:24] Ace Karimi: Sam. Thank you.

Dish City
Little Saigon & Eden Center

Dish City

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 36:16 Very Popular


The center of Northern Virginia's thriving Vietnamese community is Eden Center in Falls Church. It's the biggest Vietnamese commercial center on the east coast and draws visitors from all over the DMV region and the country. But before Eden Center, the local Vietnamese community was based in Little Saigon in Clarendon. This week, Ruth and Patrick learn the origins of Little Saigon, how the community relocated there to Eden Center, and what the local Vietnamese community's future might hold. Patrick and Ruth will be at the Giant Barbecue Battle in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, June 25. Stop by and grab some stickers and magnets! Check out music from this episode by No-No Boy, composed by Julian Saporiti and engineered by Seth Boggess. Fill out our survey: dishcity.org/survey Leave us a tip at wamu.org/supportdishcity. Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/dishcity Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/dishcity

The Fierce Female Network
The Shallowz, Jazzy Sky, and The Antenna Tribe Are On Air

The Fierce Female Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 35:00


The Shallowz are a Northern Virginia quintet specializing in contagious indie rock. The sound is somewhat familiar to the ear, yet surprisingly new and different. Dedicated to enjoying the creative process of writing and performing original rock music, The Shallowz come from diverse musical backgrounds but work as a cohesive unit to craft and perform their own take on indie pop/rock. Typically conducted in a small barn in rural Warrenton, Virginia, The Shallowz would get together every other weekend to block out the weekly remnants of their day jobs and enjoy writing and play music. This ritual has continued for over 20 years in various incarnations, but at present we call ourselves, The Shallowz.   Jazzy Sky is a vocal Jazz band. It starts its activity in 2018, and has been founded by Stephane Querry (Pianist and Composer) who writes the songs. One EP and numerous singles have already been released in all the streaming and download platforms, and new projects are going on. Two singers (Camille and Lydia) and different musicians perform the songs as function as the music.   The Antenna Tribe From crafting gorgeous layered soundscapes to producing familiar pop-sensible stories, The Antenna Tribe has, at its core, an unrelenting drive to be both emotionally familiar and sonically unique. A knack for impeccable craftsmanship and an ear for faithfully communicating the human condition has resulted in glimmering arrangements and unforgettable musical memories. Working with an array of talented singer-songwriters, The Antenna Tribe strives to cast each vocalist in their optimal light, building layers of sound around each of them as they tell each story with emotion and poignancy. 

Stories in Small Business
186. Flipping Time to Live (and Work) Your Best Life with Karen Briscoe

Stories in Small Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:51


When was the last time you thought or said there's not enough time in the day? For me, it was probably earlier today.    We spend so much time trying to ensure that our basic needs are met: We work so we can pay our mortgage or electric bill. We spend time tending to the kids and pets, making sure we have food and clothing. We meet other peoples' needs because we want to feel like we belong. And so on. Think Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. And that leaves little to no space to do what brings us joy.   This holds true in business too. We spend so much time doing the little things: posting to social media, updating our website, answering emails, etc. And when we fill our time with these things, we don't have time to do the really deep work that we excel at. The work that we started our business to do.   What if we flipped time and started with the deep work instead? We're exploring that concept in this week's episode of the podcast with Karen Briscoe, creator of the “5 Minute Success” concept and author of Flip Time Love Life. Mentioned in This Episode: Flip Time Love Life book Flip Time Video Living in the Gap The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg The Dip by Seth Godin   About Karen Briscoe: Karen Briscoe is the creator of the transformative "5 Minute Success" concept.  Her first book Real Estate Success in 5 Minutes a Day: Secrets of a Top Agent Revealed, and Commit to Get Leads:  66 Day Challenge® and Consult to Sell: 66 Day Challenge® offer a combination of information and inspiration delivered through memorable stories. The daily format with takeaways propels one to achieve success at a higher level in business and life.  Topics include:  Commit to Get Leads; Consult to Sell; Connect to Build and Grow; Success Thinking, Activities and Vision; which all lead to the Sweet Spot of Success. Her most recent book, Flip Time / Love Life is a Heroine's Journey tale about loving the life you have while you create and co-create the life of your dreams.        Her first book was featured in INMAN as “must read for your best year in real estate” in 2017.  The book ranks on Amazon in the top 1% in its category.  It has been endorsed by industry leaders Hal Elrod, Pat Hiban and Michael J. Maher.  She is a contributing author to INMAN and Real Trends real estate media outlets.   Karen is the host of the “5 Minute Success” podcast which has ranked #1 on Overcast most recommended in the business category.  The show has an amazing array of guests who achieve success at a high level.   Karen also is a frequent guest on other podcasts that focus on entrepreneurial, success and motivation, as well as real estate related topics.  She coaches on the best of 5 Minute Success principles.                                  Karen is the principal owner of the Huckaby Briscoe Conroy Group (HBC) with Keller Williams. The HBC Group has been recognized by the Wall Street Journal as one of the 250 Top Realtor® teams in the United States. Since 1977, HBC Group has sold over 1,500 homes valued at over $1.5 billion. The team consistently sells over 100 residential properties annually ranging from multi-million dollar luxury estates to condominiums and townhomes. Primary market areas include Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, and Washington, DC.