Podcast appearances and mentions of Robert Burns

Scottish poet and lyricist

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Best podcasts about Robert Burns

Latest podcast episodes about Robert Burns

John Fredericks Radio Network
#JFRS Daily Podcast: September 27, 2022

John Fredericks Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 162:52


The John Fredericks Radio Show - GUESTS: Phillip Patrick, James Kimmey, Liz Harrington, Dave Brat, Robert Burns, Ken Bennett, Jennifer Economy + your calls at 1-888-480-JOHN (5646) and on GETTR @jfradioshow #GodzillaOfTruth #TruckingTheTruth #OracleOfDeplorables 

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery
Episode 102 - 4 Historic Cemeteries in Edinburgh, Scotland

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 61:46


Dianne and Jennie chat with special guest Ahna Wolff. Ahna took a trip to Edinburgh, Scotland over the summer in order to study, but she made time to visit four of Edinburgh's most historic cemeteries: Old Calton Cemetery, New Calton Cemetery, Canongate Kirkyard, and most famously known, Gray Friar's Kirkyard. Ahna shares her impressions of each cemetery, her favorite graves to visit, including the graves of some of Scotland's most prolific writers and philosophers, such as David Hume, Adam Smith, and Sir Walter Scott; as well as Scottish poets Robert Burns and Robert Ferguson. Join us as Ahna relates Ordinary Extraordinary tales of famous dogs, graves that inspired J.K. Rowling's characters in the Harry Potter series, and a very surprising connection to an American born US president.If you are in the Colorado Springs area and would like to purchase tickets for 2022's Beyond the Grave: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, please follow this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/beyond-the-grave-presents-the-legend-of-sleepy-hollow-tickets-402403950047?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Beta Reader Bits
Sensory Details, Part Two

Beta Reader Bits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 23:26


Today we'll continue with Taste, Touch and Smell, the step sisters of Sight and Sound. These are very important, definitely more important than sight, in my opinion, so let's get into the meat and potatoes, the grit like sand paper and the rosy topic of Taste, touch and smell.   Subscribe and follow the show to make sure you don't miss an episode! And if you know an author who may need this podcast, share it with them. Thanks for listening! Walking on Thin Ice by Robert Burns: https://amzn.to/3AX6l8k  Shows Website: https://betareaderbits.podbean.com/ Beta Bits eBook! and other titles by Tiffany: https://bit.ly/TCLewis Author's Helper Service: https://authorshelpservice.wordpress.com/  Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AuthorTCLewis Join my mailing list, get a free book!: http://bit.ly/ReadyPrequel  Wanna start a podcast? DM my producer @Poeticearthling on Twitter Make cool videos with wavelengths and sound from your podcast with Headliner! (Referral Link) I get my sound from Epidemic Sound! (Referral Link)

All Of It
Alan Cumming in 'Burn'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 21:31


Robert Burns is known as the national poet of Scotland, a trailblazer for his decision to write in Scots and a Scots dialect of English. But his journey to become a famous poet was not always easy. Actor and fellow Scotsman Alan Cumming brings the story of Burns to life in a new show of theater and dance called "Burn." Co-created by Steven Hoggett, "Burn" is running from September 20-25 at The Joyce Theater. Cumming joins us to discuss.

Marcel Proust:
Christian Zaschke: Hell's kitchen. Storys aus Manhattan (4/18)

Marcel Proust: "Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit"

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 22:38


Barfliegen können unterhaltsam erzählen, Fremdenführer auch. Zaschke bewegt sich in Ellipsen durch kleine und große Welten und erzählt in seinen Kolumnen heute von schönen Frauen mit seltsamer DNA, von deutschen Touristen in New York, von Robert Burns und den längsten Theken, von einem misslingenden Heiratsantrag, einer unglaublich netten Bostonerin, einstürzenden Altbauten - und einer Unglücksserie. Audio verfügbar bis zum 19.09.2023

The Craig T. Owens Audio Blog
The best laid plans

The Craig T. Owens Audio Blog

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 5:35


On the Thriving In Ministry podcast, Kyle Willis and I tried to talk about the importance of a sabbath rest for pastors, but our conversation was “interrupted” on multiple occasions. These interruptions teach us a valuable lesson. I'll be sharing more clips from this Thriving In Ministry interview soon, so please stay tuned. Shepherd Leadership: The Metrics That Really Matter is available in print or ebook, and in audiobook through either Audible or Apple. ►► Would you please prayerfully consider supporting this ministry? My Patreon supporters get behind-the-scenes access to exclusive materials. ◀︎◀︎

Thought For Today
Lover of Your Soul

Thought For Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:28


It is Wednesday morning. I greet you in Jesus' precious name! It is the 14th of September 2022, and this is your friend, Angus Buchan, with a thought for today.“Oh, do not deliver the life of Your turtledove to the wild beast!”Psalm 74:19“My beloved spoke, and said to me:“Rise up, my love, my fair one,And come away.”Song of Songs 2:10“Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one's life for his friends.”John 15:13We need to ask ourselves a question - do we love Jesus? Is He truly the Lover of our souls?Robert Burns, the famous Scottish poet wrote a love poem and it goes like this:O my Luve is like a red, red roseThat's newly sprung in June;O my Luve is like the melodyThat's sweetly played in tune.So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,So deep in luve am I;And I will luve thee still, my dear,Till a' the seas gang dry.Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,And the rocks melt wi' the sun;I will love thee still, my dear,While the sands o' life shall run.And fare thee weel, my only luve!And fare thee weel awhile!And I will come again, my luve,Though it were ten thousand mile.We say, “But how much does our Lord Jesus love us?” Well, the answer my dear friend, is found in the nail marks in His hands and feet, and the wound in His side. They tell us the whole story. Spend time with the Lover of your soul today.Jesus bless you and goodbye.

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO
LOS Vol 131 Bing Crosby Exclusive Show w/talk of Robert Burns & Music!

SOUNDS LIKE RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 16:42


Your Humble Host is proud to bring you a Bing Crosby Show, one of his 15 min. shows, from January 25, 1956. This is another one of the Bing's in The Library of Sound (Volume 131) you won't find anywhere else on the interwebs. Bing & Ken Carpenter chat about Scottish poet Robert Burns and Bing sings a few ditties along the way. Another Bing Exclusive here from Sounds Like Radio's Library of Sound, take a break & relax a while with Bing, Ken & Your Humble Host.

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
UConn Huskies College Football Season Preview 2022 | The College Football Experience (Ep. 1078)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 32:18


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network previews the upcoming 2022 college football season for the UConn Huskies. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD) breaks down the 2022 UCONN Huskies roster and keys in on each and every game the Huskies play in 2022? Did the UConn Huskies hit a home run when they hired former UCLA Bruins head football coach Jim Mora Jr.? Did the UConn Huskies dominate the transfer portal this offseason? Will it be Ta'Quan Roberson starting for the Huskies in Week Zero at Utah State? Will the duo of Nathan Carter and Robert Burns be running wild for the Huskies? Will the receiving core for UConn be vastly improved with the likes of Cameron Ross, Keelan Marion, Kylish Hicks, Dajon Harrison and Brandon Niemenski? Can the offensive line improve despite only returning 3 starters? Will Lou Spanos continue to improve the UConn defense? Is Eric Watts a name to watch on the defensive line? Will the linebackers be their top defensive unit with Kevon Jones, Ian Swenson, Jackson Mitchell, etc? Can the secondary emerge as perhaps the top unit with the likes of Durante Jones, Malik Dixon, Myles Bell, and Marquez Bembry? We talk it all and more on the UConn Huskies edition of The College Football Experience.   UCONN Huskies 2022 Schedule Win Total O/U: 2.5 @ Utah State vs Central Connecticut State vs Syracuse @ Michigan @ NC State vs Fresno State @ Florida International @ Ball State BYE vs Boston College vs UMASS vs Liberty @ Army ===================================================== SGPN FREE SURVIVOR POOL - https://play.runyourpool.com/sgpn SGPN Merch Store - https://sg.pn/store Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $100 and get a $100 FREE bet! - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - https://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - OddsTrader.com/bluewire | DrinkTrade.com/sgp | DAVE.com Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Watch the Sports Gambling Podcast YouTube - https://www.sg.pn/YouTube Twitch - https://www.sg.pn/Twitch   Read & Discuss - Join the conversation Website - https://www.sportsgamblingpodcast.com Discord - https://sg.pn/discord Reddit - https://www.sg.pn/reddit   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Scottish Poetry Library Podcast

In this podcast Jennifer Williams speaks to Jamaican-born, American-based poet Shara McCallum about her new Robert Burns poetry project which brought her to Scotland for a research visit; the lyric self; female and minority voices in poetry and much more. Originally from Jamaica, Shara McCallum is the author of five books of poetry, the latest of which is Madwoman.

Front Row
Edinburgh Festival: Burn, Counting & Cracking, Aftersun, Festival picks

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 42:02


Live from Edinburgh, with a review of Alan Cumming's one man show, Burn, which sets out to update the biscuit-tin image of Robert Burns. Plus Counting & Cracking - the epic, multilingual life journey of four generations, from Sri Lanka to Australia. To review the Edinburgh International Festival performances, Kate Molleson is joined by Arusa Qureshi, writer and editor of Fest Magazine, and Alan Bissett, playwright, novelist and performer. Plus we speak to Scottish film director Charlotte Wells about her critically acclaimed new film Aftersun, as she returns to her home town to open this year's Edinburgh International Film Festival. Presenter: Kate Molleson Producer: Emma Wallace Photo: Burn - Alan Cumming; picture credit - Gian Andrea di Stefano

Kinda Murdery
Cañon City Carnage - PART TWO

Kinda Murdery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 46:30


The judge sentenced Danny Daniels to 28 years hard time at The Colorado State Penitentiary, but Danny and his comrades had other plans; violent plans. And yet, to paraphrase Robert Burns, "The best laid plans of mice and cons..." Tune in for the thrilling conclusion of Cañon City Carnage.

Digital Marketing Master
"From Media to Marketing: Explaining Electronics Recycling Plainly" with Robert Burns

Digital Marketing Master

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 21:33


Luis talks with Robert Burns, Director of Marketing & Digital Media at Sunnking Inc. about an increased user engagement across a variety of media outlets both locally and nationally.

Handed Down
Brown Adam with Franz Andres Morrissey

Handed Down

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 50:14


It's another epic ballad this week as I catch up with Franz Andres Morrissey to learn more about this song, that was originally collected in Scotland. We also chat about the ups and downs of the Swiss folk scene, have a good old gossip about Robert Burns, and I learn where Martin Carthy gets his tunes from.Brown Adam, or Broun Edom, is a rare song with some old, even pre-Christian, themes and motifs. It unfolds in true storytelling style and includes such colourful characters  as a False Knight, a faithful Lady, and Brown Adam himself, a magnificent young Smith. Shenanigans ensue and there's quite a bit of gratuitous bird shooting before the story moves on. Who needs Netflix when you've got songs like this?Franz is an academic (though he carries it  lightly) and an experienced folk musician, and we talk about his book, Language, the Singer and the Song. We also discuss his play which tells the stories of slavery through words and song.His band Taradiddle (https://taradiddle.ch) has just recorded an album that will be out soon, and there's a rumour that there'll be tour dates announced shortly. You can hear more of Franz's music on Soundcloud.MusicBrown Adam was performed and produced by by Franz. The episode also features three live recordings by Taradiddle: Benediction Song, Who's The Fool Now, Hey Ca' Thro and Leaving Limerick. You can find more here. There's also a snippet of the song that Franz and I recorded together remotely, Now Westlin Winds.AcknowledgementsFranz and I met through The Barnstoners, a self-organising group of musicians who have all been to the fabulous Stones Barn run by Maddy Prior and Rose-Ellen Kemp up in Cumbria. It goes without saying that we're big fans of theirs and recommend them highly.

Consistently Eccentric
William McGonagall - Because not every Scottish Poet can be Robert Burns

Consistently Eccentric

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 55:33


100 episodes down and we are celebrating with a feast of culture from north of the border!William Topaz McGonagall was a man who knew that the had the spirit of an artist. Unfortunately he had the occupation of a weaver and would have to wait until he was over half a century old before he could begin pursuing his dream in earnest. With a long-suffering wife in tow he vowed to become the greatest poet in British History, determined to achieve fame, fortune, Royal favour and the respect of his fellow man...One out of four isn't too bad, right?Guest Host: Emma Heathcote See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Encouragement Diaries
Joan McAlpine brings Robert Burns amazing home at Ellisland Farm alive - amazing

The Encouragement Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 10:03


Robert Burns designed and built Ellisland Farm as an enlightened farmer. It is the most important and significant of all his homes and it's where, in three years, he wrote some of his most important works, and a quarter of his total output! Formerly a Member of Parliament, Joan McAlpine is the Business Development Manager and the queen of multitasking - so interesting and encouraging

Claare Ny Gael - Manx Radio
Claare ny Gael 17th July 2022

Claare Ny Gael - Manx Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 52:30


Rev Thomas Stephen's 1832 publication, 'A Poetical Guide to the Isle of Mann', has brought us to what he calls 'Dunlop's Ellerslie left in the lurch'. We start to find out about one-time owner of the farm, Anthony Dunlop, and we two personal glimpses of him, one as an older agriculturalist by Hannah Bullock in 1816, and the other by Scottish poet, Robert Burns, in a letter to Anthony's mother in 1790, when Anthony was 16. Bram Stoker's ancient mariner, Mr Swales, is continuing with his explanation as to why the gravestones in the churchyard at Whitby are full of lies. Mina Murray and Lucy Westenra are a bit taken aback by it all. As nyn giaull - jannoo ard eailley jeh keayrtee da'n Chruinnaght - MIKE JAMES & YVES LEBLANC - Breton polkas THE FRIEL SISTERS - Tir Connell HUW ROBERTS & STEPHEN REES - Ffidl ffadl/Mogi Laddyr RUTH KEGGIN & RACHEL HAIR - Arrane oie vie THE BOLINGEY TROYL BAND - We ent goin' far TALISK - Abyss 9BACH - Gwydr glas LYNCHED - Father had a knife KERLENN PONDI - Elle est lassee d'etre

The Cybrary Podcast
401 Access Denied Ep. 58 | Creating a Human-Centered Cyber Strategy with Robert Burns

The Cybrary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 18:59 Transcription Available


As our threat landscape evolves and remote work opportunities continue to grow in popularity, it's important that security leaders enhance their future-proofing strategies. How can organizations cultivate human-centered approaches to prioritizing risks and developing proactive incident response plans? Robert Burns, Chief Security Officer of the Thales Cloud Protection and Licensing division, sits down with the 401 Access Denied team to discuss these strategies and other key takeaways from the June 2022 BSIDES and RSA conferences. Connect with Bob! ~LinkedIn  ~Twitter  Follow us on Social!! ~Cybrary Twitter ~Delinea Twitter ~Instagram ~Facebook ~YouTube ~Cybrary LinkedIn ~Delinea LinkedIn

Parkway Fellowship Church, Katy, TX Sermons
When Things Don't Go As Planned

Parkway Fellowship Church, Katy, TX Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 24:29


Your business. Your marriage. Your kids. Your week. When things don't go as planned, then what? “The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” Scottish poet Robert Burns. Reflects a Biblical truth

Parkway Fellowship Church, Katy, TX Sermons
When Things Don't Go As Planned

Parkway Fellowship Church, Katy, TX Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 30:29


Your business. Your marriage. Your kids. Your week. When things don't go as planned, then what? “The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” Scottish poet Robert Burns. Reflects a Biblical truth

Sound Escape Theatre
The Lady and The Poet

Sound Escape Theatre

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 43:33


“Canny Rab, to send his book to Frances Dunlop! She was weel-kent in Ayrshire society, and she it was who made sure his fame would quickly spread about the county and beyond.” In 1786, Robert Burns sent a copy of his book, Poems, Chiefly in The Scottish Dialect, to Mrs Frances Wallace Dunlop of Dunlop in Ayrshire. She was so taken with it, and with him, that she became his patron and later, his confidant. But the voices of these two strong and determined characters still resonate across the years through their letters. Their friendship endured for a decade before their differences drove them apart. The Lady and The Poet focuses on this platonic relationship, which was like no other in Burns's short and eventful life. The Lady and The Poet is the second play in An Ayrshire Trilogy, three audio dramas which celebrate Ayrshire and its people. The Trilogy is supported by Creative Scotland.

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Robert Burns is searching for Rondo Hatton and the new documentary, years in the making, aims to capture the near spiritual quest by the famed art director of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Tourist Trap, and many others! Director and lauded journalist Joe M. O'Connell pieced together this previously unknown personal tale in the annals of horror history through reenactments, interviews with family, friends, the likes of Tobe Hooper, Dee Wallace, Joe Bob Briggs, and much more. We sit down with Joe to discuss the impact of the film, the long making-of process, meeting Bob Burns himself before his untimely passing, guerilla filmmaking at its finest, and get down to why this story needed to be told about the intersecting lives of these two faces of horror. RONDO AND BOB is streaming via Electric Entertainment on all platforms. Download the interview now and uncover Rondo Hatton for yourself! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Amazon Podcasts: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/534ZPRmDoZzNs5GtiAhOEcStitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr https://www.rondoandbob.com/https://twitter.com/rondoandbobhttps://twitter.com/joemoconnell

Forgotten Eagles
*Celebrity Shot* - Robert Burns (Head Baseball Coach - Southeastern CC)-“I'm tired of staying down.”

Forgotten Eagles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 121:53


In a super special *Celebrity Shot* edition, the Head Baseball Coach of Southeastern Community College joins ‘The Nest.' Robert Burns, one of the youngest collegiate head baseball coach's in the nation joins Coach Helsabeck to discuss a wide array of topics. Burns' early years growing up, playing college baseball which of course comes with crazy college baseball stories (i.e. a teammate losing a finger), becoming an announcer, going through depression ... and oh yea, a brain surgery somewhere in all that... ultimately leads you to who, what, when, where, why and how Coach Burns got the head job - how season one went - and what to expect at ‘The Pasture' moving forward. It's a beautiful episode! We hope you guys enjoy listening to it as much as we did recording it! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Daily Gardener
May 17, 2022 Sandro Botticelli, Montreal, Robert Tannahill, Elvin Charles Stakman, 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek, and Louisa Yeomans King on Peony Pruning

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:33


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1510 Death of Sandro Botticelli, Italian Renaissance master.  His painting Allegory of Abundance or Autumn is one of his most elaborate and detailed drawings, and it depicts an abundance of flowers and fruits. Sandro painted idyllic garden scenes filled with beautiful women and men from the classical period. His painting, Primavera, depicts nine springtime gods and goddesses from classical mythology in a garden. Venus, the goddess of love, presides over the Garden of the Hesperides. To her right, Flora, the goddess of flowers, sprinkles roses. The garden features orange and laurel trees and dozens of other species of plants.   1642 On this day, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, French military officer, catches his first glimpse of Montreal's landscape. He is recognized as the founder of Fort Ville-Marie (modern-day Montreal) in New France (Province of Quebec, Canada). In George Waldo Browne's 1905 book, The St. Lawrence River: Historical, Legendary, Picturesque, he wrote, On the 17th of May, the rounded slopes of Mount Royal, clad in the delicate green foliage of spring, burst into sight, stirring the hearts of the anxious beholders with newfound joy. They were delighted with the scenery. The fragrance of the springing forest permeated the balmy air, and, what was dearer far to them, over the water and over the landscape, rested an air of peace quite in keeping with their pious purpose. Maisonneuve was the first to step upon the land, and as the others followed him... they fell upon their knees, sending up their songs of praise and thanksgiving. Their first work was to erect an altar at a favorable spot within sight and sound of the riverbank, the women decorating the rough woodwork with some of the wildflowers growing in abundance upon the island, until the whole, looked very beautiful.  Then every member of the party... knelt in solemn silence while M. Barthelemy Vimont... performed ...high mass. As he closed, he addressed his little congregation with these prophetic words: You are a grain of mustard seed that shall rise and grow till its branches overshadow the earth.   1810 Death of Robert Tannahill, Scottish poet, and lyricist. Remembered as the 'Weaver Poet,' Robert was born in Paisley and is often hailed as Paisley's own Robert Burns, as his work is said to rival Robert Burns.  Today in Paisley, a stunning 50ft high mural of a young Robert Tannahill was painted by Mark Worst, collaborating with Paisley Housing Association. The mural overlooks where Robert Tannahill was born on Castle Street in 1774. One of Robert's most beloved songs is Will Ye Go Lassie, Go. The lyrics mention picking Wild Mountain Thyme, a plant known botanically as Thymus serpyllum (TY-mus sir-PIE-lum). Wild Mountain Thyme is a showy, wide growing groundcover from the Old World and has beautiful rose-red flowers and glossy deep green, mat-forming foliage. In the song, the thyme has grown in and around the heather. O the summer time has come And the trees are sweetly bloomin' The wild mountain thyme Grows around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go? And we'll all go together To pull wild mountain thyme All around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go?   1885 Birth of Elvin Charles Stakman, American plant pathologist. Elvin is remembered for his work identifying and combatting diseases in wheat. In 1917, he married fellow a  plant pathologist named Estelle Louise Jensen. He also encouraged Norman Borlaug to pursue his career in phytopathology after Norman's job at the Forest Service was eliminated due to budget cuts. Elvin was Norman's teacher. And Norman went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1970) after discovering dwarf wheat varieties that reduced famine in India, Pakistan, and other third world countries. In 1938, Elvin gave a speech entitled These Shifty Little Enemies that Destroy our Food Crops. During his talk, Elvin focused on one shifty little enemy in particular: rust. Rust is a parasitic fungus that feeds on phytonutrients in grain crops like wheat, oat, and barley. Today, Elvin is remembered with the naming of Stakman Hall - the building where Plant Pathology is taught - at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus.  In The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World, Charles Mann reflected, Stakman did not view science as a disinterested quest for knowledge. It was a tool—may be the tool—for human betterment. Not all sciences were equally valuable, as he liked to explain. “Botany,” he said, “is the most important of all sciences, and plant pathology is one of its most essential branches.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek  This book came out in 2022. Stefanie writes in her introduction: In 150 Gardens You Need to Visit Before You Die, I've shared a vast range of gardens, from immense botanical institutions with thousands of specimens, to smaller plots for quiet meditations, to museums that combine both artworks and plantings. I hope these brief introductions inspire you to plan a visit or two, whether in your hometown or on your global travels, so that you can enjoy the sights, smells, sounds, and stories of the world's best gardens.   The publisher writes: From Kew Gardens in London to the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and from Monet's garden at Giverny to the Zen garden of the Ryoan-ji Temple in Kyoto, this handsomely bound book captures in words and images the most notable features of these 150 glorious, not-to-be-missed gardens. An essential bucket list book for garden lovers! You can get a copy of 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes.   Botanic Spark 1905 On this day, Louisa Yeomans King wrote in her garden journal about peonies. She published a year's worth of entries in her book, The Flower Garden Day by Day.  In 1902, Louisa and her husband moved to Michigan, where they built a home called Orchard House. With the help of a gardener named Frank Ackney, Louisa began to plan and create her garden. She also began writing about her Gardens. Soon, she gave lectures, contributed pieces to magazines, wrote columns, and organized garden clubs. She even became friends with prominent gardeners of her time like Gertrude Jekyll, Charles Sprague Sargent, and the landscape architects Fletcher Steele and Ellen Biddle Shipman. Louisa learned to garden during the heyday of American Garden Culture. Her garden writing in newspaper columns and magazine publications made her the most widely read American Garden author in the United States. Louisa's first book, "The Well-Considered Garden," the preface was written by her dear friend Gertrude Jekyll. In 1915, when the book debuted, it was considered an instant classic in garden literature. Louisa would go on to write a total of nine books. The garden estate known as Blithewold has a copy of "The Well-Considered Garden." Their particular text also contains a handwritten inscription along with Louisa's signature. The inscription borrows a quote from Sir William Temple, who said, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no man is too high or too low." Louisa changed the quote and wrote, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no woman is too high or too low." Louisa helped start the Garden Club of America and the Women's National Farm and Garden Association. She held leadership positions in both organizations. When her husband died suddenly in 1927, Louisa was forced to sell Orchard House. She moved to Hartford, New York, and bought a property she called Kingstree. This time, she set up a smaller garden. The size meant less work, which accommodated her writing and speaking commitments better. On this day, Louisa wrote in her journal this note of advice about the Peony: May 17. Disbud most of your peonies now; that is, of a cluster of buds, cut off all but the larger central one. Certain varieties, however, are considered more beautiful if left alone to flower as they will. Among these are Alsace Lorraine and La Rosiere.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Harvard Classics
The Two Dogs, by Robert Burns

Harvard Classics

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 11:13


Two dogs fell a-gossiping about their masters and about a dog's life among the humble Scotch folk. Each "rejoic'd they werena men but dogs; an' each took aff his several way." (Volume 6, Harvard Classics)  

Harvard Classics
Introductory Note: Robert Burns

Harvard Classics

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:23


Introductory note on Robert Burns (Volume 6, Harvard Classics)  

Wild for Scotland
Glasgow Women's Library with Adele Patrick

Wild for Scotland

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 52:50


Adele Patrick is the co-founder of Glasgow Women's Library, a textile artist and fierce advocate for women's and LGBTQ rights - but as you'll soon also find out, one of the warmest people you could encounter on a trip to the city.Listen to my conversation with Adele in which we cover...What it was like moving to Scotland in the late 1980sHow Glasgow has changed since the early 1990sWhat to expect at the Glasgow Women's Library and how it came to beHer favourite places in the cityand much more! I even talk about how I got into Robert Burns' poetry...!Connect with Glasgow Women's Library on Instagram: @womenslibraryLearn more about the Women's Heritage Walks here and download FREE leaflets for all the routes.Visit our website to find the full show notes incl. our top tips for a trip to Edinburgh.Join the Wild for Scotland email list here.Access the transcript of this episode on wildforscotland.comSupport this show on Patreon and unlock bonus episodes. Support my show on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Whiskey Lore: The Interviews
Scotch Distiller Legacy Series: John Campbell Talks Laphroaig Peat to Lowland Whisky at Lochlea

Whiskey Lore: The Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 64:37


Not long ago I had a chat with Jeff Arnett, who left the distillery that makes his favorite, Jack Daniel's to start his own Company Distilling. Around the time of that interview I heard the news that John Campbell was stepping away from Laphroaig after a 27 year career to move to the Lowlands. Was I dreaming? Was this real? I caught up with John at his new distilling home of Lochlea and we talked about Robert Burns, Islay vs Lowland, and the importance of feeling you don't know all the answers.

Berean Spokane - Sermons

Gang aft a-gley, from “The best-laid plans o' mice and men gang aft a-gley.” (From the poem “To A Mouse” by Robert Burns.

Thunder Pop
TP Extra: Special Guest Joe O'Connell Producer/director of RONDO AND BOB

Thunder Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 73:34


Our special guest has 12 combined years as a film industry columnist for the Dallas Morning News, Austin Chronicle and Austin American-Statesman which led him to produce/write/direct the documentary films Danger God and Rondo and Bob, both examinations of B-movie icons.

Desert Island Discs
Alan Cumming, actor

Desert Island Discs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 35:02 Very Popular


Alan Cumming's wide-ranging career on stage includes playing Hamlet, starring opposite Daniel Radcliffe in Samuel Beckett's Endgame and – perhaps most notably - taking the role of the Emcee in the musical Cabaret in London and New York to great acclaim: his 1998 Broadway performance won seven awards, including a Tony. He's also appeared in films including GoldenEye and Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut, and in the TV series The Good Wife. Alan was born in Perthshire in 1965. His father was a forester and the family moved to the Panmure estate on the east coast of Scotland. Encouraged by his English teacher, Alan grew up loving drama at school but his childhood was blighted by his violent and abusive father. He worked for the publisher DC Thomson as a sub-editor before going to the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. There he launched his performing career with fellow student Forbes Masson: together they were Victor and Barry, a comedy and music double-act. They drew on these characters for their BBC TV sit-com The High Life, based around a fictional Scottish airline. Alan has published a novel and three memoirs: his 2014 autobiography Not My Father's Son detailed his very difficult relationship with his father, both in his early years and later in his life. In 2022 Alan is developing a solo dance-theatre work, focusing on the personal history of the Scottish poet Robert Burns, which he will perform in Scotland and New York. He's now also the co-owner of a bar, Club Cumming, in Manhattan. DISC ONE: Dignity by Deacon Blue DISC TWO: L'Amour Looks Something Like You by Kate Bush DISC THREE: Barcelona by Freddie Mercury & Montserrat Caballé DISC FOUR: I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles) by The Proclaimers DISC FIVE: Whenever Wherever Whatever by Maxwell DISC SIX: Give Me Back My Heart by Dollar DISC SEVEN: Catalani: La Wally : Ebben? ne andrò lontana Act 1 by Maria Callas and Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Tullio Serafin DISC EIGHT: These Are My Mountains by Peter Morrison BOOK CHOICE: Desert Gardening for Beginners: How to grow vegetables, flowers, and herbs in an Arid Climate by Cathy Cromell, Linda A. Guy, Lucy K. Bradley LUXURY ITEM: Marijuana seeds CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Give Me Back My Heart by Dollar Presenter Lauren Laverne Producer Sarah Taylor

Walton Productions Be EPIC Podcast
Building a Vibrant and Inclusive Community in Northwest Arkansas with Robert Burns

Walton Productions Be EPIC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 24:36 Transcription Available


In this episode of the Be Epic podcast, Matt talks with Robert Burns, Director of the Home Region for the Walton Family Foundation. Robert provided an overview of the Walton Family Foundation, which was founded by Sam and Helen Walton and is currently led by their children and grandchildren here in Northwest Arkansas. He explained what the three pillars of the foundation are (K-12 education, environment and home region) and discusses the work that the home region focuses on in Northwest Arkansas. Matt and Robert further discuss how the foundation is focused on continuing to build our vibrant, inclusive community here in Northwest Arkansas. Learn more about the Walton Family Foundation here: https://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/ (https://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/ )

A Time to Sharpen
Good Medicine

A Time to Sharpen

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 46:53


There is no script for how to help a struggling teenager. To paraphrase the 18th century Scottish poet Robert Burns, “the best laid plans of mice and men often go wrong.” Or as the late 20th century American philosopher, Mike Tyson, once said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” Whetstone Boys Ranch can't tell you what to do when your son or daughter is spiraling out of control. We can however, provide some guidance that will keep you from doing the same. And it starts with a good old fashioned movie night. It all starts with the cinematic masterpiece, Nacho Libre. So sit back and enjoy a conversation about how a joyful heart, in the midst of all the chaos of raising kids, is truly “good medicine.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/time-to-sharpen/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/time-to-sharpen/support

New Books in History
Jenni Calder, "Frontier Scots" (Luath Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 44:46


Today there are up to 25 million Americans who claim to have Scottish heritage. Many of these people are the descendants of Scots who journeyed to America in the 19th Century, and became true pioneers in the West. In Frontier Scots (Luath Press, 2020), Jenni Calder argues that these men and women were real cowboys and homesteaders; they were sheriffs and outlaws; they mined gold and built railroads; and they were among the first to conquer the frontier, making lives for themselves in the wild west. Most importantly, they became the Scots who helped to shape the United States of America. “There is scarcely an episode in the dramatic and remnant story of the American West in which Scots do not appear. The bagpipes that were heard on the walls of the Alamo, the Gaelic spoken by Montana cowboys, the volume of Robert Burns' poetry carried by John Muir on his long walks, these belong with the continuing narrative of Scotland's past.” From the commended to the condemned, the Scots who braved America's frontier territories have made a lasting impact on what is now the world's most powerful country. This is an accurate and fascinating depiction of these people and their stories, giving real insight into the lives of the frontier Scots. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in the American West
Jenni Calder, "Frontier Scots" (Luath Press, 2020)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 44:46


Today there are up to 25 million Americans who claim to have Scottish heritage. Many of these people are the descendants of Scots who journeyed to America in the 19th Century, and became true pioneers in the West. In Frontier Scots (Luath Press, 2020), Jenni Calder argues that these men and women were real cowboys and homesteaders; they were sheriffs and outlaws; they mined gold and built railroads; and they were among the first to conquer the frontier, making lives for themselves in the wild west. Most importantly, they became the Scots who helped to shape the United States of America. “There is scarcely an episode in the dramatic and remnant story of the American West in which Scots do not appear. The bagpipes that were heard on the walls of the Alamo, the Gaelic spoken by Montana cowboys, the volume of Robert Burns' poetry carried by John Muir on his long walks, these belong with the continuing narrative of Scotland's past.” From the commended to the condemned, the Scots who braved America's frontier territories have made a lasting impact on what is now the world's most powerful country. This is an accurate and fascinating depiction of these people and their stories, giving real insight into the lives of the frontier Scots. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in American Studies
Jenni Calder, "Frontier Scots" (Luath Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 44:46


Today there are up to 25 million Americans who claim to have Scottish heritage. Many of these people are the descendants of Scots who journeyed to America in the 19th Century, and became true pioneers in the West. In Frontier Scots (Luath Press, 2020), Jenni Calder argues that these men and women were real cowboys and homesteaders; they were sheriffs and outlaws; they mined gold and built railroads; and they were among the first to conquer the frontier, making lives for themselves in the wild west. Most importantly, they became the Scots who helped to shape the United States of America. “There is scarcely an episode in the dramatic and remnant story of the American West in which Scots do not appear. The bagpipes that were heard on the walls of the Alamo, the Gaelic spoken by Montana cowboys, the volume of Robert Burns' poetry carried by John Muir on his long walks, these belong with the continuing narrative of Scotland's past.” From the commended to the condemned, the Scots who braved America's frontier territories have made a lasting impact on what is now the world's most powerful country. This is an accurate and fascinating depiction of these people and their stories, giving real insight into the lives of the frontier Scots. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Jenni Calder, "Frontier Scots" (Luath Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 44:46


Today there are up to 25 million Americans who claim to have Scottish heritage. Many of these people are the descendants of Scots who journeyed to America in the 19th Century, and became true pioneers in the West. In Frontier Scots (Luath Press, 2020), Jenni Calder argues that these men and women were real cowboys and homesteaders; they were sheriffs and outlaws; they mined gold and built railroads; and they were among the first to conquer the frontier, making lives for themselves in the wild west. Most importantly, they became the Scots who helped to shape the United States of America. “There is scarcely an episode in the dramatic and remnant story of the American West in which Scots do not appear. The bagpipes that were heard on the walls of the Alamo, the Gaelic spoken by Montana cowboys, the volume of Robert Burns' poetry carried by John Muir on his long walks, these belong with the continuing narrative of Scotland's past.” From the commended to the condemned, the Scots who braved America's frontier territories have made a lasting impact on what is now the world's most powerful country. This is an accurate and fascinating depiction of these people and their stories, giving real insight into the lives of the frontier Scots. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

City Breaks
Edinburgh Episode 11 Edinburgh Writers - the big 3

City Breaks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 29:43


Edinburgh was the first city to be designated a UNESCO City of Literature and whole books have been written about its writers and their legacy. The city's Writers' Museum is dedicated to 'the big three', Robert Burns, Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson. Here's a rundown of the life and works of each, plus ideas for where else to 'find' them in Edinburgh today. Enjoy! Useful links     https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/writers-museum https://edinburgh.org City Breaks: all the history and culture you'd research for yourself if you had the time! Check our website to find more episodes from our Edinburgh series or to browse our back catalogue of other cities which are well worth visiting: https://www.citybreakspodcast.co.uk We love to receive your comments and suggestions!  You can e mail us at citybreaks@citybreakspodcast.co.uk And if you like what you hear, please do post comments or a review wherever you downloaded this episode.  That would be very much appreciated!   

All Around Growth
Ep. 300 - Coneflowers: 7 Best Echinacea Varieties

All Around Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 15:21


Again rejoicing Nature sees  Her robe assume its vernal hues;   Her leafy locks wave in the breeze,  All freshly steep'd in morning dews.  –Robert Burns (1759–96)Join Rob as he discusses easy splitting and propagation of Sansevieria and other various landscape grasses with reciprocating saws and axes.  Don't be shy - butcher your plants!  Rob also discusses an article titled "Coneflowers: 7 Best Echinacea Varieties" by Robin Sweeter and shares his own +20 years of experience with the Echinacea species.Rob shares some thoughts about using Echinacea as an herbal medicinal and some thoughts that he has regarding practices for use of the plant in herbal and/or medicinal products.  Do your own research, nothing contained within the show are medical claims, and all information contained within this show and these notes are for entertainment purposes only.  Let us know what YOU think about Echinacea in the group chat!  Telegram Group Chat - https://t.me/allaroundgrowth  Also - Rob is still looking for assistance with social media assistance and promotion!  If you're interested in collaboration regarding increasing an online presence - I'd love to hear from you!  Connect on social media!  Twitter - https://twitter.com/allaroundgrowthFlote - https://flote.app/allaroundgrowthFacebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/allaroundgrowthFacebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/allaroundgrowth~  Subscribe to the All Around Growth Podcast Telegram Channel for show updates ONLY:    https://t.me/allaroundgrowthpodcast  ~Follow this link to ALL EPISODES   ~ How To Leave a Rating & Review in Apple Podcast AppThis really *does* affect the algorithm......as of recording in March 2022 - I would invite you to do this!The podcast game is changing - help us with a rating and review!~Have a Question or any feedback for Rob?Send me an email at allaroundgrowth@gmail.com~Discussion Links:Friday, March 8, 2022Many other mentioned show links are contained in the above post!SNAKE PLANTSConeflowers: 7 Best Echinacea VarietiesSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/allaroundgrowth)

For the love of Scotland podcast
The Burns Cottage plot

For the love of Scotland podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 28:25


To mark International Women's Day, our host Jackie Bird hears how Scotland's leading suffragettes plotted to bomb Burns Cottage, the birthplace of the national bard. We hear about Ethel Moorhead, the first woman to be force fed in a Scottish jail, and her co-conspirator Frances Parker, on how they led the fight for women's votes north of the border. Professor Pederson tells how the women cycled in dead of night with home-made bombs, to the birthplace of Robert Burns. What happened to the two women? How did their struggle win and lose support in society at the time? And how did the poetry of Robert Burns play a part in their defence? Take a listen… 

Kunstfilter
POBÁSNENIE ŠPECIÁL - Robert Burns: Haggis (SK & EN)

Kunstfilter

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 10, 2022 5:54


POBÁSNENIE ŠPECIÁL    V ten istý, neskoro-januárový večer sa gajdy rozozvučia ešte o niečo hlasnejšie a zrak všetkým prítomných sa uprie na jedinú striebornú tácku. Na nej sa hrdo vypína bucľatý, pariaci sa ovčí žalúdok, naplnený vnútornosťami, korením a ovsenými vločkami, ktorý zakrátko bude slávnostne rozkrájaný pred hosťami večere. Predtým si však ešte žalúdok vypočuje báseň, ktorú špeciálne preň napísal sám Robert Burns (25 Január 1759 – 21 Júl 1796), národný básnik, označovaný tiež za škótsku kultúrnu ikonu. Milí poslucháči,v tomto špeciálnom dieli sa s vami ako hosťami Burnsovej noci podelíme o Báseň pre Haggis, tentokrát v preklade z originálneho škótskeho dialektu, viac-menej nezrozumiteľnému pre zvyšok anglicky hovoriaceho sveta, do, povedzme, klasickejšej angličtiny, ktorú pre náš podcast nahrala so svojím nezameniteľným glasgowským prízvukom Lola Wilson. Báseň je obohatená aj o voľný slovenský preklad, zemiaky (tatties) a okrúhlicu (neeps). Dobrú chuť !   Číta: Natalia Timaniková (SK), Lola Wilson (EN) Dramaturgia: Natalia Timaniková Postprodukcia: Martin Jakubčo, Patrik Kako Hudba: Patrik Kako: .musica brevis   Instagram @pobásnenie: https://www.instagram.com/pobasnenie/   Kunstkameru môžete sledovať na Instagrame:  https://www.instagram.com/kunstkamerapodcast/ alebo na Facebooku: https://www.facebook.com/Kunstkamera/ alebo na Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaNbO_M_Cz_l8XZ5lOWzPeA   Taktiež môžete sledovať naše ďalšie podcasty: Silný výber  https://silnyvyber.podbean.com/ Hybadlo: https://hybadlo.podbean.com/  

St. Columba's Sermons
It's Time to Say "Yes!" A Sermon Preached by the Rev. Ledlie I. Laughlin - The Rev. Ledlie Laughlin

St. Columba's Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2022 13:26


It's Time to Say "Yes!" A Sermon Preached by the Rev. Ledlie I. Laughlin February 6, 2022 ~ Luke 5:1-11 The problem with waiting for the pandemic to be over is that we risk putting life on hold. We tell ourselves, because it is not safe to do x, y, or z, I'll just stay here for a little while longer. But, over time, does "just staying here a little longer" become the lens through which we live, the determining posture for our choices, inhibiting life itself - leading as one parishioner recently commented, to "a meager and disconnected existence." That is not the life to which we are called. I have come that you may have life, said Jesus - life abundant.. Well before this pandemic, Jungian James Hollis stated that, "life's two biggest threats we carry within: fear and lethargy." Says he, "Every morning we rise to find two gremlins at the foot of the bed. The one named Fear says, "The world is too big for you, too much. You are not up to it. Find a way to slip-slide away again today." And the one named Lethargy says, "Hey, chill out. You've had a hard day. [Treat yourself to something special.] Tomorrow's another day." Says Hollis, "Those perverse twins munch on our souls every day. No matter what we do today, they will turn up again tomorrow." Living An Examined Life So, each day, we must start afresh. The Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius chose to sleep not in his palace but with his troops on the battle field that each day he would awaken with a sense of call and purpose. Aurelius wrote, "At day's first light, have in readiness, against disinclination to leave your bed, the thought that "I am rising for the work of man." Must I grumble at setting out to do what I was born for, and for the sake of which I have been brought into the world? Is this the purpose of my creation, to lie here under the blankets and keep myself warm? "Ah, but it is a great deal more pleasant!" said he. Indeed. The call of the cozy blanket. I pray you not take offense that I cite an emperor, a warrior, one who had little regard for the God of love and those who seek to follow Christ. For I appreciate the image of rising each day, aware that despite the beckoning blanket, each day offers the opportunity to say, yes. Like you, I have my morning routines. In recent months, I have been attempting what is often called "morning pages" - writing several pages first thing, stream of consciousness, while still on the cusp between sleep and waking. Most mornings I begin, "Hello God. Hello world. I am alive to love." And then go from there. In a variation on that theme, our parish staff has been reflecting on and discussing the proposition that, "for our ministry, today is the new baseline." While we may return to much of what nourished us in church, a lot of patterns have shifted and we're not going back. So, what does today offer? What is God's preferred future from this point forward? What opportunities do we now see to Live God's Love? Our readings this morning tell stories of those who unexpectedly say "yes" to God. In this hour and in this season of our life, I invite you to consider how it is that God may be inviting you to say "yes." In what ways have you been waiting, keeping your life on hold? This is the day the Lord has made. In what ways might you say yes? In the biblical literature, these are stories of "call." Since the beginning, God calls God's people: to lead, to follow, to teach, or heal; to give, or sacrifice; with humility, with courage; for love. From Abraham and Sarah, to Isaiah; from Mary and Joseph, to Peter, Paul, and the disciples of every generation. We know this, but it helps to remember some of the characteristics we see in all the biblical stories of call. Let me recount: No one is ready. No one earned it or started out deserving. It is never convenient. It is always costly. God's call can come anytime, any where, through any means. In dreams, through angels, at work, in the kitchen. In the temple or in a prison cell. In a storm, in blinding light, or in silence. While God's call may come in a single moment, almost everyone who is called finds her or himself wavering, needing to commit and recommit to this newly called life, time and again. By definition, call involves an insistent reorientation from a life that is self-referential to a life that is oriented toward others, toward God, towards love, towards the least and most vulnerable among us. Not as Marcus Aurelius, for Empire. Rather, for beloved community. While the price is high, sometimes even one's life, the gift is life, new life. The call of the prophet Isaiah is set before the very throne of God in a vision as awe-inspiring as any in literature. Amid six-winged seraphs, "holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts." "Woe is me," says Isaiah. But once cleansed with hot coals upon his lips, says, "here am I. Send me." Poor Isaiah. Little could he know that while he would one day prophesy restoration and redemption, the opening charge is to proclaim a message that no one will want to hear: "Say to the people, listen, but do not comprehend. Make the mind of this people dull! Until cities lie waste, without inhabitant. And vast is the emptiness." To be called by God to the task of striving to bring about the world as God would have it be is to join God in dismantling the structures that oppress - in order to plant new seeds or build a new community. There is a hinge, a point of turning - for the individual and the community - that entails freedom from to enable freedom for. Freedom from this construct, that we may be free to live for and toward this new life. This is made explicit in Jesus' call of his first disciples. Jesus meets these fisherman right in the midst of their labor. The biblical stories of call are special, memorable; they stand out. But given how unlikely most of the characters seem to be, the stories are not meant to signal the individuals are special, or different from you and me. The whole point is to let us know that God calls anyone, each of us, all of us - in the temple, or the boat, or the kitchen, or at school. When we're in prayer, or at work. When the stories are written and we look back at them, the outcome seems inevitable. Of course Moses said yes, as did Isaiah, and Mary, and Peter. But in the moment, they had no idea what they were getting themselves into, no idea where that yes would lead. Maybe a disciple is just someone who says yes - everyday until it sticks, until it redirects their path. So we go to the place where fear or lethargy are most likely to take hold. And from there, say yes. We are saying yes to the challenge of creating affordable housing, yes to examining systems of racial oppression, yes to uncharted paths of carrying out parish ministry. Let's say yes to life, yes to being in-person, yes to laughter, yes to joy, yes to love, yes to you, yes to most any invitation that comes our way. For some of these invitations may be coming from none other than the living loving God. In J.D. Salinger's, Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield is telling his sister Phoebe what he wants to be when he grows up. Holden reminds Phoebe of the song about "if a body catch a body comin' through the rye." Phoebe corrects him. It's a poem by Robert Burns, she says, that goes "if a body meets a body comin' through the rye." She's right, he admits. "I thought it was "if a body catch a body," I said. Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around - nobody big, I mean - except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I'd do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be. I know it's crazy." Then Jesus said, "Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people." It may be crazy, but it's time to say yes. Say yes. Amen.

The Creepy Wee Podcast
11: Tam o' Shanter

The Creepy Wee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 52:54


Our once unreleased pilot episode on the epic poem, Tam o' Shanter by Robert Burns.  Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Putting it Together
Theatre and all the rest of it…

Putting it Together

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 54:43


A wee chat with Brian, catching up on Robert Burns, theatre, poetry, you know the type of thing. The post Theatre and all the rest of it… appeared first on Putting it Together.

The White House 1600 Sessions
64. Abraham Lincoln, Robert Burns, and the Scottish Connection

The White House 1600 Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 24:30


There is a long history of Scottish influence on the White House, dating back to the Scottish stonemasons that contributed to the construction of the Executive Mansion. Perhaps one of the most unique Scottish connections is through President Abraham Lincoln and famed poet Robert Burns. In this episode, White House Historical Association President Stewart McLaurin talks with Professor Murray Pittock, Burns historian and professor of literature at the University of Glasgow, and Mr. Ian Houston, President of the Scottish Business Network Americas, about President Abraham Lincoln and his fondness of Robert Burns and Scottish culture throughout his life.

Simply Scottish
Episode 74: Why We Need Robert Burns in 2022

Simply Scottish

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 26:29


In this episode of Simply Scottish, learn why we need Scottish poet Robert Burns now more than ever before! He's been dead over two centuries but his catchy songs and verse championing liberty, equality, and democracy are alive and well. See how Burns helped to unite Americans during the Civil War and discover three ways he can unite us again in 2022. Hear poetry about Burns and by Burns, along with a great mix of Burns-inspired music from Hamish Napier, Kilmarnock Edition, Brina, and Davy Steele. 

Twin Terrors Macabre Manor of Mead Metal and Mayhem
Episode 199 --Robert Burns Day 2022

Twin Terrors Macabre Manor of Mead Metal and Mayhem

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 27:45


Welcome back to the Manor!  Welcome back to what seems to be an annual event!  Robert Burns, Scottish poet, is celebrated on his birthday (January 25th) with wide recognition in Scotland and wherever the Scots diaspora are living.  We're doing our part by having a wee dram or a Wee Heavy and reading some of our most beloved Burns poetry.   To Burnsie! Next week's episode is about (stay tuned). Get in touch with us at Podbean: https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-4pksr-a17e1a Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twinterrorsmacabremanormeadmetalmayhe/ Or on twitter: @Terrors_Manor On Instagram: @macabremanormeadmetalmayhem You can also find our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, and I Heart Radio; pretty much wherever fine (and our) podcasts are aired. Image courtesy of: Wiki Commons (Robert Burns)

The American Tapestry Project
Ep 18 - Happy New Year & Auld Lang Syne

The American Tapestry Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 58:25


This episode of The American Tapestry Project continues exploring those things Americans love in common – holidays! In this episode we look at the history of New Year's celebrations, ask why champagne, where did New Year's resolutions begin, are there any great New Year's tunes, who was Robert Burns and what does Auld Lang Syne mean, where did it originate and what is its definitive version? All this and more” on Episode 18 of The American Tapestry Project.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Be More Wrong with Colin Hunter

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 46:18


Colin Hunter is the author of Be More Wrong,  he's a mentor, entrepreneur and coach and the CEO of Potential Squared. Colin shares an intimate journey of how his career developed and led to the work he does now. We can learn some great lessons in this weeks' show including: Why being more wrong helps us unlock great learning. How creating “virtual playgrounds” can provide the perfect environment for development. Colin's three enablers of leadership: Purpose/Identity & Presence. A new take on leaderships styles. Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA   Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Colin below: Colin on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/colinhunter Colin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/bemorewrong Potential Squared Website: https://www.potential2.com Be More Wrong (Book) https://info.potential2.com/en-us/bemorewrong   Full Transcript Below ----more---- Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Colin Hunter is a special guest on today's show. He's an author of Be More Wrong, a mentor, entrepreneur and coach. He's also the CEO of Potential Squared, but before we get a chance to speak with Colin, it's The Leadership Hacker. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: In news today, we explored the world's top female friendly companies of 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic is taken an especially heavy toll on women around the world. It's estimated more than 64 million women around the world, lost their jobs with at least 800 billion in earnings lost last year in U.S. dollars alone. And that's a result, the time it will take to close the global gender pay gap has increased from 99 years to 135 years, according to the world economic forum. And these issues are achingly familiar, inadequate childcare, managing work, home stress, lack of opportunities. And in many cases, COVID may amplified the burden to the point where many women just left their jobs. Forbes Magazine recently teamed up with market research company Statista to help identify companies leading the way when it comes to try and support women inside and outside their workforces with an all-girl ranking of the world's top female friendly companies. So which company clinched the number one spot? Well CEO Michelle Buck became the first woman to lead the chocolatier in its 127 year history, you've got it? Hershey. Today women make up 42% of the Pennsylvania based businesses board. By 2025, aims to increase the percentage of women working in its workforce to 50%. And then this leadership population to 42%, that's up from currently 48 and 37% respectively. To reach its goals, Hershey launched a five-year plan called Project Pathways and it's to help its workplace and communities become more inclusive. And the project is run by collaboration of human resources and The Women's Business Resource Group and provides their teams with resources, such as, childcare, transportation, tutoring, and eldercare resources. Another firm to meet the top 10, Zoom. Video Communications Team, Chief People Officer, Lynne Oldham said that the Silicon Valley tech company had redesigned this recruiting and hiring strategies, diversifying its pipelines, revising job descriptions that they feature inclusive language and introduce uniformity across its interviewing process in an effort to reduce bias and increase the number of female hires. Zoom has also sought to support women through partnerships with charities, such as, If Chloe Can, a UK Organization that hosts workshops and connects teams with mentors to prepare them for the workforce. When admitted stay at home orders were unable to continue with its usual impersonal operations. Zoom stepped in, offering to facilitate their programming through services free of charge. And there are many other organizations who are demonstrating great diversity equity inclusion principles when it comes to hiring female employees in their workforce. If you want to get a full list, go to Forbes and look for the world's top female friendly companies and Statista surveyed over 85,000 women in 40 countries to curate this great report. That's been The Leadership Hacker News. Please let us know what you'd like us to feature in the news on our Leadership Hacker Podcast. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Colin Hunter is a special guest on today's show. He's an author of Be More Wrong. He's a mental, entrepreneur, coach and the CEO of Potential Squared International. Colin, welcome to the show. Colin Hunter: Thanks Steve, it's a pleasure. Real pleasure. Steve Rush: So how have you been? Colin Hunter: Yeah, well, good. Life is, and I hate to say this sometimes nowadays, but life is good. It's busy, but the new startup business which we're working on at the moment and yeah, we've got a lot of things, but I'm struggling to deal with sometimes with this new hybrid world. I'm sure everybody out there is. But starting to work with the new norm. Steve Rush: It's kind of ironic. We've tried to have lunch for six months and we're like ships that pass in the night when it comes to London these days, because we're in that hybrid world, right? Colin Hunter: And I'm sure it's nothing personal. It's nothing personal from my side. Steve Rush: Sure, likewise. Yeah. So Colin for the listeners that haven't had the opportunity to meet with you, just to give us a little bit about the backstory and how Potential Squared came about? Colin Hunter: Yeah, so if I go back, so I've been in leadership since 1996, but before that, if I go back, I was brought up in Newcastle, Northeast of England. Father was a pediatric cardiologist. And part of me telling you this, because there's a story that I grew up with him working on looking at ultrasound for baby's hearts and was an amazing doctor, saved many people's lives. And I had a grandfather was professor of Theology. So my early part of my life was wondering how the hell do I actually compete and match up to my father and my grandfather. So I spent most of that time working, trying to be somebody I'm not. And then around about 30, 31. I had a moment which I'm sure we'll talk about, which redefined my career. And since then I've been working in the form of leadership consultants, working on leadership, looking at leaders and how they work. And more luckily I've started to recraft my career and our business around creating playgrounds to disrupt the way people are led. I started to realize I wanted to have some fun, Steve. I wanted to, to play with our work and I started one to experiment. And since 2007, I have set it out, whether it's about the use of actors or VR, virtual reality. I've started to look at how we do immersive, but real experiential workshops and training for leaders to shift the way and disrupt the way they think about leadership. And that is where I am now. And I'm still experimenting, still learning, but there's still suffering a bit from what I went through up to the age of 30 and how that's impacted my career, yeah, Steve Rush: Yeah, you comfortable? Let's go in there, if we talk about that time. Because I think it's a really important lesson for many people listening to this story because it really defined who you were at that time, but also how you ended up where you are now. Tell us about what happened that defining moment that you called it? Colin Hunter: Yeah, So I spent my childhood exploring experiments, having loads of groups of friends and I loved my life. I was out, my mother and father used to say this, you know, many forms of communication, but one was, “go tell Colin” and he would go tell somebody else and then I'd have conversations, a startup conversations. So I spent up to a probably the ages, 17 of loving my friends, my life, and even despite school, enjoying the rest of what I was trying to do. But in the background, my father being what he was and my grandfather being a professor of Theology and, you know, I was known as AM Hunter grandson. Pardon he was an author a writer in the New Testament. And therefore I spent my life what I would do to reach the levels that they'd got to? Steve Rush: Did that happened at quite an early age for you as well, that awareness of who you were and the indeed unconscious pressure that you felt from that. Happened at quite an early age, right? Colin Hunter: Yeah, it did. I mean, if I go back to when I was 11, my grandfather sat me down and said, for those who know, Robert Burns. He said, Tama Shanta, I want you to be able to learn this and re-slate Tama Shanta. And I want you to do this over Christmas and I want you to learn. And so therefore I started learning. I realized I couldn't, firstly I couldn't learn it by road,  Secondly, I didn't know why I was doing it. And thirdly, they seem to be some sort of tests that I was going through and I don't criticize my grandfather for it. He was an academic, he was looking for me to show that I could be logical. And that I could work in a principle in a way that could have constructed arguments in the right way. All I cared about was relationships and emotions. I was in that space going, you know, I sat at his feet and I looked up at him. I thought, wow, this is great, but in no way could live and breathe what he was doing. He was just brilliant at constructing an argument. And I felt that in my depth. So that was at the age of 11 and 12. And then my father was in that space and he was working on ultrasound. Looking at how they diagnose and the baby's hearts. So I used to go in and see him in the hospital's saving baby's lives and that tiny, small babies and how we had this care, but this ability to teach others. And I thought this, I can't do this either. So, therefore I thought, should I be a doctor? Should I be an academic? Should I stretch myself? And therefore, I always looked at others from an early stage with a degree of imposter syndrome and said, I'm not worthy. And I wouldn't call it in those days, but what it meant was, I searched out areas that I could play in, but they tended to be away from my family. They tended to be away from those areas of logic and academia. And therefore I fought school, fought and in some ways, literally out a major argument with one of my teachers who suggested the age of 17. I leave school and go and get just a job in retail because that's all I want to achieve in my life. So, therefore when it comes to how I started off my career, I took everybody's advice. I joined and became a tax consultant. And I spent my life sat in a cubicle doing hand written computations attacks and wondered why I wasn't happy. And then, so I went to Procter & Gamble and had a great career there, but I was doing a job where I hated it. I mean, I was successful, but the cost of my energy in that role was huge. So I ended up having a breakdown basically at the age of 30 where I went back up to my parents' house in Newcastle in the Northeast of England from Nottingham. And I spent two weeks in tears. And I'm happy to talk about it now. And for many years I wasn't, but it was this clash where I was walking in a house where my father only cried once that I can remember when our dog died and therefore I walked into the house and I was crying. And it was almost like, they knew how to deal with it, but they didn't know how to do with it. Steve Rush: So how were you received by them at that time? Because I suspect having that strong veneer of professional academia around success doesn't come with showing much vulnerability. So how did that play out? Colin Hunter: I was lucky that he was adopted and, you know, bless him. He passed away earlier this year and I've done a lot of soul searching and he dealt with it in the way he knew, which is he suggested that I go see the doctor, a local GP, a general practitioner. And so therefore it wasn't a case of they weren't unsympathetic, but they were looking for a cure for it. And my mother has laterally suffered from mental health issues herself. And therefore there's more understanding in that space from that side, but I was lucky. They sent me to Gusto Silver, a GP and he canceled the appointments ahead of me and after me and he sat down and he did this brilliant thing, Steve. He told me the story of when he was in a car accident and how this card flipped over. And he remembered in slow motion, the car sliding along on its roof. And he remembered the music going slowly on the radio, but he saw his life flash in front of him. And he said something which has always stayed with me. He said, I have a gift then to learn about my life and what I needed to change. And he said, you've been given a gift, might not seem at the moment, but you given a gift that life is about energy systems and your energy is at zero basically. And your mind is telling you, you can't cope with it. And now is the time to think about your energy systems that feed your life and how you use them and be much more intentional about how you feed them and how you spend them in your life. And that was the most powerful thing somebody ever said to me in my life. And it's changed the way I work now. Steve Rush: When you look back on that time, do you see that as a gift now? Colin Hunter: Oh yeah. I mean, it's interesting when I was writing the book and I was thinking about it. I suddenly realized I had never gone back to see Gusto Silver. I'm not even sure if he's alive now and I feel guilty about that. Because that was a transformational piece for me, but I also think it's taught me, if I look now and how I'm bringing up my daughters who are 17 at 16, it's taught me to realize that real connection with them is so, so important. But as a leader, it's taught me so much more. Steve Rush: Yeah, indeed. And one of the things that astound me about you, Colin is, you are incredibly successful, incredibly well presented, strong courageous leader, as I see you today, but you still suffer with this nagging imposter syndrome from time to time. And I knew that of you, but how do you deal with that? Colin Hunter: I think the first thing is sharing it. Steve Rush: Yeah. Colin Hunter: So I was doing a keynote last night to an American audience, and these are all my competitors, the learning and development professionals globally, we meet each year at this conference. And I was sharing in this webinar with them, this story, and said about the imposter syndrome. And what was amazing for me is that however many people suddenly started to share that they had the same thing. So I used to walk into this place, center for creative leadership, vital, smartest, crucial conversations, and just feel I wasn't worthy, but so many people in that same space have the same feelings. And so therefore by telling that story, and I think this is where the humility and the humble nature of leaders. If you tell your story of where you have struggled, it's amazing how many people suddenly go. Yeah, I'm the same way. Steve Rush: Yeah. Colin Hunter: And that's what's happening now, but there's other things I've been possibly to work on, but sharing the story has been one of the biggest, first steps. Steve Rush: And I don't know about you, but I think just having the label imposter syndrome, which, you know, wasn't there sort of 10 years ago, it helps us to actually recognize that it's a thing and that we can actually deal with it. Whereas before we might have dealt with it as something else. Colin Hunter: I think the senior leaders, you know, work in this space, we work with senior leaders. I'm amazed how many of them senior leaders have imposter syndrome, one version, or the other, you know, wondering how the hell they got to the top of the organization. Secondly, wondering how the hell they're going to lead this organization, because whether it's intellect. I was chatting to a client friend the other day, and he's been dyslexic diagnosed probably later in his life, but he's been very, very successful in this career, but he's always worried that somebody's going to find them out. However, he's used that positively because he leads with a humble nature because of that, it's been a powerful piece. And I think that's what a lot of people need to hear about the imposter syndrome is it starts you from a humility in a humble space, which is a powerful places that you needed to start rather than an arrogance and a belief in your own power and ability, that can be worked on. But listening to that voice in your head, not removing it, sometimes I described this as it's the loudest voice at a dinner party. And all you've got to do is dial it down and dial up the other voices in your head and the other neural pathways that allow you to be successful. Steve Rush: Yeah, great words. I often use the same analogy, but help people to think about, it's the one voice you wake up with in the morning. It's the one that you go to bed with and it'd be the last voice you hear before you die. So it needs to serve you well. Colin Hunter: Also, my meditation headspace in the morning and my exercise in the morning is a powerful piece of me. As Jamie Smarter wrote a book, clarity said, when you fall out to your thinking, it allows you to come up with inspired action. And I find that really heavy in the morning and within my head space and something pops into my head and it's just, oh, yep. That's the answer. That's the answer. But how often do you do that? Steve Rush: Thanks for sharing that story. And I think it's really important to help people understand you actually as a character, because you are incredibly successful now, and you're running a successful business with Potential Squared. And I think it just gives people some insights that we all come from different perspectives to arrive at where we've arrived at. And that journey is really important, isn't it? Colin Hunter: Yeah, it's massive. Hero's journey as they say. Steve Rush: Yeah, so tell us a little bit about the work that you and the team are doing at Potential Squared at the moment? Colin Hunter: We're having fun, and I think that's a key sense. Because we're in a startup on one area of business and anybody who's been involved in a starter, we'll say it's fun, but at the time it doesn't feel like it's fun quite a bit at the time. We're doing a couple of things. One is, we are restlessly dissatisfied about our work. So we've got our P2 leadership side of the business, which is leadership development and working. We've got VR, we've got virtual reality in there. We've got the use of The Actors, which is a powerful piece. And the always gets most positive feedback about the work we do, bringing in actors to explore conversations, getting people to have a, almost a who's line is it any way, if you remember the comedy program interaction and we find that that immersive experience of getting the conversations in leadership is the same as now, as the VR is allowing us to do where people are in the headsets, they are in this virtual reality. And they suddenly find that they're being themselves, you know, their true behaviors are coming out. So we're doing a lot of good work in there, but there's always been something missing from that work. And so therefore our new project is something called the 500 where we're looking at saying so biggest challenges in this world at the moment is equity. Increasing equity for people when they're young in terms of moving up in their careers. And if you look at where organizations are facing challenges at the moment is finding new talent, they're all fighting for talent in the same pools, is costing them more. Most of them can't afford that extra cost. And then we've suddenly realized that we're probably only tapping into 25% of the talent pool. And the other 75% is set in places, either places where they've had a very difficult backgrounds. So they've had a life story that's, you know, I wouldn't recognize even despite my stories, I'm telling you. Mine is trivial in some ways, compared to what others are experiencing. And therefore they've got newer diversity side to that where they're challenged by that. So we're, doing some work to say, so how do we train leaders and develop leaders to think with a wider view of life? To explore into different areas of the community? Exploring different areas of society and have a wider vision for that? Which benefits a couple of things Steve, which I'd never really thought about before. One is design thinking. You look at Procter & Gamble. You look at all the different types of organizations I used to work for. And you look at how they are trying to design for the different needs of different people and whether its disability or whether it's [Inaudible 00:20:01] or whether it's age or gender, all of these things need to come into play. But then you've got this talent pool where suddenly people are realizing that in that near diversity pool, you've got some brilliant thinkers and brilliant ideas, so how do we tap into that? But you've also got these people, they come from those places that you're trying to sell your products into. So why wouldn't you tap into that? But the third thing, I think the most important thing for me is that if you look at where most leaders are now, and particularly with the pandemic, that said, most people thinking, how do I give something back? How do I tap back into society? How do I do some good for the wider population? And I see so many who are willing to spend their own money to go and do something for others. And this new project works along those lines. So that's what we're working on at the moment to get people into a wider space. Steve Rush: Sound fun. Colin Hunter: Wider vision, it is. Steve Rush: And when it comes to your work, one of the things that I particularly like about what you do is, you called it at the beginning of the show actually. You have these equal playgrounds that you create to really tap into helping people unlock different behaviors. From your experience, by just having the notion of creating playgrounds, what behavior does that then unlock? Colin Hunter: There's two things, you can't tell people to have fun. The old saying, well go have fun. Steve Rush: That's right. Colin Hunter: It doesn't help. But if you think about some of the best times you've had, it's that stepping out of where you are now. Stepping out of the front door. And for some people, playgrounds is going off into the wilds and just taking some time by itself. Scotland for me has been through the pandemic because looking after my father at the time as allowed me to go on these coastal walks and experience nature, and that's a playground for me, I gets inspired and some great thoughts. I have had an old collogue who used to work when they were doing the Marks & Spencer turnaround, his idea was working 14, 15-hour days doing the night shift in the marble arch store of Marks & Spencer. And his playground was discovering new ways of working. But the idea in my head was, how do we create a place where it makes people think they're going to have fun? They're stretching themselves, but it's almost like they've got a safe place with a soft landing if they fail to try something different, rather than sailing their ship around the Harbor, as we describe it and doing the same thing safely all the time, why not seek rougher seas? Why not get barnacles on your butters as I described it and go and stretch yourself. But if it's in a playground where the highest risk is that you might get it wrong and somebody who's going to give you feedback, you going to learn. And why don't we do that? And just take a simple thing, like having a conversation now about race, skin, color diversity, wouldn't it be great to have a safe place, to allow people to have conversations, to learn and grow, but as soon as you say something wrong, you're hammered for it. So that's what we're talking about. Playgrounds, safe places to land, where people can explore. Steve Rush: Yeah, it's a great metaphor and the reality as well, I guess, if you were allowing yourself to think that way. Colin Hunter: Yeah. Steve Rush: Yeah, and did that help you then start to think about using that notion to write your book, Be More Wrong? Was that kind of a trigger that led you that way? Colin Hunter: Yeah, it's ironic that the title is be more wrong and it took four years for me to be comfortable to publish it. Steve Rush: So, let's talk about that because actually I recall when we had a conversation about this before the whole notion of calling a book Be More Wrong is an oxymoron for most people, isn't it? Colin Hunter: Yes, the title was probably the first thing I put down because I was starting a thing. So I've had so many screw ups in my life, but I'm still here and being successful. So surely there's something rich in this. But I think the biggest thing that helped me was in writing the book was I was introduced to IDEO through a Canadian company experience point where the whole principle of failing early, failing fast and learning first was introduced to me. And I started the think that all the work we do is around that. So to write the book, I suddenly realized we need to find using the hero's journey, metaphor, stepping out of your house, going on a journey, gathering your team together, carrying your followers together, having an inspiring story, a quest, a purpose, going and failing, facing good evil and failing and succeeding in equal measure, but learning and having a guide to do that was what we'd be doing for years. And actually the only bit that was missing was this design thinking piece, which is getting out there and experiencing and having a go at something, observing people in the real world. So therefore, the be more wrong philosophy is embedded in that fail fast, learn fast philosophy and give it the juice for the book, yeah. Steve Rush: And of course, if you reframe being wrong and failing to actually that's a learning experience, it helps you to grow from it. Doesn't it? Colin Hunter: It does. I mean, it is fascinating in our culture, that one failure and make somebody a bad person. Whereas actually, if you look in many different aspects of our life, these failures are learning and they are spaces where people can start to work on different ways of living. I still a big fan of Mandela and the sessions he had, the conversations he had after apartheid and he didn't let it go. He brought those people who had diminished the rights of people to understand and work on. So you could learn. And there's a classic example of a mistake of failure in many people's eyes that had to be learned from rather than just finishing it and getting on. We had to learn from the lesson. And some cases, some days, I actually feel that we haven't learned from those times or those mistakes and therefore, how do we create that environment to do it more again? Steve Rush: And do you think there's a lot to do with mindset and how people have perceived the event? So if you take Mandela as a perfect example, right? This is a guy who was imprisoned in Robben Island for decades, who could have been really bitter, twisted, and angry, and the people that imprison him. He then subsequently taught, educated and encouraged to think differently. And that's got to be down to mindset and other behaviors. What's your experience with that? Colin Hunter: I think it is. I think it is mindset. But I think it's a gift of mindset because I think if he hadn't that experience, a tough experience and he hadn't had the time to reflect and be really, really clear. And he was very intentional about his learning from that. And he was very intentional, but how he treated people around him, even his wife in terms of how he works in there. And I think there's leaders who, you know, they almost celebrate failures in the workplace as learning pieces, as long as there's learning and there's movement forward. Steve Rush: Yeah. Colin Hunter: What is a mindset? Steve Rush: One thing you said that specifically kind of, I think, was also being intentional. Colin Hunter: Yes. Steve Rush: Yeah. Colin Hunter: I think purposeful practice is a classic piece. You know, I'm not a sportsman, but I love my sport. And when you look at all the workers in here, having a purpose towards something whether it's being a top tennis player or competing at a particular level. And then there's purposeful practice, intentional practice of small, small things that can be. So, what we call practices. So how do I make a practice to become a habit habitual that feeds the system that makes me successful? And Brailsford with the Sky Cycling now, and he did it with British Cycling. Now critics always have these things, but if you look now in all sports, soccer, you look at American football, the small incremental gains that people are making intentional failure towards something, stress testing, working with exactly what this is about Steve Rush: Exactly right, yeah. And ironically purpose is one of your three enablers of leadership. So you have purpose, identity and presence. And I thought it'd be useful just to kick that about. Colin Hunter: Yeah, again, it's funny when you put something out there and Simon the snake put his work on purpose out there, you know, his Ted talk, which has been watched by many people and I loved it. And then you look at other people like Tom Peters, who said, well, purpose, it's great to say, you can just find it. But a lot of us don't find our purpose immediately. We stumble across it. But there is an intentionality about what motivates me. What is my passion? What do I want to do? And even when somebody says, well, my purpose is to be a good father, a good mother. There's that question afterwards, what type of a father or mother do you want to be? And so, for example, if I take the person identity for me, my purpose is to create playgrounds, to disrupt the way people are led. That's the mantra that I worked on to do that. But my identity I also have, and I hold as a father of daughters. So, my whole being and the identity of father of daughters is to start to think about how I disrupt the way that people lead and recruits and give opportunities so that women and my daughters have equal opportunities in the future. And therefore, my personal identity, then every day when I'm looking at things, not only for gender, but for race, and I'm starting to say, so how do I get more equity in society from that? So that purpose and identity. Now for most people, it's a tough one to establish a purpose. And that's why we do a lot of work on stories, getting people to tell their stories and working out their stories. When she listened to your stories and you realize, how have you crafted your life, what you've hated and what you've loved, you normally can find an underlying purpose that you can work on, but it's an experiment. In my work, it might be rejected. And then you move on to the next one. So, purpose and identity and the identity piece, I love this, which is, do I cycle or am I a cyclist? That's the classic piece. And if I'm a cyclist, I suddenly take it professionally. And I take it with great importance. So if I'm a father of daughters, I've suddenly put an identity. I need to work at it to be proud of. So those are two elements we've got. But I think the bit that I love the most is the presence piece that we have. In which if you think about it, we have to learn to dance to the music as a leader. We need to be agile. We need to go on a crazy train through the pandemic, and we're on an even crazier train next year. So how do I dance to that music? But the piece I love is, why not dance to other people's music and learning to do that? So rather than bringing the music I would have as a leader, how do I learn to be agile in the moment with other people's music? We'll be able to adapt and move to that music. And therefore we do a lot of work around gravitas, prominence, executive presence, and teaching people from an early age, how to have more impact in the vocal, physical, and also mental in terms of how they come across. So those are the three things. Purpose, why we do stuff, how we do it, and then the presence is how we show up. Steve Rush: I love it, yeah. Really simple. But actually, they're all aligned, aren't they? Colin Hunter: Yeah, if you get one of them wrong, it has a knock-on effect, like all systems on the other ones. Steve Rush: Coming back to your identity piece, that kind of sits in the middle because it gives permission, I suppose, to delve into purpose and also permission to how you show up. And we can change that identity by the shifting label that we wear, right? Colin Hunter: Yeah, I'd love that. I mean, it's a bit of,  “Tonight Matthew”, Matthew, for those, you know, there's a program in the UK where people go on and say, tonight, Matthew, I am going to be, but actually with the use of the Actors is given me a lot of work to say, how do I adopt an identity and how do I live and breathe it? And how do I learn to be authentic in that new version? And I think that's one of my other biggest challenges is authenticity is normally given as an excuse by somebody who say, well, this is how I am. I'm not going to change, but authenticity, Herminia Ibarra, London Business School says, authenticity is something that adapts and dresses, different circumstances you face. And therefore tonight, Matthew, I'm going to be this to try and develop something. That's going to be my future identity and my authenticity. Steve Rush: Yeah, very much so. So, one of the things I've seen about the work that you've had is that you're not afraid to challenge some of the traditional status quo of how we perceive leadership and leadership styles has been written about and quoted about for many years in different guises. You've reframed some of those, and you have your own full leadership styles now. And I wonder if you could share those with our listeners? Colin Hunter: Yeah, and I love this because it fits into the hero's journey. So, whether you're a Lord of The Rings fan or everything else that goes into Harry Potter, whatever your choices is. We talk about leaders, need followers, followers need leaders. So, the first system is, we describe it as how do I get engaged connections? How do I get followers to follow me? And how do I be impactful in that? And we call this the host. So, if you imagine a host at a dinner party or a host in terms of relationships, most of us only worry about our relationships on networks, our teams, either we've lost a job or we need to recruit, we need to hire and we don't pay attention to them. So, the first one is, about how I creates psychological safety? And how I create real difference diversity, inclusion, in my network? So that I'm not sitting in an echo chamber listening to my own thoughts. So that's the first one, the host. So, if you think about Frodo and Sam, a dwarf and an elf and Aragon, there was real diversity and different thinking and different views that came to that. And once you've your followership and you've got your hosts and you've got your team together, then the second system is the Energizer or what I call inspired energy in there, which is, how clear is your story? How clear are your inspiring stories that allow other people to see a part of your story as the leader? And therefore, we talk a lot around storytelling. We talk a lot about points of view around how we work and crafting that story and crafting the future story you've got is important in that, but the other part of energy is personal drive. So how resilient are you? How anti fragile, and a lot of my work at the moment, particularly in the pandemic is about poaching people to be more resilient, to put systems, whether it's meditation, fitness, diet, breath, other works in there, to have the energy by osmosis, give it to your team, but also spend it on the right thing. So that's the Energizer. And then the third area is disruptor. And this was given to me by IDEO, but how do I get fresh ideas through experimentation, but also how do I get ruthless and narrowing choices in there? So, we always believe that 80% of your experiments will fail, 20% be successful. Every day, I'm thinking, what are the two to three experiments I'm going to start running that could succeed, could fail. But as long as feeding, the system of fresh ideas, we're going to run in the team. And then when you think about Gandalf, you think about Dumbledore, there's always a guide. So as a leader, how strong is your mentoring and coaching and growth of capabilities? So the final style we talk about is catalyst. So as a mentor, having points of view and almost lighting fires under backsides for people to get them in the right direction, giving them points of view and direction, and then the coaching, which is lighting fires in their bellies by coaching and spending time. So, host, Energizer, disruptor, and then the catalyst of the four styles that have been use. Steve Rush: Great. I love the descriptive nature of them as well and brings it to life for folks listening to this, hopefully too. Colin Hunter: It's good. I love it. Steve Rush: Next part of our show Colin, we get into turn our leadership focus and hack into your leadership mind, which has enormous experience, not only leading the businesses you've led, but also having worked with some of the best leaders around the world. So first place I'd like us to go tap into your top three leadership hacks. Colin Hunter: So, the first one is pay it forward. So I was given a gift by a gentleman called Mike Taylor. And this is about network. For the last probably seven, eight years. I've practiced the principle on that for a leader, which is, I work my network, not wondering what I can get out of them, but by thinking about what are the three things I can do for people that I have connections with? So, I very rarely say no to a connection, very rarely. I'm going to a great club. That's celebrates massive mistakes in lives. And it's called the Cock-up club in London. I've never been to it, but I got an invite. And it's about leaders who go in and celebrate that. But I'm already going into that meeting by saying, so what are the three things that I can give to people I'm meeting there that night? What are the three things that I take? So that's my first leadership hack. The second thing is a very simple one. I don't know if you've ever heard of Churchill's prayers, but during the war, Churchill did something very simple with all his leaders every day. He got them together for a very short space of time. We now call a pulse, a daily pulse. And in that daily pulse, we talk about what did I do yesterday? What am I doing today? What am I doing tomorrow? And we started to do that in our business. And it gives a really clear idea about what people are working on, what gaps we have, but it's amazing how we identify resource issues and work in there. So, it's a very simple hack to give people, 9:50 in the morning, till 9:45 each day, we meet as a team for half an hour and we do that. And it's a breath of fresh air in terms of communication. Final hack. I was going to put something down here, but I'm going to change it. It was one given to me by an ex special forces gentleman. And he talked about brief back, check back and brief back, check back is the most simple thing in some ways, but we avoid it. So once I've given a brief to somebody and I've said, this is what I'm expecting, this is the project. We very rarely asked the question, which is what we tend to ask the question is like clear. And everybody goes, yeah, yeah, that's fine. Go away. But what we tend to not do is ask the question. So repeat back to me, please, if you could, exactly what you've heard. And in that brief back, it's amazing how often the articulation of the idea is different from the receiver than it was from the giver. So that's the first bit, what that allows you to do is correct any miscommunication or misguidance of the expectations you've given, but it also allows you with confidence for them to go off and just allow yourself to check back in. So it's a core part of empowering people and giving people accountability in there. So that's the final one Steve Rush: Love that last one. And we've had a couple of major generals on actually. This has come up in the conversations we've had with them too, because it's rooted in when you're about to send somebody off to war. Colin Hunter: Yeah. Steve Rush: Asking somebody, if it's clear, it's just not enough. Asking somebody if they really get it and understand it is absolutely essential, great hack. Next part of the show we call it Hack to Attack. So, this is where your be more wrong principle starts to play in really well. So, this is definitely where something in your life and your work has it worked out at all well, but there is an overall learning experience form them. You shared one that was a pivotal moment for you, but what would another Hack to Attack? Colin Hunter: So that the act for me is the need for a business partner. I've spent most of my life and it's probably related to the imposter syndrome, worried that if I didn't have a business partner, my business would not be successful because my level of capability and intellect and decision-making was not enough to drive it. So, you know, I had probably more business partners than I would care to admit, but when I look back, it gave me an insight that what I needed was less of a business partner and more of an advisory board. And so, I took on an advisory board in the last two to three years, three people, different skills, one in innovation and design, the other person more on the sales side. And the third one tended to be around more of the strategic direction and what are summarized by getting their noses into our business. But in most cases, fingers out, you know, as an advisory board, I had all the benefits of a business partner without needing to end a relationship that certain points, they could do that. And that's been my amazing Hack to Attack that I've deployed. And now we're seeing it as a proving ground, a playground for some of our advisors have never done advisory board roles before, never been non-execs. So they get to play and practice with us before they go on to bigger and better things afterwards. So that's, my Hack to Attack. Steve Rush: That's a great attack because what I'm hearing is exactly that and non-executive director role, who provides you with the counsel and direction. And then there's not that awkward. You know, this isn't working out for us when we have the tie, you know, equity, stakes and all the mess that comes with partnerships. Colin Hunter: Exactly. Steve Rush: Yeah, great. Colin Hunter: We pay them. Steve Rush: Yeah, of course. And the advantage, I guess, in doing so still is that when that time has served and the mutual value has got to its natural kind of capacity, you can switch them in and switch them out as the business starts to pivot and change directions as well. Colin Hunter: Yeah, and it's interesting on the latest business venture for the 500, we started to think that the advisory board we're going to have for that is I've got a contact who runs a business mentoring ex-convicts coming out of prison. And I'm starting to think, so that would be a great person to have it as an advisory board member and maybe somebody of your diversity area. So you can play with this in a good way to get different voices in your head and different points of view. So, it's a great process. Steve Rush: Definitely, yeah. So, the last part, the show Colin, you get an opportunity to go back and bump into Colin at 21 face-to-face toe-to-toe and give him some advice. What would your advice to Colin be at 21? Colin Hunter: It's interesting because I struggled with this at 21 because I look back to 21 and I struggled to work out what it is. And I had one thing that goes through my mind, but just mentioned before, but I would say to him, go find your own music to dance too. Find out what the music is that you want to dance too and then go dance with it, but also find other people whose music interests you to go dance with. And the key thing here, and I think Amazon web services have, this is one of the core values, which is natural curiosity, be curious enough to explore other people's music as well and find out what you like and go with it. Steve Rush: Super stuff. So, Colin for folk, listening to this, wanting to get a copy of, Be More Wrong, or learn a bit more about the business that you lead and the work that you do, where's the best place for us to send them? Colin Hunter: So, Be More Wrong, @bemorewrong on Instagram, be more wrong on Twitter. Website is bemorewrong.com, go explore that. For the business itself, potential2.com and go find out more about that. I'd love to connect with any of the listeners and explore more with you, but they can find out more information and connect with us there. Steve Rush: And they have to jump into the show notes and find all of that information in there as well. Colin Hunter: Lovely. Steve Rush: Colin, I've loved chatting and always do and wanted to say, thank you ever so much for being vulnerable, sharing your stories and being part of our community on The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Colin Hunter: It's been a pleasure, Steve, looking forward to that lunch when we can finally get it right. Steve Rush: Indeed, yeah, exactly. Thanks Colin. Colin Hunter: Cheers. Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler there: @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.