Podcasts about Heart Sutra

Popular Sutra in Mahāyāna Buddhism

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Guru Viking Podcast
Ep175: Dakini Translations - Adele Tomlin

Guru Viking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 85:25


In this episode I am joined by Adele Tomlin, Buddhist practitioner, writer, poet, independent scholar-translator of Tibetan Buddhist texts, and founder of the Dakini Translations website. Adele recalls her upbringing in England, training as a barrister, and work as a strategist in the city of London, before a chance meeting with the 17th Karmapa changed her life forever. Adele traces her beginnings in becoming a Buddhist, her studies of the Tibetan language in Nepal, and thriving in the academic rigour of Tibetology at the University of Hamburg. Adele discusses her published works, shares her research and translation process, and explores the implications of the shentong vs rangtong doctrines of emptiness. Adele also expresses her frustration with gate-keeping in academia, reveals the reasons behind her founding of DakiniTranslations.com, and shares her research into the forgotten female mystics of India and Tibet. …

 Video version: https://www.guruviking.com/podcast/ep175-dakini-translations-adele-tomlin 
Also available on Youtube, iTunes, & Spotify – search ‘Guru Viking Podcast'. … Topics include: 00:00 - Intro 01:05 - Endorsed by scholars 02:53 - Miranda Shaw 03:48 - Adele's upbringing 04:35 - Training as a barrister and entering the city of London 07:39 - Dissatisfaction with life and training in yoga and philosophy 08:53 - Life changing meeting with the 17th Karmapa 14:47 - Reaction of friends and family 15:33 - Learning Tibetan to be closer to the guru 17:33 - Studying Tibetan in India and Nepal 20:28 - Discovering a talent for the Tibetan language 21:46 - The power of past life connections 28:22 - Studying Tibetology at the University of Hamburg 30:08 - Adele adjusts to the academic rigour at Hamburg 32:29 - The importance of practice experience when translating Vajrayana texts 34:54 - Publishes her first critical edition translation 36:30 - Philological and philosophical challenges of translating Taranatha's commentary on the Heart Sutra  41:04 - Rangtong vs Shentong 48:13 - The implications of the shentong view for practice 54:11 - Taranatha's shentong reading of the Heart Sutra 55:08 - Frustration with gatekeeping in academia and founding dakinitranslations dot com 01:00:25 - Making Buddhist translation and research accessible and relatable 01:03:16 - Ethics of profiting from dharma 01:04:23 - The secret of Adele's prolific output 01:06:33 - How Adele chooses which texts to translate 01:11:14 - Research into forgotten female mystics and masters 01:15:39 - Humour in Vajrayana and pointing out all male panels 01:18:36 - Male dominated lineage trees 01:20:08 - ‘Dakini Translations' and British humour … To find out more about Adele Tomlin, visit: - https://dakinitranslations.com/ - www.facebook.com/dakinitranslations For more interviews, videos, and more visit: - www.guruviking.com Music ‘Deva Dasi' by Steve James

Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief
Episode 91: The Prajna Paramita 2 of 2

Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 7:09


In continuing our exploration of the prajna paramita, I'd like to focus on the inseparable trio of prajna (knowledge or wisdom), shunyata (emptiness), and compassion (karuna)  •  according to Trungpa Rinpoche, the freshness of prajna insight and the warmth of compassion are always connected  •  this challenges some common assumptions: that intelligence or sharpness of mind is harsh and aggressive; that compassion and love are fuzzy, soft, and weak; and that both compassion and sharpness of mind are solid and fixed  •  in the famous teaching called “The Heart Sutra,” the three main characters embody this inseparable trio  •  there is the Buddha, who is sitting in meditation; there is Avalokiteshvara, who is the embodiment of compassion; and there is Shariputra, who is the student asking questions  •  to embody and practice the prajna paramita, we need to empty ourselves of our preconceptions, and we also need to let go of our sense of attainment in having done so. 

New Books in Literary Studies
Carlos Rojas on Translating Yan Lianke

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:21


In this episode, Carlos Rojas shares with us his experience as a translator. He has translated several renowned authors in the Chinese-speaking world, including Yan Lianke, Yu Hua, Jia Pingwa, and Ng Kim Chew, into English. Among the literary translations, Carlos has translated ten books written by Yan Lianke, including novels, short stories, novellas, and essay collections. The books include Lenin's Kisses (2012), The Four Books (2015), Marrow (2016), The Explosion Chronicles: A Novel (2017), The Years, Months, Days: Two Novellas (2017), The Day the Sun Died (2018), Three Brothers: Memories of My Family (2020), the most recent Hard Like Water (2021) and Discovering Fiction (2022), and the forthcoming Heart Sutra (2023). Yan Lianke is one of the most famous and prolific authors in China. He is the winner of the Newman Prize for Chinese Literature and the Franz Kafka Prize and a two-time finalist for the Man Booker International Prize. He teaches at Renmin University in Beijing and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His works have been translated into more than 30 languages including English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, Hungarian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Mongolian and Portuguese. Carlos Rojas is Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. His research focuses on modern Chinese literature and culture, as well as gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Linshan Jiang is Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Carlos Rojas on Translating Yan Lianke

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:21


In this episode, Carlos Rojas shares with us his experience as a translator. He has translated several renowned authors in the Chinese-speaking world, including Yan Lianke, Yu Hua, Jia Pingwa, and Ng Kim Chew, into English. Among the literary translations, Carlos has translated ten books written by Yan Lianke, including novels, short stories, novellas, and essay collections. The books include Lenin's Kisses (2012), The Four Books (2015), Marrow (2016), The Explosion Chronicles: A Novel (2017), The Years, Months, Days: Two Novellas (2017), The Day the Sun Died (2018), Three Brothers: Memories of My Family (2020), the most recent Hard Like Water (2021) and Discovering Fiction (2022), and the forthcoming Heart Sutra (2023). Yan Lianke is one of the most famous and prolific authors in China. He is the winner of the Newman Prize for Chinese Literature and the Franz Kafka Prize and a two-time finalist for the Man Booker International Prize. He teaches at Renmin University in Beijing and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His works have been translated into more than 30 languages including English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, Hungarian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Mongolian and Portuguese. Carlos Rojas is Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. His research focuses on modern Chinese literature and culture, as well as gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Linshan Jiang is Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Carlos Rojas on Translating Yan Lianke

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:21


In this episode, Carlos Rojas shares with us his experience as a translator. He has translated several renowned authors in the Chinese-speaking world, including Yan Lianke, Yu Hua, Jia Pingwa, and Ng Kim Chew, into English. Among the literary translations, Carlos has translated ten books written by Yan Lianke, including novels, short stories, novellas, and essay collections. The books include Lenin's Kisses (2012), The Four Books (2015), Marrow (2016), The Explosion Chronicles: A Novel (2017), The Years, Months, Days: Two Novellas (2017), The Day the Sun Died (2018), Three Brothers: Memories of My Family (2020), the most recent Hard Like Water (2021) and Discovering Fiction (2022), and the forthcoming Heart Sutra (2023). Yan Lianke is one of the most famous and prolific authors in China. He is the winner of the Newman Prize for Chinese Literature and the Franz Kafka Prize and a two-time finalist for the Man Booker International Prize. He teaches at Renmin University in Beijing and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His works have been translated into more than 30 languages including English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, Hungarian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Mongolian and Portuguese. Carlos Rojas is Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. His research focuses on modern Chinese literature and culture, as well as gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Linshan Jiang is Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Chinese Studies
Carlos Rojas on Translating Yan Lianke

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 47:21


In this episode, Carlos Rojas shares with us his experience as a translator. He has translated several renowned authors in the Chinese-speaking world, including Yan Lianke, Yu Hua, Jia Pingwa, and Ng Kim Chew, into English. Among the literary translations, Carlos has translated ten books written by Yan Lianke, including novels, short stories, novellas, and essay collections. The books include Lenin's Kisses (2012), The Four Books (2015), Marrow (2016), The Explosion Chronicles: A Novel (2017), The Years, Months, Days: Two Novellas (2017), The Day the Sun Died (2018), Three Brothers: Memories of My Family (2020), the most recent Hard Like Water (2021) and Discovering Fiction (2022), and the forthcoming Heart Sutra (2023). Yan Lianke is one of the most famous and prolific authors in China. He is the winner of the Newman Prize for Chinese Literature and the Franz Kafka Prize and a two-time finalist for the Man Booker International Prize. He teaches at Renmin University in Beijing and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His works have been translated into more than 30 languages including English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, Hungarian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Mongolian and Portuguese. Carlos Rojas is Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. His research focuses on modern Chinese literature and culture, as well as gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Linshan Jiang is Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

Open Question
OQ 304 - Sacred World: Where is "THE" World?

Open Question

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:10


What do you see when you think about the world? You might picture a rainforest or desert. You might envision a crowded subway terminal. You might imagine a household or a war zone. You might think: “the world is a mess,” or feel touched by the beauty and the beings that inhabit it. Where exactly is “the” world? Is it conscious or material? Does it exist within our individual mind streams or outside of us? Is it cruel, mundane or sacred? Is it one or many? Is “the” world even findable?

The Altrusian Grace Media Podcast
The Diamond Sutra - Ancient Mahāyāna Buddhism

The Altrusian Grace Media Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 46:09


The Diamond Sutra is a Mahāyāna sutra from the genre of Prajñāpāramitā sutras. Translated into a variety of languages over a broad geographic range, the Diamond Sūtra is one of the most influential Mahayana sutras in East Asia, and it is particularly prominent within the Chan tradition, along with the Heart Sutra. Please consider supporting my work and download this audio as part of the ESOTERIC AND OCCULT WISDOM - MASTER COLLECTION (an ongoing collection of Gnostic, alchemical, Hermetic, and related occult/spiritual audio projects that span dozens of hours) at https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com/ *JOIN MY PATREON at https://www.patreon.com/altrusiangracemedia *BECOME A YOUTUBE CHANNEL MEMBER at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMzRTOugvDLwhSwJdoSWBZA/join *JOIN THE CULT OF STARRY WISDOM at https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com/starry-wisdom-cult *FOLLOW THE AGM PODCAST at https://altrusiangracemedia.podbean.com *MY TSHIRTS AND DESIGNS ON AMAZON at https://amzn.to/3peS9j3 *MY NEW 2022 MERCH LINE "OCCULT NOUVEAU" at https://amzn.to/3OeUHZL *MY TSHIRTS AND DESIGNS ON TEEPUBLIC at https://teepublic.sjv.io/XxvPDX *LICENSE MY MUSIC FOR YOUR PROJECT at https://www.pond5.com/artist/altrusiangracemedia *MY BOOKS ON AMAZON at https://amzn.to/3oQGh6A As an Amazon Associate I earn a small amount from qualifying purchases and it helps to support my channel. Please consider LIKING the video, SUBSCRIBING to the channel, and SHARING the links! These simple actions go a long way in supporting AGM and is truly appreciated!  ~~Places to follow and support Altrusian Grace Media~~ Website ► https://altrusiangrace.blogspot.com/ Bandcamp ► https://altrusiangrace.bandcamp.com Teepublic Store ► https://teepublic.sjv.io/XxvPDX Twitter ► https://twitter.com/AltrusianGrace Rumble ► https://rumble.com/c/c-375437 YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/AltrusianGraceMedia Odessy ► https://odysee.com/@altrusiangracemedia:1 Bitchute ► https://www.bitchute.com/channel/altrusiangracemedia/ To kindly donate directly to my channel: www.paypal.me/altrusiangrace For inquiries regarding voice-over work or licensing for my work (including music) please contact altrusiangracemedia ((at)) gmail.com AGM BACKUP CONTENT ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO0nCG5aqB1CHyU3Xf0TUbg #Gnosticism #Alchemy #Hermeticism #Occult #Esoteric #Audiobook #Mysticism #Gnostic #Egyptian #Christianity #NagHammadi #Spirituality #Jung

Bob Thurman Podcast
Chanting and Practicing the Heart Sutra – Ep. 304

Bob Thurman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 47:45


The Heart Sutra is one of the most profound and widely studied texts in the Buddhist canon which is recited at the start of teachings, events & as a blessing. In this podcast Robert A.F. Thurman leads a recitation of The Heart Sutra and gives a teaching on it's connections to the Four Noble Truths and the Buddha's Eight Folk Path of liberation for all audiences. Professor Thurman begins this podcast with an explanation of the Heart Sutra focusing on the the dialog between Shāriputra and Avalokiteśvara in the Buddha's samadhi field, and it's connection to Clear Light, Bliss, Relativity and how one can avoid absolutism when thinking about emptiness. Podcast concludes with Professor Thurman explaining how the practice of reciting The Heart Sutra is the key to understanding it's teaching as a tool for mind transformation and a reading of the the third chapter of "The Flower Ornament Sutra" as translated by Thomas Cleary. “The Transcendent Wisdom Heart Sutra, known as The Heart Sutra in all Mahayana Buddhist countries, and The Heart of Wisdom in Tibet, is a concise expression of the profound vision of reality that is the root of liberation from suffering. Tibetan religious all know this by heart and chant is solemnly at the beginning of every ceremony. In addition to a prescription for enlightenment, they consider it the most powerful exorcism, purifier, and developer of merit as well of wisdom.” Robert A.F. Thurman from Essential Tibetan Buddhism Professor Thurman's translation of the Heart Sutra can be found in his book, Essential Tibetan Buddhism, on page 171, under the chapter heading, “Practicing the Liberating Wisdom.”

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
Dogen's Genjokoan and the Signs of the Times

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 29:42


08/20/2022, Kyoshin Wendy Lewis, dharma talk at City Center. In Genjokoan, Dogen further investigates the teaching of The Heart Sutra, especially the dialectical relationship between the relative and the absolute in the context of emptiness. This inquiry is related to how we live in practice-realization.

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud
104. Design & Zen Summary IV

UnMind: Zen Moments With Great Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 16:53


All are on the Path,Though many do not know it.This Path is no path.* * *The focus of this segment, the intersection of the Social Sphere and the Path to Cessation, sounds dangerously close to “sociopath,” a term that is becoming more and more familiar in the era of extreme divisiveness in the cultural and political landscape, not only in the USA but around the globe. What more appropriate designation for the president living in luxury in Russia, who finds it desirable to be constantly bombing and shelling civilians, women and children, in Ukraine? But then, what name is most fitting for a president who tries to steal an election? “Narcissist” doesn't quite cut it.When we return from our meditation to our family, or sally forth into the public fray — crossing the boundary between the Personal and Social spheres as shown in the graphic model — we enter the Original Frontier™ that Buddha must have encountered the night of his profound enlightenment some 2500 years ago. Perhaps the more accurate term would be “reenter,” as the Social sphere into which he had been born and raised had not changed — he had changed. In the 1960s, the “reentry problem” became a ubiquitous trope, designating that segue back into so-called normality, following a psychedelic-induced “trip” to what appeared to be another world. One of my design students at U of I, Chicago Circle campus, described it as “dumping out all of the drawers in the house in one big pile, and next day, having to put all that stuff back where it belongs.” A psychotropic, rather than alcoholic, hangover.Of course, we never completely leave the Social realm, even when intently focusing on the Personal, in meditation. The influences of our particular social milieu are ever-present, even in the deep isolation of meditation. The Four Spheres are not only outside of us, they are also inside. The body's biology and inherited DNA are obvious examples of the Natural. Subtle movements of chemistry and the neurological verge on the microcosmic Universal. As do such subtle phenomena as circadian rhythms, subliminal responses to sunlight, and the tidal pull of the moon.Not that we are conscious of these influences. The inner Social sphere includes such unconscious elements as self-identity, i.e. association with family ancestry, including persuasions such as identifying with the political party that our parents favored. In receiving the Zen Buddhist lay precepts, we embrace interpretations of others regarding the avoidance of killing, stealing, lying, and so forth, on a conscious level. But we harbor built-in precepts inherited from parents and peers, all unbeknownst to ourselves. Zen's Precepts often belabor the obvious. But they bear repetition.Considering the intersection of the Social sphere with the Path, we call to mind its eight dimensions. Not capitalized here, in order to embrace them as Universal and Natural, as well as Social and Personal, rather than as holy writ. Right view and thought, or understanding, which together comprise right wisdom; right speech, action and livelihood, or right conduct; and right effort, mindfulness and meditation, taken together as right discipline. With our usual caveat that the term “right,” as used here, is more of a verb than an adjective. It indicates taking right action to correct our worldview and understanding, bringing them more into alignment with the worldview of Buddhism, or Buddha himself.One could argue that effort, mindfulness and meditation live entirely within the Personal sphere of action, as exemplified by Bodhidharma, alone in his cave in ancient China. But we point to the halo- or ripple-effect of our personal discipline upon others around us, once we do leave the cushion and reenter the Social realm. Master Dogen is attributed with encouraging us to do one thing, and to do it well enough that we can even do it in front of other people. I have not been able to locate this saying in the written record, but in his famous Genjokoan [Actualizing the Fundamental Point] he declares that “Doing one practice is practicing completely.” This is analogous to the current Zen trope that asks, If you want to drill for water, would you drill a lot of shallow wells, or one deep well? This applies broadly.In the fields of performing arts and athletics, connections of the discipline of Personal effort to Social performance becomes obvious, through repetition of rehearsal and practicing routines. As does the recommendation that “practice makes perfect,” notwithstanding the Buddhist tenet of fundamental imperfection. But the training, while clearly physical, is not only physical. Highly trained athletes are often guilty of making “mental errors.” Gymnasts, musicians, dancers and pole vaulters who persevere and break records, or move audiences to laughter or tears, are examples of this principle. They realize the non-separation of the Personal and Social, following the Path of process and progress through which we integrate inner discipline and outer conduct. In Zen as well as the arts, we arrive at a convergence in which wisdom emerges, on physical as well as mental and emotional planes.Let's take a brief look at each of the eight dimensions and its connection to the Social sphere, beginning where our practice begins, with right meditation. Sometimes rendered traditionally as contemplation or concentration, that there is right meditation suggests that there could be wrong meditation. Again, the usage is not exactly right versus wrong here on the Personal level of meditation practice, but we can agree that there may be wrong attitudes or usages of meditation in the Social context. For example, if we make a divisive or wedge issue of our zazen practice within the dynamics of our household, allowing it to affect our relationships to our family — spouse, children, parents, even in-laws — that might be an example of wrong meditation. An old saying holds that if your spouse and children are happy, your meditation is working. Adding an hour of meditation to our daily routine should not be a cause celebre, but can be inserted at an hour and in a place that does not disrupt or disturb anyone. In fact, practicing zazen should add to the harmony of the household, just as it does to the Zen community, or Sangha.Right mindfulness in the Social realm would suggest extending this Personal caution and humility to the workspace, whether in the office or in the field. Making a display of wearing a wrist mala, for example, calls upon our fellow workers, managers and team members to respond, with questions or comments. While Zen practice has definite benefits in terms of our relationship to colleagues under the stressful conditions of productivity demands, making an issue of it with people who have little or no familiarity with Zen is not advisable. It introduces an irrelevant and even irritating element into a situation already fraught with potential for friction and conflict, e.g. along political or ideological lines. Not that we should be evasive about it, or try to hide the fact that we engage in a practice — meditation — that has its detractors, and does not yet enjoy the kind of mainstream acceptability that it is gaining.A similarly inappropriate, and more common, phenomenon, is the tendency of some to insert their religious views into the business environment, when the business itself has little or nothing to do with religion. I have worked for a relatively large corporation where one of the partners held regular prayer meetings. He was also involved in an illicit affair with one of the employees. Along with being mindful of our practice, we practice mindfulness of context.Right effort plays into the Social context as well, witnessed as our tendency to overdo and overthink all of these relationships, sometimes to the detriment of the relationship. In a comment I came across recently, a mother cogently summed up one example of this syndrome, suggesting that we would be a whole lot less worried about what other people thought of us if we realized how seldom they do. We have all been there, done that, when a colleague or boss makes a comment and we spend the next all-too-long period of time ruminating over it, fretting about what the person really meant, and insulted that they do not appreciate us for the contribution we make to the corporate cause.There are innumerable books published about this, one I heard reviewed on television titled “Neanderthals at Work” by Albert J. Bernstein. He suggests that in the modern office setting you have three distinct types of coping strategies or views of the situation, one he called something like the politician, another the believer, and the third the genius. The “politician,” an example of the bad boss syndrome, schmoozes the people above them, while largely ignoring those lower on the ladder, or worse, criticizing them as a way of improving his position. The “believer” thinks the politician is immoral, feeling that as long as they come to work and do their job, they should not have to play politics. The “genius” comes out of the computer room to solve the problem du jour, but is often culpable in creating the problem. The politician looks down on the other two as naive, simply not understanding how things work in the modern office. Focusing on the boss is the natural approach to the reporting structure. The problem is not that these tendencies exist, but that their adherents do not understand each other, which exacerbates the friction between them.Which brings us to another four-pointed model, my take on the traditional Zen jargon term, “Samadhi,” usually capitalized to stress the high regard in which it is held. I reduce it to the more prosaic “balance.” This concept is simple enough to grasp that no illustration is required. The first of the four is physical samadhi, the centered and balanced form of the zazen posture, leaning neither to the right or left, or front or back, as Master Dogen explains what it is not. From it, or along with it, comes the second samadhi, emotional balance: more calm, less anxiety. Thirdly we begin to experience mental samadhi: more clarity, less confusion. And finally, after some time, social samadhi: more harmony, less friction in our relationships to others. These four comprehend the inner-Personal and outer-Social benefits, or side-effects of Zen meditation practice.Most people want to leap to the Social aspect right away, to handle interpersonal transactions with greater patience and compassion. But Zen goes deeper, of course. When the upright posture becomes more natural and comfortable, the heart-mind (J. shin) becomes calmer and clearer naturally. When one becomes more patient with the monkey mind, and more comfortable in one's own skin through zazen, it becomes easier to have patience with others. But we have to be patient with the time that it takes to get over ourselves, and to divest ourselves of a lot of excess baggage we carry around. This is why Zen takes so long to penetrate to the deeper levels of Samadhi, as a transformational experience, sometimes regarded as the precursor to the fabled spiritual insight (J. satori) of Zen.Summing up so far, we have looked briefly at the Universal Existence of Dukkha, change or suffering, that we are to fully understand; its Natural Origin, or craving, which we are to fully abandon — and which is built-into birth as a human being — which is considered the necessary condition for Buddhist awakening; and the Social Path recommended by Shakyamuni Buddha, which we are to follow to its ultimate conclusion in the Cessation of suffering. A caveat is in order as to this last claim. In the Heart Sutra we chant: “Given Emptiness, no suffering, no end of suffering.” This is not a contradiction, but indicates that the kind of suffering that can come to an end is that self- and mutually-inflicted suffering, intentionally and unintentionally, that we visit upon ourselves and others. The Natural suffering of aging, sickness and death, which come with the territory of sentient existence, do not, cannot, come to an end. But embracing that fact as reality, and perfectly natural, mitigates the suffering as a human meme.Continuing, we will next take up the remaining pair of the combinations of the Four Spheres and the Four Noble Truths, the Personal and the Cessation of suffering, which necessarily involves the Eightfold Path to cessation. Personal Cessation is the only kind there is. Stay tuned one more time.* * *Elliston Roshi is guiding teacher of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center and abbot of the Silent Thunder Order. He is also a gallery-represented fine artist expressing his Zen through visual poetry, or “music to the eyes.”UnMind is a production of the Atlanta Soto Zen Center in Atlanta, Georgia and the Silent Thunder Order. You can support these teachings by PayPal to donate@STorder.org. Gassho.Producer: Kyōsaku Jon Mitchell

Thongdrol
The Heart Sutra | ཤེས་རབ་སྙིང་པོ། ། | Sherab Nyingpo

Thongdrol

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 7:21


༄༅། །བཅོམ་ལྡན་འདས་མ་ཤེས་རབ་ཀྱི་ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པའི་སྙིང་པོ། ། The Sūtra of the Heart of Transcendent Wisdom by Gyalwang Karmapa ཤེས་རབ་སྙིང་པོ། ། | The Heart Sūtra or Sherab Nyingpo The Heart Sūtra or Sherap Nyingpo (ཤེས་རབ་སྙིང་པོ་) is one of the most popular Buddhist sūtra and certainly among the most widely used and chanted sutra-s in Tibet. Its full title in Sanskrit is Bhagavatīprajñāpāramitāhṛdaya and in Tibetan བཅོམ་ལྡན་འདས་མ་ཤེས་རབ་ཀྱི་ཕ་རོལ་ཏུ་ཕྱིན་པའི་སྙིང་པོ་ which translates as The Heart of the Blessed Perfection of Wisdom. The followers of Mahāyāna Buddhism consider it as sacred literature that falls within the category of the words of the Buddha. Thus, it is placed within the Perfection of Wisdom (ཤེར་ཕྱིན་) section of the Kagyur (བཀའ་འགྱུར་) canon. According to the sūtra itself, the Heart Sūtra was taught by the Buddha while he was on Vulture Peak, Rajagṛha, with his monastic and bodhisattva followers. https://thongdrol.org/sherab-nyingpo/

Bright On Buddhism
The Heart Sutra

Bright On Buddhism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 23:39


Bright On Buddhism - The Heart Sutra- Join us as we read and discuss the Heart Sutra. Resources: Episode 17 - https://anchor.fm/brightonbuddhism/episodes/Who-is-Avalokitesvara-e1cjkqg Episode 18 - https://anchor.fm/brightonbuddhism/episodes/What-is-the-Buddhist-philosophy-of-speech--language--and-words-e1dgqu9 Episode 24 - https://anchor.fm/brightonbuddhism/episodes/What-are-mantra-in-Buddhism-e1g01mg Episode 33 - https://anchor.fm/brightonbuddhism/episodes/What-is-emptiness-e1jc31i Lopez, Donald S. Elaborations on Emptiness: Uses of the Heart Sūtra. Princeton University Press, 1996. http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1ggjkvp.; The Heart Sutra: A Comprehensive Guide to the Classic of Mahayana Buddhism by Kazuaki Tanahashi 2015; Donald S. Lopez Jr., The Heart Sutra Explained: SUNY, 1987; Edward Conze, Buddhist Wisdom: The Diamond Sutra and The Heart Sutra, Random House, 2001; Chan Master Sheng Yen, There Is No Suffering: A Commentary on the Heart Sutra, Dharma Drum Publications, 2001; Kazuaki Tanahashi, The Heart Sutra: A Comprehensive Guide to the Classic of Mahayana Buddhism, Shambhala Publications, 2015 Do you have a question about Buddhism that you'd like us to discuss? Let us know by tweeting to us @BrightBuddhism, emailing us at Bright.On.Buddhism@gmail.com, or joining us on our discord server, Hidden Sangha https://discord.gg/tEwcVpu! Credits: Nick Bright: Script, Cover Art, Music, Voice of Hearer, Co-Host Proven Paradox: Editing, mixing and mastering, social media, Voice of Hermit, Co-Host

The Heart Of Practice
Window Reflection Meditation by Rev. WonGong

The Heart Of Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 3:14


Many of us ask ourselves, "Who am I really?" - a question that Rev. WonGong contemplated as she watched her reflected image disappear in the morning light. In this gentle dharma talk, you are invited to join Rev. WonGong's introspective journey that begins with reflected light and ends with the Heart Sutra. https://www.wonbuddhismnc.org/donations

Bob Thurman Podcast
Mindfulness & The Mahasatipatthana Sutta – Ep. 299

Bob Thurman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 54:32


In this episode Robert A.F. Thurman uses the Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta, the Buddha's direct instructions on practicing meditation and developing mindfulness as a gateway to give a teaching on the intersection of Buddhism & Psychotherapy and the Buddhist perspective on Non-Duality. Joined by Dr. Mark Epstein, Thurman in this episode discusses the Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta's connection to the Heart Sutra, the four focuses of mindfulness, the legacy of Wilhelm Reich, the practice of circumambulation of stupas and sacred sites and the concept of "good enough mother" as presented by D.W. Winnicott. The four focuses of mindfulness in the sutta are the body, the sensations, the mind, and the mental objects, among which the last is the longest and most elaborated. In addition to meditating as directed, many of the elements used by the Buddha to aim and structure the meditations, such as the five aggregates, the eighteen elements, and the twelve sense-mediums, need to be explained and incorporated in mind, in order to be able to meditatively follow the guidance effectively. Podcast includes an in depth exploration of Nirvana and the terminology used by Buddhist translators and concludes with a guided mindfulness meditation by Robert A.F. Thurman. "Mindfulness & The Mahasatipatthana Sutta - Ep. 299" Podcast Photo of Mueang Chiang Mai, Thailand by Robert A.F. Thurman from 2019 GeoEx Trip, All Rights Reserved. Recorded and streamed online live from Tibet House US in New York City on March 22, 2019, this podcast is an excerpt from the "Force For Good" class series available as part of the Tibet House US | Menla Member Archives. To listen to the first half of this talk with Dr. Mark Epstein, please visit: www.thusmenla.org.

Twining Vines Zen Centre
Heart Sutra Line One

Twining Vines Zen Centre

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 31:50


Rev. Neti Mushin Parekh gives a dharma talk to the Twining Vines Zen Centre on Sunday the 17th of July 2022. Home

Clouds in Water Zen Center
Realizing Nirvana

Clouds in Water Zen Center

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 49:15


Readings and reflections from The Other Shore, Thich Nhat Hanh's new translation of the Heart Sutra and his commentaries on it. Dharma talk by Sosan Theresa Flynn on Sunday, July 17, 2022.

Open Question
OQ 303 - Sacred World: The Shimmering Apparition

Open Question

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 23:45


In Open Question 303, Elizabeth explores the power of words and what it means to go beyond them in the tradition of Prajnaparamita.

The Zen Mountain Monastery Podcast

Patrick Yunen Kelly, Senior Lay Student - Zen Center of New York City, Sunday 06/26/2022 - In this talk, Yunen delves into the Heart Sutra, exploring how this important teaching comes to us and the depth of what it has to offer.

Enlightened World Network
Freedom - Escape the Prison of Your Own Mind - OM School Live with GP Walsh and Lisa Berry on EWN

Enlightened World Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 54:41


"Only when one is free of the projections of the mind can one apprehend what is real." Buddha (Lankavatara Sutra) It is early in the morning here in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. The sun has just come up and there is a spectacular thunderstorm going on. My whole body feels the sound waves as they crack and rumble. It is a total, direct experience. It has passed now and I need to write a blog for the upcoming OM School Live. I had an extraordinary experience. But I could have missed it. I could have analyzed it, thought about how the lightning is static charge build up in the atmosphere, how the thunder is produced by a sonic boom. I could have consulted the weather on my phone to see how long it would last and if I would be able to get to the store later. I could have check a radar map to see the extent of it. I choose to just open the door and feel it, smell it, hear it. All of our analysis, our comparisons, our attempts to domesticate nature are an attempt to reduce the miracle of life to an idea, a picture in an album, a video on YouGoop. In other words, it is the habit of living in the mind instead of in reality. It is never any actual circumstance in our lives that bind us. It is never some person, place, situation or condition. It is always the mind. It is always our beliefs about this moment that put us into that cage. We cannot grow beyond our beliefs. They form the boundary of experience. We don't create beliefs. We acquire them, from family, friends, churches, schools and, tragically, from media, social and otherwise. And, while we do not create them we do ourselves enforce them. There is nothing more powerful than a belief. They shape our perceptions and thus form all of our experiences and relationships. They determine the limits of what is possible. They create right and wrong. But once again I point out. It is we ourselves who are the guards in this prison in which we are held captive. This is what Buddha meant in the quote above. "Only when one is free of the projections of the mind [our unexamined beliefs] can one apprehend what is real." And it says in the Heart Sutra, "...take refuge in Prajnaparamita [what is real] and live without walls of the mind. Without walls of the mind and thus without fears" In a world that is full of trite entertainment and where every event is reduced to a sound bite or a TikTok clip, learning to inquire as to what is real and what is a projection of the mind, is a rather radical undertaking. Challenging the convention wisdom and assumptions, whose fruit is obviously spoiled, takes courage and a new way of approaching our relationship with "the mind." Shall we be its servant? Do we let un scrutinized beliefs create a wall of limitations around us? Or do we claim that utilize the momentous gift of human intellect which, when turned on itself, can break down those walls of the mind, dissolve the cell walls and walk once and for all into a freedom that is self-sustained. Let me offer my definition of freedom that i think sums up what we all in our hearts desire. Freedom is a sense of well being that is independent of all conditions and circumstances Freedom, in order to be truly free, can depend on nothing but itself. You, in order to be truly free, must find the golden key within yourself that opens the prison gate. Then, as you walk through that gate you realize, there never was a gate at all. It was always a wall constructed by the mind and so you leave both the walls and the mind forever. Join us for the next episode of "OM School Live" every Tuesday at 12 noon eastern time. at http://youtube.com/gpwalsh or in the private facebook group https://facebook.com/groups/gpwalsh

Anacortes Mindfulness Community

In the Heart Sutra, Avalokiteshvara tells his friend Shariputra about the moment he awakened to emptiness. In this talk, Jonathan Prescott explores what these two ancient spiritual friends woke up to and how we can touch the same transformative insight in our modern lives.

Astral Projection Podcast by Astral Doorway | Astral Travel How To Guides & Out of Body Experiences
1 Hour Heart Sutra Mantra Recitation: Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate Bodhi Svaha

Astral Projection Podcast by Astral Doorway | Astral Travel How To Guides & Out of Body Experiences

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 61:33


Watch this video first: https://youtu.be/g3YGCHVK6nU

Astral Projection Podcast by Astral Doorway | Astral Travel How To Guides & Out of Body Experiences

YouTube episode: https://youtu.be/g3YGCHVK6nU The Prajnaparamita, or Heart Sutra, is one of the most powerful and transcendental teachings that the great Buddha Shakyamuni left us. It enables us to find the ultimate, or root, reality. With it, he left one of the most powerful mantras which has acted as a fundamental basis to many schools of Buddhism. This mantras helps us to reach that which is called 'Sunyata', 'Emptiness', 'The Absolute', 'The Ain Soph', 'The Void', 'Samadhi' etc. The mantra is: "Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate Bodhi Swaha". Extra Reading:

Buddhist Voices
40: Prasadacarin - Friendship and the Path of Responsibility

Buddhist Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 31:18


“Padmapani is my Yidam, two-armed Avalokitesvara… I came from a Pureland Mahayana tradition so I wanted all of the Buddhas and bodhisattvas to be part of my practice, but I gradually narrowed down… Avalokitesvara gave the Heart Sutra and bit by bit it became clear that, ‘Well, it's just a question of how many arms!” When Prasadacarin's school teacher organized a class visit to a Mahayana Buddhist temple in Stockholm, Sweden, he did not imagine his encounter with the Dharma that day would spark off his own spiritual quest, and lead eventually to becoming Chair of  Triratna's Stockholm Buddhist Centre in his early 20s! Listen to this moving account of a spiritual life that started at a very early age, passing through the twists and turns of growing up and the complications of coming out as a gay man in a context that wasn't supportive. Prasadacarin speaks openly and from the heart in this latest Fifty Years, Fifty Voices episode. Extracts from this talk were used for the 50 Years, 50 Voices project - visit the dedicated space on The Buddhist Centre Online for more. 

Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part two

Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 38:19


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) How the nothing of feelings becomes the something of objects and further exploration of the third and fourth foundations. Plus a guided meditation on the third foundation

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part two

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 38:19


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) How the nothing of feelings becomes the something of objects and further exploration of the third and fourth foundations. Plus a guided meditation on the third foundation

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part two

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 38:19


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) How the nothing of feelings becomes the something of objects and further exploration of the third and fourth foundations. Plus a guided meditation on the third foundation

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part one

Dharma Seed - dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 42:39


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) These two ancient sutras fuse seamlessly together/explore how the body (form) becomes formless when we don't infuse the body with knowledge or remembrance

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part one

Dharmaseed.org: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 42:39


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) These two ancient sutras fuse seamlessly together/explore how the body (form) becomes formless when we don't infuse the body with knowledge or remembrance

Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge: dharma talks and meditation instruction
Rodney Smith: Merging the Heart Sutra with the four foundations of mindfulness - part one

Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge: dharma talks and meditation instruction

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 42:39


(Insight Meditation Society - Forest Refuge) These two ancient sutras fuse seamlessly together/explore how the body (form) becomes formless when we don't infuse the body with knowledge or remembrance

The Neijiaquan Podcast
S2 Ep.22 Cheng Ting Hua's Tragic Death and The Characteristics of his Ba Gua Zhang

The Neijiaquan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 30:14


In this episode we look a  few different accounts of Cheng Ting Hua's tragic death and the we look at some of the characteristics of his Bagua Zhang. We finish up with some final thoughts from Sun Lu Tang's book. Our Patreon Episode this week concludes our discussion on the famous Buddhist master Tanxu Fa Shi with a look at the Buddhist text The Heart Sutra. Enjoy the episode.  www.theneijiaquanpodcast.com

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks
The Heart Sutra: Something Like Grief

San Francisco Zen Center Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 32:27


04/20/2022, Kyoshin Wendy Lewis, dharma talk at City Center. The Heart Sutra teaches emptiness as a context for understanding Buddhist teaching as not static or rigid, but ever-evolving. The connection between the teachings and changing circumstances includes a necessary emotional adjustment.

DHARMA SPRING
Self and Other the Same

DHARMA SPRING

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 34:23


All dharmas are innately amazing beyond description. Perfect vision has no gap. In mountain groves, grasslands, and woods the truth has always been exhibited. Discern and comprehend the broad long tongue [of Buddha's teaching] , which cannot be muted anywhere. The spoken is instantly heard; what is heard is instantly spoken. Senses and objects merge; principle and wisdom are united. When self and other are the same, mind and dharmas are one. When you face what you have excluded and see how it appears, you must quickly gather it together and integrate with it. Make it work within your house, then establish stable sitting.Hongzhi Zhengjue, Cultivating the Empty FieldSupport the show (https://www.paypal.me/apalmr)

Chan Meditation
71 - Heart Sutra Dharma Talk 4 by Guo Gu

Chan Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 68:42


This teaching is by Guo Gu (Dr. Jimmy Yu). He is the founder and teacher at the Tallahassee Chan Center. He first learned meditation as a child in 1972 with Master Guangqin (1892-1986), one of the most respected Chinese meditation masters and ascetics who lived in Taiwan. In 1980, Guo Gu moved to the United States and began studying with Master Sheng Yen (1931-2009). In 1991, Guo Gu was ordained as a monk and became Master Sheng Yen's first personal attendant and assistant. In 1995, he was given permission by the master to teach Chan independently; his experiences were later recognized by other teachers as well. Wanting to bring Buddhism beyond monastic walls, Guo Gu left the monkhood and re-entered the world in 2000. In 2008 he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Princeton University and is currently a professor of Buddhist studies at Florida State University. You can find more from him at https://tallahasseechan.org/ This podcast is run by the London Chan Meditation. You can find out more about us at https://londonchanmeditation.org

Lotus Underground
Heart Sutra Class - Saturdays - April 23 - June 11, 2022

Lotus Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 2:19


THE HEART SUTRA An 8-week in depth study with M.C. Owens New Class Starting April 23rd, 2022 Saturdays: 9am - 10:15am (PDT) April 23rd - June 11th, 2022 Tuition: $200 Class will live on Zoom with recordings of each class available for participants afterwards. The Heart Sutra is by far the most popular sutra in the Buddhist world today, chanted aloud by Buddhists daily, regardless of sectarian affiliation. In addition to being the most ubiquitous sutra, it is also one of the smallest - consisting of a mere 25 lines of Sanskrit, or 260 characters in the standard Chinese version. This course is an in-depth, word-by-word study of the Heart Sutra focused on understanding its underlying teaching of ‘Emptiness', the philosophical foundation of Mahayana Buddhism. The course will also present the contested origins of the sutra and its various interpretations by different schools of Buddhism.

Riddle移动书屋双语电台|听云游的YUAN讲温暖的故事
015 睡前英文|致敬一行禅师——在蓝崖寺遇到的可爱陌生人们 by Yuan #美国

Riddle移动书屋双语电台|听云游的YUAN讲温暖的故事

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 36:45


致敬一行禅师——在禅师的Blue Cliff Monastery遇到可爱的陌生人们 by Yuan原文链接 https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/YqB9kB6rWNHESFpxvfAP0A背景音乐 Ólafur Arnalds - Epilogue, a-Pav - Pavonis ~ Piano Collection, 薬師寺寛邦,キッサコ - 般若心经 (chorus ver.)[中文版]Riddle Apple Podcast https://apple.co/3tl9UBf Riddle 喜马拉雅 https://bit.ly/riddleximalaya Riddle Wechat Blogs https://bit.ly/riddlewechatRiddle Instagram https://bit.ly/riddleinsta Patreon Page https://www.patreon.com/yuanriddle The last day of 2021 for me was a rainy day. I left New York City by myself. My physical destination was Blue Cliff Monastery, a meditation center established by Thay Thich Nhat Hanh in update New York. He was a great Buddhism master from Vietnam. If you're not familiar with this name in Vietnamese, you'd either know his famous book Old Path, White Cloud in China or his name Shi Yi Xing in Chinese (Yi Xing literally means “one action” in Chinese). 2021年的最后一天,对于我来说是一个雨天,我一个人离开了纽约市。我的目的地是蓝崖寺,这是Thich Nhat Hanh在纽约上州设立的冥想中心。Thich Nhat Hanh是一位伟大的越南佛教大师,如果你不熟悉这个名字的越南语,你应该会知道他的名著《故道白云》(或译为《佛陀转》),或者知道他的中文法号释一行(Nhat Hanh是“一行”的意思)。On my way to the great master's zen place, I was nowhere near the word ZEN. Like I said before, my physical destination was Blue Cliff. Yet I was lost in trying to find my spiritual home. Three things led to my loss. 在去大师禅堂的路上,我离“禅”这个字还非常的远。就像我之前说的,我的目的地是蓝崖寺,然而,我在试图寻找我精神家园时却迷失了方向。有三件事导致了我的失败。First, I was so ready to be home-bound after seeing the person I want to see in New York and saying what I want to say. Yet, due to the rampant break of Omicron, the flights back to China were either canceled or way too expensive for me to afford. My heart was already sent away from where I was then. But physically, I was trapped in New York. 第一,我在纽约见到想见的人并说出想说的话之后,就已经准备好回家了。然而,因为奥密克戎的猖獗,回家计划被迫中断,回中国的航班要么被取消,要么就是太贵负担不起。我的心其实已经离开了当时所在的地方。但在身体上,我被困在了纽约。Second, I was having a fever with a severe headache and runny nose. All symptoms were suggesting that I was possibly a recent victim of Omicron, a new variant of COVID-19 that was raging in New York. Even though the testing kit told me I was negative, I couldn't control my paranoid mind to go to crazy town, pessimistically ruminating “What if this? What if that?” and concluding that I was nothing but a liability. 其次是,我发烧了,并伴有剧烈的头痛和流鼻涕。所有症状都表明我应该是奥密克戎的受害者,这是一种在纽约肆虐的新冠变种病毒。尽管新冠自测棒的结果是阴性,但我还是控制不住偏执地疯狂幻想,悲观地思考“如果真得了,咋办呢?万一呢?”,最后的结论是自己什么也不是,只是一个累赘。Third, on my way to Blue Cliff, I missed a transit bus from Newburgh to Middletown. I was too shy to ask for help and was too cheap to take a taxi to the monastery. I trapped myself in this realistic dilemma. In fact, I was on time for the bus. It was the bus driver that didn't see me in the stop, so it ran off on me with no mercy to my soaked clothes, my fever-laden head, and my drenched heart. So missing that bus was the last straw that breaks the camel's back. I was left by everybody. There was the only thing left on my mind—the scariest thing of one's life, despair. Oh, also, I broke my glasses. So I was half-blind. It was like the universe was working against me. 第三,在去蓝崖寺的路上,我错过了从纽堡到米德尔顿的中转巴士。我太害羞而根本不敢寻求帮助,并且又吝啬于打车费,我把自己困在这个两难之境。但事实上,我是准时在等车的。但是巴士司机并没有看到在车站等车的我,毫不留情地一脚油门走了,留下我湿漉漉的衣服、发烧的脑袋和湿透的心。错过那辆巴士是压垮我的最后一根稻草,我好像被所有人抛弃了,我脑子里只剩下一个东西——人生中最可怕的东西:绝望。哦,还有,我的眼镜还被我弄坏了,所以我是半盲着的,就好像整个宇宙都在与我作对。Tears flooded my eyes. To this day, I was still befuddled by how I chose to beat myself up like this, especially considering I was basically a homeless couch surfer for the last two years in China. I was well trained in making the best of what comes to me in life, no matter it's mishaps or good fortunes. Yet, on the other shore of the Pacific, in that bus stop in New Burgh, I turned myself into another person. A person I sympathize towards to the point of despising him at the same time. 泪水淹没了我的眼眶。直到今天,我仍对我为何选择这样虐待自己感到困惑,特别是考虑到我在中国的过去两年基本上是一个无家可归的沙发客。我受过良好的训练,随遇而安于生活的一切起伏是我最擅长不过的了,无论是霉运,还是好运。然而在太平洋的彼岸,在纽堡的巴士站,我完全把自己变成了另一个人,一个我同情到鄙视他的人。Now, let's fast forward. 10 days later. As I was making one first step out of Blue Cliff Monastery and thinking about who I'd become, the crybaby in the above paragraphs was gone. To be more exact, he was resting in peace. How? I pay my tribute to lots of strangers I have met and haven't met at Blue Cliff, including Thich Nhat Hanh. 现在,让我们快进吧。十天后。当我迈出蓝崖寺的第一步,想着我会成为什么样的人时,上面几段中的爱哭鬼早已经消失不见。更准确地说,他安详的睡着了。怎么做到的呢?于此,我要向我在蓝崖寺认识的和未曾谋面的许多陌生人致敬,包括一行禅师。…Like I said before, en route to the monastery, I was in pretty shitty shape (Sorry for my vulgar choice of words. I rarely curse in my writing. But that's exactly how I was. Shitty.). Yet, I managed to get myself there in spite of my broken glasses, drenched heart, and a head-spinning fever. 就像我之前说的,在去修道院的路上,我的身体屎一般的糟糕(对不起,用词粗俗。我很少在写作中说脏话。但我真的是如此糟糕)。然而,尽管我的眼镜坏了,心脏湿透了,发烧了,我还是让自己最终成功到达寺院。The first person I met was Jean. I talked to her on the phone before. She had a very soothing voice in explaining why they consider my application for a scholarship here (The monastery charges one visitor 40 dollars per night for accommodation and food. And they offer scholarships for people who have special cases. I was on a tight budget, so I applied for the scholarship.). While reading the part I came to New York for love in the application letter, she let out a cute laugh. To me, her laugh was telling me, “Yeah. We've all been there”. She, in person, was an accurate personification of that laugh, understanding my struggles and helping me settle down in the dormitory. The second I laid my head on my new bed, I could finally find a hint of peacefulness in my world. Still homeless, yet one inch nearer my spiritual home. 我遇到的第一个人是吉恩,我之前和她通过电话。在解释我的补助金申请时,她的声音非常舒缓(寺院向每位访客收取每晚 40 美元的住宿和伙食费,并为有特殊情况的人提供补助金。我的预算很紧张,自然申请了补助金)。她一边读着申请信中我为爱来到纽约的故事,一边发出可爱的笑声。对我来说,她的笑声告诉我,“是的,我们都经历过。”她本人的样子就是那个笑声的准确化身,理解我的痛楚,并帮我在宿舍安顿下来。当我把头靠在床上的那一刻,我终于在我的世界里找到了一丝平静。虽然仍无家可归,但我离我的精神家园更近了一点点。After settling down, I gave myself a tour around the monastery. The monastery was located in a very serene forest. My ears, getting used to the rowdy New York, could actually hear sounds that you'd have ignored, like the sound of falling leave, whistling of the wind, footfalls of some wild animals. Speaking of wild animals, I met some dears around my dorm cabin on my first day here. They were scared by my sudden presence at first. But we got along after returning their "welcome" by feeding one of them. I sent the picture of them to a friend. She said she'd dreamed about them before. I lost sight of them for several days there. One day, the very same friend surprise visited me with medicine and fruits because I'd been sickened by a fever for several days. On the same day, the deers showed up again. 安顿好之后,我一个人参观了寺院。修道院坐落在一片非常宁静的森林中。我的耳朵,习惯了喧闹的纽约,但在这儿可以听到你会忽略的各种声音,比如落叶声,风的呼啸,一些野生动物的脚步声。说到野生动物,我第一天来宿舍就遇到了一些小鹿。起初它们被我的突然出现给吓到了。但在喂养其中一只小鹿,以回报它们的“欢迎仪式”之后,我们相处得很好。我把它们的照片发给了朋友,她说她以前梦见过它们。之后的好几天,它们不见了踪影。有一天,这位朋友突然给我送来了药和水果,因为我已经发烧好几天了。就在那同一天,鹿儿们才再次出现。…All the routines in the monastery were practiced to help you go back to yourself and find mindfulness and peacefulness. The clock will ring a bell every 15 minutes, a reminder for everyone to go back to their inner selves. So on hearing the sound of the bell or the singing bowl, everyone will stop talking or walking and spend some seconds being with themselves. Mindful Sangha meals will be served and eaten in silence so that you can feel every chew of the delicious food in your mouth and appreciate such a dietary blessing from Mother Nature. Walking and sitting meditations are led by monastics for lay friends every day. We sing songs together or chant sutras together before each session. 寺院里的整个日程都是为了帮助你回归自我,找到正念与平静。时钟每十五分钟会响一次,提醒每个人回归内心。因此,当听到钟声或歌声时,每个人都会停止说话或走路,花几秒钟与自己相处。在正念僧餐时,所有人会在止语中食用餐食,你会感受到每一口美味的食物在嘴里被细细咀嚼,并感恩于自然母亲恩赐的食物。僧侣每天为居士主持行禅和坐禅。每次行禅之前,我们都一起唱歌或念经。On my first day here, I met Luc, a young Chinese French filmmaker who lives in New York now. His long hair in a bun, baggy pants, and round glasses made him look like a brother of mine. His slow mannerism and soft words manifest great peacefulness. We exchanged some small talks and life stories. Thanks to Luc, I was already feeling that my lonesome soul was starting to stop fidgeting and letting itself get back on its road to its spiritual home. You'd often find Luc volunteering in the kitchen all the time, which motivated me to volunteer in the kitchen in later days as well. 第一天到这儿的时候,我遇到了卢克,一位现居纽约的法国华裔的青年电影人。他的长发、宽松的裤子和圆眼镜让他看起来像我的兄弟,他缓慢的举止和柔和的语言表现出极大的平静。我们交谈一些闲谈和彼此的故事。多亏了卢克,我才感觉到我孤独的灵魂开始停止于坐立不安,让自己回到通往精神家园的道路上。你经常会发现卢克一直在厨房里做义工,这也鼓励我在后面的日子里在厨房帮忙。In a warm community like this, helping each other does not take a second thought. It's in everyone's blood. When you see something is not tidy in the kitchen or bathroom, you'd put them back in order instead of walking away from them. This is what happened to my laundry one day. I put all my laundry in the washer and set up a timer for an hour to come back to put them in the dryer. Yet, by the time I got back, all my laundry was already in the dryer thanks to a nameless samaritan. I left a thank-you note for this kind stranger. Later I found out it was Sister Manifest. In later days, we shared some laughs when cleaning and washing in the kitchen together. I guess the natural spirit of volunteering and always being thoughtful to others is core to keeping this community together. You don't rely on one system or one person to maintain the operation and spirits of one community. All it needs is the natural kindness and compassion inside all human beings. 在这样一个温暖的社区里,互相帮助是不假思索的,它在每个人的血液中。当你看到厨房或厕所里的东西不整洁时,你会把它们放回原处,而不是走开。有一天我洗衣服时,就发生了这样的善举。我把我所有的衣服都放在洗衣机里,并设置了一个小时的闹钟,然后打算等下回来把它们放进烘干机。然而,当我回来的时候,多谢一个无名的好心人,我所有的衣服都已经放在烘干机里了。我给这个好心的陌生人留下了感谢字条,后来才知道那位好心人是永照师妹(译者注:法号是从英文名字Sister Manifest翻译而来)。之后的日子里,我们一起在厨房打扫卫生,共同分享笑声。我想,自然的志愿服务和始终利他的精神是这个社区团结在一起的核心,并不需要依赖一个系统或某一个人来维持一个社区的运作和精神,它所需要的只是所有人发自内心的自然、善良和同情心。…For the first 5 days at the Monastery, I wasn't quite active. I always found myself walking around the others. Instead of meditating with the group, I often found a quieter slot to meditate by myself in the meditation hall. Like I said, I still felt under the weather due to the fever and I was paranoid that it might be COVID, so I chose to isolate myself most of the time. That physical and spiritual isolation went on even after I felt better physically and mentally. The person who helped me open up more was Brother Dailuc. 在寺院的前 5 天,我都不太活跃。我总是发现自己在遇见别人时绕道而行,也没有和大家一起打坐,而是经常在禅堂里找一个更安静的地方自己打坐。就像我说的,由于发烧,我仍然感觉很不舒服,我很怀疑它可能是新冠,所以我大部分时间都选择了自我隔离。即使在我身体和精神上都感觉好些之后,这种双重隔离仍在继续,而帮助我更开放的人是大力师兄。At one lunch on Day 6, I was eating at the far end of the table in silence that day. Then Brother Dailuc sat next to me and greeted me with joined palms before dining. Between his eyes, I felt a great stream of softness and kindness mixed with a tinge of sadness. After the silent 20 minutes passed, we started to talk. I wasn't feeling shy or paranoid around him and his energy. Just like the softness between his eyes, his words and smile were equally gentle to me. One thing led to another, we started to talk about our depression days before and how we overcame it. It was the Buddha in our hearts and friends and family in reality who lit the way for us in those difficult times. After lunch, he invited me for a walk around the mountains. I had rarely talked to anyone in my first 5 days. And with Brother Dailuc, I started to pour all my thoughts and emotions to him and he took them well with words of wisdom and encouragement. Later, I asked him to write on my LOVE book—a book where I collected people's definition of love—and this is what he wrote. 在第六天的午餐中,那天我在桌子的另一端默默地吃饭。然后大力师兄走过来,坐在了我的旁边,在用餐前双手合十向我打招呼。在他的眼中,我感受到了一股巨大的温柔和善意,同时又夹杂着淡淡的悲伤。二十分钟的止语用餐过后,我们开始交谈。在他的能量周围,我并没有感到任何害羞或偏执,就像他眼中的柔软一样,他的言语和微笑对我来说同样的温暖。不知不觉的,我们聊起了我们之前抑郁的日子,并且是如何克服它的:在那些困难时期,我们心中的佛以及生活中的朋友和家人为我们照亮了道路。午饭后,他邀请我去山上散步。在我最初的五天里,我很少与任何人交谈,而同大力师兄一起,我开始向他倾诉我的各种想法与情感,他用智慧和鼓励的话很好地接受了它们。后来,我邀请在我的“爱之书”——一个我用来收集人们对爱情定义的笔记本——上写下些什么,下面的文字则来自于大力师兄。“Love is sharing a deep connection with others that transcend walls and boundaries. Therefore, it is very important for us to be truly there, for our quality of presence is the gateway to the many depths of love. In love, we find joy, happiness, compassion, forgiveness…, but also tears and the pains that help enriched it. If we know that we are interconnected in many ways, we can touch love in a deeper, more spacious, and more thankful way.” “爱是与超越壁垒和边界的与他人分享的深厚连结。因此,对我们来说,真正处于那里是非常重要的,因为我们存在的质量是通往爱之深处的大门。在爱中,我们找到快乐、幸福、同情、宽恕……但也有帮助丰富爱情的眼泪和痛苦。如果我们知道我们在很多方面是相互连结的,我们就能以一种更深、更广阔、更感恩的方式来触摸爱。”…One night, I was reading in the dining room. It was my usual hangout after dinner since I had the big room for myself and had access to all kinds of tea I want. The English calligraphies on the wall by Thich Nhat Hanh were great reminders for us to do everything with great consciousness. Then V, a girl I said hi to before, entered the room. We weren't really close. But her hearty smile brought us closer. It turned out that V, a Vietnamese student in the US, spoke Chinese fluently. What amazed me more was her baking skills. That night, she came to the dining room to bake banana bread for everyone. Of course, I was the fortunate first genie pig for her only batch of bread that night. While bread-tasting together, we talked in the dining room for almost 2 hours about food, languages, cultures and life. I learned so much about her and her country. For example, I had no idea that Jin Yong's books and the TV shows based on his books could be a common topic for Vietnamese and Chinese to talk about forever! 一天晚上,我坐在餐厅看书。这是我晚餐后经常去的地方,因为我可以独享整个空间,并且可以享用我想喝的各种茶。一行禅师在墙上的英文书法很好地提醒了我们做每件事时都要有“念”。然后V走进了房间,一个我之前打过招呼的女孩。我们不是很熟悉,但她爽朗的笑容让我们距离近了一些。原来,V是一名越南留美的大学生,能说一口流利的中文,更让我吃惊的是她的烘焙技巧。那个晚上,她来到餐厅是为了给大家烤香蕉面包。当然,那晚我是一个幸运儿,能够品尝她做出来的的第一批面包。在一起品尝面包的同时,我们在餐厅里聊了将近两个小时,谈论食物、语言、文化和生活。我对她和她的国家了解了很多。比如,我从没想到金庸的书和根据书改编的电视剧可以成为越南人和中国人永远谈论的话题!To this day, that banana aftertaste and V's smile still linger in my tastebud and memory foam. 直到今天,香蕉的回甜和 V 的笑容仍然萦绕在我的味蕾和记忆中。… My friend Haoruo surprised me on Jan 2, 2022, my third day in Blue Cliff. Well, the reason why she rushed here all the way from New York was that I was still quite sick with a fever. Endless headaches stopped me from being the person I want to be. Yet her visit brought some glimmers of hope and energies of vitality to my sick body and mind. However, she had to go back to New York on the same day, but there were no cabs around in the forest that can take her to Middletown to catch the last train to New York. In dire situations like this, Haoruo and I always find a solution by the help of kind people. This time the superhero who saved us from troubled waters was Athena, mother of a very cute 8-year-old, Dagony. 2022 年 1 月 2 日,我在蓝崖的第三天,我的朋友皓若给了我一个惊喜,突然探望我。她从纽约一路赶到这里的原因是我还发着烧,无休止的头痛让我无法做自己,她的探望给我生病的身心带来了一丝希望和活力。可她又不得不在当天返回纽约,森林里没有出租车可以带她去米德尔敦搭上去纽约的末班车。在这种危急情况下,我和皓若总是能在好心人的帮助下找到解决办法。这次把我们从困境中拯救出来的英雄是雅典娜,她是一位非常可爱的8岁孩女孩——戴戈妮——的母亲。Haoruo and I went to the dining room on the sister's side to try our luck to see if anybody happened to go to Middletown so that we could share a ride. Yet, it was already after dusk. All day-time visiting lay friends had already gone home. So such news brought furrowed brows to Haoruo and me. However, the brothers and sisters started to spread the word. Even though I didn't understand any Vietnamese, the expressions on their faces looked optimistic to us. Within 5 minutes, our superhero, Athena, showed up with her ride. When we learned that it was Athena who was driving us to the train station, we couldn't be happier. We loved her and her perky energy! Her daughter and she were such sunshine in the community, always bringing a big smile to everyone's face and always lending people their helping hands. 我和皓若准备去尼姑餐厅碰碰运气,看看有没有人碰巧也去米德尔敦,这样我们就可以拼车了。然而,太阳已经下山,所有白天拜访的居士朋友都已经回家了。听到这个消息,让我和皓若都皱起了眉头。但寺院的师兄和师姐们开始帮忙散播消息,尽管我不懂越南语,但他们脸上的表情在我们看来是乐观的。不到五分钟,我们的英雄雅典娜就开着她的车出现了。当我们得知开车送我们去火车站的是雅典娜时,我们高兴极了,我们特别喜爱她和她那活泼的能量!她和她女儿在社区里都是那么阳光,总是给每个人带来灿烂的笑容,总是向大家伸出援助之手。It goes without saying that we made it on time thanks to Athena's speedy driving. I offered Haoruo a long hug as her train was coming. She asked me for a promise, a promise to talk about my pain with someone in the community. And I fulfilled that promise. On our way back, Athena listened to my pain and stories. Suddenly, she felt like a mother to me. A mother who was driving her heartbroken son back home. When arriving at Blue Cliff, she asked the sisters to fix up some food for me and we shared a long hug, a hug for more than 10 seconds, a hug that you could feel each other's peaceful heartbeat. 不用多说,由于雅典娜的高超驾驶,我们准时到达了。火车快到了的时候,我给了皓若一个长长的拥抱。她向我要一个承诺,让我答应她和社区中的某个人聊聊我的痛苦。我履行了承诺,在我们回来的路上,雅典娜听了我的痛苦和故事。突然间,她对我来来说就像妈妈一样,一位母亲开车送她伤心欲绝的儿子回家。到了蓝崖寺,她让师姐们给我准备了一些食物,我们分享了一个很长的拥抱,一个十多秒的拥抱,一个可以感受到彼此平静心跳的拥抱。…There are just so many stories of hearty strangers at Blue Cliff who've helped me and like mirrors, reminded me who I should be. There's Brother Emptiness, the senior monastic who talked about Jin Yong's wuxia books and books about Xuanzang with me. There's the brother who I deem as the funniest guy in Vietnamese in spite of his broken English. He joked that I looked like a monastic from the Wu-tang Clan in Jin Yong's book. There's Abishek who talked about love with me and introduced me the Dharma meditation camp. There's this sister who introduced me to great books by Thich Nhat Hanh and explained the Heart Sutra for me. There's another sister who I've cleaned dishes with in the kitchen and who is just like my bigger sister. There's Riles who played basketball with me, talked about his vagabond life in the US and drove me to the train station. One day, I'm sure he'll vagabond his way to China and to my van. We'll tour around China for sure. And of course, there's Thich Nhat Hanh, the Zen master I've never met, but his words and works brought more compassion and zen in me, in this community and in this world. 蓝崖寺有很多暖心陌生人故事,他们帮助了我,并像镜子一样提醒我,应该做什么样的自己。这其中包括至空师兄,和我讨论金庸的武侠小说和关于玄奘的书。有一个师兄,尽管他的英语不好,但我认为他是寺院越南僧侣中最搞笑的。他开玩笑说我像金庸书中的武当道长。有Abishek和我谈论爱,还给我推荐了内观冥想营。有一位师姐向我介绍一行禅师的好的作品,并为我解释心经。还有和我在厨房里一起洗碗的师姐,她就像我的大姐姐一样。有和我一起打篮球的Riles,我们聊着他在美国的流浪生活,最后还开车送我去火车站。有一天,我相信他会流浪到中国和Riddle的,我们肯定会环游中国的。当然,还有一行禅师,我从未见过的禅师,但他的文字和作品给我,给这个社区以及这个世界带来了太多的慈悲和禅意。When Thich Nhat Hanh passed away, I was reading his book named The Novice. In the epilogue, he shared one story about always going back to your spiritual home. His exact words are:当听到一行禅师去世的消息时,我正在读他的书《沙弥》。在后记中,他分享了一个关于回到你的精神家园的故事。 他这样写道:After I read it, I realized that my old glasses were broken again—one of the lenses fell out of the frame, again. This time, instead of complaining, I took out my superglue, laid down my glasses, and carefully glued up the broken part together. Like Thich Nhat Hanh said, when there is a storm that messed up your physical home, you first close the door and the windows, lit up the fire, pick up all the loose ends, and then enjoy yourself in your spiritual home, a home that nobody could take away from you. 读完之后,我意识到我的旧眼镜又坏了——一个镜片又从镜框里掉了出来。 这一次,我没有抱怨,而是拿出强力胶水,放下眼镜,小心翼翼地将破损的部分粘在一起。 就像一行禅师说的,当一场暴风雨把你的物质家园弄得一团糟时,你首先关上门窗,点燃炉火,把散落一地的东西都捡起来,然后在你的精神家园中尽情享受,在这个家园,没有任何人能让你无家可归。7.50 am2022.1.24@Honolulu Airport, Hawaii. 早上7:502022.1.24@夏威夷檀香山机场

Science & Wisdom LIVE
Buddhism, Science, Compassion, and Climate: An Interview with Dr. Thupten Jinpa

Science & Wisdom LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 48:46


Our guest today is Dr. Thupten Jinpa, renowned Buddhist scholar and practitioner, chair of the Mind and Life Institute, and co-founder of the Compassion Institute. Dr. Jinpa holds a PhD in religious studies from Cambridge University, and served for decades as the Dalai Lama's principal translator.In this interview with Scott Snibbe, Dr. Jinpa talks about the relationship between science and Buddhism, discussing the role of critical thinking in contemplative practices and scientific inquiry. He also focuses on the powerful role of compassion, on how ethical principles can help us address the climate crisis, and on the key virtues that promote fulfilling relationships and a harmonious family life.This episode is the fruit of a collaboration between Science & Wisdom LIVE and A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment. A Skeptic's Path to Enlightenment draws on modern science and psychology to bring the ancient inner science of Buddhist meditation to twenty-first century people hungry for happy, meaningful lives. Find out more: www.skepticspath.org______Thupten Jinpa Langri was educated in the classical Tibetan monastic academia and received the highest academic degree of Geshe Lharam (equivalent to a doctorate in divinity). Jinpa also holds a BA in philosophy and a PhD in religious studies, both from the University of Cambridge, England. Since 1985, he has been the principal English-language translator to the Dalai Lama. He has translated and edited many books by the Dalai Lama, including The World of Tibetan Buddhism, Essence of the Heart Sutra, and Ethics for the New Millennium. Jinpa has published scholarly articles on various aspects of Tibetan culture, Buddhism, and philosophy, and books such as Songs of Spiritual Experience (co-authored) and Self, Reality and Reason in Tibetan Thought. He serves on the advisory board of numerous educational and cultural organizations in North America, Europe, and India. He is currently the president and the editor-in-chief of the Institute of Tibetan Classics, a non-profit educational organization dedicated to translating key Tibetan classics into contemporary languages. He also currently chairs the Mind and Life Institute.If you'd like to learn more from Dr. Jinpa's, he's currently leading an online course at the Compassion Institute on Building Compassion from the Inside Out. ______Science & Wisdom LIVE is a project of Jamyang London Buddhist Centre. Our events and podcasts explore the middle ground between science and contemplative wisdom, focusing on themes such as the ethics of artificial intelligence, gender equality, climate change, and the benefits of mindfulness and meditation for mental health.Find out more: www.sciwizlive.com

International Buddhist Society
The Heart Sutra - Lecture 28 - Ven. Guan Cheng

International Buddhist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 35:10


The Heart Sutra - Lecture 28, in English. Lectured by Venerable Guan Cheng at the International Buddhist Temple 觀成法師 主講 英語 心經 第28講

International Buddhist Society
The Heart Sutra - Lecture 27 - Ven. Guan Cheng

International Buddhist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 35:35


The Heart Sutra - Lecture 27, in English. Lectured by Venerable Guan Cheng at the International Buddhist Temple 觀成法師 主講 英語 心經 第27講

International Buddhist Society
The Heart Sutra - Lecture 26 - Ven. Guan Cheng

International Buddhist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 22:58


The Heart Sutra - Lecture 26, in English. Lectured by Venerable Guan Cheng at the International Buddhist Temple 觀成法師 主講 英語 心經 第26講

Chan Meditation
69 - Heart Sutra Dharma Talk 3 by Guo Gu

Chan Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 81:25


This teaching is by Guo Gu (Dr. Jimmy Yu). He is the founder and teacher at the Tallahassee Chan Center. He first learned meditation as a child in 1972 with Master Guangqin (1892-1986), one of the most respected Chinese meditation masters and ascetics who lived in Taiwan. In 1980, Guo Gu moved to the United States and began studying with Master Sheng Yen (1931-2009). In 1991, Guo Gu was ordained as a monk and became Master Sheng Yen's first personal attendant and assistant. In 1995, he was given permission by the master to teach Chan independently; his experiences were later recognized by other teachers as well. Wanting to bring Buddhism beyond monastic walls, Guo Gu left the monkhood and re-entered the world in 2000. In 2008 he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Princeton University and is currently a professor of Buddhist studies at Florida State University. You can find more from him at https://tallahasseechan.org/ This podcast is run by the London Chan Meditation. You can find out more about us at https://londonchanmeditation.org

International Buddhist Society
The Heart Sutra - Lecture 25 - Ven. Guan Cheng

International Buddhist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 31:04


The Heart Sutra - Lecture 25, in English. Lectured by Venerable Guan Cheng at the International Buddhist Temple 觀成法師 主講 英語 心經 第25講

Open Question
OQ 301 - Sacred World: Through the Eyes of Prajnaparamita

Open Question

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 18:40


Most spiritual traditions offer teachings on "sacred world"-the promise of a life beyond struggle-the search for a place of ease. This is a noble human quest. And yet, the "sacred" often seems to be a place other than where we find ourselves now. How do we reconcile the tension between the spiritual and temporal aspects of life? This is our conundrum

International Buddhist Society
The Heart Sutra - Lecture 24 - Ven. Guan Cheng

International Buddhist Society

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 30:25


The Heart Sutra - Lecture 24, in English. Lectured by Venerable Guan Cheng at the International Buddhist Temple 觀成法師 主講 英語 心經 第24講

World Happiness Fest
From Plum Village. A Cloud Never Dies: The Passing of Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh

World Happiness Fest

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 109:25


At such a demanding and delicate time, the presenters, Zen Buddhist monk Brother Phap Huu and lay Buddhist practitioner and journalist Jo Confino, reflect on Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh passing on January 22nd, 2022. They offer a profound insight into the memorial week, the funeral, impact on the Plum Village community, and the overwhelming global response.This installment of the podcast is an intimate account of the period between the announcement of Thich Nhat Hanh's passing and the recording of this episode: “a retreat of silence, and a retreat of remembering Thay and continuing Thay.”Brother Phap Huu, Thay's former attendant and current Abbot of the Upper Hamlet, shares his personal relationship with Thich Nhat Hanh and how these events have impacted him. He also shares a detailed behind-the-scenes look at the traditional ceremonies and memorial services, preparations, and processions, as well as personal stories from the Plum Village communities over the eight days following the beloved teacher's passing.The conversation delves into: the significance of the ceremonies' texts; the deep practises underpinning the formalities; Thay becoming a spiritual ancestor; deep levels of aspiration; the symbolic homes for Thay's ashes; acceptance, togetherness, and impermanence; the relevance of Thay's teachings for years to come; and what it means to be the continuation of Thay.The episode ends with a short meditation on continuation and gratitude, guided by Brother Phap Huu. ------

Chan Meditation
67 - Heart Sutra Dharma Talk 2 by Guo Gu

Chan Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 81:25


This teaching is by Guo Gu (Dr. Jimmy Yu). He is the founder and teacher at the Tallahassee Chan Center. He first learned meditation as a child in 1972 with Master Guangqin (1892-1986), one of the most respected Chinese meditation masters and ascetics who lived in Taiwan. In 1980, Guo Gu moved to the United States and began studying with Master Sheng Yen (1931-2009). In 1991, Guo Gu was ordained as a monk and became Master Sheng Yen's first personal attendant and assistant. In 1995, he was given permission by the master to teach Chan independently; his experiences were later recognized by other teachers as well. Wanting to bring Buddhism beyond monastic walls, Guo Gu left the monkhood and re-entered the world in 2000. In 2008 he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Princeton University and is currently a professor of Buddhist studies at Florida State University. You can find more from him at https://tallahasseechan.org/ This podcast is run by the London Chan Meditation. You can find out more about us at https://londonchanmeditation.org

Chan Meditation
64 - Heart Sutra Dharma Talk 1 by Guo Gu

Chan Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 68:42


This teaching is by Guo Gu (Dr. Jimmy Yu). He is the founder and teacher at the Tallahassee Chan Center. He first learned meditation as a child in 1972 with Master Guangqin (1892-1986), one of the most respected Chinese meditation masters and ascetics who lived in Taiwan. In 1980, Guo Gu moved to the United States and began studying with Master Sheng Yen (1931-2009). In 1991, Guo Gu was ordained as a monk and became Master Sheng Yen's first personal attendant and assistant. In 1995, he was given permission by the master to teach Chan independently; his experiences were later recognized by other teachers as well. Wanting to bring Buddhism beyond monastic walls, Guo Gu left the monkhood and re-entered the world in 2000. In 2008 he received his Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies from Princeton University and is currently a professor of Buddhist studies at Florida State University. You can find more from him at https://tallahasseechan.org/ This podcast is run by the London Chan Meditation. You can find out more about us at https://londonchanmeditation.org

The Buddhist Studies Podcast
5. Connie Kassor | History and Philosophy of Tibetan Buddhism

The Buddhist Studies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 80:44


In this episode, we speak with Dr. Constance Kassor about her beginnings as a scholar of Tibetan Buddhism, different Tibetan interpretations of emptiness, and how studying history sheds light on philosophy and practice. Plus, we chat about some of our favorite books, articles, and other resources for learning more about Tibetan Buddhism! We also preview Dr. Kassor's upcoming online course, 104 | Tibetan Buddhism, which will cover the history, schools, philosophy, and practices of Tibetan Buddhism. The course is meant to give an overview of various important aspects of Tibetan history and culture that give students frameworks of understanding that can support future study and practice. Speaker BioDr. Constance Kassor is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Lawrence University in Wisconsin, where she teaches courses on Buddhist thought and Asian religious traditions. Prior to joining the Lawrence faculty in 2016, she taught Buddhist Studies at Smith College, Hampshire College, Amherst College, and the Rangjung Yeshe Institute in Nepal.Connie's research primarily focuses on Tibetan Buddhist philosophy, and she is interested in different ways that Tibetan Buddhist scholars understand the cultivation of knowledge. Her forthcoming book, Accounting for Awakened Awareness, examines the nature of knowledge through the lens of the 15th century philosopher Gorampa Sonam Senge. With support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Connie is also currently translating Gorampa's extensive Madhyamaka treatise, Synopsis of Madhyamaka (dbu ma'i spyi don) into English, in collaboration with Khenpo Dr. Ngawang Jorden, principal and abbot of the International Buddhist Academy in Nepal.Connie has spent several years living, working, and teaching in Buddhist communities in India and Nepal. In addition to her scholarly publications, she has written for Lion's Roar and Tricycle, and has recently published an audio course for The Great Courses and AudibleLinks104 | Tibetan BuddhismReferenced in the EpisodeThe Parable of the Raft (in the Alagaddupama Sutta, MN 22)The Sound of Two Hands Clapping by Georges Dreyfus"The Heart Sutra: the Fullness of Emptiness" by Thich Nhat Hanh Accounting for Awakened Awareness by  Constance Kassor (no link yet, but click here for other publications by Connie!)High Peaks Pure Earth Tibet Reading List

Bob Thurman Podcast
Four Friendly Fun Facts: The Four Noble Truths – Ep. 264

Bob Thurman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 48:49


In this episode Robert Thurman share's his thoughts on the First Turning of the Wheel of Dharma, the holiday celebrations that mark the occasion of the Buddha's initial public teachings and the inherent fun and friendly nature of the wisdom and compassion found in the Four Noble Truths. Recorded on Chokhor Duchen to celebrate the Buddha's Heart Sutra or Prajnaparamita teaching, The Four Noble Truths they contain, and the launch of Professor Thurman's new book “Wisdom Is Bliss: Four Friendly Fun Facts That Can Change Your Life” Available from Hay House on August, 3rd, 2021. This episode explores the Four Noble Truths as a joyful exploration into the nature of reality through Buddha's threefold curriculum of “super-education” and the Eight Fold Path. From the book: "Buddha had to be an educator, rather than a prophet or religion founder, since he had achieved his goal of exact and complete understanding of reality by using reason, experiments to open his own mind, and vision to do so. From his own experience, he could help [others] as a teacher by streamlining the process. He could not just transplant his realization into their minds. They could not get their own realizations just by believing whatever he said. He could only provide them with a prospect of full realization along a path of learning and experiencing they could follow-they would have to travel on their own. This book is your invitation to travel that same road. Deeply felt and bracingly direct, it doesn't teach about the teaching-it is the teaching. Get ready to get real, and have fun along the way, as you chart a path to reliable, lasting happiness." To learn more about "Wisdom is Bliss", Available as a Kindle E-Book and in hardcover through Hay House, Please visit www.bobthurman.com. Four Fun Friendly Facts: Four Noble Truths Thumbnail via www.himalayanart.org.

Occult Experiments in the Home
OEITH #110 Evil, Be Thou My Good

Occult Experiments in the Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 56:14


We plummet deep into the fundamental nature of reality in this episode, examining the necessary association of magick with evil: the premise of John Milton's Paradise Lost; Satan and the possible origin of evil; Satan as the archetype of the rebel; our relationship as magicians to this archetype; the absence of a moral framework from magick; the suggestion that magick needs to be kept "evil"; understanding evil in contrast to the good; Neoplatonist approaches to the good; the good as the aspiration of all beings; the misidentification of the good; the Platonic ideals as a guide to goodness; beauty, truth, goodness, and the One (wholeness); Proclus on the separation of being and goodness; wholeness as better than goodness; wholeness as the mystical state, as union with goodness; evil as a consequence of the separation of being from the good; evil as a characteristic of wholeness; evil as a consequence of the actions of beings versus evil as transcendent; Satan as the origin of evil versus Satan as a participant in evil; evil as an attribute of the Divine; the relationship of the Divine to goodness; a Divine wholly good as necessarily imperfect; evil as a bug versus evil as a feature; Nishida Kitaro on the self-negation of the Divine; how the Divine by its nature contradicts itself; Satan as the pawn of God; how Milton glosses over the evil in God; the perfect as perfect only if it includes the imperfect; Nishida's ideas as observations, not theories; the experience of emptiness as the experience of the self-negation of the Divine; how emptiness gives rise to form by standing in a relationship of self-negation to itself; how we have no relationship to the Divine; Creation proceeding not from any relationship to the Divine but by the Divine negating itself; the Heart Sutra and the nature of the Divine; (summary and an emergence from the metaphysical deep-end); Lionel Snell on art, science, religion and magick, and their corresponding principles of beauty, truth, goodness, and wholeness; magick as the aspiration to wholeness rather than to goodness; how magick rejects only the principle of rejection itself; how and why magick rejects neither untruth nor evil; how magick necessarily has a relationship to evil, yet not necessarily an answer to it; the mystery and elusiveness of evil; evil as unfixable, as the universe operating as designed; Jung on Job: humanity as morally superior to the Divine; Christ (God in human form) as the epitome of morality; accepting our moral superiority to God as a magician's response to evil; how there is no escape from evil or morality. Ramsey Dukes (2000). SSOTBME Revised: An Essay on Magic. El-Cheapo. Carl Gustav Jung (2002). Answer to Job. New York: Routledge. Nishida Kitaro (1987). Last Writings: Nothingness and the Religious Worldview. Honolulu: University of Hawaii. John Milton (2008). Paradise Lost. New York: Modern Library. Proclus (2017). The Elements of Theology, translated by Juan and Maria Balboa, https://tinyurl.com/73bxtxsd (archive.org).