Podcasts about Walla Walla

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Best podcasts about Walla Walla

Latest podcast episodes about Walla Walla

Wine for Normal People
Ep 448: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Terroir with Dr. Kevin Pogue, PhD, Geologist and Terroir Educator

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 59:34


Dr. Kevin Pogue, PhD, professor, geologist, and terroir expert educates us on terroir. This podcast is like taking a terroir class: it debunks so many things that people spout in reference books, at wineries, and in mainstream press about the topic! He explains things brilliantly and he is one of the first people I've ever met who actually has answers to my really dorky questions about terroir.  Photo: Kevin Pogue. From Vinterra.net As more detail, Kevin is one of the most famous people in the field of terroir. He's considered the foremost terroir expert on Washington State wine and he's known around the world -  his work has been featured in both national and international journals. He's a licensed geologist and professor of geology at Whitman College in Walla Walla. Kevin has a doctorate in geology from Oregon State University, and decades of college teaching and research experience. He has authored books, articles, and done extensive research on the terroir of the Pacific northwest, with a good portion of this time spent on investigating the deposits of the Missoula floods, which were the pivotal event that formed the geological base of the region.    Kevin's research today focuses on terroir. He owns a consulting company, Vinterra, through which he assists wineries in choosing the best vineyard sites, matching grape to site, and educating winery owners and winemakers and their customers on why their specific terroir leads to the style in their wine.  Photo: Whitman.edu I need to thank Eric McKibben from Amavi and Pepper Bridge for the introduction.    Here are the items we discuss: Kevin tells us about his past, studying the Himalyan thrust belt, and how he got into wine in Walla Walla To set our baseline, Kevin defines terroir, referring to the definition of terroir from the OIV (International Organization of Vine and Wine)   The majority of the show is spent with Kevin clearing up many, many things we hear about terroir, much of which is not exactly correct. We cover... Why grapes that grow on slopes are often of higher quality than those on the valley floor. Why slopes can be warmer even though altitude makes them cooler (VERY confusing -- temperature drops 1˚C for every 100 meters of altitude yet during the coldest times, the slopes are warmer due to air density!) The benefits of south, southeast, and southwest facing slopes in the northern hemisphere and what actually happens with temperatures of the soil to have this make an appreciable difference.   Solar radiation and how it plays a part in ripening and quality of the grapes. We get into whether slope angle actually matters.   DIRT! Kevin is a geologist and he rocks my world talking about the two or three REALLY key factors of soil and what you may be tasting in the wine that is reflective of the terroir. We also discuss the role of irrigation and whether that makes wine or a more manipulated beverage. Kevin helps me understand the “terroir deniers” and the argument he makes to try to convince them. Washington State, discussing the AVA petition for the Rocks of Milton Freewater, which makes some of the most distinctive Syrah in the world. Kevin discusses this unique plot and why some of the wines taste so much of place (“funk”) and some are just ok.  Photo: https://rocksdistrict.com/terroir How AVAs are made, what goes into it and whether or not they are meaningful or meaningless. We compare the AVA system in the US to the PDO system in Europe.   To me, this is the most comprehensive look at terroir I have ever received. I hope you learn as much as I did in the show. This is Kevin's first show with me, but it won't be his last! I hope you love the super dork out that is this show!!  _________________________________________    

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
Thursday, October 27, 2022 – The strength of tribal courts

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 55:51


Tribal courts are asserting their ability to mete out justice and work toward healing. Many tribal courts are being recognized for restorative justice and for providing a means to address wrongs that go unresolved in other courts. Today on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce speaks with Matthew Fletcher (Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians), law professor at the University of Michigan Law School and author of the “Turtle Talk” blog, and Matt Johnson (enrolled in the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla; the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation), court director of the Umatilla Tribal Court.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 2 - It's Free speech unless we don't like it

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 42:08


What's Trending: WWU investigates hate speech on its free speech board, Washington L&I is keeping its vaccine mandate and a WSP trooper shot in Walla Walla is recovering.Big Local: Everett can't enforce its bikini barista ordinance, WSU is lifting its COVID vaccine mandate and Joe Kennedy is set to be reinstated as Bremerton football coach. // Pierce County deputies rescued an alligator from an odd situation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MFI Leaders Podcast
Hospitality: Creating a Place of Honor & Refreshment - Tina Brennan

MFI Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 30:26


Hospitality doesn't mean extravagant spending, gifts or even a minute-by-minute plan, but it does take intentionality. This session will help you actionize your culture of honor by designing moments and creating spaces where people are able to bring their best self and walk away feeling seen, known and loved.Tina Brennan spent over 10 years working in public education and administration. Five years ago she transitioned to full time staff at LIFE Church in Walla Walla, WA helping execute and organize systems across all departments of the church. Her role as executive assistant to the lead pastors has developed over the years and she loves equipping others at all levels to serve their pastors and put feet to the vision. We hope that this teaching left you more encouraged and equipped today. Ministers Fellowship International exists to help leaders build healthy, strong, impacting churches and to do so in a way that makes for a healthy leader. Join the MFI family or learn more at mfileader.org, and find hundreds of resources to help you grow at mfiresource.comFollow along on ...

The Wine CEO Podcast
The Wine CEO Episode #95: Interview with Doug Frost, Master Sommelier & Master of Wine

The Wine CEO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 39:50


Doug Frost is one of only 4 people in the world to hold both titles - Master of Wine and Master Sommelier. These extremely difficult certifications make Doug a bit of a phenomenon in the wine industry and today on The Wine CEO Podcast he chats with Sarah about why he got both distinctions, how they changed his career, and what he is doing now. Doug talks about his winery, Echolands, in Walla Walla and also mentions The Wine Pinnacle Awards - an illustrious Wine Award Ceremony held in Singapore later this month where he is on the judging panel. This is an episode you don't want to miss, so grab a glass of your favorite wine and press play now! -------- Sign up for my newsletter and get a free guide to Food & Wine Pairing! >> thewineceo.com Email: Sarah@thewineceo.com  Instagram: @thewineceo Facebook: @sarahthewineceo ------ Today's Guest: Doug Frost Doug's Instagram: @dougmsmw Echolands Winery Instagram: @echolandswine Stay tuned for the winners of this year's Wine Pinnacle Awards! Doug will be judging this competition at the end of October and the results should showcase some of the world's top wines!

Vin for begyndere
Walla Walla - Cabernet Sauvignon - Washington State

Vin for begyndere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 84:58


Vinene i dette afsnit er skænket af Juuls Vin og Spiritus https://www.juuls.dk/ Smagekasse: https://www.juuls.dk/radioteket ………………… Vi skal til et område i den østlige del af Washington State, Columbia Vallay og mere specifikt i Walla Walla, hvor klimaet er perfekt til at dyrke cabernet sauvignon. Hvordan smager cabernet sauvignon i sin rene form i området og hvordan smager den, når den er i et bordeaux-blend? Hvordan er klimaet i og hvilke forskelle er der på den vestlige og østlige del af Walla Walla? Hvordan ser det ud med nedbør og temperaturer og hvad svarer det til i Europa? Hvorfor laver man ikke kun enkeltmarksvine i den forbindelse; hvorfor laver man sammenstik med druer fra 10 marker? Hvorfor er der opstået denne særlige lille appellation Walla Walla og hvilket terroir gør sig gældende her? Hvad kan man spise til cabernet sauvignon og hvor længe kan vin egentlig tåle at lægge på træfade? Skal vi mon lave en lille pariser-smagning med jer lyttere og se om Amerika slår Frankrig igen? Det kunne være sjovt! Til slut snakker vi om 100-pointsskalaen og hvordan den kan og skal forstås til eget brug og til brug ved indkøb.   100-points skala (starter ved 50 point)   Farve 5 point Aroma 15 point Intensitet og kompleksitet Smag 20 point Følesans, smagssans, struktur, syre, tannin, alkohol,  intensitet og kompleksitet, balance og længde Overordnet kvalitet og finish 10 point Sammenhæng mellem de tre foregående punkter samt det “subjekltive element”   Men hey; hvad med stedsmagning og kontekst?! Hvor spiller det ind?   Vi smager på 1) Woodward Canyion, Artist Series #26, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2017 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/woodward-canyon-artist-series-26 2) L'Ecole No 41, Cabernet Saouvignon, Columbia Valley, 2018 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/lecole-no-41-cabernet-sauvignon-columbia-valley-1 3) L'Ecole No 41, Estate Ferguson Vineyard, 2018 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/lecole-no-41-estate-ferguson-vineyard-4 ....................... KØB BOGEN HER http://vinforbegyndere.com/ Besøg os på Facebook og Instagram, hvor man kan se billeder af vinene og få tips til vin og mad sammensætning. https://www.facebook.com/vinforbegyndere https://www.instagram.com/vinforbegyndere Web: https://www.radioteket.dk/ Kontakt: radioteket@radioteket.dk Musik: Jonas Landin

The History Of The Evergreen State
64- The Massacre at Erlands Point

The History Of The Evergreen State

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 29:00


Six people are murdered in a beach home on Erlands Point, six miles northwest of Bremerton in Kitsap County, on March 28th, 1934. Barking dogs alert neighbors to the murder scene three days later. The murder investigation becomes a circus as a result of excessive and sensational news attention. The inquiry stalls after a week, and the killer's trail becomes cold. Leo Roderick Bernard Hall, 33, an ex-fighter and dry-dock worker, is arrested for the mass murder in October of 1935. On the 11th of September, 1936, Leo Hall is hung in the state penitentiary at Walla Walla, in another news-frenzied tragedy.Peggy Peterson Paulos, a 27-year-old local barmaid and waitress, claimed Hall was a reluctant partner in a botched heist at Erlands Point. Paulos fled for her life as the murders began. In Kitsap County, both Hall and Paulos were charged with murder and went on trial in December 1935. Hall was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to death; Paulos was acquitted and released.Listen now to learn more about this grisly episode in the History of the Evergreen State!A special thank you goes out to Al Hirsch for providing the music for the podcast, check him out on YouTube.Find merchandise for the podcast now available at:     https://washington-history-by-jon-c.creator-spring.comIf you enjoy the podcast and would like to contribute, please visit: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/EvergreenpodIf you have any questions, episode ideas you'd like to see explored, or just have a general comment, please reach out at Historyoftheevergreenstatepod@gmail.comTo keep up on news for the podcast and other related announcements, please like and follow:https://www.facebook.com/HistoryoftheevergreenstatepodcastThank you for listening!

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast
Using Clarity to Create Goals That Matter to YOU: Episode 867

Grow My Cleaning Company's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 25:48


Today on the podcast, we have Mike here chatting with Olivia Kay. Olivia started Zest Cleaning Company in January 2022 in Walla Walla, Washington.  She's here today to talk to Mike about how to move into her second year of business as the CEO of her company, rather than someone working in the business or cleaning. She and Mike talk about the clarity she needs in order to make this change effectively and what to think about before she does so. This is such a great reminder to plan the future of your business intentionally.  10:51 How to Get Clear on Your Goals  16:04 Get to at Least an Eight In Clarity Before You Make Any Decisions 19:52 Being Rich is More About Mindset Than a Dollar Amount Love the idea, but find it overwhelming? Want to learn the next steps like, what to actually say on the call? Jump on a call with one of our coaches and learn strategies on how to grow your cleaning company and start loving your job every day! Book here 

The Kyle Carpenter Podcast
#10 - Director Charles Sams

The Kyle Carpenter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 67:46


Kyle and Director Sams sit down together to discuss the National Park Service and the challenges of preserving and protecting 63 national parks, 84 national monuments, 5,000 bridges and 85 million acres of land. Charles "Chuck" Sams is the 19th Director of the National Park Service. He is also the first tribal citizen to be nominated to this position. Director Sams is Cayuse and Walla Walla and is an enrolled member, and former executive director, of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Northeast Oregon, where he grew up. Before being appointed as Director,  he served as the appointee for the state of Oregon to the Pacific Northwest Power and Conservation Council. Like many in his family, Sams served in the United States Military. He was an Intelligence Specialist in the U.S. Navy. 

Wine Time Fridays Podcast
129 - Throwback Friday - Flashback to 2021 Walla Walla Trip

Wine Time Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 36:35


In todays episode, Shelley and Phil head down memory lane with a Throwback Friday (yes, it's supposed to be Throwback Thursday, we know, but that's not our brand!) with a flashback to last October when they visited Walla Walla. They taste through two balanced and intensely delicious wines, a Chardonnay from Abeja Winery and Anvil by Forgeron, a red blend.  #HappyFriday! #ItsWineTime! #CheersingWines tasted this episode:  2020 Abeja Winery Chardonnay ($45 at the winery)2018 Anvil by Forgeron ($65 at the winery)To find out more about the Cuvée Collective Goosecross Winery NFT collection head to https://www.cuveecollective.com/marketplace/wine/goosecross-cellars Thanks to our sponsors: Studio 107 and Eternal WineAt Studio 107, in the heart of downtown Coeur D'alene, Idaho, we believe that small towns deserve great wines, too!  Come join us in our wine bar and gallery for an afternoon or evening escape. For more information, please visit https://studio107cda.comCheck out Eternal Wine! Their focus is on single vineyard Rhone valley wines in Washington State. Also check out their Drink Washington State brand of approachable wines! Visit https://eternalwine.com for more information or simply call 509-240-6258. Eternal Wine: Drink Wine, Be Happy.And of course, a HUGE thank you to Tod Hornby who wrote and recorded our official Wine Time Fridays theme music, which is ANYthing but average.  The Cuvée Collective Wine Word of the Week - BalanceBalance is how well the wine can juggle acidity, alcohol, sugar, aromas, and flavors in a single taste. A well-balanced wine won't have an unpleasant dominance of one characteristic above the rest.For more information on Cuvée Collective, future NFT drops and how they're bringing the worlds of wine and NFT's together in Web3, please visit https://www.cuveecollective.comMentions: Northstar Winery, Kontos Cellars, Woodward Canyon, Rick Small, Doubleback Winery, Josh McDaniels, Passing Time, Bledsoe Family Wines, Drew Bledsoe, Damon Huard, Dorothy ‘Dottie' Gaiter and John Brecher, Wayne Gretzky, Ryan Kalil, GaryVee Wine Club, Marcus Whitman Hotel and Conference Center, Marla Lopez, Coeur d'Alene FRESH Wine Bar, Rotary on the Rocks, Souport the End of Homelessness, Cave B Estate Winery, Saviah Cellars, Arbor Crest and Orr Wines.Wines we enjoyed this week:  Cave B Merlot, Saviah Cellars Syrah, La Story Cabernet Sauvignon, Arbor Crest Chardonnay and Orr Wines Merlot.Please find us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/WineTimeFridays), Twitter (@VintageTweets) and Instagram (@WineTimeFridays). You can also “Follow” Phil on Vivino. His profile name is Phil Anderson and will probably “Follow” you back! Check out all of our current sponsors by visiting our Wine Time Fridays Resource Page by visiting https://winetimefridays.com/wine-time-fridays-resources/

Legends Behind the Craft
Creating and Managing Multiple Wine Brands With Josh McDaniels of Bledsoe Wine Estates

Legends Behind the Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 47:35


Josh McDaniels is the CEO and Director of Winemaking at Bledsoe Wine Estates. He was born and raised in Walla Walla, where he fell in love with the wine industry at an early age. Josh started his own winery during high school and pursued this passion by obtaining formal education from the Institute of Enology and Viticulture. He also took extension courses through Washington State University and UC Davis and interned in Argentina at Paul Hobbs' Vina Cobos Winery to further his education. Josh has been named a "Game Changer of Washington Wine," a "Washington Prodigy," and a "Top 40 Under 40 Tastemakers of America" from Wine Enthusiast Magazine. In this episode with Josh McDaniels Creating one wine brand from scratch and growing it takes a lot of time, effort, and money. But running multiple brands across different locations is so much tougher. So, how do you successfully build and manage multiple wine brands? According to Josh McDaniels, the key is to leverage synergies and economies of scale. At Bledsoe Wine Estates, only one core team handles all three brands. One of the main benefits of this setup is having a fixed set of people Josh and his partner can trust. There's an established trust, understanding, and synergy between different personalities — which helps the brands run smoothly. In this episode of the Legends Behind the Craft podcast, Drew Thomas Hendricks and Bianca Harmon sit down with Josh McDaniels, the CEO and Director of Winemaking at Bledsoe Wine Estates. Josh shares how he got started in the wine business as early as high school, how he met NFL quarterback Drew Bledsoe, and how they ended up as business partners. He also talks about the process of creating three wine brands and the challenges of managing and growing them.

The Commute with Carlson
WSP Trooper out of hospital after being shot in face by suspect

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 6:04


KVI's John Carlson updates the story of Washington State Patrol (WSP) Trooper, Dean Atkinson Jr, who is now recovering at home after being shot in the face by a warrant arrest suspect in the line of duty in Walla Walla. Carlson explains the criminal warrant that was issued for the suspect's arrest last week when the shooting occurred.

End Seclusion Podcast
The Power of One, a discussion with Jim Sporleder

End Seclusion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 81:26


Join us for a special discussion with Jim Sporleder, The Power of One.We will discuss alternative strategies to the traditional practice of seclusion and restraint. The Power of One is a mindset that draws connection, and promotes positive caring adult relationships, as compared to punitive seclusion and restraint techniques that create disconnection and become barriers to positive outcomes through a caring adult relationship.Jim Sporleder retired in 2014 as Principal of Lincoln High School in Walla Walla, WA. Under Jim's leadership, Lincoln High School became a “Trauma Informed” school, gaining national attention due to a dramatic drop in out of school suspensions, increased graduation rates and the number of students going on to post-secondary education. These dramatic changes at Lincoln caught the attention of Jamie Redford, who spent a year filming the documentary, Paper Tigers, which tells the Lincoln story. The documentary was released at the May 2015 Seattle International Film Festival and received positive reviews.Jim is currently working as a trauma-informed coach / consultant and is based in Walla Walla, WA. His travels as consultant, keynote speaker, presenter and trainer have taken him all over the United States. Jim is married, has three daughters and seven granddaughters. In his spare time, Jim enjoys fishing, hunting, but most of all…spending time with family.Support the show

The Commute with Carlson
October 3, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 105:32


Hour 1 -- Seattle Mariners end two-decade playoff drought in most dramatic way possible, severe devastation in parts of Florida after Hurricane Ian and VP Kamala Harris promises "resources based on equity", HBO's Bill Maher suggests Democrats might have to dump VP Kamala Harris from 2024 re-election ticket, prepare to pay more for everything in WA in 2023: the WA minimum wage will go up $1.25 an hour because its tied to inflation, surprising answers about what's pushing the cost of homes and real estate from the two candidates for WA 3rd Congressional district, Seattle bad news: another weekend marked by several shootings around town, Seattle good news: hey, at least nobody died in these shootings, Carlson and Lars Larson evaluate the two candidates in the WA 3rd Congressional District who are trying to define themselves for voters. Hour 2 -- WSP Trooper shot in face in Walla Walla and then airlifted to Seattle's Harborview is now home from the hospital, more facts finally released in the suspect shooting the WSP Trooper in the face last week, suspect was wanted on an arrest warrant with prior criminal record, GUEST: the Public Address voice of the Mariners at T-Mobile Park and KNWN news and sports anchor, Tom Hutyler, talks about the playoff-bound Seattle Mariners, how the M's transacted the current roster to finally make the playoffs, how a potent rookie has galvanized the clubhouse and fans right now, now the M's await final standings for playoff road-games or home-games, the Seattle Seahawks confronted with a possible double-standard about which political candidates they align with, Hour 3 -- the US military falling behind its recruiting goals by 25%, US military now accepting recruits that were initially rejected, Carlson gives 4 reasons why he thinks US military is missing their recruiting metrics so badly, KVI callers sound off on the recruiting shortage including one caller who says "go woke, go broke", when a TV show theme song becomes its own hit, more data about how much more WA pays for gasoline than just about any other place than California, Seattle Mariners finally end their 21-year-long playoff drought, the surprising quote about climate change from Bill Gates, why Gates realizes people won't changer their personal consumption purely for climate change politics.

The Commute with Carlson
September 28, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 103:46


Hour 1 -- your chance to win Carlson's Legendary Lyrics, questions and speculation that Europe's big Nordstream oil pipeline might have been sabotaged but by who/whom?, locally gas prices have jumped by about 9-cents a gallon in the last week and refinery capacity is to blame, one of Italy's former prime ministers--a political opponent of the newly elected PM, Giorgia Meloni--tells American news media/pundits that saying she's the return of Benito Mussolini is "fake news", CNN's Don Lemon gets shut down on climate change beliefs by NOAA acting director, Celebrity Stacy political ad in Georgia Governor's race, King Co. Exec. Dow Constantine now wants a new property tax levy upwards of $1.25 billion for mental health treatment but two KVI hosts are skeptical of the plan. Hour 2 -- good news on the updated condition of a WSP Trooper (from Walla Walla) shot in the face by an assailant last week, a montage of American news media really distorting the political beliefs of Italy's newly elected female Prime Minister , what the Italian Prime Minister has actually been saying in campaign events that mirrors the political divide in America, so what is Washington getting for our $10 billion state tax surplus?, GUEST: KOMO 4's meteorologist Kristin Clark has been monitoring the strength and path of Hurricane Ian about to hit western Florida, why Clark says the north east quadrant of the hurricane is the most dangerous for rainfall and storm surge, CNN's Don Lemon gets rebuffed by NOAA Director when asking about Hurricane Ian and climate change, the remarkable survival story of two brothers in their 70s who climbed out of a crashed small plane in a heavily wooded portion of Skagit County. Hour 3 -- Seattle was once the fastest growing big city in America but the population is now shrinking, students are leaving the Seattle schools at twice the rate of other school districts in WA, the protests in Seattle's CID continue against King County officials "trying to sneak in" a proposed 400+ bed homeless shelter, the "harm reduction" philosophy of homeless drug addicts in Seattle is failing, PSBJ report says people are moving out of Seattle/King Co. to Pierce and Snohomish Counties, the utterly confounding assertion by Pres. Biden that people should get a COVID vaxx to prepare for hurricane season, promising new research in slowing the decline from Alzheimer's disease, why research and development spending is so important, the growing mystery of Nordstream Pipeline ruptures now in three places and why Carlson thinks this is a sabotage, the CIA has previously warned German gov't about possible security risks to Nordstream, why Donald Trump looks prescient today about Nordstream Pipeline opposition in the past, other European governments are saying Russia may have damaged the Nordstream pipe under the Baltic Sea, 8 stolen cars discovered at a single property in Parkland WA south of Tacoma and the stolen cars are from cities all over Puget Sound.

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 1: White House won't talk about Biden's mental health

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 34:46


12pm - Big Lead @ Noon // More states cut taxes while Washington remains the only state in the nation that hasn't since the beginning of the pandemic // GUEST: Dean Atkinson, father of Trooper Dean Atkinson Jr who was shot in the face in Walla Walla and drove himself to the hospital - he's currently recovering at Harborview // WH won't talk about Biden's mental health after he forgets Rep diedSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Bad policy spreads to Yakima with deadly consequences

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 41:47


What's Trending: A 17-year-old in Yakima should have been in jail when he killed a woman, an update on a Walla Walla trooper who show in the face, a wild outburst on Canadian reality TV. // The Seattle Times puts out a smear job on Tiffany Smiley and California governor Gavin Newsom calls out the right. // A LGBTQ group does not want to be represented by Jeffrey Dahmer. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Unfinished Print
Lucy May Schofield - Printmaker: Light, Time, Process

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 94:30


The time and dedication that it takes to make mokuhanga is well known. And if it isn't then it really should be. It feels that it's easy to follow social media, and watch the pretty prints come out of nowhere, but behind all those nice pictures is a lot of hard work, and dedication. One person who is a prime example of this hard work, dedication and passion for the craft, is Lucy May Schofield. Based in England, Lucy has been making mokuhanga for some time. She has travelled the world, using her environment, and her passion to create mokuhanga that is expressive and powerful.  On this episode of The Unfinished Print, I speak with Lucy about how she discovered mokuhanga, her time at MI Lab, Lucy's love of bokashi,  and her mokuhanga relationships; those that have helped her along the way. Lucy also speaks on the Mokuhanga Sisters Collective, how grants and scholarships assist in Lucy's artistic pursuits, as well as how her other artistic endeavours affect her mokuhanga. Lucy's is a story which explores independence, pilgrimage, freedom, and how it affects a persons life.  Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com  Artists works follow after the note about them. Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. Artists works follow after the note. Lucy May Schofield - website, Instagram Rebecca Salter - is the President of The Royal Academy of Arts, in London, England. She is also an artist who has written two books about Japanese woodblock printing, Japanese Woodblock Printing (2001), and Japanese Popular Prints (2006). She worked with the Satō Woodblock Print Workshop, documenting their process. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Untitled 2015-14 (2015) Royal Academy of Arts - is an English art institution which as been in operation for 250 years. More info, here.  Fukuoka, Prefecture, Japan - is a Prefecture in the second most southern part of the Japanese archipelago.  It is known for is temples, hot springs, and natural beauty. Fukuoka tourist website, here. kotatsu - is a low table, electrically heated by an internal heater underneath the table itself, more info, here.  Munakata Shikō (志功棟方) - (1903-1975) arguably one of the most famous modern printmakers, Shiko is famous for his prints of women, animals, the supernatural, and Buddhist deities. He made his prints with an esoteric fervour where his philosophies about mokuhanga were just as interesting as his print work.  Hizakura no Saku (1978) colour lithograph New Year Card - called nengajo (年賀状) in Japanese, these cards have been traditionally passed from person to person  since the Heian Period (794-1185). Mokuhanga practitioners make them as well, creating a new one every year focusing on the zodiac sign of the year as a theme. shina - is a type of wood used in mokuhanga. It is part of the linden family of trees. This wood is produced in various parts of the world, such as Japan and Russia. Not all shina is created equal so buyer beware. magnolia wood - a straight grained hard wood located in North America and Asia. more info, here. washi paper - (和紙) is a type of Japanese paper made with the fibres of either gampi, mitsumata, or mulberry. It is versatile and can be used in many ways.  International Mokuhanga Conference - is a bi-yearly conference dedicated to mokuhanga which started in 2011 by the International Mokuhanga Association. Each conference is themed. The latest conference was in 2021, delayed a year because of the pandemic. More information can be found, here.  Ralph Kiggell (1960-2022) -  was one of the most important mokuhanga practitioners to have made work. Originally from England, Ralph lived and worked in Thailand. Ralph pushed the boundaries of mokuhanga with extremely large pieces, jigsaw carving, and by using fantastic colour for his work. He also worked with the International Mokuhanga Conference to promote mokuhanga around the world. He will be greatly missed. Ralph's work can be found, here. His obituary in The Guardian can be found, here. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Pool Diver (1996) Keiko Hara - is an artist who works, and teaches in Walla Walla, Washington. She is a painter, and printmaker in various relief mediums, such as mokuhanga.  Untitled (2019) Keiko Kadota - (d. 2017) was a director of MI Lab and of Nagasawa Art Park, previously. She was a mentor to many mokuhanga practitioners and helped to promote mokuhanga around the world. MI Lab - is a mokuhanga residency located in Kawaguchi-ko, near Mount Fuji. More info can be found, here.  Kate MacDonagh - is an Irish mokuhanga printmaker based in Dublin, Ireland. Kanreki was an exhibition curated by Kate MacDonagh at The Model, Sligo. Kate's website. Katsutoshi Yuasa - is a printmaker and artist based in Tokyo, Japan. His work tends to be large scale, and created through photography, bits, and focuses on the overall "image" itself. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. website, Instagram I-know-not-what (2022) oil-based mokuhanga kirazruri  - is a style of printing which uses mica to give a silver, glittering tone to the print. Mica is used as a lovely addition to your print. You can find more information, here.  Hiroki Satake - is a mokuhanga printmaker, and instructor based in Japan. He has taught at MI Lab, as well as given demonstrations regarding tool sharpening, around the world.  Carol Wilhide Justin - is a mokuhanga printmaker based in London, England. Her work focuses on the natural world and the process of making mokuhanga. Carol's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Asemic Writing  Tochigi, Prefecture - is a Japanese Prefecture sandwiched between Saitama, Ibaraki, Fukushima, and Gunma Prefectures. It is famous for its autumnal leaves,  temples, and UNESCO World Heritage Site, Nikkō. More info, here.  Nishijin - is an area in Fukuoka City known for its shopping district.  inaka (田舎) - is a Japanese word for “country-side.” Kurokawa Onsen (黒川温泉) - is a hot spring town located on the island of Kyushu, near Mount Aso, the largest active volcano in Japan. It is famous of its traditional style inns, hot springs, baths, and food. More info, here.   Beppu (別府市) - is a hot spring town located in Kyushu. More info, here. matsuri (祭り)- is the Japanese word for “festival.” Japan is a country famous of it's festivals. Each Prefecture, city, town, municipality has a special festival for their area, connected to the seasons, gods, or harvests.  Itoshima (糸島市) - is a city in Fukuoka Prefecture, popular for its beaches, surfing, and nature.  Northumberland, Britain - is a county located in the northernmost area of Britain. It shares a border with Scotland. It is known for its nature, industry, castles, and history. https://www.visitnorthumberland.com cyanotype -  a type of work which uses iron compounds, and when exposed to UV light creates various blues. More info, here.  Indigo dyeing - made famous in the Edo Period (1603-1968), indigo dyeing has been a part of Japanese handicrafts for a long time. Shikoku is famous for it, towns such as Mima, Wakimachi, Tokushima, amongst others continue to produce hand dyed garments of indigo.More info can be found, here, and here.  Awagami -  is arguably the largest paper making company in Japan at the moment. With a large International name, Awagami sponsors, and promotes its paper all over the world. More information can be found on its website, here.  88 Temple Pilgrimage - associated with the Buddhist priest Kōbō Daishi (Kūkai) [774-835]. It is one of the few circular pilgrimages in the world. You can walk, or drive the pilgrimage. You can also see it in parts, called kuguri-uchi. Essentially you can walk this pilgrimage in order, backwards or frontwards as they are all temples associated with Kūkai. If you do make the pilgrimage by foot, it is a commitment, but extremely rewarding. Pilgrims are called ō-henro. More info, here.   Ō-settai - are gifts, such as lodging, food, money, or clothing. They are given by non-pilgrims to pilgrims on they journey of the 88 Temples. More info can be found, here. QEST - is the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust, and is given to British craftspeople who are given money to pursue training and education in their specific field and medium.  More info, here.  kōzo - is a paper made from the bark of the mulberry bush. It is used in mokuhanga frequently, and comes in various weights. YInMn - is a blue colour discovered by Professor Mas Subramanian in 2009.  Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011) -  was an American abstract impressionist painter who enjoyed experimenting, discovering new ways of expression through paint. More info, here.  Echizen - is a region in Fukui Prefecture, Japan associated with Japanese paper making. It has a long history of paper making. There are many paper artisans in the area. One famous person is Iwano Ichibei whom Megan mentions in this episode. He is a Living National Treasure in paper making, and the ninth generation of his family still making paper today. More info can be found here in English, and here in Japanese.  Paul Furneaux - is a Scottish born mokuhanga printmaker and teacher who uses the medium of  mokuhanga in order to create pieces of work that are third dimensional, and abstract.  The Mokuhanga Sisters - are a mokuhanga collective consisting of Yoonmi Nam, Mariko Jesse, Lucy May Schofield, Melissa Schulenberg, Kate MacDonagh, Katie Baldwin, Mia-O, Patty Hudak, and Natasha Norman. Instagram Yasuyuki Sato - is the Chair of Center for the Science of Human Endeavor/CfSHE, and Director of the Mokuhanga Conference.  Yoonmi Nam (b. 1974) - is a contemporary mokuhanga printmaker, lithographer, sculptor, and teacher, based in Lawrence, Kansas. Her work can be found, here. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. More Beer...For Instance (2013) Katie Baldwin - a woodblock printmaker, letterpress, screen printer. website, Instagram Raft (shore) #2 (2013) Mariko Jesse - is an illustrator, and mokuhanga printmaker based in Tōkyō, London, and California. Her work can be found, here. Mariko is also a part of the collective, wood+paper+box, which can be found, here.  Between Times - folded screen with mokuhanga wood+paper+box - is a collaborative art group made up of Katie Baldwin, Mariko Jesse, and Yoonmi Nam. It is based on their experiences at Nagasawa Art Park, the precursor of MI Lab.  Patty Hudak - is an American artist who splits her time between Vermont and NYC, who works in installation, and mokuhanga. She has travelled the world, and is a part of three artist collectives. Patty's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.    Melissa Schulenberg - is a woodblock printmaker and professor of Art and Art History at St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY. Some of her work can be found, here.  Newcastle University - is a public research university located in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, Britain. London College of Printing - now called the London College of Communication, is an art college associated with the University of the Arts London.  Toshio Sayama - is an instructor at MI Lab as well as on the MI Lab Committee Board.  Borderless scroll - is the Mokuhanga Sisters collaborative scroll. Shown in Nara during the International Mokuhanga Conference, as well as at the Southern Vermont Art Center. nori - is a type of paste made from starch. It is usually used when making mokuhanga. You can make nori from any type of material made of starch. For instance, paste can be made with tapioca,  rice, corn, even potato. You can purchase nori pretty much anywhere but making it is more environmentally friendly. Laura Boswell has a great recipe, here.  bokashi -  is a Japanese term associated with the gradation of water into ink. There are several types of bokashi. For more information regarding these types of bokashi please check out Professor Claire Cuccio's lecture called “A Story in Layers,” for the Library of Congress, and the book Japanese Printmaking by Tōshi Yoshida, and Rei Yuki. Below are the following types of bokashi. This is from the Yoshida book: ichimonji bokashi - straight line gradation ichimonji mura bokashi - straight line gradation with an uneven edg. Ō-bokashi - a gradual shading over a wide area atenashi bokashi - gradation without definition futairo bokashi - two tone gradation Utamaro - A Prelude To Desire Series - is a series created by Kitagawa Utamaro (1750-1806) in 1799. His designs changed the whole perspective of shunga, erotic prints. Below is as print as designed by Utamaro and Lucy's self-produced print, Prelude To Desire IV.  shunga (春画)- is a type of mokuhanga which is connected with the ukiyo-e period of the Japanese print. The theme is sexuality, whether male-female, or male-male. Many print designers helped to create these prints, and were very popular.  Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858) - born in Edo, Hiroshige is famous for his landscape series of that burgeoning city. The most famous series being, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (1856-1859), and the landcape series, Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō (1833-1834). His work highlights bokashi, and bright colours. More info about his work can be found, here.  Ōmayagashi - from One Hundred Famous Views of Edo Northumberland National Park - is a park in Northumberland , England. It is considered a “dark skies” park where the night sky is preserved by having no artificial lighting in the area. Holbein -  is a pigment company with offices located in Japan, The United States, and Canada. They offer high end gouache, watercolour, and pigment pastes.  scrolls - called kakemono 掛物 or emakimono 絵巻物  in Japanese. These scrolls contain many different types of themes and subjects. More info can be found, here.  The Legend of Gisho Turner Design Gouache - is a company based in Osaka, Japan. The make acrylic and design (water based) gouache.  Oak gall - is a type of plant swelling, which can be found in various plants. Oak gall is made by the Gall Wasp. The ink and pigment made form oak gall has been used for centuries. hanshita - is a thin sheet of gampi paper that is pasted, reverse side, on a piece of wood. This is a guide, carved onto the block and is generally used for the key block and subsequent colour blocks. Methods such as acetate with water based pigment, can also be used rather than the thin gampi paper, which can cause misregistration if not pasted correctly. The Japanese Paper Place - is a Toronto based Japanese paper store servicing the Mokuhanga community for many years.  Interview with the Nancy Jacobi of the JPP can be found, here. Ozuwashi -  is a brick and mortar paper store located in the Nihonbashi district of Tōkyō. More info here. You can purchase all types of paper that Lucy mentions ion her interview, such as pansion, and sekishu. Chine-collé - is a two layered printmaking process where the paper is  placed onto an inked metal plated run through a press. More info, here.  © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing musical credit - The Smiths - The Headmaster Ritual from the album Meat Is Murder (1985) logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***    

The Commute with Carlson
September 23, 2022 show

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 114:12


Hour 1 -- 24 hours later and still no response from Seattle's Congresswoman after incendiary/provocative comments about Israel by Squad member Rashida Tlaib, GA gubernatorial candidate Stacy Abrams makes disturbing comment about fetal heartbeats, some Abrams zingers after her pronouncement about in-vitro heartbeats, why the 'war on cars' is failing, GUEST: author and Reason.com's Randal O'Toole, gives some strong examples of how anti-car environmentalists have moved the goal posts on pollution and cars, cites examples of mis-spent taxpayer dollars on mass transit that has done nothing to reduce emissions, uses an example of Portland's "light rail" MAX system, how light rail systems cannibalize mass transit usage taking away from bus ridership, "half of employed people in Bellevue/Seattle" were working at home last year is a warning sign for mass transit agencies. Hour 2 -- some MLB history is on the verge of changing very soon, a WSP trooper is shot and wounded in the line of duty in Walla Walla and airlifted to Seattle, thankfully the shooting suspect was arrested after wounding the trooper, WSDOT gets really defensive after city of Spokane threatens lawsuit over unsanctioned homeless camp along I-90, the irony that WSDOT would get defensive after constant homeless camping on DOT property in Seattle and Tacoma along I-5, federal authorities say $43 billion worth of COVID relief fraud has been discovered, the $43 billion is a prime example of why inflation right now is out of control with over-cooking the price of goods across America. Hour 3 --GUEST: economist and author, Steve Moore, describes the "ferocious bear market" now that the stock market has lost 15% of its value--adjusted for inflation--since Biden took office, why the Democrats spending $4 trilion after COVID has forced The Federal Reserve to raise interest rates continuously, Biden's UN speech this week spent more time on climate change than any other subject, why Moore admits he made a mistake about supporting China's inclusion in the WTO 15 years ago, why political freedom has eluded Chinese people as the nation's economy has exploded with trade deals, how American politicians "were duped" by China, update on condition of Walla Walla WSP Trooper who was shot in the face in the line of duty by a suspect who rammed trooper's car, GUEST: Sno. Co. Sheriff Adam Fortney per WA Legislature urged to revise police pursuit law they changed in early 2021, "emboldened nature of criminals these days", Fortney says police chases all have varying circumstances and officers need discretion of when to pursue, how Senate Democrats in Olympia prevented prior reform on the police pursuit law, Fortney says "politics got in the way of community safety", Fortney says there's a disconnect between regular working folks and a small group of powerful politicians.

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - The Air Force wants you unless you're cisgender and white

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 40:39


What's Trending: A trooper is shot in Walla Walla and certain laws have made us less safe, the City of Seattle wants to clean up Third Avenue and Washington apparently has aggressive drivers. // John Fetterman's medical records come into question again and more talk about migrants crossing the border. // The Air Force Academy promotes an anti-cisgender male organization. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Short Wave
Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 13:49 Very Popular


In the final episode of Short Wave's Summer Road Trip series exploring the science happening in national parks and public lands, Aaron talks to National Park Service Director Charles Sams, who recently issued new policy guidance to strengthen the ways the park service collaborates with American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, the Native Hawaiian Community, and other indigenous peoples. It's part of a push across the federal government to increase the level of tribal co-stewardship over public lands. Aaron talks with Sams, the first Tribal citizen to head the agency, about how he hopes this will change the way parks are managed, how the parks are already incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and what national parkland meant to him growing up as a member of the Cayuse and Walla Walla tribes on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in eastern Oregon. Listen to more episodes about all the amazing research taking place on public lands, where we hike up sky islands and crawl into caves in search of fantastical creatures, by visiting the series website: https://www.npr.org/series/1120432990/road-trip-short-wave

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Casting Long Shadows over Columbia Valley w/ Gilles Nicault, Longshadows

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 31:29


After spending two decades promoting the wines of Washington State, Allen Shoup founded Longshadows, a collective of partnerships leveraging internationally renowned winemaking talent to express the best of the Columbia Valley. Director of Winemaking, Gilles Nicault, describes how the partnerships work from both a business and winemaking perspective; what he's learned from making wines with the likes of Michel Rolland to Randy Dunn; and how Washington State's wine profile has been elevated from this concept.  Don't forget to support the show on Patreon!Detailed Show Notes: Allen Shoup founded LongshadowsHe was CEO of Ste Michelle Wine Estates (“SMWE”) for 20 yearsHis mentor was Robert Mondavi, who founded Opus One, a collaboration between the old and new worldAt SMWE, Allen started collaborations with Eroica (Dr. Loosen) and Col Solari (Antinori)Wanted to build partnerships for Longshadows - showcase the Columbia Valley, which is east of the Cascade Mountains and has very dry terroir (~6 inches of rain/year), enabling great diversity of grapes to be grown (Bordeaux, Rhone, Italian, Spanish varieties)The name “Long Shadows” refers to renowned winemakers casting long shadows over the Columbia ValleyPartnershipsPoet's Leap, a Riesling w/ Armin Diel (Schollsgut Diel in Nahe, Germany)Saggi, a Super Tuscan (Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah blend) w/ Ambrogio & Giovanni Folonari (Tuscany)Pedestal, a Merlot w/ Michel Rolland (Pomerol)Pirouette, a Bordeaux style blend w/ Agustin Huneeus, Sr and Phillipe Melka (Napa)Feather, a Cabernet Sauvignon w/ Randy Dunn (Napa)Sequel, a Syrah w/ John Duval (Barossa Valley, Australia)Gilles crafts his own Cab / Syrah blend with 30 months in French oakAll partnerships were established when Longshadows was founded in 2003 except Folonari, which came in 2004All are true partnerships - each partner owns 25% of their labels, which are separate companies. They are not consultants and are not paid any other feesLongshadows does the sales & marketing for the winesWorking relationships w/ partners varyJohn Duval can be there during harvest (Southern Hemisphere)Partners did not give any recipes for wines but pitched in and developed styles togetherFruit sourced from across Columbia Valley and its 15 sub-AVAs through acreage contractsSource both old vines and can work with growers to plant specific clones (e.g., German clones for Poet's Leap Riesling vineyards)Volume of wines set by Allen Shoup and Dane Narbaitz (current President and Allen's son-in-law), choose quality over quantityWines that don't make the main wines go into 2nd label Nine HatsEach winemaker is so different. Gilles learned there are many ways to make winesE.g., Randy Dunn wants the jacks of the fruit in the wine, whereas Michel Rolland wants all of them outWinemakers are interested in what each other does but do not work togetherEach winemaker has their own allocation of vineyards and blocks for their winesSelling LongshadowsThe wine club “Key Club” is a big part of sales2 tasting rooms - at the winery (Walla Walla) and in Woodinville (near Seattle)Some distribution in the US and a few international marketsLongshadows was honored to be selected 4x to be served at the White HouseThe future - partners are getting older, and many are on the verge of retirement. Gilles to carry the flame forward with lessons he's learned from them Get access to library episodes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Fruit Grower Report
WWVWA New Leadership Pt 2

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


The Walla Walla Valley Wine Alliance has named former Communications Director, Liz Knapke as the new Executive Director to replace Robert Hansen who retired last week.

Fruit Grower Report
WWVWA New Leadership Pt 1

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022


The Walla Walla Valley Wine Alliance has named former Communications Director, Liz Knapke as the new Executive Director to replace Robert Hansen who retired last week.

Uncorked With Friends
We are Adamant that you listen to this episode!!

Uncorked With Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 29:11


We drink wine and reminisce about our trip to Walla Walla and update on the going ons of the business!!

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
147: Big Picture Economic Themes in Wine Production

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 37:24


There has been a big surge in wine consumption on a macro level in recent years. California production is down due to both the removal of acres and climate challenges. Because national production cannot keep up with demand, imports have increased. Dr. Christopher Thornberg, Founding Partner at Beacon Economics and Director of UC Riverside Center for Economic Forecasting looks at big picture economic themes in the wine industry. From differentiation with sustainability, to an economic perspective on pricing water use, to the need for regional marketing efforts. Collaborating with the industry, local partners, and government can bolster the success for all people coming together to make great wines.   References: 83: Sustainability: An Advantage in any Market (Podcast) Beacon Economics California and U.S. Wine Production (Wine Institute) Central Coast Economic Forecast Christopher Thornberg's Biography Eco-Certifications Increase Sales Economic Impact of California Wine (Wine Institute) SIP Certified Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 | Use code PODCAST for $50 off UC Riverside Center for Economic Forecasting & Development Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  My guest today is Dr. Christopher Thornberg. He is a founding partner of Beacon Economics and he's the director of the UC Riverside Center for Economic Forecasting. Dr. Thornberg, thank you for being with us.   Dr. Christopher Thornberg  0:11  Great to be here.   Craig Macmillan  0:12  You are an economic forecaster, macro economic forecaster. And you have a lot of experience in all kinds of things. This is a wine show, obviously, wine and grapes. How do you see the role of wine in the bigger kind of economic picture in the United States?   Unknown Speaker  0:29  Yes, you know, is interesting. I'm a macro economist, I'm based here in California, I spend a lot of my time talking about big things, interest rates, inflation, consumer spending. But at the same time as a California based guy is a guy who's done lots of talks in wine country, I've also become relatively cognizant, shall we say, of the ebbs and flows of Ag and the wine economy in general, right here. In California. Obviously, when you think about places like Sonoma or Napa, it's incredibly important part of not only local production, but local tourism. And as such, you always have to walk, you know, sort of watch what's happening in these spaces in these industries. Now, of course, when you think about California wine, when you think about US wine, from a macro perspective, there are two things that are happening simultaneously over the last couple of years. The first thing has happened is another big surge in wine consumption, you think about the history of wine, we saw big gains and consumption in the early part of the century, it plateaued for a number of years. And all of a sudden, over the last few years, yet again, wine consumption on a per person basis is going up, people are buying good wine. So we know from a consumption standpoint, demand is strong. The other interesting part of this, of course has to do with the fact that California wine production is down. It's down, in part because of the removal of some acreage. But it's also of course down because we've had not exactly the best weather over the last couple of years. And so you do have this interesting situation whereby California production has not been able to keep up with, if you will, national demand. One of the results of that, of course, has been an enormous surge of imports into the United States. So so times are good from an external standpoint, but obviously producers here in the state are facing some substantial headwinds, whether we're talking about land, whether climate labor, and of course, the real question is, is how does this thing shake out? Where does this thing hit?   Craig Macmillan  2:25  That's what everybody's wondering, you know, the investment in vineyards and wineries is substantial. Everybody wants one I've discovered in my consulting career, everybody wants to get in not always such a great idea that takes a lot of capital. And it takes a long time. Many wineries are losing money for 10 years or more before you even get close to breaking even depending on the product and the place. I have had many conversations about well, what can we do to kind of protect us, you know, what can we do to kind of, you know, get it get ahead of imports? What can we do to make our product special? So that can we be protected from some of this? And I would love to know your thoughts on how can a producer of a good like wine or wine grapes goes into wine? What things can they do to try to gain a bigger market share, again, something like imports or how to protect themselves against losing more of the marketplace.   Unknown Speaker  3:16  I don't think California wines are losing market share. Like if you look at the numbers, for example, crop prices, they're way up, they're doing very well. Sonoma's prices are very high Napa's prices are very high. I mean, to give you a sense, remember I get I focus on the entire state. And I always have to point out that there are more acres of wine grape production in Fresno by a good margin than there are in Sonoma, Napa combined. Now a lot of people outside the state are shocked by that. But then I have to point out you know, California box-o-wine on some the bottom shelf there in the supermarket. That's all made in Fresno. It's a perfectly reasonable part of market as the case may be. But it's a different kind of situation. It is a commodity product, as opposed to the name brand products that are made, of course in the vintage regions. And so when we have this conversation, the question is which part of the conversation are we going to have? Right? Are we talking about the prestige dub? Are we talking about the commodity stuff? Obviously, where you're located, you'd say the prestige stuff is, is more important, in a lot of ways. The prestige wines are doing fine, but the prestige wine industry in general has a problem. And the problem is you already said it that people want to be in the industry. It is a an ego industry. Everybody who makes a gazillion in finance wants to have a winery. That's how you impress your friends. Correct. You're in Wall Street. And so you do have a lot of guys coming in. Primarily guys, I appreciate the sexism involved there but I think we know that the guys are coming in buying these. These ego wineries, if you will, are predominantly men. What they're doing is flooding the market with a tremendous amount of great products in a very odd way, because they don't care as much about profit margins. Now what happens, of course, is, if you are that small winemaker who doesn't want to go commodity, you're the small one winemaker who wants to make a quality product, you suddenly find yourself between the rock and proverbial rock and the hard place. The rock are the commodity guys, and the hard place are those rich guys who don't care about a profit, and how you navigate in between those. And, you know, as a macro economist, I'll be the first person to tell you I don't have any clue.   Craig Macmillan  5:36  Business Strategy thing there.   Unknown Speaker  5:37  It obviously is a narrow path you have to walk in, and in general, they do I know enough small, high quality wine growers, you know, you can do it. But you got to be modest in terms of your ability to, shall we say, have great success here, you're going to have to be very careful as you navigate that.   Craig Macmillan  5:55  You know, this actually, this reminds me of a conversation I've had many, many times, and that is how do we make ourselves stand out? Yeah, we need people to know us, we need people to respect that we do. And there's different kinds of ways you can do that. You can try to get people to say, oh, this is the best quality product, everybody jumps up and down. But how do you communicate that that's tough, you need scores, reviews, things like that, that you have no control over. Or you can say it's a price based thing. So we're going to try to be a bargain brand, we're gonna have this level of quality at this lower price, right? Makes sense. But there's also lots of other kinds of signaling something called virtue, virtue signaling, where you can say, hey, there's this other thing about us, that makes us really special. And some of it has to do with maybe family, a lot of wineries really focus on the fact that it's a family business. And you know, we're we're kind of the working class heroes, even though we have this amazing property in this edifice, winery bootstraps and that's great. There's also virtue signaling around sustainability, I have kind of wondered whether that signaling how effective that is. So for instance, this organization Vineyard Team has a sustainability certification called SIP sustainability in practice, and lots of folks have gotten certified folks who are making really good quality wine, folks whose farming practices I am familiar with, and we also certified wineries and they're doing a great job. One of the things I've always wondered is how responsive are consumers to things like virtue signaling? Do you have an idea how how people respond to that kind of thing?   Unknown Speaker  7:21  Yeah, no, no, no, listen, there's a whole literature on this in economics. We know virtue signaling is incredibly important in more industries than just wine. I mean, whether your whole foods, pretending you're organic, because they're not really in hand, or, or in so many other places. virtue signaling is a singular part of business, particularly today in this era, where there's a lot of concerns about the environment where things are going. So to me, I think it's something that the industry continues to need to invest in, along with what I would call the other kind of branding items. One of the things that got me into wine in general was my explorations of California wine country, which again, we all have to keep in mind. I think a lot of wineries find their best clients are often the ones who wander into their winery for that tasting. And one of the questions is, is Nomad as a region, making sufficient efforts on making wine tasting available to folks on a more regular basis? How are they going about especially now in the post COVID area, when if people suddenly have a myriad of potential attractions available to them? How is the region standing out there among all these other things that are now available to people after a couple years of closure and say, Hey, no, no, no, you still need to come back here. You need to come to Sonoma. Get up here to Healdsburg get out there to, you know, and Russian River products and how do you encourage them to be there? So I think that aspect right now has to be heavily in the minds of, of local development.   Craig Macmillan  8:59  So one of the things that I've observed, certainly on the Central Coast, and I think it applies in other areas as well, definitely, you have vineyards that are really production oriented, and selling their grapes out of the area, places like Napa Sonoma, for the Central Coast as an example. Then you have a couple of pioneers that try and say, hey, we're gonna keep some of this, they do well, that brings other people into the game. And then eventually, there's a need for other kind of other auxillary businesses and activities to come along. So you need hotels, you need restaurants, you get horseback riding and balloon rides, and then people start to come for a variety of reasons, as well as not just wine or even if they come for wine, they start to enjoy other things. How important do you think that is for creating a stable marketplace for the wine industry or encouraging the growth of the market for wine?   Unknown Speaker  9:46  Yeah, it listen, it's incredibly important for a number of reasons. Obviously, ultimately, your best customers are the customers who come to the winery who join your wine club who get that every three months case of wine. Every winery wants those direct people and the direct people are the ones are going to show up in a room. So you say you need to be part of a concerted effort locally to build the wine tourism industry. And yes, by the way, that means you have to have other attractions as well, as anyone who's gone wine tasting can tell you, after about four or five wineries, you're not tasting much of anything anymore. Yeah, yeah, you really need to have other things to do for the rest of the day. And that means having again, an economic development strategy locally that tries to build up the entire tourism industry, it's the restaurants, it's the hotels, secondary attractions, and how do you tie them all together? And how do you build those regional collaborations that benefit everybody? How do you build the money necessary for that? The other thing, of course, ultimately, is that by doing that, you're driving the long run brand. You know, everybody knows Napa, you go anywhere in the world, you say Napa, people know Napa, you get to Paso Robles, there's some awareness, certainly better than it was 20 years ago, but nowhere near that of Napa. But over time, as you get more clients, high end clients who were serving the local wine at a dinner party, other people get aware of it. And it builds up until the point that you to have, if you will, almost that international reputation of a place like Napa. Now, what's interesting is, you know, when we think about this, particularly here in California, there is what I would call those those organizational outreach efforts. How do we make this all work for everybody outside, but here in California, we have an interesting problem is we don't make it very easy for local governments to do these kinds of things. Because here in California, for example, we don't build enough housing. You know, the Paso Robles region, for example, is shockingly devoid of multifamily housing, but it's multifamily housing you need for those young folks who are just trying to break into the industry, for the folks who are going to work in your wine tasting room or work in these restaurants. If you're not building multifamily, how are you going to build your labor force and able to be able to man, all these tourist operations, it has to be really a combined vision, because there's a lot of things that go sideways in these efforts. And ultimately, if you will diminish the the all you know, it's interesting, I'm an economist. And so at some level, I always come to the conversation with a big role to be played by the market, right. That's what economists are all about the market. But what we're talking about here is a brand reputation, which is a social product, we own it jointly, if you're in Pasco, if you're in Sonoma, if you're in the Finger Lakes, if you're in, in Walla Walla, Washington, you all own commonly that brand, and you have to have a local conversation to make sure you're all doing the right thing to support that brand. And that means you desperately need local, some sort of local cooperation. Typically public doesn't have to be could be a nonprofit, or public private partnership, whatever it is, but you need to have those institutions there to drive the whole thing forward. The good news is yet again, wine is one of those things that kind of attracts everybody's attention. It's almost like Hollywood, but slightly less evil. And if you can get people interested, because it's fun, it gets people to the table. But you have to have that regional collaboration, you got to make sure people are there. And it takes these kinds of community conversations.   Craig Macmillan  13:31  Are there organizations, people positions, that should be could be leadership in that process? And what role did the producers themselves have in this process, because like you said, I need to have folks who can work for me at a wage that I can afford to pay. And quite frankly, I need it to be stable. I don't want to put a year of in training, and it's very specialized thing, and then have them bail, and have to start all over again. I want to have employees that are happy, and they're confident they're settled. So what role does something like the grower community having this effect? I mean, do you go to meetings and say, hey, we need housing? Do you go to the politicians and say, hey, we were gonna lobby you to take this seriously? What's the strategy?   Unknown Speaker  14:13  My personal advice on that is, again, every region should have some sort of public private partnership, right? You build up some sort of local wine tourism chamber, if you will. And you bring in public plank, private clients, you put money into a kitty and use that to push forward the kind of conversations necessary, whether it's about branding, tourism or local, if you will, development needs, you got to have everybody at the table for that kind of coordination and cooperation, for better or for worse. The nice thing about government in this particular case is they can enforce if you will, some sort of fairness and supportive such an organization. One of the things I always worry about when it comes to the strictly private nonprofits I get like a Chamber of Commerce is the tendency for free riding, you're always gonna have two winemakers who are going to be very happy to, shall we say, take advantage of making money off the name brand, but they're not going to participate in the in that social efforts. And it's good to have a little authority, if you will, to make sure everybody's contributing at some level to ultimately, what's good for the social good. So that's helpful as well. And of course, that one of the bigger issues here has to do with how such organizations deal with whatever called some of the broader pressures we're dealing with. Because like, when you talk about housing, it's not just ag, right? It's everybody. And they have to be there to bring wines point of view to the table, when you have planning meetings, when you're discussing the lack of multifamily that has to be the voice of the community at those particular tables. That's, of course, particularly profound here in California. But there's been a big decline in wine production state over the last couple of years. And it's because we've had some pretty hideous weather, incredibly dry. We know we are in a big water shortage, the ag industry in general has got to be part of the solution to water shortages here in the state. And by the way, it behooves the wind industry to be part of the process to get ag to the table. You know, it's interesting, when you think about the water shortages that we're dealing with right now, a lot of folks point at, say, for example, nuts, there's, that's a big enemy. No, until we're growing nuts, how dare we grow nuts in this state,.   Craig Macmillan  16:30  So many gallons to produce a pound almonds, that was the big one a couple of years ago.   Unknown Speaker  16:33  But what's the value of that pound of almond see, you have to think about the dollars coming off the trees coming off the vine or treesout of the ground, it's not gallons per pound that matters, it's gallons per dollar that matters. And the problem you have with water in the state of California, is this just allocated on the basis of 120 year old agreements, there's no economic logic used to assign where that water is used. It's not just oh, take it away from the farmers to get into the cities, we have to understand that high value crops suffer as well. So it behooves everybody in the ag industry to come to the table to have these conversations. Because if you're not there, if you're if you're part of this, what's almost seems to me to be a boycott of negotiations over water, that's what ag is, right now, we're just boycotting this, if you even if you even bring it up, we're gonna we're gonna ask you, do you think people should stop eating eventhough that's a ridiculous question, you can't do that. You got to be at the table, you got to acknowledge the problems, acknowledges solutions and work towards a compromise. And again, I think the wine industry, the wine grape industry, here in the state has a lot to say about this. And they should be part of that conversation that should be part of pushing that conversation.   Craig Macmillan  18:02  So this is a really interesting division they've seen philosophically amongst growers, and also other areas. If I have pumps, if I have wells on my land, the water that comes out of that, well, is that a private good? Is that benefits me, and is not somebody else's property? Or is it a public good, that I'm taking advantage of and we're all going to hit a tragedy of the commons? Well, okay, I'm using a bunch of terminology that and that's where a lot of conflict comes from is if I'm treating it as a private good, or am I being quote unquote, responsible. You hear people say that, and this treating it like a public good, then what kind of benefit am I getting for what I'm doing? So I very much get your point, I would love to hear a little bit more about if I am drawing a public good and much like grazing sheep on the commons, where it came from, but I'm contributing to the economy. I'm hiring people, I'm paying wages and paying taxes, protecting this land from some other use. That's another thing.   Unknown Speaker  18:58  I don't I don't like that term at all.   Craig Macmillan  19:00  Okay, go ahead. Hit me.   Unknown Speaker  19:03  You're protecting the land from another use. What does that mean?   Craig Macmillan  19:06  Oh, it's an open space argument. If you if you consider vineyards to be open space, then I'm keeping this land in open space, as opposed to letting a big housing development go in.   Unknown Speaker  19:15  Okay, well, first of all, we have more wealth, way more wind acreage, and we have need for new housing in California at the moment. So I'm a little dubious of that specific argument. And I think that the whole idea of market economics is it allows whatever scarce resource to be used at its greatest possible potential. If a hunk of land is more valuable as houses than it is winegrapes, then we should be building housing there. That's the logical economic outcome. Unless there's some sort of externality we can point to and there may well be there's a value to open space that often doesn't get priced into these conversations. That's a completely different debate for a completely I think different show is as the case may be. But in general, look, let me put it this way. Water is a public good. It just is. We know that. All right, nobody owns the water, the water under your land is part of a massive aquifer. It's not just under your land is sloshes over the place, just like the river running by your farm, it has people upstream and downstream. And you don't want the people upstream of you taking all the water before it gets to you. I don't think you should be allowed to take all the water for gets the next person down the way, we again have to have a cooperative solution for how to deal with this water question. Now in general, if we acknowledge it's a public good, there should be a public price for the product. It's as simple as that people should be paying for the water they use, which they don't do in this state. At any real level, our water agencies charge people on the basis of cost, which is not a market price, it's not the relevant figure, we need to price water at a level that will basically constrain usage to a reasonable sustainable amount. Now guess what? The good news for wine grape growers, particularly for higher end wine grape growers, is you'll be able to afford a higher price. Why? Because you're producing a high profit margin usually, sometimes water is not your cost, you could do it. Whereas folks would probably get pushed out as yeah, I would anticipate that some hay farmers may no longer grow hay. Now, by the way, before we feel sad for the Hey, farmers, remember, if I'm talking about using a market, that, hey, farmers are going to get paid for not using their water. And by the way, they will almost assuredly make a hell of a lot more money selling their water than they are selling the hay. Yet again, we end up with a good social outcome all the way around. This is a win win win proposition that I'm suggesting here. But again, it's amazing the mental lock we have when it comes to having conversations about applying even basic market mechanisms to water consumption. When as a quote unquote capitalist economy, we seem to rely on markets to supply most of our basic day to day goods. It's interesting. Yeah.   Craig Macmillan  22:14  So this is just my perspective. I'm curious, would you agree that there's a lot of resistance to the idea of paying for water?   Unknown Speaker  22:19  We already pay for water. I mean, everybody pays a little bit, but obviously, the are wildly different. What I pay for my water at my house in Los Angeles is completely different than what the guy's paying for water for hay in Imperial County, which is different than what the winegrape farmer in Fresno is paying for his water. So we all pay completely different prices. For the most part, those prices are way below what they should be. Really all ends up being some bureaucrat out there saying okay, well you're paying under so you can only consume X amount. Again, that's the wrong way of doing things. We really want prices to be more equilibrated. It means allowing the market to set some sort of price, and then allowing the various market participants to purchase what they can economically do at that price level. Is it complicated? Not to go off topic here. But let me just your typical, I've done some of these calculations, your typical hay farmer Imperial County makes about from best case scenario, 15 to maybe $50 per acre foot of water, they used to grow hay, right? There is debate going on in Orange County right now about opening and desal plant, that desal plant to be clear will produce water at something on the order of 2000 to $2,300 per acre foot. And of course, that doesn't even include the environmental damage such plants create because they are bad for the oceans. We know that. Why would we do that? Why is it Orange County's paying those farmers in Imperial I don't know. let's give them $400 An acre foot that's roughly 10 times what they're making growing hay. By the way, that still leaves you $1,600 An acre foot to do environmental remediation. Move the water to Orange County. Economic remediation if you think parts of the Imperial County will suffer because there's less hay being grown. I'm not sure what it would be but maybe there's somebody getting hurt their. To me there's so much money being left over how can this state be anything but better off with that transaction taking place? The only as far as I can tell the only agents who suffer are the cows and horses in Korean and Japan are going to be denied their lunch.   Craig Macmillan  24:42  You do have to put the frame on you do have to put on the box. You know what area are we looking at and what's a rational box to draw? And then who are the players in that box and what's the resource and how much resources there right here are you talking about the making a market for Wwater. Aren't markets, volatile, unpredictable, potentially dangerous? I mean, that's a value loaded word. I know, but.   Unknown Speaker  25:09  What does that mean? Exactly? We have markets for apartments and market for home and markets, gas markets for milk. They work everywhere. What really were afraid of a market. Since when? This is a market economy. There are places that markets don't work very well. I agree with that, by the way, health care markets horrendous. We don't we don't need markets running health care. That's a separate conversation for a different podcast. I'd you know, I just opened up a massive can there. But when it comes to this, isn't this isn't healthcare, water is water. And markets make sense.   Craig Macmillan  25:44  Again, how would a group of growers engage that? Can you see wine grape growers being leaders because their crop is different. That's again, one of these things we've had danger in a multi-ag, in multi crop counties is like the wine folks, you're gonna like, hey, we don't use anywhere near what these guys use. But you don't want to throw that out there. You want to throw that stone because we need to get them involved right in the plan. And yet winemakers have a couple of things going for them. Number one, they have prestige. So I think that they get attention. They have a commonality that I think holds them together better than other crops, because everybody's in the same boat. And yeah, commodity growers are in the same boat. But I've seen this in wine where people are a little bit more willing to get together. There is a lot of conflict within the group, obviously. Can you see growers being proactive towards this process and saying, hey, we think this is a good idea, we think this will not only help us we'll have everybody else does the sustainability aspect here because people want to be sustainable. So they're going to be looking for things that say, Hey, this is going to help us have water and also we're gonna be able to use it equitably. Can you see the movement there? What does that look like? Or have you seen examples of this kind of thing in other situations?   Unknown Speaker  25:44  listen, where your hometown Paso Robles, the classic case of this, right, because we know there that there's our growers and buyers who are heavily involved with local water conversations. They can have an they should have a seat at the table, whether it's local, or statewide, or national. The industry's sustainability, at some level is ultimately tied to the sustainability of overall agriculture in the state, just like your sustainability, as a brand is going to be tied to your local branding and tourist efforts. You have to understand the broader macro nature of the world you exist in and be part of those broader processes. By the way, what I just said is true, not just for conversations about water, or housing, it's conversations about politics in general, not to go too far off into left field here. But a lot of Americans right now feel completely alienated from politics as it exists right now in the US, you look at both parties who are talking about topics and conversations that seem almost completely bizarrely foreign to your actual day to day living your world. And you wonder how we got here. And again, it's a function of a lack of participation. We are social creatures, we exist within a community. And when the community starts going directions, we don't understand, then we have to look in the mirror and ask, is it because I'm not being part of those conversations? And if so, how do I become part of those conversations? How do I get involved? And the answer is being a leader yourself, or supporting organizations that are going to go out and lead on your behalf. It's about being involved, which, again, when you're trying to build a brand, when you're trying to make sure you have enough workers on the wine farm and in the wine tasting shop, I appreciate how hard that is. If you're relying on somebody else to make the right decision, well, then you're not going to be able to, shall we say have a moral high ground to complain when the decision is not what should happen have happened. We have to remember that we have to remember that the that the broader ag community, wine producers wine grape producers can be part of this broader conversation. And indeed they should.   Craig Macmillan  29:16  And perhaps they need to be.   Dr. Christopher Thornberg  29:18  Yes, I think so.   Craig Macmillan  29:19  We're talking about an imperative here. Yeah. Yeah. And that probably applies to lots of other things. We've seen it with habitat. We've seen it around pesticide use. We've seen our worker equity, and a lot of really positive things have happened in the last 20 or 30 years. This is the next one. I go back and I look at sustainability reports. And it was from various companies and I see lots of stuff about habitat. I see a lot of stuff about workers, electricity starting to show up more and more. They almost never touch on pesticides. That's like the third rail, which is too bad because the industry has been doing a much better job last 30 years than they did but then the one thing that I always noticed is missing is water. There's nothing about really what are we doing about water in some cases they do, don't get me wrong. Some folks are very out there saying, Hey, look at what we're doing, but a lot of them are not. And I think that may have to become, like you said, part of the identity and big focus for how people behave, and getting involved at different levels.   Dr. Christopher Thornberg  30:11  And now more than ever, because we all know that California is drying out as part of the climate change that's around us. We still have lots of water. You know, I keep saying I've always say that we don't have, if you will, a drought in as much as we really don't have enough water to go around. We do if you actually sat down and applied basic water conservation efforts, you would actually see we have plenty of water in this day, we just have to use a smarter, that's where we just fall over. Because we don't seem to be able to get to that conversation that ag can change, they can continue to thrive through this process. You we got to stop the whole, every time there's any kind of conversation about change. The first place we go is existential threat, you know?   Craig Macmillan  31:05  Yeah, exactly. Oh, yeah. Threat to my life. That's a tough one. That's a tough one. It's a very basic kind of socio sociological, psychological reaction. You know, the change is like, Oh, my lifestyles threatened. Me, and my family has done this for 1000 years, whatever, which completely aligns the fact that you okay, your people been on the land for 150 years, but they weren't wearing sneakers. You're wearing sneakers now. They weren't wearing blue jeans, you're wearing blue jeans. They didn't have diesel powered tractors, you have diesel powered tractors now. And all of those things, some of them are about just changes in society and the way people dress and and culture, but also a lot of it's about efficiency.   Dr. Christopher Thornberg  31:42  And you didn't have 40 living in California, and you didn't have a 20 year drought behind you. The world is not same nor should your life be.   Craig Macmillan  31:53  And it's not gonna be Yeah, well, that's great. This is pretty much the time that we've got, I would love to just sit down and like have a beer with you. This is I was gonna, I was gonna ask you about Veblen goods. But I think that might be a totally different show, not a different episode. What is what is one thing you'd recommend to our listeners just in general.   Dr. Christopher Thornberg  32:13  I exist in a world as an economist right now, where there are economic realities. And then there are public narratives. In the 25, 30 years, I've been studying the economy, never have I seen such a massive gap between public narratives and the economic data. How many times does the newspaper use the term cliff were at the cliff edge, we're on the constantly right, and we have panicked ourselves to ridiculous point. And as a result of that, we paralyzed ourselves for fears that don't actually exist. So my one advice to everybody out there is turn off the crisis mode, you got to turn it off, let it go. The world changes, we all have to sit down and understand that. And from a community standpoint, we could figure out the best way to move forward, if we can have conversations about how we all adapt together. But if everybody's screaming under the world, everybody's screaming crisis, everybody's creating an existential threat where it doesn't exist. Again, we're paralyzed. Thus, we cannot respond to crises. Thus, the crises become that much worse. By not allowing that mentality to exist, we can actually take these things on, and all be better off, but it means Yeah, it means taking a step back and being a little less selfish and, and a little more willing to hear other people's opinions and outputs and and moving accordingly. We live in and I think we live in a period of time where people are having a tough time with that. And that's we again, you gotta look in the mirror.   Craig Macmillan  33:48  That is great advice. Very insightful. Where can people find out more about you?   Unknown Speaker  33:52  Yeah, well, Beacon Economics, beaconecon.com. We do all sorts of stuff. You'll find some stuff I write on a regular basis, which goes around to a lot of these topics we touched on here, so www.beaconecon.com.   Craig Macmillan  34:05  Our guest today was Dr. Christopher Thornberg, founding partner of Beacon Economics and director of EC UC Riverside Center for Economic Forecasting. Dr. Thornberg, thank you so much. This has been a real pleasure. This has been really really fun for me.   Unknown Speaker  34:18  Absolutely. Me as well. I enjoyed the conversation.   Transcribed by https://otter.ai

Sun City Church Podcast
HD - Part 4 - How Does the Holy Spirit Speak?

Sun City Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 45:32


Pastors Bob & Cara Grimm join us from LIFE Church in Walla Walla to continue our HD series. They unpack what it means and what it looks like to hear from the Holy Spirit. This is an important factor in hearing and doing what God is asking us. You won't want to miss this!

Fruit Grower Report
Wine Away Pt 2

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022


Wine lovers have a locally made solution for the inevitable spill while enjoying your favorite red, and that is the stain remover Wine Away created in the heart of Walla Walla Wine Country.

Bumblebutt Podcast
Ep 24: The Spokane Serial Killer

Bumblebutt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 61:23


Robert Lee Yates Jr. (born May 27, 1952) is an American serial killer from Spokane, Washington. From 1975 to 1998, Yates is known to have murdered at least 11 women in Spokane. Yates also confessed to two murders committed in Walla Walla in 1975 and a 1988 murder committed in Skagit County.   Intro/outro music is titled 'LOSE' from New Totally Radical by EXIT MINDBOMB  

Fruit Grower Report
Wine Away Pt 1

Fruit Grower Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022


Wine lovers have a locally made solution for the inevitable spill while enjoying your favorite red, and that is the stain remover Wine Away created in the heart of Walla Walla Wine Country.

The Broken Cork: Bourbon Podcast
Starlight Cigar Batch Single Barrel Bourbon w/ Matt Poselwait and Bryan Brammer

The Broken Cork: Bourbon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 17:56


The Broken Cork is back after a short hiatus, and we've got 2 special guests in studio: Matt Poselwait from Wild Turkey, and Bryan Brammer, of The Thief Fine Wine, Beer and Spirits, Walla Walla, WA! Join us as we sample a single barrel release of Starlight's Cigar Batch Bourbon!Follow us:Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/the_broken_corkFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheBrokenCorkPodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebrokencorkpodcast/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@brokencorkbourbonpodcastBecome a Patron- https://www.patreon.com/thebrokencork-----Music Credit:"Whiskey Drinking Man" by Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band is used with granted permission by Chubby Carrier, March 1, 2022. Check out more of his music here: https://chubbycarrier.comBeverage Barn Proudly serving Henderson, KY, and the tri-state area. Come let our knowledgeable staff help you!The Thief Fine Wine and Beer Serving the Walla Walla, Washington Area! Find wine, beer, and spirits from every part of the world!

SLOW FLOWERS with Debra Prinzing
Episode 565: Petals and Alpacas at Gholson Gardens in Walla Walla, Washington (Encore Edition)

SLOW FLOWERS with Debra Prinzing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 42:37


Greetings, friends. Here at the Slow Flowers Society, we have experienced a whirlwind several weeks, including producing our fifth and largest Slow Flowers Summit conference ever, celebrating American Flowers Week, and publishing our debut Summer issue of our Slow Flowers Journal e-zine quarterly. Add to that 10 days of me traveling away from home and […] The post Episode 565: Petals and Alpacas at Gholson Gardens in Walla Walla, Washington (Encore Edition) appeared first on Slow Flowers Podcast with Debra Prinzing.

Dental All-Stars | Dental Practice Training & Systems
Podcast: Elevating Excellence with Dr. Rick Simcock

Dental All-Stars | Dental Practice Training & Systems

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 47:55


All-Star Dental Academy President of Coaching Eric Vickery is joined by Dr. Rick Simcock. Eric and Dr. Simcock look at strategies for raising the level of excellence in your practice.   About Dr. Rick Simcock: Dr. Simcock was raised in Walla Walla, Washington and graduated college from Walla Walla College, Washington in 1993. Following college, […] The post Podcast: Elevating Excellence with Dr. Rick Simcock appeared first on All-Star Dental Academy.

Wine for Normal People
Ep 431: The Grape Mini-Series -- Sémillon

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 46:57 Very Popular


Sémillon used to be the most planted white grape in the world. From its native home in France to Australia, Chile, South Africa, Argentina, and beyond, it was planted en masse to pump out large quantities of flavorless bulk white wine. The problem was that Sémillon doesn't cooperate when it's forced to high yields. It loses acidity and it lacks flavor unlike some other grapes that can still muster some umph when over-cropped (Chenin blanc, Sauvignon blanc, Colombard, to name three).  For this reason, plantings were replaced and the grape became unpopular. Photo: Sémillon, Bordeaux.com  Today it is grown in limited quantities but two distinct areas– Sauternes/Barsac and Pessac-Leognan in Bordeaux and the Hunter Valley of Australia --  create wines that are incredibly specific and unique. Demand and fascination with these iconic wines means that cultivation of this grape is not doomed!   Here are the show notes: The origins of the grape Although we don't know the parentage, we do know the grape is from southwestern France. It is likely from Bordeaux Until the 1700s, producers were only using the grape in Sauternes (at this point it was already a sweet wine, as records from 1717-1736 at the local abbey show) Later, it was found in St-Emilion, from which it derives its name. The name most likely comes from Selejun – the local pronunciation of Saint-Emilion     Sémillon in the vineyard A thick-skinned grape, part of the reason it was so widely planted was that this feature makes Sémillon pretty resistant to molds and mildews (although, thankfully not botrytis). This feature of the grape helps make it easy to grow and it can be quite vigorous, which is why it was so used and abused in the past! The grape buds later and ripens earlier than its blending partner, Sauvignon blanc, and this short growing window means it is not as susceptible to spring or autumn frosts The grape is versatile on soil types – it can thrive on gravel, calcareous clay, sand, and other types making it incredibly adaptable Fully ripe Sémillon will have big yellow to nearly copper colored berries Low yields are best Château d'Yquem, the most famous Sauternes producer in the world, allegedly makes one glass per vine. The rest of Sauternes yields about 24hl/ha, and lower quality regions yield 80 -100 hl/ha. Hunter Valley in Australia – 60 hl/ha **M.C. Ice and I fully acknowledge that we have no idea what a hl/ha looks like but we use the numbers for comparison sake – ratios are still helpful, right? ** Photo: Australian Semillon, courtesy Wine Australia Climate can vary enormously and the grape can still perform: In Sauternes, special climate conditions must exist (we discuss later) Top dry white areas of Graves and Pessac-Leognan have warmer sites for Sémillon, which allows it to get fully ripe, adding lushness to the blend with Sauvignon blanc In Hunter valley, humidity with tropical storms are best! Because the area has strong cloud cover there is less direct sun so it slows photosynthesis, despite heat. The humid afternoons somehow help build acidity. The light, sandy soils that contain some loam and iron have good drainage, during rain     We discuss the growing regions for most of the remaining part of the show France: Bordeaux France grows more Sémillon than any other country and most of the plantings are in Bordeaux, specifically – Graves, Pessac-Leognan, and Sauternes 50 or so years ago, half the production in Bordeaux was white, mostly from Semillon, which traditionally made up 4/5 of any white wine in the area, sweet or white, but now has taken a backseat to Sauvignon Blanc, which offers more acidity to the wine in a warming climate  Photo: Bordeaux vineyard, Getty Images via Canva subscription   Sauternes, Barsac In Sauternes, Barsac (please see episode 369 for more info) and the sweet appellations of Cadillac, Ste Croix du Mont, Loupiac, and Cerons Sémillon is always partnered with Sauvignon blanc, which also receives botrytis well but maintains its acidity. Wines are hand harvested, with several passes through the vineyard to get the right level of botrytis, which can be patchy and can be grey rot if it developed poorly on the grapes Botrytis is a fungus that affects the grapes right when the fruit forms. It concentrates sugar and creates honeyed, apricot, mango flavors with a viscous mouthfeel from the glycerol it produces. Alcohol levels range in the region -- the minimum in Sauternes is 13% but it can well over 20% ABV For botrytis to form, a region needs foggy nights and early morning, followed by warm and sunny days. This is essential in the autumn, and is a very consistent weather pattern in the sweet wine regions of Bordeaux, which botrytized wine can be made nearly every year These wines are aged for long periods in oak barrels Some, like Chateau Climens in Barsac, are 100% Sémillon   Dry white appellations In Graves and the lighter, sandier regions of Pessac-Leognan, Sémillon is often the biggest percentage of the blend. The best versions – Haut-Brion Blanc and La Mission Haut-Brion Blanc (different Châteaux, owned by the same group = confusing, I know) – are hundreds of dollars a bottle and often have Sémillon as the main component, but it's vintage dependent In Pessac-Leognan, 25% of blend must be Sauvignon Blanc, and the trend is to favor that grape over Sémillon both because it's easier to grow, and because it has acidity. From good producers, these wines can age for decades The grape can be in Côtes de Bordeaux blancs and in basic Bordeaux blanc from better producers Sémillon adds fullness to the texture and when it is aged in oak (as is the case with Sauternes, Barsac and in Graves and Pessac-Leognan), it can have peach, mango, nuts, and toast flavors, which contrast well with Sauvignon blanc's more “green” aromas. If Sémillon is not aged in oak, it can have citrus, grass, notes without much flavor. When it is fully ripe and aged in oak, it is fat in texture with lemon and tropical fruit and has lower acidity.   Other places in France Sémillon grows... Southwest France has the sweet wine of Monbazillac (like Sauternes) and dry white of Bergerac Provence and the Languedoc, but not of any quality     Australia Makes the most distinctive dry white in Australia and was first planted in the Hunter Valley where it gained popularity for its ease to grow, high yields, and resistance to disease It went from being the workhorse grape in the 1980s, to accounting for only 3.1% of the total Australian crush today More than half of Australia's Semillon comes from the bulk New South Wales region of Riverina Hunter Valley in New South Wales The warm, humid climate of the Hunter Valley isn't conducive to most grapes but Semillon (no accent on the “e” in Australia!) changes from a grassy, lemony acidic wine into a dark yellow, nutty, honey and straw-scented viscous wine if grown and made under certain conditions To achieve this, growers pick early, before the summer rains and the grapes have very high acidity. Alcohol levels are around 10-11% ABV, and most of the wine spends no time in oak for fermentation nor for aging – it is put in stainless, fermented cold, and bottled. Wines in their youth are like Sauvignon blanc – citrus, green herbs, and straw flavors persist, with high acidity. After 5-10 years of storage the wine darkens and tastes like honey, toasted, grilled nuts and seems like it has been in an oak barrel (hasn't) – a total odd ball. Although the grapes can have some botrytis, this phenomenon is just a result of the rainy, tropical growing conditions To learn more about Hunter Valley and the Semillon, listen to ep 309, with the amazing Connie Paur Griffiths of Tranquil Vale, an excellent small producer located there Tyrells is the famous producer here (especially Vat 1 Semillon). Also Brokenwood, Silkman, Andrew Thomas    Photo: Hunter Valley Vineyard, credit Wine Australia   Western Australia: Margaret River: Popular for blends of Semillon and Sauvignon blanc You will see Semillon-Sauvignon Blanc or Sauvignon Blanc-Semillon on the bottle, the first name indicates which grape dominates the blend These wines can be made in a juicy, fruit style with no oak, or oak fermented and/or oak matured to last longer Producers: Vasse Felix, Cullen, Cape Mentelle, Leeuwin   South Australia Adelaide Hills: Wines are like white Bordeaux in that they are picked early and blended with Sauvignon Blanc to avoid oiliness, too much ripeness. They sometimes use oak, sometimes not. Charlotte Dalton is the big producer here. Barossa: Sometimes makes varietal versions that show the purity of the grape, sometimes use big oak and can be toasty and Chardonnay-esque. Producers: Torbreck, Peter Lehmann, Henschke in Eden Valley Clare Valley: Can be more refined than Barossa but still peachy with apple and citrus and fuller body. Oak influence is common. Producers: Mount Harrocks, Pauletts Riverina: Is notorious for low quality bulk wine but a pocket of it develops botrytis easily and makes high quality sweet wines: McWilliams, De Bortoli     New Zealand has a small amount of Semillon in Marlborough, Hawkes Bay, and Gisbourne   South Africa Semillon was once so important it was called “greengrape” because of its bring green foliage By 1822, 93% of the vineyard land planted was Semillon. Then it was commonly just called “wine grape” but by the 1900s it began its sharp decline It is grown now in Stellenbosch, Swartland, and Franschhoek. Some areas have older bush vines. Producers like: Cederberg, Steenberg, Vergelegen , Mullineux are using more Semillon in blends with Sauvignon Blanc (some sweet, some dry versions)   United States   California Barely uses Semillon but vines that were imported in the 1880s to the Livermore Valley in northern California, were allegedly from Château d'Yquem Vines that live in the Monte Rosso vineyard in Sonoma date from 1886 and can make excellent wines. Morgon is an example Sierra Foothills: Some here, notably my friend Lorenzo Muslia of Andis makes the Bill Dillian Semillon that has great acidity but silkiness and hay, herb, and melon notes (for the podcast with Lorenzo click here) Photo: Andis Wines   Washington State Big decline in plantings and they usually a blend with Sauvignon Blanc Popular from Walla Walla producers: L'Ecole 41 – lemon curd, nut and toast notes with a pretty full body, Amavi (episode with Amavi here) – slightly more acidic and less full with more citrus and grass notes but still with a rich body     Others countries that use Sémilllon Chile: Because of the Bordeaux link, has Semillon and usually uses it for blends or Sauternes-like sweet wines. Semillon used be 75% of white vines in Chile! Argentina, Uruguay have some nice examples Canada     Food Pairing Ideas Sauternes/dessert styles: blue (Roquefort) cheese, foie gras, scallops, fruit based-dessert Lighter styles: Oysters, shellfish, white fish or chicken dishes with citrus or herbal sauces or creamy sauces, salads, goat and sheep's milk cheeses _____________________________________________ Research Sources: “Wine Grapes” by Jancis Robinson, Dr. José Vouillamoz, Julia Harding “Grapes & Wines” by Margaret Rand and Oz Clarke https://www.bordeaux.com/us/ https://www.wineaustralia.com/ Fiona Beckett – Matching Food & Wine As always, talking to people about the grape who grow it, and drinking a lot of the wine itself – Sémillon is awesome! __________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ From our Sponsors... Wine Spies uncovers incredible wines at unreal prices - on big names or boutique brands from all over the world at up to 75% off! It's not a club and there's no obligation to buy. They have a build-a-case option, so you can mix and match wines while enjoying free shipping on every purchase. Visit www.winespies.com/normal you'll get $20 credit to use on your first order! Don't forget to go to the store page to see what wines I love with descriptions I have written.    If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes  

The Broken Cork: Bourbon Podcast
Questions from The Crew: A Q&A with Matt Poselwait

The Broken Cork: Bourbon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 45:18


In this episode of The Broken Cork, Matt Poselwait stops by the studio to answer some of our listener's most pressing questions. We discuss everything from single barrel picks to the effect of the climate on the bourbon industry, and everything in between. There are a lot of listener shoutouts in this one! Did your question make the cut? Listen here to find out! Follow us:Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/the_broken_corkFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheBrokenCorkPodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebrokencorkpodcast/TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@brokencorkbourbonpodcastBecome a Patron- https://www.patreon.com/thebrokencork-----Music Credit:"Whiskey Drinking Man" by Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band is used with granted permission by Chubby Carrier, March 1, 2022. Check out more of his music here: https://chubbycarrier.comBeverage Barn Proudly serving Henderson, KY, and the tri-state area. Come let our knowledgeable staff help you!The Thief Fine Wine, Spirits, and Beer Serving the Walla Walla, Washington Area! Find wine, beer, and spirits from every part of the world!

Exploring Washington State
[REPLAY] #123 Stephanie Forrer is Talking About Eat, Drink, Travel, Y'all in Walla Walla. oh and her podcast too.....

Exploring Washington State

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 74:01


 Our guest for this episode is Stephanie Forrer. Steph is the host of the “Eat, Drink, Travel, Y'all,” podcast where  she has delicious conversations with the most intriguing industry professionals in the culinary world.  Steph also is a active food and travel writer, photographer and social media marketing consultant. Originally from Alabama Steph decided to move west.  Her three choices were Los Angeles, San Francisco or Tacoma..... find out why she chose the Seattle/Tacoma area over LA or San Francisco.Great stories about food, drink, and travel across the State of Washington. My list of must try places continues to grow.Stephanie is now living in Walla Walla and we spend a lot of the episode talking about food and wine in Walla Walla..  It is obvious that she is happy to be living in Walla Walla and loves to share places to visit, and things to do.Thanks for tuning into this episode of the Exploring Washington State Podcast! If the information in our conversations and interviews are enjoyable and valuable to you, please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave us an honest review. Your reviews and feedback will not only help us continue to deliver great, helpful content, but it will also help us reach even more amazing listeners just like you! If you want to read about some of the many amazing places to explore in Washington State, you should just pack your bags and go! Explore Washington State is the perfect place for inspiration.    Check it out today.   Support the show

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style
The French Way: How to Create a Luxurious Everyday Life

The Simple Sophisticate - Intelligent Living Paired with Signature Style

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:58 Very Popular


"He who comes home with the most money doesn't win. He who comes home with the most experiences wins." - Steve Smith, contributor with Rick Steves in Rick Steves France 2015 The Simple Sophisticate, episode #23 One of the most exquisite pleasures in my experience has always been having time at home without a to-do list. To enjoy my sanctuary that comforts me, rejuvenates me and allows me to dream so that when I do step outside into the world I can do, seek and produce, is one of the things I most treasure about living simply luxuriously. And so it began when I was a child, no doubt, as my mother always cultivated a warm home, but as I grew up and became responsible for establishing my own abode, it took much exploration, dead-ins from time to time and investment to create a space that allowed the everyday to be just as stimulating as new experiences brought about by travel. And in so doing, paying attention to my home environment, I began to pay attention to how I spend my days. Was I exhausted and unfilled at the end or exhausted and feeling productive? Did I have time in my day to spend it with those I loved, converse with those who engaged in creative, uplifting and thought-provoking conversation or care for myself in such a way that respected my overall health? And depending upon my answer, I would tweak, eliminate, maximize or designate more or less time to those activities that improved the quality of living. "He has achieved success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much." -Bessie A. Stanley As the quote reminds us, living well is truly about prioritizing how we spend our days. Did we make time to enjoy the day, spend it with those we hold dear, take time to respect what our minds and bodies need or did we cram everything into our waking hours in order to fit a mold that we weren't asked for input regarding its creation? Everyone's path to living well will be different, but the key is to know what you want - more loosely rather than specifically. Because as we know, our lives intermingle with the rest of the world, but if we bring our best selves, have good intentions and are willing to be true selves, success is possible when it comes to living well. Recently, I was watching the travel guru Rick Steves discuss on PBS his explorations through the countryside of France. While staying at Chateau de Pray and dining on their outdoor terrace, his dining companion shared the quote listed at the beginning of today's post. And I couldn't agree more especially when it comes to travel, but why not bring a similar way of living into our everyday? Why not . . . live well each and every day? Why not use the nice china in the middle of the week? Why not treat ourselves regularly to dinner or lunch with a dear friend at a restaurant that piques our interest or tantalizes our taste buds? Why not sleep on silk pillowcases each night? Many may quickly scoff at such ideas as being too indulgent, thus deflating the exhilaration that is felt when they are only experiences from time to time, but what I hope to bring to your attention today is that with patience and careful planning, everyday life can indeed be lived luxuriously and can actually enhance the quality of our lives. Below are 20 ways to foster a simply luxurious way of living, but these are just a taste. If you would like the full list inspired by the French way of living, check out chapter 10 "Indulging Your Inner Francophile" in Choosing The Simply Luxurious Life: A Modern Woman's Guide. 1. Cook at home. Find simple, yet delicious recipes and discover the pleasures of cooking on your own schedule for your own dietary needs and preferences. (View TSLL recipes here.) 2. Indulge in café time. Once, twice or three times a week depending up on your schedule and enjoyment, select a favorite local café and stop in for some reading time, moseying through magazine time, or chats with friends. Indulge in one of the patisseries delicious sweet treats and lose track of time. ~Les Deux Garcons cafe in Aix-en-Provence, cours Mirabeau~ 3. Wear luxurious lingerie everyday. As I talk about in my book, lingerie is a necessity for the woman who wears it, not for those who might see her in it. Why? Because simply knowing we are wearing beautiful, comfortable, luxurious lingerie feels good. And everything begins with our thoughts. If we feel good, we smile more readily, we are more open to new experiences and our attitude is lifted. 4. Let go of busy. A powerful decision that will change your day-to-day living drastically for the better. Busy doesn't mean better or more productive, it simply reveals a life that perhaps could be managed better. After all, living well means living a life of quality. A life that focuses on what is necessary and lets go of the rest. And when you let go of busy, you have more time for moments of simple leisure and luxury that cultivate an everyday life to savor. (Click here to dive into this topic.) 5. Cultivate a capsule wardrobe for each season. Knowing you have in your closet clothes that will make you look and feel your best is a very powerful tool to possess as you begin your day. While this takes time and never really ends due to lives and bodies changing, it is worth our attention. (Click here to learn more about building a capsule wardrobe.) 6. Follow your own schedule. Perhaps it's Friday or even Saturday night, everyone must be out doing something, staying up late, right? Wrong. Your daily schedule is one that works for you and those you spend your time with. Perhaps you prefer Wednesday evenings out because Thursdays are lighter days at work and you enjoy spending your weekends waking up early and getting things done. Whatever schedule works for your goals, intentions, health, family, etc - adhere to it and don't apologize. After all, our lives, needs and desires change, listen to what is nudging you, calling your name and that is where you will find the unexpected beauty. 7. Discover a personal scent. Similar to knowing you are wearing luxurious lingerie is the choice of scent you layer upon your skin before stepping out the door for work or for play. A luxurious decision and investment, but one that will reveal your attention to detail. 8. Subscribe to daily/weekly/monthly periodicals. Running throughout the philosophy of living simply luxuriously is being well-read. Depending upon your lifestyle, curiosities, locale and interests, you will select reading material that interests you. Most importantly, gather knowledge, choose to learn something new each day, read a review of a new play or restaurant and be encouraged to give it a try. Become in the know of current events in order to strike up a conversation with anyone. Reading in truth, is a way of tickling your brain and refusing to live each day the same even if the events may be routine. 9. Save time and don't wash your hair everyday. Purchase a dry shampoo and have on hand for the days you don't lather up. Shampoo less often, thereby saving yourself more time in the morning, and believe it or not, improve the condition of your tresses. (Klorane Gentle Dry Shampoo with Oat Milk) 10. Invest in quality skincare products. In episode #13 of the podcast, specifics are shared on how to create glowing skin, and by investing in quality skincare products, your most beautiful skin will shine. The power of prevention is real, and while it takes time and a bit of investment, the pay-offs are tremendous. 11. Design a workout regimen to look forward to. Whether you enjoy exercising outdoors in Mother Nature or attending classes lead by instructors that inspire you and classmates that boost your mood, explore your interests and community to see what is available and what captures your needs and proclivities. Most people after having exercise will tell you that they feel better, energized and less stress, and if you can bring that into your everyday life, everything will be affected in a very positive way. (Revolver Yoga Studio, Walla Walla) 12. Find time to treasure hunt. Even if you are not necessarily going to buy, poke around in local consignment shops, yard sales, second-hand shops, antique boutiques and even boutiques that catch your eye. If nothing else, you will walk away with ideas on how to design, style and mix and match what you already have. 13. Be sincere, yet kind. While everyone has days that you are simply grumpy for any list of reasons, taking it out on others is something you will most likely regret. And even if you have to deliver news that isn't favorable, there is always a way to do so with kindness. Being conscious of how we treat people and our delivery will almost always be appreciated, and even if it is taken for granted, at least we can go home at night and feel good about the energy we put out into the world. 14. Shop at local vendors and boutiques. Perhaps you live in a town that you hand-selected for the community it offers, but what if you didn't? Either way, supporting local vendors when it comes to food or local boutiques when it comes to shopping for gifts, necessities and products not only builds good-will, but strengthens the economy of the local community. And additionally, when it comes to buying food locally, you benefit your overall health as most foods are free from pesticides and hold more nutritional value that your body craves. 15. Eat real food. Full of flavor that will satiate, real food is a choice your body will thank you for. Processed food may be more convenient and help you reduce the shopping trips to the grocery store, but in the long term, it is a bad investment. Returning home after a long day knowing the food you will be incorporating into your meal will be satisfying and nutritious will remove guilt and properly fuel your body for whatever it may be asked to do next. 16. Elevate the conversation. Easier said than done when we are exhausted, stressed and frustrated, but when you do your best to refrain from complaining and gossiping, you are less likely to go home in the evening regretting or feeling guilty about partaking. In fact, when conversations are full of curious information - books, local events, news, etc - you can walk away inspired, motivated and eager to do something new. Why not bring such a conversation to those in your world? 17. Create an evening routine to look forward to. At the end of the day, your body and mind may be entirely taxed which is why making time (even 15 minutes) for unwinding with a favorite pastime is crucial. Being able to look forward to this simple routine can be the silver lining no matter what your day has unearthed. 18. Schedule regular spa appointments for beauty and health maintenance. Much like exercise, caring for our bodies is a means to caring for our health, overall beauty and mind. So be sure to schedule your facial, massage, hair cut/color, waxing and any other must-dos before you walk out the door from your last appointment. They can often be the respite in a busy week and will no doubt leave you feeling rejuvenated. 19. Stock a bar cart for spur-of-the-moment entertaining. Whether you drink alcoholic beverages or not, stock a bar cart that has drinks and nibbles at the ready for last-minute guests. Even for one or two guests, having a bar with wine, beer or if it's morning - croissants and hot tea keeps the food with the conversation in the living room or sitting room. Luxurious and ready for any everyday occasion. (A glimpse of my 20. Fill your home with inspired music. For techies or retro audiophiles, have your turntable or playlists ready for any occasion. From leisurely jazz tunes when you return from work and wish to read the daily news to beautiful Bach in the morning as you get ready for work, set up your music station, turn off the television and forget about time, even if for a moment. Whatever inspires you in your travels or remains memorable to you from your past, why not bring it into your everyday life if at all possible? Cultivate an everyday life that perhaps no one would believe is possible, but rest assured it is. After all, as Annie Dillard reminds us, how we spend our days is how we spend our lives. Why not spend your life living well each and everyday? ~SIMILAR POSTS FROM THE ARCHIVES YOU MIGHT ENJOY: ~Episode #32: The Francophile's Style Guide: The 14 Essentials ~10 Gifts of Mastering the French Mystique ~Why Not . . . Indulge Your Inner Francophile? ~Why Not . . . Find Your Je Ne Sais Quoi? ~10 Ways to Unearth Your Inner Francophile (episode #4) ~French-Inspired Living: Books to Enjoy Petit Plaisir: Befriend a local wine shop to ensure great wines no matter what the occasion. ~Liner & Elsen "One of America's six great main street wine shops." -Bon Appetit 2222 NW Quimby St. (off 22nd Ave.) Portland, OR 97210 They can ship the wine to you! Staff who've helped me in the past: Neil Thompson and Kevin Geller ~Chateau Du Grand Bos (2005) Bordeaux, France (wine enjoyed in the photo to the right). ~Images: (1) a cafe in Paris in Montmartre captured by TSLL

Wine Club Posse
Jerk Juice!!??

Wine Club Posse

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 34:25


The Wine Club Posse is a group of friends that gets together to share a bottle of wine, tell stories and talk about life.

The Trident Room Podcast
27(1/2) - Jeff Kline and Lyla Englehorn - Warfare Innovation

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


The Trident Room Podcast host Luke Goorsky sits down with Jeff Kline and Lyla Ann Englehorn – they discuss problem spaces, the importance of research and the future of warfare. Jeff Kline attended the University of Missouri, School of Engineering, graduating with honors in Industrial Engineering, and received his Navy commission through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program in 1979. His initial sea tour was in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD-980) serving as Gunnery Officer and Navigator. Jeff's following sea tours included assignments as propulsion officer in USS RANGER (CV-61), Combat Systems Officer in USS JOHN L. HALL (FFG-32), Operations Officer for Tactical Destroyer Squadron 32, Commanding Officer of USS AQUILA (PHM-4), Commanding Officer of USS CUSHING (DD-985), and Deputy Operations Officer of COMSIXTHFLT. His shore tours include Marine Corps Landing Force Training Command, Pacific as an instructor in Naval Gunfire and Supporting Arms, Naval Postgraduate School as a student in Operations Research graduating with honors, and Office of the Secretary of Defense as a Naval Analyst. Jeff is also a 1997 honors graduate of the National War College in Washington D.C. Jeff is currently a Professor of Practice in the Operations Research department and is the Director of the Wayne P. Hughes Jr. Naval Warfare Studies Institute. He teaches Joint Campaign Analysis, systems analysis, executive risk assessment and contributes to maritime security education programs offered at NPS. Jeff supports applied analytical research in naval warfare, maritime operations and security, theater ballistic missile defense, and future force composition studies. Jeff was a member of the 2017 Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Design Advisory Board. He has also served on several Naval Study Board Committees. His NPS faculty awards include the 2019 J. Steinhardt Award for lifetime achievement in Military Operations Research, the Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award, 2011 Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) Award for Teaching of OR Practice, 2009 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Homeland Security Award, 2007 Hamming Award for interdisciplinary research, 2007 Wayne E. Meyers Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering Research, and the 2005 Northrop Grumman Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering. He is a member of the Military Operations Research Society and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science. Ms. Lyla Englehorn, MPP, has a research faculty appointment at Naval Postgraduate School, and supports many research initiatives involving rapid concept generation, innovation, and information sharing. At NPS she has worked on a diverse range of projects and programs, and now serves as the Warfighting Concepts Lead for the Naval Warfare Studies Institute (NWSI) where she guides rapid concept generation using tools of human-centered design. She has held a faculty appointment at NPS since 2012 and in that time has served as the Associate Director for the Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER), a member of the instruction team for the International Maritime Security course sequence, and is an active member of the NPS Design Thinking Community of Practice. Lyla earned a Master of Public Policy degree from the Panetta Institute for Public Policy at CSUMB, and completed her undergraduate work at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. Her research interests include international maritime security policy, information sharing practices, issues around climate change, and innovation processes focusing on human users. Ms. Englehorn holds a TS/SCI clearance. The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you! The views expressed in this interview are those of the individuals and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, the US Navy, or the Naval Postgraduate School.

The Trident Room Podcast
27(2/2) - Jeff Kline and Lyla Englehorn - Solving Wicked Problems

The Trident Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


The Trident Room Podcast host Luke Goorsky sits down with Jeff Kline and Lyla Ann Englehorn – they discuss problem spaces, the importance of research and the future of warfare. Jeff Kline attended the University of Missouri, School of Engineering, graduating with honors in Industrial Engineering, and received his Navy commission through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program in 1979. His initial sea tour was in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD-980) serving as Gunnery Officer and Navigator. Jeff's following sea tours included assignments as propulsion officer in USS RANGER (CV-61), Combat Systems Officer in USS JOHN L. HALL (FFG-32), Operations Officer for Tactical Destroyer Squadron 32, Commanding Officer of USS AQUILA (PHM-4), Commanding Officer of USS CUSHING (DD-985), and Deputy Operations Officer of COMSIXTHFLT. His shore tours include Marine Corps Landing Force Training Command, Pacific as an instructor in Naval Gunfire and Supporting Arms, Naval Postgraduate School as a student in Operations Research graduating with honors, and Office of the Secretary of Defense as a Naval Analyst. Jeff is also a 1997 honors graduate of the National War College in Washington D.C. Jeff is currently a Professor of Practice in the Operations Research department and is the Director of the Wayne P. Hughes Jr. Naval Warfare Studies Institute. He teaches Joint Campaign Analysis, systems analysis, executive risk assessment and contributes to maritime security education programs offered at NPS. Jeff supports applied analytical research in naval warfare, maritime operations and security, theater ballistic missile defense, and future force composition studies. Jeff was a member of the 2017 Chief of Naval Operations Fleet Design Advisory Board. He has also served on several Naval Study Board Committees. His NPS faculty awards include the 2019 J. Steinhardt Award for lifetime achievement in Military Operations Research, the Navy's Superior Civilian Service Award, 2011 Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) Award for Teaching of OR Practice, 2009 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Homeland Security Award, 2007 Hamming Award for interdisciplinary research, 2007 Wayne E. Meyers Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering Research, and the 2005 Northrop Grumman Award for Excellence in Systems Engineering. He is a member of the Military Operations Research Society and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science. Ms. Lyla Englehorn, MPP, has a research faculty appointment at Naval Postgraduate School, and supports many research initiatives involving rapid concept generation, innovation, and information sharing. At NPS she has worked on a diverse range of projects and programs, and now serves as the Warfighting Concepts Lead for the Naval Warfare Studies Institute (NWSI) where she guides rapid concept generation using tools of human-centered design. She has held a faculty appointment at NPS since 2012 and in that time has served as the Associate Director for the Consortium for Robotics and Unmanned Systems Education and Research (CRUSER), a member of the instruction team for the International Maritime Security course sequence, and is an active member of the NPS Design Thinking Community of Practice. Lyla earned a Master of Public Policy degree from the Panetta Institute for Public Policy at CSUMB, and completed her undergraduate work at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. Her research interests include international maritime security policy, information sharing practices, issues around climate change, and innovation processes focusing on human users. Ms. Englehorn holds a TS/SCI clearance. The Trident Room Podcast is brought to you by the Naval Postgraduate School Alumni Association and the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation. npsfoundation.org For comments, suggestions, and critiques, please email us at TridentRoomPodcastHost@nps.edu, and find us online at nps.edu/tridentroompodcast. Thank you!

Northwest Wine Radio
Northwest Wine Radio Episde 360 - To Tell The Truth

Northwest Wine Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 46:40


[2022 - Season 9 Finale]  You know we love to share good stories on this show, right?  This week, we close our 9th season with a couple of the most fun wine stories we've come across. This week's guests share the stories of TruthTeller Winery of Walla Walla, and Left Coast Estate of Rickreall. Join host Brian Calvert for all this, plus our "Wine and Booze in the News" feature.  Master of Wine Bob Betz of Betz Family Winery stops by to answer our wine questions in his segment "Ask Bob," and Cote Bonneville winemaker Kerry Shiels has a food pairing in "Bites & Bottles."  Do you use social media?  Be sure to follow us on Instagram and Facebook @NorthwestWineNight. Thank you for listening, and remember, you can find out more about the show and listen to past episodes at NorthwestWineRadio.com #WineRadio #NorthwestWineRadio   CLICK HERE to Download Episode   A PRODUCTION OF copyright 2022  The Northwest Channel.  All Rights Reserved.  Audio clips of less than 15 seconds can be used, as long as they're credited "Northwest Wine Radio" or "NorthwestWineRadio.com." Audio clips longer than 15 seconds cannot be re-posted or used without permission.  

The Adult in the Room
Concoctions & Convictions: The Washington State Prison Experiment Scandal with Glen Morgan

The Adult in the Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 64:07


This week, We The Governed's Glen Morgan joins the program to talk about a shocking investigation he's been covering into newly-uncovered documents detailing disturbing medical experiments conducted on inmates at Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla, and why governor Jay Inslee is trying to hush it all up. Plus, a follow-up interview with last episode's guest, Jake Lang, with some updates on the status of his case and a deeper look at his motivations for his actions in DC. TOP STORIES: Durham: The Case of Hillary's Accused Lying Lawyer Goes to D.C. Jury West Coast, Messed Coast™ Report: A Time When Police Knew How to Respond to a Mass Shooting The FBI Was Also on Trial in Sussmann Russia Collusion Case You'd Think Ten Guns Fired Themselves and Injured 10 People in One Day in Portland Sussmann Acquitted of Lying to FBI in Trump Russia Hoax, Delivering Big Loss to Special Counsel Durham The D.C. Swamp – A Place Where Only Leftists Like Sussmann Get a Jury of Their Peers West Coast, Messed Coast™ Report: Judge Overturns Election After Voter Fraud Hillary's Attorney 'Operated' an FBI Office at Law Firm, But Wait, It Gets Worse... MORE INFO: VictoriaTaft.com Victoria Taft @ PJ Media --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/victoria-taft/support