Podcasts about Four Noble Truths

Basic framework of Buddhist thought

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Latest podcast episodes about Four Noble Truths

Buddhist Society of Western Australia
The Four Noble Truths - The Reality of Life | Ajahn Nissarano | 02 October 2022

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 68:31


Ajahn Nissarano gives a Dhamma talk from Newbury Buddhist Monastery, Victoria, Australia (www.nbm.org.au) on 02 October 2022. Please visit the BSV Podcast Channel and BSV YouTube Channel Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page: https://bswa.org/teachings/, choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean. Teaching retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyNIh4DIAOk (YouTube Channel: BSV Dhamma Talks)

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast
Dharma Encounter: Our Suffering Sense Of Self

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 80:23


Geoffrey Shugen Arnold, Roshi - Zen Mountain Monastery, New York, Sunday 10/02/2022 - Dharma Encounter at the conclusion of the Mountains & Rivers Sesshin - The Buddha said there is "ordinary suffering" - dukkha - which is the everyday garden variety of suffering that you think of and experience when you hear the word "suffering". There is the suffering that arises through "change"; i.e. you have something, and you want it to last forever, but it won't. You have something that you don't want, and it won't change fast enough. You have a position, a relationship, a feeling, an accomplishment, you have a samadhi, you have something that is dear to you, and you want it to always be "just like that". And then there is the more subtle suffering that is the skandhas themselves. (The skandhas are form, feeling, perception, volitional formation, and consciousness.) The Buddha often referred to them as "the clinging skandhas"; that we are nothing but that very process that happens within the skandhas. We don't see it because it happens so instantaneously and then it's gone and it happens again and again, and our consciousness creates a seamless flow so that we create an experience of continuity, a kind of permanent, ongoing coherence in our actual lived experience which we interpret or equate as a kind of permanent someone. Then there is a kind of symphony, drawing from each of these forms of suffering, that is particular, that is directed towards ourselves; how we see that self, having identified with it, having created, and constructed it, unknowingly for the most part, being very invested in keeping it up and going. Though, never quite complete. We can identify the self (ourself) out of a habit, a behavior, an action, and interpret that as a sign of that incompleteness. (Self-doubt comes out of this.) - How is it when that sense of self is suffering itself? How do we practice this? What needs to be understood about this aspect of self? What understanding will serve to free us? How do we understand this in terms of the Four Noble Truths? - Shugen Roshi brought up these questions for students to engage with him in Dharma Encounter.

Dhammatalks.org Evening Talks
Four Noble Truths to One

Dhammatalks.org Evening Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:25


A talk by Thanissaro Bhikkhu entitled "Four Noble Truths to One"

Zen Commuter
1862: Lion's Roar Week - No Self, No Suffering by Melvin Mcleod - Part 1

Zen Commuter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 10:02


The Buddha has a roadmap to end your suffering, and it has been around for over 2500 years.  Today we end Lion's Roar week with a two part artcle that explains the Four Noble Truths. The article being read is by Melvin Mcleod

Way of Compassion Dharma Center
Approaching the Buddhist Path 07 - The Four Truths of the Aryas

Way of Compassion Dharma Center

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 52:33


John Bruna, the spiritual director of the Way of Compassion Dharma Center, continues his commentary on the text "Approaching Buddhism" by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Venerable Thubten Chödron. In this session, John unpacks the Four Truths of the Aryas which are commonly known as the Four Noble Truths. This episode was recorded on September 7th, 2022. Welcome to the Way of Compassion Dharma Center Podcast. Located in Carbondale, Colorado, the Way of Compassion Dharma center's primary objective is to provide programs of Buddhist studies and practices that are practical, accessible, and meet the needs of the communities we serve.  As a traditional Buddhist center, all of our teachings are offered freely. If you would like to make a donation to support the center, please visit www.wocdc.org.  May you flourish in your practice and may all beings swiftly be free of suffering.

Clear Mountain Podcast
Dhamma & the Multiverse of Madness (MN 9, III) | Ven. Nisabho

Clear Mountain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 55:02


In this talk, Tan Nisabho describes the third iteration of Right View, the application of the Four Noble Truths' framework to Dependent Origination, as described by Ven. Sariputta in the Sammādiṭṭhi Sutta (MN 9) - https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/MN/MN9.html .

Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast
Jhana Meditation Structured Study Class 19-2 Sacca-Vibhanga Sutta, The Buddha's Analysis of Four Noble Truths Part 2

Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 44:05


This is a recording from Cross River Meditation Center in Frenchtown, New Jersey. Our Dhamma classes are streamed live on Tuesday at 7:15 pm, Thursday at 2:15 pm, and Saturday at 8:30 am Eastern Us Time.  Please support  future recordings and the continued restoration, preservation, and presentation of the Buddha's Dhamma, please consider a donation: Support John and B ecoming-Buddha.com  There are guided Jhana meditations, more than 300 restored Suttas and 800 Dhamma class recordings at Becoming-Buddha.com Each Dhamma class will have a Jhana meditation session followed by my Dhamma talk and Sangha discussion. We conclude with mindfulness of Metta.   My talks and classes can be joined live:   Through your web browse: https://zoom.us/j/9083919079  Through your Android device here: Zoom Android App  Through your IOS device here: Zoom IOS Ap   New audio and video recordings are posted typically within twenty-four hours post-class:   Podcast/Audio Archive   Video Archive   If you are subscribed to my Podcast on Podbean or iTunes, you will receive notifications when new videos are posted.   To schedule private individual or group Dhamma instruction via video conference please  Email John

Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast
Jhana Meditation Structured Study Class 19 Sacca-Vibhanga Sutta, The Buddha's Analysis of Four Noble Truths Part 1

Becoming Buddha Cross River Meditation Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 79:24


This is a recording from Cross River Meditation Center in Frenchtown, New Jersey. Our Dhamma classes are streamed live on Tuesday at 7:15 pm, Thursday at 2:15 pm, and Saturday at 8:30 am Eastern Us Time.  Please support  future recordings and the continued restoration, preservation, and presentation of the Buddha's Dhamma, please consider a donation: Support John and B ecoming-Buddha.com  There are guided Jhana meditations, more than 300 restored Suttas and 800 Dhamma class recordings at Becoming-Buddha.com Each Dhamma class will have a Jhana meditation session followed by my Dhamma talk and Sangha discussion. We conclude with mindfulness of Metta.   My talks and classes can be joined live:   Through your web browse: https://zoom.us/j/9083919079  Through your Android device here: Zoom Android App  Through your IOS device here: Zoom IOS Ap   New audio and video recordings are posted typically within twenty-four hours post-class:   Podcast/Audio Archive   Video Archive   If you are subscribed to my Podcast on Podbean or iTunes, you will receive notifications when new videos are posted.   To schedule private individual or group Dhamma instruction via video conference please  Email John

Sutta Meditation Series
HOW DO WE DEVELOP NOBLE RIGHT CONCENTRATION WITH THE EIGHTFOLD PATH? (FULL DHAMMA SESSION, Poya)

Sutta Meditation Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 115:11


Welcome back to the Sutta Meditation Series Podcast. This is the FULL DHAMMA SESSION, conducted on BINARA POYA (10 September 2022) via zoom, on "HOW DO WE DEVELOP NOBLE RIGHT CONCENTRATION WITH THE EIGHTFOLD PATH?" We examine the Mahācattārīsaka Sutta (MN 117), which is an important teaching of the Buddha on how the Noble Eightfold Path works, how we activate and develop it to fulfilment. **Please note - we are examining this teaching from the Buddha with the aspiration for the supramundane development of the Noble Eightfold Path** In this Dhamma session, we cover: Quick recap of the Four Noble Truths (including arising and passing away, the stages and insights and wrong/right paths) Intro to the Noble Eightfold Path - Mahācattārīsaka Sutta (MN 117) and what is important about this teaching “Deep Dive” into how the Noble Eightfold Path works, how we activate and develop it, how the path factors support noble right concentration and leads to right knowledge and right liberation Understanding the Great Forty Some of the suttas covered directly or indirectly in this session: — Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta (SN 56.11) — Pariññeyya Sutta (SN 56.29) — Arahanta Sutta (SN 56.24) — Āvijjā Sutta (SN 56.17) — Vijjā Sutta (SN 56.18) — Dvayatānupassana Sutta (Sn 3.12) — Gavampati Sutta (SN 56.30) — Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta (SN 56.11) — Pariññeyya Sutta (SN 56.29) — Saṅgīti Sutta (DN 33) — Suttavebhaṅgiya (Pe 9) — Vijjā Sutta (AN 10.105) — Vipattisampadā Sutta (AN 3.117) — Sammādiṭṭhi Sutta (MN 9) — Saḷāyatanavibhaṅga Sutta (MN 137) — Pamadavihari Sutta (SN 35.97) — Samadhi-bhavana Sutta (SN 22.5) — Pīti Sutta (AN 5.176) — Dhatuvibhanga Sutta (MN 140) — Culasunnata Sutta (MN 121) — Duccaritavipākasutta (AN 8.40) — Vaṇijjā Sutta (AN 5.177) — Karaṇīyametta Sutta (Snp 1.8) An electronic copy of the slide for the "Three states that run together" from the Mahācattārīsaka Sutta and the "wisdom path of renunciation based on Saḷāyatanavibhaṅga Sutta " as discussed in this Dhamma Session will be posted (and pinned) to the Sutta Meditation Series Telegram channel (https://t.me/suttameditationseries) Bohoma pin (much merit) to the person who requested this sutta asking the question on noble right concentration. The video of this talk has been published to the Sutta Meditation YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dX_1b1AMCw Blessings of the Triple Gem. Theruwan saranai To find the YT Sutta Meditation Series playlists visit: https://www.youtube.com/c/SuttaMeditationSeries/playlists, or click on 'Playlists' in the top menu bar. Selected tables, slides and documents are shared via the Sutta Meditation Series Telegram channel - https://t.me/suttameditationseries For all enquiries - suttameditationseries@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/suttameditationseries/message

Lotus Underground
Lotus Underground FALL 2022 classes

Lotus Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:30


LUSB - FALL SEMESTER CLASSES TURNING THE DHARMA WHEEL 10-week course on essential Buddhist teachings Saturdays, 9:00am – 10:30am PT October 1 – December 10, 2022 A traditional way of learning Buddhism is called Anguttara, ‘adding one' – wherein the teachings of the Buddha are presented numerically in increasing order, such as the Three Poisons, the Four Noble Truths, and then the Five Aggregations. This 10-week course uses a similar method of interlocking systems to explore fundamental Buddhist concepts and their interrelations. The ideas presented in each week's session grow in complexity and systematically build on previous session topics, thus ‘turning the wheel of Truth,' or Dharma. This is the first of a three-part Buddhist Studies Program, designed to introduce basic Buddhist practices, philosophy, and history. Even if you are already familiar with these teachings, the intention of this course is to present them in a new way. EIGHT SCHOOLS OF BUDDHISM 8-part series on the History of Buddhism Tuesdays, 9:00am – 10:30am PT September 20 – November 8, 2022 The ‘Eight Schools' is a traditional Buddhist classification system from medieval China and Japan that categorizes different Buddhist practices and communities that arose in India during the first thousand years of Buddhist history, from approximately 400 BC to 600 AD. This course uses a similar classification system to present the origins and foundational teachings of eight major trends in Buddhism found in the world today, which are essentially remnants of the schools from this medieval system. This course is the third part of the LUSB Buddhist Studies Program, designed to show how the essential teachings and deeper philosophies presented in the first two courses have been put in to practice throughout history. ADVANCED STUDY: MIND-ONLY BUDDHISM 8-week advanced course on Yogacara Buddhism Thursdays, 5:30pm – 7:00pm PT September 15 – November 3, 2022 One of the oldest philosophical questions concerns the relationship between ‘mind' and ‘matter' - the mental world of ideas and thought, and the physical world experienced by our senses. Are mind and consciousness simply emergent results of the physical world, or is ‘the physical world' merely an idea entertained by a conscious mind? This course is an introduction to the ‘mind-only' teaching of Yogacara Buddhism, an idealistic school of Buddhism that arose around the the 4th-century AD in the Gandharan region of what is today Afghanistan. This school has come to represent the so-called ‘Third Turning' (or phase) of the teachings of the Buddha, in which the concept of Emptiness (indicative of the ‘Second Turning'), is taken to the logical conclusion that the ‘physical world' is merely a conscious construction, similar to, but not the same as, a dream. The focus of this course will be understanding the Yogacara model of eight consciousnesses, which includes the so-called ‘Storehouse Consciousness' or ālaya-vijñāna. This course in available to participants who have already taken the Turning the Dharma Wheel course and the Wheel of Becoming course on Dependent-Origination. If you have not taken the LUSB introductory courses but would still like to attend, please let me know as there is always room for exceptions.

Bob Thurman Podcast
Chanting and Practicing the Heart Sutra – Ep. 304

Bob Thurman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 47:45 Very Popular


The Heart Sutra is one of the most profound and widely studied texts in the Buddhist canon which is recited at the start of teachings, events & as a blessing. In this podcast Robert A.F. Thurman leads a recitation of The Heart Sutra and gives a teaching on it's connections to the Four Noble Truths and the Buddha's Eight Folk Path of liberation for all audiences. Professor Thurman begins this podcast with an explanation of the Heart Sutra focusing on the the dialog between Shāriputra and Avalokiteśvara in the Buddha's samadhi field, and it's connection to Clear Light, Bliss, Relativity and how one can avoid absolutism when thinking about emptiness. Podcast concludes with Professor Thurman explaining how the practice of reciting The Heart Sutra is the key to understanding it's teaching as a tool for mind transformation and a reading of the the third chapter of "The Flower Ornament Sutra" as translated by Thomas Cleary. “The Transcendent Wisdom Heart Sutra, known as The Heart Sutra in all Mahayana Buddhist countries, and The Heart of Wisdom in Tibet, is a concise expression of the profound vision of reality that is the root of liberation from suffering. Tibetan religious all know this by heart and chant is solemnly at the beginning of every ceremony. In addition to a prescription for enlightenment, they consider it the most powerful exorcism, purifier, and developer of merit as well of wisdom.” Robert A.F. Thurman from Essential Tibetan Buddhism Professor Thurman's translation of the Heart Sutra can be found in his book, Essential Tibetan Buddhism, on page 171, under the chapter heading, “Practicing the Liberating Wisdom.”

Centered in the City
Episode 120: The Buddhist Enneagram with Susan Piver

Centered in the City

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 34:47


In this podcast episode I get to talk to Susan Piver, an internationally-acclaimed meditation teacher and award-winning author on her new book, “The Buddhist Enneagram: Nine Paths to Warriorship.” Susan discusses the Enneagram in more detail. We highlight why personality assesments can be helpful and harmful. Susan also discusses how the Buddhist lens of "Warriorship" helps us have courage to turn inwards and examine who we are. Take a listen to the whole episode and share your takeaways with us on Instagram @OneWade and @Susan.piver   Are you looking to feel more centered and embodied as you transition into the Fall season? Join us for a two-week, Center Yourself This Fall Challenge filled with resources and community support so that you can feel your best without striving.    ***** Pre-order “The Buddhist Enneagram: Nine Paths to Warriorship” here and receive a *bonus* webinar if ordered before 9/13.  Susan Piver is a New York Times bestselling author of many books, including the award-winning "How Not to Be Afraid of Your Own Life", "The Wisdom of a Broken Heart", "Start Here Now: An Open-Hearted Guide to the Path and Practice of Meditation", and "The Four Noble Truths of Love: Buddhist Wisdom for Modern Relationships". Susan has been a practicing Buddhist since 1993 and graduated from a Buddhist seminary in 2004. She is an internationally-acclaimed meditation teacher, known for her ability to translate ancient practices into modern life. Her work has been featured on the Oprah show, TODAY, CNN, and in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and others. In 2013, she launched the Open Heart Project, the largest virtual mindfulness community in the world, with 20,000 members. Her newest book is “The Buddhist Enneagram: Nine Paths to Warriorship.”

theeffect Podcasts
Out Beyond

theeffect Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 56:33


Dave Brisbin 8.28.22 Ever been frustrated by Jesus' communication style? Get in line because even his first followers throw their hands up in the gospels and ask why he doesn't just speak plainly. Why always in parables and figures of speech. Jesus is a poet. One of the best. He knows he can't express spiritual truths directly, but only through stories and metaphors that point without limiting. I'm sure this is a big part of the allure of Buddhism in the West: Buddha is more engineer than poet, giving us Three Universal Truths, Four Noble Truths, an Eight Fold Path, all interconnected and breaking down into further sublists. Something to hold on to. Jesus never gives us lists or interlocking structure. He points toward the experience of top-level concepts and principles, what it feels like to live them. Frustrating, because he is always challenging embedded thought, always introducing paradox and mystery, attempting to take us beyond. Beyond where we are, beyond where we think we can go, even beyond what we think proper. Between Jesus' poetic lines, we find him taking us beyond obedience—to realize that law can only frame the door to life; walking through is experiencing law being fulfilled in relationships that are no longer contractual, that live and breathe in the freedom to break the code whenever love requires. Beyond certainty—to realize that certainty is an illusion, that re-introducing mystery and paradox is to thrive in grateful unknowing, in faith. Beyond belief—to realize that ideas don't transform us until we act on them, risk losing everything we believe will save us to experience what really does. Our codes and beliefs, our need for certainty, our conscious minds are hardened targets. They have to be to sustain us through the fears of physical life. But Jesus is taking us beyond physical life, to the life that exists beyond our fears. Like Abraham, asked to kill his miracle son and promise, Jesus is taking us beyond all the defenses we build around what we believe will save us…to experience that we already are.

True North with Dave Brisbin

Dave Brisbin 8.28.22 Ever been frustrated by Jesus' communication style? Get in line because even his first followers throw their hands up in the gospels and ask why he doesn't just speak plainly. Why always in parables and figures of speech. Jesus is a poet. One of the best. He knows he can't express spiritual truths directly, but only through stories and metaphors that point without limiting. I'm sure this is a big part of the allure of Buddhism in the West: Buddha is more engineer than poet, giving us Three Universal Truths, Four Noble Truths, an Eight Fold Path, all interconnected and breaking down into further sublists. Something to hold on to. Jesus never gives us lists or interlocking structure. He points toward the experience of top-level concepts and principles, what it feels like to live them. Frustrating, because he is always challenging embedded thought, always introducing paradox and mystery, attempting to take us beyond. Beyond where we are, beyond where we think we can go, even beyond what we think proper. Between Jesus' poetic lines, we find him taking us beyond obedience—to realize that law can only frame the door to life; walking through is experiencing law being fulfilled in relationships that are no longer contractual, that live and breathe in the freedom to break the code whenever love requires. Beyond certainty—to realize that certainty is an illusion, that re-introducing mystery and paradox is to thrive in grateful unknowing, in faith. Beyond belief—to realize that ideas don't transform us until we act on them, risk losing everything we believe will save us to experience what really does. Our codes and beliefs, our need for certainty, our conscious minds are hardened targets. They have to be to sustain us through the fears of physical life. But Jesus is taking us beyond physical life, to the life that exists beyond our fears. Like Abraham, asked to kill his miracle son and promise, Jesus is taking us beyond all the defenses we build around what we believe will save us…to experience that we already are.

Wild Heart Meditation Center
The Eightfold Path - Wise Mindfulness

Wild Heart Meditation Center

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 45:11 Very Popular


In this episode, Andrew continues his series of talks on the Buddha's Eightfold Path, discussing the topic of "Wise Mindfulness". Mindfulness is such a popular focus of the Buddha's teaching, but what did he actually say about it 2600 years ago? We hope you enjoy!

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
105. Design & Zen Summary V

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 15:29


It's not personal.But it manifests that way —Universally.* * *As promised in the last segment, we will finish this series of five by taking up the remaining pair of combinations — the intersection of the Personal from the Four Spheres, with the Cessation of suffering from the Four Noble Truths, which involves the Eightfold Path previously touched upon. Personal Cessation is the only kind there can be, it seems. Even the Natural Cessation of physical death is not considered the end of suffering in Buddhism, owing to the principle of rebirth. Social Cessation does not seem that germane, other than the relatively decreasing engagement that comes with aging. But ask anyone in assisted living, palliative or hospice care, and you will find most of the issues that arise are social in nature. It must be admitted that if Cessation of suffering can and does actually occur in the midst of life, it must be a Universal phenomenon, as well as Personal. But the only dimension that counts must be the Personal, i.e. how we actually experience and embrace it.The graphic illustrates the correlation of the Four Spheres of reality — the Personal, Social, Natural and Universal — with the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism — the Existence, Origin, Cessation, and Path to Cessation, of suffering, dukkha, a comprehensive model of lay Zen householder practice.The Personal sphere is the bubble in which we sit when we assume the zazen posture. As mentioned, we do not thereby totally leave behind the Social, any more than we can escape the Natural and Universal spheres of influence, notwithstanding ancient claims to the contrary for the powers of meditation. But we can establish some distance between ourselves and others in meditation. Master Dogen hints at this in Fukanzazengi [Principles of Seated Meditation], his early tract on zazen:Now, in doing zazen it is desirable to have a quiet room. You should be temperate in eating and drinking, forsaking all delusive relationships.The operative phrase here is “forsaking all delusive relationships,” which begs the question: Which, if any, of the many relationships we have are not delusive? In another teaching, Genjokoan [Actualizing the Fundamental Point], Dogen lays out four transitions in Zen practice in descriptive, but cryptic, terms:To study the Buddha way is to study the self To study the self is to forget the self To forget the self is to be actualized by the myriad things When actualized by the myriad things your body and mind as well as the bodies and minds of others drop away No trace of realization remains and this no-trace continues endlessly Another translation says something like: “to forget the self is to be enlightened by all things; to be enlightened by all things is to remove the barrier between self and other and go on in traceless enlightenment forever.” This can be misinterpreted, I think, to indicate that this realization is a kind of “kumbaya” moment, where we see and embrace the fact that we are all alike, all in the same boat, et cetera, and why “Can't we all just get along?” In other words, a Social interpretation of self and others, plural, and removing any apparent barriers. But I do not think this is what Master Dogen is getting at.If instead we “remove the barrier between self and other,” singular, this identifies the fundamental relationship that we have to resolve, above and before all others. Like Bodhidharma alone in his cave, self-and-other are still present. This basic bifurcation in our apprehension of reality is akin to the Fall from Grace in Buddhism. It amounts to a kind of category error, one that develops in early childhood via the natural process called individuation, i.e. becoming aware of ourselves as individual beings separate from mom, the crib, and everything else. This is further reinforced by parents, teachers and peers, in conventional education. Which, in our culture, does not typically include meditation.Not that this growing awareness of separate individuality is not true; it is just that it is not complete. The rest of the story is that we are intricately interconnected to all of our relationships, including with other human beings, but also sentient beings of other species in the animal kingdom, as well as plant life, and the insentient world. In other words, the Personal cannot be isolated from the Natural and Universal, let alone the Social. Master Dogen goes on to suggest that in zazen, however, we suspend judgment about all of this for the moment, at least for the time we are on the cushion:Setting everything aside, think of neither good nor evil, right or wrong. Thus having stopped the various functions of your mind, give up even the idea of becoming a Buddha.Note that “everything,” here, primarily entailing those judgment calls in the Social sphere, such as identifying “good and evil, right and wrong,” are to be set aside, in zazen. And that this kind of thinking represents the natural functioning of the mind, that is, the thinking or discriminating mind, known as citta in Sanskrit, the complement of bodhi, or wisdom mind. I think we can define these terms simply as analytical versus intuitive aspects of the total mind, or bodhicitta. This basic division of the mind into a dyad, or binary, we may take as the psychology or mind science of the times, as compared to the more complex models of the brain and its functions propounded by science today.The main point here is that the ordinary functions of the mind —which we advisedly tend to label as “monkey mind” — reach a point of diminishing returns, though I don't think we can literally stop them. Like a live monkey, citta will eventually wear itself out, lie down and take a nap. Trying to stop the functions of the mind intentionally only turns out to be more monkey business, as in the Ch'an poem Hshinshinming [Trust in Mind]:Trying to stop activity to achieve passivity, the very effort fills you with activityThis is one of the many catch-22s that we find in Zen practice. And not only on the cushion, as Dogen goes on to remind us:This holds true not only for zazen but for all your daily actions.So the Personal Cessation of suffering may be experienced not as a sudden, irreversible event, like a thunderbolt from the sky, but a series of gradual, incremental cessations of our knee-jerk reactions to events. Both in the Personal sphere, particularly in meditation, as well as interactions with others in the Social and Natural spheres. This attitude adjustment may extend to other forces in the Universal realm, such as the effects of climate change. Or something as simple, but potentially deadly, as a sunburn.One premise that has to be reinforced from time to time in Zen and other meditation circles, is that our practice does not, and cannot, reveal anything that is not already true. Meditation does not and cannot change anything, other than our personal apprehension and appreciation of our own reality. The revered Zen Buddhist saint, Bodhidharma, declared that it is not necessary to do zazen in order to “grasp the vital principle.” Which tells us that we do zazen for some other reason, namely to set aside all delusive relationships, for one example. Which suggests that we must be harboring a lot of delusive relationships, whether we are aware of them or not. Otherwise, why does zazen require so much time?As I mention in The Original Frontier, the first reason most people give as to why they cannot do meditation, is that they do not have time. This is mainly because they look for immediate results, and give up when the novelty wears off, and they cannot detect sufficient positive feedback to encourage them to continue. According to the principles of zazen, and Personal Cessation, meditation does not necessarily take any time at all to take effect. Since we are getting in our own way, all we have to do is stop. Aha, you say — but that's how they get you. Catch-22 déjà vu.If the Cessation of suffering writ large is dependent upon case-by-case Personal Cessation of all those habits of thought and behavior that are getting in the way, how do we recognize and identify them, and relinquish our attachments or aversions to them that keep dragging us down? I think one of the key attitude adjustments is to recognize that we are not only receiving, but interpreting, our experience, even at the near-subliminal level in zazen. If we can set aside any interpretation at all — let alone judgments of good and evil, right and wrong, at least while we are on the cushion — then maybe we can move that dharma gate a little.One last consideration before we leave this perhaps overly convoluted analysis of the intersection of the Four Noble Truths with my model of the Four Spheres of Influence, suggests another connection with the teachings of Buddhism. The spheres of internal and external reality correlate with the Three Treasures of classical Buddhism. Buddha, Dharma and Sangha track to the Personal, Universal and Social spheres. Briefly, Buddha — indicating practice on the cushion as a practical matter, but also our original nature, or birthright as human beings — is obviously a very Personal dimension of Zen practice. Of course, in light of its deeper connotations as “original nature,” it has Universal and Social implications. The study of and propagation of Dharma clearly involves a Social program of education — or “sharing the dharma assets,” expressed as a Precept — but also a Personal endeavor, climbing the Zen mountain. Again with Universal implications as Dharma, capital D, as the Way, or Tao, the law that governs the universe. Sangha is most obviously Social in character, but also Universal, representing the entirety of the human species from its origins hundreds of thousands of years in the misty past, to its current manifestation in facing the looming possibility of the Anthropocene Extinction, the sixth such global catastrophe on record. I could go on. But it is time to shift to another paradigm.Meanwhile, please continue practicing in the holistic context of the Four Spheres and the Four Noble Truths, as well as the Three Treasures. Climbing Zen Mountain, and then descending.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Jill Shepherd: Talk: introduction to the theme of taking refuge in Dharma

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 28:51 Very Popular


(Auckland Insight Meditation) An exploration of what it means to take refuge generally, and then specifically in relation to dharma, with a brief introduction to the Four Noble Truths and the Four Brahamavihāra of kindness, compassion, appreciative joy and equanimity

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Jill Shepherd: Talk: introduction to the theme of taking refuge in Dharma

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 28:51


(Auckland Insight Meditation) An exploration of what it means to take refuge generally, and then specifically in relation to dharma, with a brief introduction to the Four Noble Truths and the Four Brahamavihāra of kindness, compassion, appreciative joy and equanimity

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
104. Design & Zen Summary IV

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 16:53


All are on the Path,Though many do not know it.This Path is no path.* * *The focus of this segment, the intersection of the Social Sphere and the Path to Cessation, sounds dangerously close to “sociopath,” a term that is becoming more and more familiar in the era of extreme divisiveness in the cultural and political landscape, not only in the USA but around the globe. What more appropriate designation for the president living in luxury in Russia, who finds it desirable to be constantly bombing and shelling civilians, women and children, in Ukraine? But then, what name is most fitting for a president who tries to steal an election? “Narcissist” doesn't quite cut it.When we return from our meditation to our family, or sally forth into the public fray — crossing the boundary between the Personal and Social spheres as shown in the graphic model — we enter the Original Frontier™ that Buddha must have encountered the night of his profound enlightenment some 2500 years ago. Perhaps the more accurate term would be “reenter,” as the Social sphere into which he had been born and raised had not changed — he had changed. In the 1960s, the “reentry problem” became a ubiquitous trope, designating that segue back into so-called normality, following a psychedelic-induced “trip” to what appeared to be another world. One of my design students at U of I, Chicago Circle campus, described it as “dumping out all of the drawers in the house in one big pile, and next day, having to put all that stuff back where it belongs.” A psychotropic, rather than alcoholic, hangover.Of course, we never completely leave the Social realm, even when intently focusing on the Personal, in meditation. The influences of our particular social milieu are ever-present, even in the deep isolation of meditation. The Four Spheres are not only outside of us, they are also inside. The body's biology and inherited DNA are obvious examples of the Natural. Subtle movements of chemistry and the neurological verge on the microcosmic Universal. As do such subtle phenomena as circadian rhythms, subliminal responses to sunlight, and the tidal pull of the moon.Not that we are conscious of these influences. The inner Social sphere includes such unconscious elements as self-identity, i.e. association with family ancestry, including persuasions such as identifying with the political party that our parents favored. In receiving the Zen Buddhist lay precepts, we embrace interpretations of others regarding the avoidance of killing, stealing, lying, and so forth, on a conscious level. But we harbor built-in precepts inherited from parents and peers, all unbeknownst to ourselves. Zen's Precepts often belabor the obvious. But they bear repetition.Considering the intersection of the Social sphere with the Path, we call to mind its eight dimensions. Not capitalized here, in order to embrace them as Universal and Natural, as well as Social and Personal, rather than as holy writ. Right view and thought, or understanding, which together comprise right wisdom; right speech, action and livelihood, or right conduct; and right effort, mindfulness and meditation, taken together as right discipline. With our usual caveat that the term “right,” as used here, is more of a verb than an adjective. It indicates taking right action to correct our worldview and understanding, bringing them more into alignment with the worldview of Buddhism, or Buddha himself.One could argue that effort, mindfulness and meditation live entirely within the Personal sphere of action, as exemplified by Bodhidharma, alone in his cave in ancient China. But we point to the halo- or ripple-effect of our personal discipline upon others around us, once we do leave the cushion and reenter the Social realm. Master Dogen is attributed with encouraging us to do one thing, and to do it well enough that we can even do it in front of other people. I have not been able to locate this saying in the written record, but in his famous Genjokoan [Actualizing the Fundamental Point] he declares that “Doing one practice is practicing completely.” This is analogous to the current Zen trope that asks, If you want to drill for water, would you drill a lot of shallow wells, or one deep well? This applies broadly.In the fields of performing arts and athletics, connections of the discipline of Personal effort to Social performance becomes obvious, through repetition of rehearsal and practicing routines. As does the recommendation that “practice makes perfect,” notwithstanding the Buddhist tenet of fundamental imperfection. But the training, while clearly physical, is not only physical. Highly trained athletes are often guilty of making “mental errors.” Gymnasts, musicians, dancers and pole vaulters who persevere and break records, or move audiences to laughter or tears, are examples of this principle. They realize the non-separation of the Personal and Social, following the Path of process and progress through which we integrate inner discipline and outer conduct. In Zen as well as the arts, we arrive at a convergence in which wisdom emerges, on physical as well as mental and emotional planes.Let's take a brief look at each of the eight dimensions and its connection to the Social sphere, beginning where our practice begins, with right meditation. Sometimes rendered traditionally as contemplation or concentration, that there is right meditation suggests that there could be wrong meditation. Again, the usage is not exactly right versus wrong here on the Personal level of meditation practice, but we can agree that there may be wrong attitudes or usages of meditation in the Social context. For example, if we make a divisive or wedge issue of our zazen practice within the dynamics of our household, allowing it to affect our relationships to our family — spouse, children, parents, even in-laws — that might be an example of wrong meditation. An old saying holds that if your spouse and children are happy, your meditation is working. Adding an hour of meditation to our daily routine should not be a cause celebre, but can be inserted at an hour and in a place that does not disrupt or disturb anyone. In fact, practicing zazen should add to the harmony of the household, just as it does to the Zen community, or Sangha.Right mindfulness in the Social realm would suggest extending this Personal caution and humility to the workspace, whether in the office or in the field. Making a display of wearing a wrist mala, for example, calls upon our fellow workers, managers and team members to respond, with questions or comments. While Zen practice has definite benefits in terms of our relationship to colleagues under the stressful conditions of productivity demands, making an issue of it with people who have little or no familiarity with Zen is not advisable. It introduces an irrelevant and even irritating element into a situation already fraught with potential for friction and conflict, e.g. along political or ideological lines. Not that we should be evasive about it, or try to hide the fact that we engage in a practice — meditation — that has its detractors, and does not yet enjoy the kind of mainstream acceptability that it is gaining.A similarly inappropriate, and more common, phenomenon, is the tendency of some to insert their religious views into the business environment, when the business itself has little or nothing to do with religion. I have worked for a relatively large corporation where one of the partners held regular prayer meetings. He was also involved in an illicit affair with one of the employees. Along with being mindful of our practice, we practice mindfulness of context.Right effort plays into the Social context as well, witnessed as our tendency to overdo and overthink all of these relationships, sometimes to the detriment of the relationship. In a comment I came across recently, a mother cogently summed up one example of this syndrome, suggesting that we would be a whole lot less worried about what other people thought of us if we realized how seldom they do. We have all been there, done that, when a colleague or boss makes a comment and we spend the next all-too-long period of time ruminating over it, fretting about what the person really meant, and insulted that they do not appreciate us for the contribution we make to the corporate cause.There are innumerable books published about this, one I heard reviewed on television titled “Neanderthals at Work” by Albert J. Bernstein. He suggests that in the modern office setting you have three distinct types of coping strategies or views of the situation, one he called something like the politician, another the believer, and the third the genius. The “politician,” an example of the bad boss syndrome, schmoozes the people above them, while largely ignoring those lower on the ladder, or worse, criticizing them as a way of improving his position. The “believer” thinks the politician is immoral, feeling that as long as they come to work and do their job, they should not have to play politics. The “genius” comes out of the computer room to solve the problem du jour, but is often culpable in creating the problem. The politician looks down on the other two as naive, simply not understanding how things work in the modern office. Focusing on the boss is the natural approach to the reporting structure. The problem is not that these tendencies exist, but that their adherents do not understand each other, which exacerbates the friction between them.Which brings us to another four-pointed model, my take on the traditional Zen jargon term, “Samadhi,” usually capitalized to stress the high regard in which it is held. I reduce it to the more prosaic “balance.” This concept is simple enough to grasp that no illustration is required. The first of the four is physical samadhi, the centered and balanced form of the zazen posture, leaning neither to the right or left, or front or back, as Master Dogen explains what it is not. From it, or along with it, comes the second samadhi, emotional balance: more calm, less anxiety. Thirdly we begin to experience mental samadhi: more clarity, less confusion. And finally, after some time, social samadhi: more harmony, less friction in our relationships to others. These four comprehend the inner-Personal and outer-Social benefits, or side-effects of Zen meditation practice.Most people want to leap to the Social aspect right away, to handle interpersonal transactions with greater patience and compassion. But Zen goes deeper, of course. When the upright posture becomes more natural and comfortable, the heart-mind (J. shin) becomes calmer and clearer naturally. When one becomes more patient with the monkey mind, and more comfortable in one's own skin through zazen, it becomes easier to have patience with others. But we have to be patient with the time that it takes to get over ourselves, and to divest ourselves of a lot of excess baggage we carry around. This is why Zen takes so long to penetrate to the deeper levels of Samadhi, as a transformational experience, sometimes regarded as the precursor to the fabled spiritual insight (J. satori) of Zen.Summing up so far, we have looked briefly at the Universal Existence of Dukkha, change or suffering, that we are to fully understand; its Natural Origin, or craving, which we are to fully abandon — and which is built-into birth as a human being — which is considered the necessary condition for Buddhist awakening; and the Social Path recommended by Shakyamuni Buddha, which we are to follow to its ultimate conclusion in the Cessation of suffering. A caveat is in order as to this last claim. In the Heart Sutra we chant: “Given Emptiness, no suffering, no end of suffering.” This is not a contradiction, but indicates that the kind of suffering that can come to an end is that self- and mutually-inflicted suffering, intentionally and unintentionally, that we visit upon ourselves and others. The Natural suffering of aging, sickness and death, which come with the territory of sentient existence, do not, cannot, come to an end. But embracing that fact as reality, and perfectly natural, mitigates the suffering as a human meme.Continuing, we will next take up the remaining pair of the combinations of the Four Spheres and the Four Noble Truths, the Personal and the Cessation of suffering, which necessarily involves the Eightfold Path to cessation. Personal Cessation is the only kind there is. Stay tuned one more time.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Buddhist Society of Western Australia
Geetha Mendis | The Four Noble Truths part 2 of 2 | The Armadale Meditation Group

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 89:54 Very Popular


Tuesday 09nd August 2022 This podcast is part 1 of 2 and Geetha will be back next Tuesday :-) Geetha Mendis joins the Armadale Meditation Group on-line live. Armadale Meditation Group (AMG) is designed to teach you about meditation. The classes generally begin with chanting the Metta Sutta, then receiving meditation instructions and meditating together, followed by asking questions and finally if time remains listening to a Dhamma talk. However, the layout can vary. Due to social distancing regulations, these weekly Tuesday night teachings are happening via Zoom from Bodhinyana Monastery. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean. Teachings are available for downloading from the BSWA website the BSWA Youtube Channel, the BSWA Podcast, and Deeper Dhamma Podcast.

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment
Am I More Important Than Everyone Else in the Universe?

A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 38:31 Very Popular


Do each of us believe deep down that we're just a little bit more important than everyone else? My happiness, my goals, my relationships? The root cause of our suffering from the Buddhist perspective is this belief, a delusion called ignorance, seen as the true source of all our suffering: from disappointment in the face of life's setbacks, to the dissatisfaction we can feel even when we get exactly what we want. It's a retelling of the Buddha's very first teaching, The Four Noble Truths: on suffering, its causes and antidotes, with a modern twist.Episode 15. Am I More Important Than Everyone Else in the Universe?Two years ago, we created A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment to share the rich tradition of Tibetan Buddhist analytical meditation in a form that requires no belief beyond what science currently accepts. The first 40 episodes of the podcast gradually go through all of these topics, in order, beginning with appreciating the gift of our life and our place in the universe, and gradually moving up to cultivating boundless compassion for all beings and understanding the ultimate nature of our inner and outer realities. Over the next year, interspersed with new interviews, we are re-releasing updated versions of these topics.Support the show

Way of Compassion Dharma Center
Approaching the Buddhist Path 03 - A Discerning Exploration

Way of Compassion Dharma Center

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 51:47


 John Bruna, spiritual director of the Way of Compassion Dharma Center, continues commentary on the initial section of the text "Approaching Buddhism" by His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Venerable Thubten Chödron. John describes how the path, rooted in the Four Noble Truths, requires a discerning mind that is open to ideas that challenge our deeply established beliefs. We are also encouraged to adopt a broader view that encompasses our fellow sentient beings and how that view leads to less suffering and more resiliency. This teaching took place on August 3rd, 2022.Welcome to the Way of Compassion Dharma Center Podcast. Located in Carbondale, Colorado, the Way of Compassion Dharma center's primary objective is to provide programs of Buddhist studies and practices that are practical, accessible, and meet the needs of the communities we serve.  As a traditional Buddhist center, all of our teachings are offered freely. If you would like to make a donation to support the center, please visit www.wocdc.org.  May you flourish in your practice and may all beings swiftly be free of suffering.

Noble Mind
66: Kate and Alex on the First Noble Truth and Facing Unavoidable Challenges

Noble Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 40:28


In this episode, hosts Kate and Alex take a deep dive into the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, with particular emphasis on the First Noble Truth commonly translated as “life is characterized by suffering.” They unpack some of the linguistic and cultural misunderstandings that can get in the way of the deeper message of this teaching. They connect the four existential givens of death, meaning, isolation, and freedom, to Buddhism and discuss ways of working with these unavoidable challenges in everyday life. Alex Gokce, MSW has a master's degree in social work from Salem State University and an undergraduate degree in Comparative Government from Harvard University. He has led psychotherapy groups on topics including mindfulness, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and mind-body approaches to pain management. He has co-led programs at the Boston Shambhala Center on the topics of trauma and self-compassion. His personal and professional interests center around the individual, societal and intergenerational impacts of trauma, as well as the sociocultural roots of interpersonal harm. Katherine (Kate) King, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychology at William James College. She has a private psychotherapy practice where she works primarily with older adults and individuals experiencing trauma, anxiety, and chronic medical conditions. She also has a special interest in supporting the well-being of helping professionals. She is involved in research exploring topics such as death anxiety, narrative medicine, and clinical training. Kate is a longtime vajrayana student of Tibetan Buddhism, and has practiced meditation for over 20 years. Learn more at www.drkateking.com. Join our free Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/noblemind. For past episodes, show details, and to join our email list, visit www.noblemindpodcast.com.

Buddhist Society of Western Australia
Geetha Mendis | The Four Noble Truths part 1 of 2 | The Armadale Meditation Group

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 90:37 Very Popular


Tuesday 02nd August 2022 This podcast is part 1 of 2 and Geetha will be back next Tuesday :-) Geetha Mendis joins the Armadale Meditation Group on-line live. Armadale Meditation Group (AMG) is designed to teach you about meditation. The classes generally begin with chanting the Metta Sutta, then receiving meditation instructions and meditating together, followed by asking questions and finally if time remains listening to a Dhamma talk. However, the layout can vary. Due to social distancing regulations, these weekly Tuesday night teachings are happening via Zoom from Bodhinyana Monastery. Please support the BSWA in making teachings available for free online via Patreon. To find and download more precious Dhamma teachings, visit the BSWA teachings page choose the teaching you want and click on the audio to open it up on Podbean. Teachings are available for downloading from the BSWA website the BSWA Youtube Channel, the BSWA Podcast, and Deeper Dhamma Podcast.

Enneagram & Coffee
Buddhist Principles and the Enneagram w/ Susan Piver

Enneagram & Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 35:29


oday we are speaking with Susan Piver the New York Times bestselling author of many books, including the award-winning "How Not to Be Afraid of Your Own Life", "The Wisdom of a Broken Heart", "Start Here Now: An Open-Hearted Guide to the Path and Practice of Meditation", and "The Four Noble Truths of Love: Buddhist Wisdom for Modern Relationships". Piver has been a practicing Buddhist since 1993 and graduated from a Buddhist seminary in 2004. She is an internationally acclaimed meditation teacher, known for her ability to translate ancient practices into modern life. Her work has been featured on the Oprah show, TODAY, CNN, and in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and others. In 2013, she launched the Open Heart Project, the largest virtual mindfulness community in the world with 20,000 members. Connect with Susan here -- THANK YOU TO THIS WEEK'S PODCAST SPONSORS Right now, when you go to heyfavor.com/egram Favor is offering a $10 donation to Bedsider.org for every Enneagram & Coffee listener who becomes a patient. Your donation will help low-income individuals get access to birth control through Bedsider.org.  — Call/text your enneagram questions to (828) 338-9127 Grab a copy of my book at www.thehonestenneagram.com Check out my YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/sarajanecase Grab a copy of know your parenting personality https://amzn.to/37Zbh0l Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
The Yoga of Inquiry

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 30:02 Very Popular


08/03/2022, Chikudo Catherine Spaeth, dharma talk at City Center. What is the role of inquiry in our practice? Inquiry has many different functions and is an expression of how we relate to the world. It is essential to our Zen practice. How does inquiry bring us closer to Buddha Nature, and how is it an expression of it?

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
102. Design & Zen Summary II

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 15:36


Yes, universal!Existence unlimitedto our perception* * *In the last session we concluded the introduction to this summary of the intersection of Design Thinking and Zen by linking Buddha's Four Noble Truths to my Four Spheres of Influence and Endeavor as encountered in daily life. The semantic model shown illustrates correlations between the Four Spheres — Universal, Natural, Social, and Personal — and the Existence, Origin, Cessation, and Eightfold Path to cessation, of suffering. We will explore the connections of each in order, in the next four segments. These include: Universal Existence, Natural Origin, Social Path, and Personal Cessation, all linked to dukkha, the Buddhist term usually translated as “suffering.” As we will see, it has a broader meaning.Sometimes overlooked in considering the Four Noble Truths are Buddha's admonitions, charges, or challenges accompanying each. We are to strive to “fully understand” the existence of suffering; to abandon its origin, usually interpreted as craving; to realize its cessation, hopefully in this lifetime; and to fully follow the Noble Eightfold Path to the realization of suffering. That's a tall order.But if we take the Design thinking approach, we can regard the prospect of fully understanding the existence of suffering as just another example of fully defining the problem, albeit the most intractable and elusive of all problems, that of existence itself. The proposition that existence is a problem, or should be regarded as such, is itself subject to challenge. But most religions and philosophies characterize our existence as a human being as a kind of test, from Job's Old Testament lament, to the triumph of reasoning of the Enlightenment, and theism's personal epiphany of being reborn, as well as Zen Buddhism's potential of spiritual awakening — kensho or satori in Japanese. Of course, the usual caveat applies, that the approach to solving this problem in Zen begins and ends with experience on the cushion, or informed by that process of personal introspection. As we often emphasize in interfaith dialog with other clergy and students online, world peace can only come about through the establishment of personal peace. Zen's pop-up exam takes place in zazen, pass or fail.Another way to phrase the first Noble Truth is that Existence is of the nature of suffering. That is, dukkha may be regarded simply as inexorable change. Galaxies colliding in space is an example of Universal Existence of change. It is not personal, but a universal principle. Human beings are necessarily caught up in it, through birth, aging, sickness and death, and tend to take it very personally. This is why it is called “suffering.” But this suffering is too laden with emotional and sentimental connotations to fit the definition of a universal principle. Suffering in the Buddhist sense has a connotation of allowing, as in “Suffer the little children to come unto me,” paraphrasing a comment attributed to Christ. He is also quoted as saying that unless we become like little children, we cannot enter the kingdom of heaven.So in the face of universal change, we are reduced to the state of children. Innocent, perhaps, but still responsible for adapting to reality. We find examples of human suffering in all spheres of our existence, including personal issues of aging, sickness and death, which is also characteristic of the natural sphere, where our relationship to Nature is ever-more challenging, owing partially to our success as a species in dominating the planet and diminishing the resources of life support. But most of us are inclined to identify the sources of our suffering as social in nature.These are all conjoined, as the pressures of living in modern society are certainly linked to the pressures of population. From stress on the commute to family unity at home, and comity at the office, much of our dissatisfaction with life in the fast lane stems from the fact that there are so many others queuing up in that same lane. And, of course, they are not usually as polite or considerate as you or I tend to be. In the modern idiom, they do not, or will not, stay in their lane, and out of ours.Please excuse me if you have heard this before, but I think an experiment I read about is germane. The scientists involved simply took the classic rats-in-the-maze to a new level, adding more and more rats. At a certain point of overpopulation or crowding, the rats began attacking each other. In human terms, each began to blame the others for the situation. If memory serves, it revealed a kind of proportionality between the space available and the degree of occupancy, which may reflect a natural limit to the population of any species. There is a relevant question in Taoism, from the “Tao te Ching” of Lao Tzu if memory serves, which asks the question, something like, Which is more destructive — success or failure? The very success of a species may be akin to the growth of a virus, which finally exceeds the capacity of its host to sustain, leading to the death of the host but also of the parasite.Another Taoist saying reminds us that, When the blaming begins, there is no end to the blame, or some such admonition. What we see in politics these days is largely the blame game writ large, usually on a damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don't basis. Increasingly, decisions regarding spending decreasing resources are taken in this no-win kind of context. Even speaking out on a given issue, no matter what position one takes, is likely to bring down hostilities upon one's head, from the cold waters of the social media. The very anonymity provided by the network fosters the tendency of many disgruntled fellow travelers to fire broadsides at every comment, no matter how reasonable or anodyne. The privacy of the original communication is often compromised, exposing the messenger to the mob, including searchable data such as the identities of their family members, along with contact and location information. Thus, the natural moan of stress and threat of living is amplified to a scream through the feedback process, like a mic and speaker facing each other. Humans are the worst enemy of humans.When we turn from our social world — as restricted to human beings — to the natural sphere, we find other social animals, such as elephants and whales, who have their own networks, and presumably some level of stress emanating from them. Much more certainly they suffer from the dire circumstances in which they live as prey to other species, primarily the encroachment of humans on their turf, and as victims of the harvesting of ivory and other private parts for such human dalliances as trivial trinkets, and supposed aphrodisiacs. Our stewardship of the creatures of the Earth has demonstrated a downward curve for most of our history, but now that we are outnumbering as well as outmaneuvering our distant cousins, many are staring into the abyss of extinction. Which is where the Natural sphere is trumped by the Universal. From the perspective of the victim of extinction, it matters little whether the end comes as the result of a meteor or comet, or the slow erosion of viable food stocks and potable water. So-called “pets” and live exhibits such as zoos are the few remaining concessions to inclusion of lowly beasts in our social circle, now that the age of horsepower has long since passed.When we look at the intersection of the Universal and the Natural, disregarding for the nonce the Social and Personal realms, we see that it is also not a respecter of persons, or dharma beings. The most awe-inspiring example may be the black hole, at least based on our current understanding of cosmic dynamics of change, dukkha on the largest scales we can envision. Whole galaxies, solar systems, stars, planets, moons and asteroids and all, provide the daily fare keeping the monster fed. We charmingly describe such processes with familiar tropes, such as that a black hole is “eating” its way through the universe, gobbling celestial bodies as we consume lesser animals and plants of the globe. A recent special on the blue whale identified them as the largest mammals to ever live on the planet — in the ocean, more exactly — as large as a Boeing 737. Yet they live on krill, one of the smallest animals on the planet. But the volume of their dining may be the closest living analogy to a black hole in the animal kingdom. Tens of thousands of tons of water in one gulp! Yet even this behemoth may be threatened with extinction, owing to the activities of the noisome human parasite.In the face of such vast scales of existence, and with the looming threat of universal and natural chickens coming home to roost, through imminent climate change, the very idea that what we call suffering is indeed universal may be disturbing, even overwhelming. And as Master Dogen reminds us in Jijuyu Zammai —Self-fulfilling Samadhi, even if we manage to divest ourselves of our ignorance, and the “whole phenomenal world becomes the Buddha's seal, and the entire sky turns into enlightenment,” even then “all this does not appear within perception, because it is unconstructedness in stillness, it is immediate realization.” So the frustration with the ungraspable nature of this truth is baked in. But we mustn't forget the micro, along with the macrocosmos. The microcosmos is also the manifestation of the universal existence of suffering, just on the other end of the scale spectrum. It recalls a line from one of our beloved Ch'an poems, Hokyo Zammai [Precious Mirror Samadhi], by Master Tozan, founder of Soto Zen in China:So minute it enters where there is no gap — so vast it transcends dimensionA hairsbreadth deviation and you are out of tuneI hear an unspoken “but” or “however” before this last bombshell — any deviation, however slight, and we are “out of tune.” Like tuning an old-fashioned analog radio dial, a little to the left or to the right, we get nothing but static. Only when we hit the frequency dead on in the middle, do we receive the transmission with clarity. If we persist in our meditation, we can hopefully penetrate beyond the Personal, Social and Natural barriers, all the way to the Universal, which is not only outside us at the furthest remove, but also inside us, at the most intimate. As Master Hakuin reminds, actually there is no “inner,” nor is there any “outer.” It is all clear, clean through. Spacetime is neither space, nor time.In the next segment we will take a look at Natural Origin, the origin of our suffering through the craving of our body, our mouth, and our mind. Stay tuned.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Listen | Dharma Talks from Plum Village
“Feel Life’s Suffering, Be Moved by its Beauty”: 3rd PV Dharma Seal (40 Years Retreat #5) — Br Pháp Ứng — Plum Village France

Listen | Dharma Talks from Plum Village

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 80:08


In this fifth talk of our June retreat “40 Years of Plum Village: Now We Have a Path, We Have Nothing More to Fear”, elder brother Pháp Ứng offers a heartfelt talk rich with poetry, music, and a video to share with us about the third Dharma Seal of PV: the “times” (past, present, and future) and the “truths” (conventional and ultimate; and the Four Noble Truths) inter-are. He shares that it is possible to realize this truth through the practice of the first two Plum Village Dharma Seals, “I have arrived, I am home”, and “Go as a river”. Seeing that our ancestors and descendants are all present in us right now, we feel full and complete, and this also helps us to dwell happily in the present moment. With our mindful breathing and walking, we are able to take good care of both, and practice in such a way that we are nourished immediately: “there is no way to happiness; happiness is the way”. Brother Pháp Ứng shares that by touching the Right View of inter-dependent co-arising (“this is, because that is”) is very practical, and helps us care for the suffering that is arising in the present moment. It protects us from drowning in that suffering and transforms it at the same time. Brother Pháp Ứng shares that touching deeply the suffering of the relative dimension gives rise very naturally to the love and understanding that allow us to be in touch with the ultimate dimension of no birth and no death. In fact, he says, when we have the practice it is even good that the suffering of birth and death is so painful. Letting ourselves really feel that pain, we make a deep vow to get to the bottom of it, to learn to truly dwell happily in the present moment and see that everything is already a wonder: “the fresh air is already there, we just have to open the door and let it in.”

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Chas DiCapua: The four noble truths

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 40:55


(Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center) Focusing more on the relationship between the first and second truths

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

(Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center) Focusing more on the relationship between the first and second truths

Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center: dharma talks and meditation instruction

(Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center) Focusing more on the relationship between the first and second truths

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein
Ep. 130 – Essential Buddhism Part 5: The Truth of Suffering

Insight Hour with Joseph Goldstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 45:48 Very Popular


The “Essential Buddhism” series continues with this 1974 dharma talk focused on the Four Noble Truths and how we must face the truth of suffering to walk the path of freedom.This dharma talk from the Naropa Institute Summer Sessions in 1974 was originally published on Dharma Seed.This podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/insighthour“The end of the path is freedom. It's open to all of us. All we have to do is begin the journey, to be facing towards the light. And some people will progress slowly, and some people will progress quickly, and it does not matter as long as we're going in the direction of enlightenment and freedom and peace, and that very much depends upon our own effort.” – Joseph GoldsteinSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
101. Design & Zen Summary I

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 12:10


Both solve a problem —though of differing import.Zen's is the broadest.* * *In the last session of live dharma dialog online at the Zen center — transcribed as the last podcast in the series on the most recent spate of mass shootings — the last participant worried that meditation would not help children in the classroom, owing to the complexity of the many personal and social issues they are confronting. Not least, the elephant in every public American classroom these days, the threat of yet another school shooter. The exchange went as follows:But don't give up! You're creative.No I won't give up. Thanks very much for your teaching.So I mean to encourage you similarly. No matter how bad it gets, don't give up on your zazen practice. And be creative in your personal life and approach to problem-solving. I closed the last by stating that this concludes the dharma dialog that took place on this occasion. But the dialog continues. In the next four sections we will draw some interim conclusions as a kind of summary of Zen and Design thinking, or those aspects of this intersection discussed to date, namely the Four Noble Truths, the first teaching of Buddha, and the Four Spheres of influence and Endeavor, my attempt at a comprehensive model of the real world in which we live and practice Zen.Buddha's First Sermon, alternatively called “Setting in Motion the Wheel of the Law,” “The Middle Way,” or “The Four Noble Truths,” lays out his description of the reality that all sentient beings face, and his prescription for what action to take to deal with it, namely the Noble Eightfold Path. We will include my semantic models of these teachings, along with my configuration of the Four Spheres in which we live and practice — the Personal, Social, Natural, and the Universal. Hopefully we can draw some correlations between the two models to get a better vision of how our Zen life can proceed in the context of the current complexities of the world. The illustration below shows that my model of nesting spheres can be usefully associated with both quartets.Before going into specifics of the four truths and their interconnectedness with the four nested spheres of our existence, it seems pertinent to ask the question: Why four? Why not five, or three, or six, eight, or twelve? I believe it has to do with what R. Buckminster Fuller developed and taught in his design science and geodesic geometry developments. The fourth point closes the system.Interestingly, if not coincidentally, Sokei-an, the Rinzai priest who accompanied Soen Shaku on his trip to America to introduce Zen Buddhism to the West at a world convocation of religions toward the end of the 19th century, said something similar about the relationship of Buddhism to Christianity. Paraphrasing broadly, he commented something to the effect that Buddha appeared some 2500 years ago and counting, propounding a kind of compassion and wisdom that required the surrender of the self. 500 years or so later, Christ appeared, preaching a kind of divine love that “closed the teaching.” In other words, the two great religious systems are complementary, not competitive.If we recall the many other teachings that are expressed in sets of four, there are the four fundamental elements of tradition: earth, wind, fire, and water. The four logical propositions, or tetralemma of ancient pedigree: it is; it is not; it both is and is not; it neither is nor is not. Then there are the four seasons: spring, summer, fall and winter. In a more contemporary context there are the four fundamental forces of the universe: gravity, electromagnetism, and the weak and strong nuclear forces, potentially with a fifth or more lurking in the shadows of dark matter and dark energy. Modern biology posits four forces of evolution: mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. The seemingly impossible phenomenon of an airplane in flight is also explained by four forces: lift, thrust, drag and weight. Orville and Wilbur must have figured that one out.Setting aside for now the apparent contradiction that in each of these cases, we can find other qualified candidates for inclusion, such as space and consciousness, sometimes listed with the other four elements, remember that Fuller was positing the simplest model of any given system, which by definition has an inside and an outside. The tetrahedron is the first geometric shape to fill the bill. But it is deceptively simple in appearance. When we look at the connecting tissue between the four points, we see that there are six such, and each can be interpreted as cutting both ways, resulting in twelve aspects of interconnectedness between the four points. (See illustration if you cannot visualize for yourself.)Not coincidentally, this number, 12, the familiar “dozen” from the Latin duodecim, pops up regularly here and there in the vernacular, in all sorts of categories of information: twelve lunar cycles or months of the solar year; the visible spectrum or color wheel; the hours of the day (in Master Dogen's day, doubled to 24 in modern times), and not to forget the twelve apostles as an outlier, with Jesus making a baker's dozen. You may counter that there are only three primary colors: red, blue, and yellow, in terms of pigment. But the hues that we can distinguish separately tend to fall into twelve combinations of the three primaries, the secondaries of violet, orange and green, and the tertiaries of red-violet and red-orange, blue-violet (or purple) and blue-green, yellow-orange and yellow-green, closing the circle. And then there is the Twelvefold Chain of Interdependent Origination, Buddhism's summary model of how things get to be the way they are, through life cycles of rebirth, aging sickness and death that are the lot of all sentient beings. Most importantly of course, those of the human persuasion.We can point to many groupings of less than four, such as the Three Treasures of Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. Or the three legs of the Zen stool articulated by John Daido Loori: faith, doubt, and perseverance. Or the Three Times, past future and present. For each of these triads, I would submit that the fourth point is YOU. You complete the tetrad, the four-pointed system, in your relation to the other three. Buddhism is like that. It included the observer from the very beginning. Buddha was a human being, and had no interest in expounding a theory of existence that did not include human beings as observers. The whole point of his teaching is the nature of reality and our place in it.Other teachings such as the Noble Eightfold Path can be parsed into a tripartite grouping: Right Wisdom (view and thought or understanding and intention); Right Ethics or Conduct (Speech, Action and Livelihood); and Right Discipline (Effort, Mindfulness and Meditation) again with the caveat that the English term “right” is a limiting translation for the intended meaning. Buddha's “right” is more a verb than an adjective, taking action to right our raft, sailing on the seas of Samsara. Again, the fourth component completing this model is, dear seeker, yourself.While these enumerations may appear to be arbitrary, they do seem to function as memory aids, mnemonics, as well as revealing an underlying need and yearning for order, in conceiving a model of our existence, which can seem so chaotic and arbitrary in its manifestations. We can be forgiven a bit of conjecture in our efforts to explain the unexplainable and conceive of the inconceivable. As long as we are willing to return to the cushion, and contemplate our creative grasp of reality, I say: No harm, no foul. The monkey mind has some utility, if limited, in adapting to and embracing reality, warts and all.In the next session we will return to consideration of the quartets of Noble Truths and nesting spheres. We will look at each of the pairs of correlates in order: Universal Existence — of sufffering, that is — Natural Origin, Social Path, and Personal Cessation, of dukkha. Stay tuned.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Way of Compassion Dharma Center
4 Noble Truths 16 - The Wisdom of Compassion

Way of Compassion Dharma Center

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 44:47


John Bruna, Spiritual director of the Way of Compassion Dharma Center, continues his commentary on compassion. John speaks about the many ways that compassion shows up in our lives and offers valuable understanding of the differences between compassion and empathy. John also speaks about how living in reality (wisdom) is such a powerful way to alleviate suffering. This teaching was given on July 13th, 2022.Welcome to the Way of Compassion Dharma Center Podcast. Located in Carbondale, Colorado, the Way of Compassion Dharma center's primary objective is to provide programs of Buddhist studies and practices that are practical, accessible, and meet the needs of the communities we serve.  As a traditional Buddhist center, all of our teachings are offered freely. If you would like to make a donation to support the center, please visit www.wocdc.org.  May you flourish in your practice and may all beings swiftly be free of suffering.

Zen Parenting Radio
The Truth About Suffering- Podcast# 667

Zen Parenting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 53:15


Cathy and Todd discuss the truth about suffering (or life is suffering) which is #1 of The Four Noble Truths. They discuss how this truth is so easily misinterpreted and how it actually offers deep wisdom and relief. They use several analogies and metaphors to make their point (some better than others…) and recognize the resilience and hope that lives at the heart of our experiences.

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts
Reflections on Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path | Ajahn Dhammasiha

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 31:40


After the meditation session on Āsāḷhā Pūjā, Ajahn Dhammasiha shares some reflections on the 4 Noble Truths. He puts special emphasis on the Fourth Noble Truth, i.e. the Noble Eightfold Path, also known as the 'Middle Way' ('Majjhimā Paṭipadā'). With the Noble Eightfold Path, the Buddha has given us a tool that we can apply virtually any time throughout our life, whether ordained or in lay life. Meditation ('Bhāvanā') is not only sitting crosslegged. We practice 'bhāvanā', mental cultivation, whenever we're putting forth effort to apply any of these 8 path factors: Right View/Opinion/Conviction Right Intention/Thought Right Speech/Communication Right Action Right Livelihood/Job Right Effort Right Mindfulness Right Samādhī https://www.dhammagiri.net https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive .

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

7/14/2022, Teah Strozer, dharma talk at Tassajara.

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts
BUDDHIST PALI CHANTING: Buddha's First Sermon Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta | Dhammagiri Asalha Full Moon Recitation

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 18:16


This is one of the most famous discourses of the Buddha, his very first formal teaching, which is recited frequently for it's profound power and deep wisdom teachings. The Buddha taught the 'Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta' ('Setting in Motion the Unsurpassable Wheel of Dhamma') on the full moon of Āsāḷhā (July) to his first five disciples, known as the 'Pañca-vaggiya' ('Group of Five'). He expounds the Middle Way ('Majjhima Paṭipadā') and the Four Noble Truths. While the discourse is being spoken, the most senior of the Group of Five, Ven Aññākondañño, realizes Stream Entry ('Sotāpatti'), the first stage of enlightenment. The devas utter an exclamation of joy that reverberates throughout the universe, up to the highest heavens. During our Āsāḷhā Full Moon program at Dhammagiri, we recited the sutta in the original ancient Pali language, the language spoken by the Buddha himself. Ven Niddaro is leading the chanting, with a large group of laity joining in. Additionally, we play the Amaravati version in the background via loudspeaker, to achieve a particular voluminous, rich and smooth sound. The text of the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta can be found on page 2 ff in the Amaravati Chanting Book, both in Pali and in English translation, here: https://cdn.amaravati.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/30/Chanting-Book-Vol-2-Web.pdf Ajahn Dhammasiha offers reflections on the deep meaning of this discourse in a live podcast here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1pkA2OCADRFcYfHH3OMoMe https://www.dhammagiri.net https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive .

Buddhist Wisdom, Modern Life
Intuitive wisdom: Moriah Williams

Buddhist Wisdom, Modern Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 52:26


Hello, friends, and welcome to this interview with Moriah Williams, who's going to share with us some of their wisdom about the world we can see and how it connects to the unseen. If you've ever felt like there's more to the human experience than what our senses show us, you'll probably enjoy getting to meet this remarkable healer. If you'd like to learn more about the basics of Buddhism, please check out the links below to my book, The Buddhist Path to Joy, and my free online courses for beginners. Moriah Williams is a holistic practitioner who offers somatic and spirit-based online sessions education. They support people in making friends with themselves, deepening their connection to their bodies and their intuition, reclaiming their energy from old wounds and ongoing structural oppression, and trusting their own power. Moriah believes that the more we trust our capacities for healing, the more we can live lives of joy, wonder, and kindness. Check out Moriah's website: moriahjwilliams.com And connect with them on Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter: @mjwintuitive The Buddhist Path to Joy (a practical guide to the Four Noble Truths): https://geni.us/buddhistpathtojoy My free online courses & resources: https://geni.us/freecourses May you and all beings be well. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/buddhist-wisdom/message

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts
The Buddha's First Teaching: Middle Way and 4 Noble Truths | Asalha Full Moon Reflections on Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta by Ajahn Dhammasiha

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 47:46


Āsāḷhā Pūja, also known as Dhamma Day, is one of Buddhism's most important festivals, celebrating the Buddha's first formal teaching, the "Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta" in the Deer Park ('Migadāya') at Sarnath near Vārāṇasī. This Sutta on “Setting into Motion the Supreme Wheel of Dhamma”is rightly one of the most famous in the whole Pali Canon. The Buddha opens by expounding the Middle Way ('Majjhimā Paṭipadā') of avoiding the extremes of sensual indulgence and self-mortification. He then proceeds to explain the Four Noble Truths: The Noble Truth of Suffering: Birth, old age, sickness & death; Association with the disliked; Seperation from the liked; Not getting what one wants; In short, the five groups of clinging The Noble Truth of the Cause of Suffering: Craving. The Noble Truth of the End of Suffering: The complete, remainderless cessation of craving. The Noble Truth of the Practice Leading to the End of Suffering: The Noble Eight-Fold Path. Next, the Buddha elucidates three aspects of each Noble Truth. Only after his knowledge and vision of things as they truly are was completely purified in respect of the Four Noble Truths in their three aspects, did he proclaim supreme awakening. The Noble Truth in and by itself. The Duty attached to each Truth: Suffering has to be comprehended; The cause of suffering has to be abandoned; The end of suffering has to be realized; The Middle Way has to be developed. The accomplishment of the duty. In his reflections, Ajahn Dhammasiha places particular emphasis on the duty connected with each of the Noble Truths. The Dhamma is not just an idea, or some idealistic thought system of philosophie. It is and eminently practical, pragmatic, teaching. It is 'opanāyiko', applicable to our life, to be implemented in all our thoughts and actions throughout every day of our life. https://www.dhammagiri.net https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive .

Mindfulness Outreach Initiative
024 -- Right View; Rev. Kyle Sorys, 06/28/22

Mindfulness Outreach Initiative

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 51:25


This week's talk is all about the first step of the Path — Right View. Traditionally Right View is understanding the Four Noble Truths and the relationship between craving and suffering. But, as MOI teacher Rev. Kyle Sorys explains, it entails much more. “Whatever teachings lead to peace, stillness, harmony, which lead to the disappearing of the problems of life, which lead to clear seeing,” Rev. Kyle says, “is Right View.” It is seeing as the Buddha himself saw, which means seeing the Dharma and the true nature of reality. Rev. Kyle also explains that since our views are intimately connected with our intentions, Right View includes that which creates the intensions of kindness, compassion, and letting go. At its core, Right View is all about cultivating peace, contentment, and clear seeing. If you feel inspired by these teachings, and wish to practice generosity, please consider supporting MOI and its teachers by visiting, https://mindfulnessoutreachinitiative.org/generosity/

Ancient Dragon Zen Gate Dharma Talks

ADZG 1010 ADZG Monday Night Dharma Talk by Brian Taylor

Be Here Now Network Guest Podcast
Ep. 107 - Historical Aspects Of The Four Noble Truths with JoAnna Hardy

Be Here Now Network Guest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 40:30


This episode of the BHNN Guest Podcast features JoAnna Hardy in a discussion of suffering, control, and The Four Noble Truths at the Insight Meditation Society.This podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/beherenow“It is kind of interesting to push the edge of our practice a little bit and engage with instead of always backing down too [that which we are not comfortable with].” – JoAnna HardySee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
Our Daily Practice With Human Suffering and Psychological Trauma

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:15


06/26/2022, Yuki Kobiyama, dharma talk at Green Gulch Farm. Recalling recent tragic events from Ukraine to Buffalo to Laguna Woods to Uvalde, and reflecting on the deep heart break, violence, hatred, and ignorance in our world, Rev. Kobiyama discusses how our daily practice and Buddhist teachings relate to human suffering and psychological trauma, while sharing her story about investigating her own self which has been shaped by two different cultures and a specific historical period of time over generations of war and conflict.

Orlando Insight Meditation Group » Podcast Feed

This talk is part of a series reviewing the Four Noble Truths.  Right Effort is an important element of the Noble Eightfold Path and can be understood as a process of channeling the energy of attention away from unwholesome self-states towards wholesome self-states.  The cooperation among the first three of the Seven Awakening Factors–Mindfulness, Investigation […]

Clear Mountain Podcast
Purity of Heart & the Four Noble Truths as a Spiral Staircase | Ven. Nisabho Q&A

Clear Mountain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 52:57


In this Q&A, Tan Nisabho speaks about developing compassion for ourselves, the Four Noble Truths as a spiral staircase, and the cultivation of right-brain thinking.

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
Taking Refuge in Just This

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 34:22


06/15/2022, Jisan Anna Thorn, dharma talk at City Center. The new Tanto's Way Seeking Mind Talk - returning to City Center and a different world.

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Attachment, and Cultivating Nonattachment

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 60:05 Very Popular


You might have heard the line “attachment is the root of suffering.” It comes from the Buddha, but you don't have to be a Buddhist to recognize that becoming overly attached to a particular outcome, person, or view of yourself can lead to a lot of suffering. At the same time, there are clearly things that are sensible to be attached to – like our loved ones, a basic moral compass, and fundamentals like food and shelter. So, what's the problem with attachment?On this episode of Being Well, Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson discuss the problem with attachment, what differentiates healthy and unhealthy forms of attachment, and what we can do to relax attachment over time.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching video? You can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00: Introduction2:10: Learning from Buddhism without trying to be a Buddhist8:45: Two kinds of suffering12:00: Distinguishing healthy desire and unhealthy desire19:40: Markers of problematic attachments24:10: Self-concept, and an example from Forrest of relaxing attachment 30:25: Balancing "Right View" and nonattachment42:25: Pain and release50:55: What's useful for you?55:45: RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month!Want to sleep better? Try the Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Try Splendid Spoon today and take meal-planning off your plate. Just go to SplendidSpoon.com/BEINGWELL for $50 off your first boxReady to shake up your protein Ritual? Being Well listeners get 10% off during your first 3 months at ritual.com/WELL.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Tara Mulay: The four noble truths and non-conceptual mindfulness

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 39:31


(Insight Meditation Society - Retreat Center)