Podcasts about famed

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GSMC Classics: Bob and Ray
GSMC Classics: Bob and Ray Radio Episode 116: Present the CBS Radio Network [011] Charlie Chu, famed oriental sleuth and [012] Grand Motel

GSMC Classics: Bob and Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 33:02


Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding were an American comedy duo whose career spanned five decades. Using satire and deadpan delivery, their routine was typically to conduct radio or television interviews presented as though it were a serious broadcast, but using off-the-wall dialogue. GSMC Classics presents some of the greatest classic radio broadcasts, classic novels, dramas, comedies, mysteries, and theatrical presentations from a bygone era. The GSMC Classics collection is the embodiment of the best of the golden age of radio. Let Golden State Media Concepts take you on a ride through the classic age of radio, with this compiled collection of episodes from a wide variety of old programs. ***PLEASE NOTE*** GSMC Podcast Network presents these shows as historical content and have brought them to you unedited. Remember that times have changed and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Golden State Media Concepts or the GSMC Podcast Network. Our goal is to entertain, educate give you a glimpse into the past.

Source Daily
YMCA announces new $15 million indoor sports center; Ohio's famed Hartman Rock Garden; Remembering Azie Lee Hart

Source Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 6:05


YMCA announces new $15 million indoor sports center to be built off I-71: https://www.richlandsource.com/news/ymca-announces-new-15-million-indoor-sports-center-to-be-built-off-i-71/article_13d257da-3442-11ed-9c56-9be4eaa95505.html Ohio's famed Hartman Rock Garden emerged from the Great Depression: https://www.richlandsource.com/area_history/ohios-famed-hartman-rock-garden-emerged-from-the-great-depression/article_8fc76f0e-7cb8-5262-b491-bd9c666a898b.html Today – Earlier this week the YMCA announced that a new $12 to $15 million, 125,000 square-foot indoor sports complex will be built near the intersection of I-71 and State Route 97 in Richland County.Support the show: https://www.sourcemembers.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Politicrat
Unpopular Speech By Tweet After Beloved Famed Persons Die: Fallback? Or Fallout Merited?

The Politicrat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 74:25


On this Wednesday episode of THE POLITICRAT daily podcast: Omar Moore on some recent examples of unpopular speech in the immediate aftermath of the death of a well-loved famous person. Is it better to fallback and suspend your sentiments in such situations? Or is the fallout from unpopular speech in the wake of one's death merited? Is speech ever really “free”? Or are there consequences? September 14, 2022. The AUTONOMY t-shirt series—buy yours here: https://bit.ly/3yD89AL Planned Parenthood: https://plannedparenthood.org Register to vote NOW: https://vote.org The ENOUGH/END GUN VIOLENCE t-shirts on sale here: https://bit.ly/3zsVDFU Donate to the Man Up Organization: https://manupinc.org FREE: SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE BRAND NEW POLITICRAT DAILY PODCAST NEWSLETTER!! Extra content, audio, analysis, exclusive essays for subscribers only, plus special offers and discounts on merchandise at The Politicrat Daily Podcast online store. Something new and informative EVERY DAY!! Subscribe FREE at https://politicrat.substack.com Buy podcast merchandise (all designed by Omar Moore) and lots more at The Politicrat Daily Podcast Store: https://the-politicrat.myshopify.com The Politicrat YouTube page: bit.ly/3bfWk6V The Politicrat Facebook page: bit.ly/3bU1O7c The Politicrat blog: https://politicrat.politics.blog Join Omar on Fanbase NOW! Download the Fanbase social media app today. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to this to this podcast! Follow/tweet Omar at: https://twitter.com/thepopcornreel.

The Michael Berry Show
Famed Author Of 'Friday Night Lights' Buzz Bissinger

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 31:50


The Czar talks to Buzz Bissinger about his Friday Night Lights, and his new book The Mosquito Bowl: A game of life and death during World War II.

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
Discover What's New at Santa Barbara's Famed Hotel Californian

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 9:53


Mia Giobbi Thomas, vice president of sales and marketing for the Hotel Californian, talks with James Shillinglaw at last month's Virtuoso Travel Week in Las Vegas, about her signature property, recent renovations, new programs and how the hotel is ready and waiting for your clients in trendy Santa Barbara. Thomas also oversees sales and marketing for two other great California properties, Hotel Les Mars and Black Walnut Inn & Vineyard. For more information, visit www.hotelcalifornian.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube.

Monitor Mondays
Medical Necessity: The Necessity of Defining the Dilemma

Monitor Mondays

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 37:09


A national debate is raging across America involving providers and payers. The vexing issue is of medical necessity—and the search for consensus on a definition for this simple yet complicated issue. During the next live edition of Monitor Mondays, Tim Brundage, MD will set the table for a robust discussion. Also on the rundown, the growing presence of private equity firms in healthcare. Given that they see healthcare as an attractive target for its investments, could their laser focus on improving profit margins potentially cross the line into Medicare fraud? Famed whistleblower attorney Mary Inman will report on False Claims Act cases that the U.S. Department of Justice has and continues to pursue against private equity for such alleged practices.Other segments will include these instantly recognizable broadcast segments:The RAC Report: Healthcare attorney Knicole Emanuel, partner at the law firm of Practus, will report the latest news about auditors.Risky Business: Healthcare attorney David Glaser, shareholder in the law offices of Fredrikson & Bryon, will join the broadcast with his trademark segment.SDoH Report: Tiffany Ferguson, a subject matter expert on the social determinants of health (SDoH), will report on the news that's happening at the intersection of healthcare regulations and the SDoH.Monday Rounds: Ronald Hirsch, MD, vice president of R1 RCM, will be making his Monday Rounds with another installment of his popular segment.Legislative Update: Matthew Albright, chief legislative affairs officer for Zelis will report on current healthcare legislation.

Legal Ethics in the News - NYC Bar Association
Documents Inadvertently Sent: Claw It Back. Shaming Lawyers For The Clients They Accept or Reject

Legal Ethics in the News - NYC Bar Association

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 31:48


Alex Jones's law firm reportedly sent opposing counsel years of Jones's text messages and they were used to cross-examine him. Could the firm have mitigated the harm through what has come to be known as claw back? Are Jones's lawyers now exposed to discipline or damages? Famed appellate lawyer Paul Clement left Kirkland when the firm decided to stop advocating for Second Amendment rights. Clement had just one a big Second Amendment case in the Supreme Court. On the flip side, lawyers are sometimes shamed because of the clients they do represent. Who's right here? No one did anything unethical. But can lawyers be criticized for the clients they accept or reject? Stephen Gillers is the Elihu Root Professor of Law and Barbara Gillers is an Adjunct Professor of Law, both at New York University School of Law.

Voices of Montana
Budd-Falen Explains Appeal of BLM Decision on American Prairie

Voices of Montana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:33


Famed property rights Attorney Karen Budd-Falen is representing the Montana Stockgrowers Association and North and South Philips County Grazing Districts on an appeal of the Bureau of Land Management’s decision to allow a change in use for the American Prairie. […]

Breaking It Down – Frank MacKay
Debbie Gibson & Anthony Michael Hall, Dr. Robert Ang, John Waters, and Peter Busacca | 09-09-2022

Breaking It Down – Frank MacKay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 52:41


Debbie Gibson & Anthony Michael Hall both star in the new film “The Class” which pays homage to the iconic brat pack film “The Breakfast Club.” Famed filmmaker John Waters talks about tripping on acid after 70 years old.  Peter Busacca is the author of “How A Nursing Home Works.” Dr. Robert Ang discusses clinical cancer trial that are taking place at Sloan & Hackensack Medical center.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The TMZ Podcast
MJ's Ex-Wife Reveals Shocking Drug Stories about Famed Bev Hills Doctor

The TMZ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 25:06 Very Popular


Debbie Rowe, Michael Jackson's ex-wife and mother of 2 of his children, worked for a Beverly Hills dermatologist for decades, and for the first time, she reveals a shocking story of how Dr. Arnie Klein traded drugs for entry into the celebrity lifestyle. Major drama at the "Don't Worry Darling" premiere -- and we're not even talking about Olivia Wilde and Florence Pugh ... this one's all Harry Styles and Chris Pine, with an apparent spit attack. Britney Spears is calling out her son Jayden James ... accusing him of undermining her and wondering if he's pissed the gravy train is about to run dry. Scottie Pippen's probably not going to like this -- his ex-wife is in Miami seemingly getting cozy with his old teammate's son ... and not just any teammate, it's Michael Jordan. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Midnight in Kentucky
Our Weird Kentucky Home #1

Midnight in Kentucky

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 12:21


"Famed gonzo writer and Kentuckian Hunter S. Thompson may have put it best when he said of his home state, simply, 'This is a weird place.'”Audio support for this episode was provided by Truckstop Dave from the upcoming Angry Small Town album.Shownotes:-Midnight in Kentucky on Patreonhttps://www.patreon.com/Midnightinkentucky-Truckstop Dave on Jamendohttps://www.jamendo.com/artist/349109/truckstopdave-Midnight in Kentucky onlinehttp://midnightinkentucky.com-Ransom Letter Publishing Tee Publichttps://www.teepublic.com/user/ransom-letter-publishing-Ransom Letter Publishing Youtubehttps://youtube.com/channel/UCbSPcYF4tS4LqjMj_l0Qf2g

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
Insider Video: Rediscover New York City's Famed Baccarat Hotel

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 19:58


Pradeep Raman, general manager of the Baccarat Hotel, talks with James Shillinglaw of Insider Travel Report about his luxury property in the heart of Manhattan, including its famed bar and public rooms, sumptuous accommodations, dining venues, pool and spa. For more information, visit www.baccarathotels.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast -- with supplemental pictures and video -- can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel  or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube. 

Networking Rx
How To Know When You're Networking, When You Think You Aren't (EPS 518)

Networking Rx

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 27:02


Famed jewelry designer Marah Lago shares her journey from zero to $15M and discovers that she was networking all along … even though she didn't believe she was. Connect with her at https://www.linkedin.com/in/marahlago/ For more great insight on professional relationships and business networking visit https://www.amspirit.com/blog/ or contact Frank Agin at frankagin@amspirit.com.

Regina Meredith
Lifting the Consciousness of Your Home with Dr. Gary Schwartz & Jeff Stegman

Regina Meredith

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 46:43


Famed scientist and researcher of consciousness, Dr. Gary Schwartz of University of Arizona, Tucson, has recently turned his eye toward Focused Light Force Energy (FLFE), which is good news for all of us!  FLFE is a technology of the future, which, while people are greatly benefiting from it, it's still hard to explain. Meanwhile, the founders of FLFE are devoted to putting their consciousness-enhancing technology to the test, which led to the partnership with Dr. Schwartz, director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health. In this episode, we will look at studies proving the effects of FLFE on the growth and yields of crops and plants, as well as how FLFE has outperformed expectations in the area of EMF sensitivity. I, personally, am thrilled to now be able to sleep in hotels and densely populated areas again without my limbs buzzing! Enjoy!   Try FLFE today!: https://tm179.isrefer.com/go/TryFLFEfree/regina/   Subscribe to my newsletter: https://reginameredith.com/join-my-community/ Support my work on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/reginameredith Join Our Neighborhood: https://www.ourneighborhood.earth/   Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in the following program do not necessarily reflect those of ReginaMeredith.com. In keeping with this site's emphasis on sovereignty and knowledge, always use your own discernment and/or seek professional advice when making consequential decisions.

Let's Talk Native... with John Kane
Resistance Radio 9/1/22: Famed Psychologist Philip Zimbardo joins me for my radio show

Let's Talk Native... with John Kane

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 55:33


Famed Stanford Psychology Professor joins me for Resistance Radio to refute certain claims made about him and his work. We discuss Native mascots, stereotyping and racism.

Eyewitness History
Famed Boxing Announcer Gives Eyewitness Account Of Calling Some Of The Most Historic Matches

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 67:56


Barry Tompkins is a 48-year network television veteran. He is a play-by-play broadcaster, a four-time Emmy Award winner, and in 2006 was voted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame for his work as a boxing commentator.Barry was born and raised in San Francisco and began his career in local television at KPIX TV in 1968. Since then he has spent five years at NBC, ten years at HBO, eight years at ESPN, fifteen years at Fox Sports and currently does the ShoBox and Championship Boxing series' for Showtime while continuing to do a full schedule of college football and basketball.His credits include play-by-play commentary of The Super Bowl, the Rose Bowl, the NCAA Final Four, eight Olympic Games, The Tour de France, Wimbledon, the French Open and the U.S. Open Tennis, the World Gymnastics Championships, World Swimming and Diving Championships, World Figure Skating Championships, and horse racing's Triple Crown, World Cup Skiing, San Francisco Giants baseball, and over 200 World Championship fights.In addition he has covered the Masters, U.S. Open, British Open and PGA golf events, The Indy 500, Baseball World Series, hockey Stanley Cup, and the Soccer World Cup.Barry spent 35 years associated nationally with Pac 12 Conference football and basketball, and currently does Mountain West Conference football and Mountain West and WCC basketball for Time Warner Cable, Root Sports and Comcast Sports. He is also a weekly contributor on CSN Bay Area's Yahoo Sports Talk Live, a nightly one-hour sports conversation show.In addition to his broadcasting work, Barry writes a humor column for the Marin Independent Journal and is a contributing columnist for Comcast Sports Net Bay Area. He also teaches Storytelling for Television at Dominican University in San Rafael, CA.He is married to author Joan Ryan. They live in Sausalito, California. They have a son, Ryan who is 24 and are parents to a 3-year old Border Collie-Great Pyrenees mix named Rosie.Source: http://barrytompkins.com/

Resistance Radio with John and Regan
Resistance Radio with John Kane 8/29/22; Famed Psychologist Philip Zimbardo is my guest!

Resistance Radio with John and Regan

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 55:12


Dr. Philip Zimbardo joins me for the program to refute those using his name and misrepresenting his work to promote the use of Native mascots and to discuss his years of research, including his famed Stanford Prison Experiment and his current Heroic Imagination Project.

CitySpeak
Viggy Ganapathy: If R2-D2 Delivered Pizza

CitySpeak

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 20:20


Famed urbanist Jane Jacobs once compared the city sidewalk to a ballet, calling it a "complex order...always replete with new improvisations." Soon, this ballet will feature a new dancer: robots.Viggy Ganapathy is the head of government relations at Serve Robotics, a company designing small, four-wheeled robots that deliver food from local restaurants right to people's homes.

Hacking The Afterlife podcast
Hacking the Afterlife with Jennifer Shaffer, Luana, Magda and Robin Williams

Hacking The Afterlife podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 36:06 Very Popular


Jennifer and I improvise each week, asking who it is on the flipside wants to chat with us. Luana Anders is our moderator on the flipside, and whoever wants to come through is up to her. Her mentioning this woman "Magda" in terms of a book I'm writing, an interview I did with a woman who was able to access this Magda, who claimed to be a Praetor's wife in the cabinet of Herod in the time of Jesus was pretty unusual.  A note here to say that I've never heard of the word Praetor that I'm aware of, I don't know what it means, but as I was typing this description the word came to mind "Praetor's wife" - which means according to Wikipedia: Praetor ( Classical Latin: was the title granted by the government of Ancient Rome to a man acting in one of two official capacities: (i) the commander of an army, and (ii) as an elected magistratus (magistrate), assigned to discharge various duties." I've heard of the Praetorian guard, but I assumed they only guarded Caesar, and as such the word Praetor is completely unknown to me. But it popped into my head. Magda Archelaus - I don't know if she was married to Herod, or just someone in his cabinet - but in the research I'd done on the name, I looked up Herod Archelaus. (Famed during the era).  The interview I did with her was mind bending, as she claimed to be privy to events that led to the Crucifixion as well as the recovery of the body of Jesus, and those who attended to him - trying to heal him with aloe and myrrh (also reported in the Bible.) Luana suggests I dig deeper.  (I had stopped digging after including the article in this book I've written about accounts of Jesus from the flipside perspective.)  I shall endeavor to do some more digging. Robin Williams came in to talk about process - and indeed, mentioned this woman who reached out to me who had a conversation with him after our mentioning him recently.  She got this idea of a "granny award" or the role of granny - which I at first assumed meant Mrs. Doubtfire, but according to this conversation, may be the one where he played the role of a Granny onstage for Andy Kaufman in the 1970's.  Pretty funny stuff. As always, enjoy the podcast as an example of how simple it is to reach out to one's loved ones.  Enjoy. 

WBBM All Local
Famed Rush Street steakhouse will close at end of the year

WBBM All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:13


Also in the news: Man scaled a security fence at Chicago's FBI field office; Families are displaced after a fire in a condo complex in Prospect Heights; People living near Midway Airport on the Southwest side say there's been an increase in sex trafficking in the area and more.

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go
Famed Rush Street steakhouse will close at end of the year

WBBM Newsradio's 8:30AM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:13


Also in the news: Man scaled a security fence at Chicago's FBI field office; Families are displaced after a fire in a condo complex in Prospect Heights; People living near Midway Airport on the Southwest side say there's been an increase in sex trafficking in the area and more.

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Famed Rush Street steakhouse will close at end of the year

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 7:13


Also in the news: Man scaled a security fence at Chicago's FBI field office; Families are displaced after a fire in a condo complex in Prospect Heights; People living near Midway Airport on the Southwest side say there's been an increase in sex trafficking in the area and more.

Take Warning
118. Famed Warriors: Snatch Stealer, Tanned Nuts, and S**ts on his Hand!

Take Warning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 50:52


On this episode the boys discuss their plan on creating their brackets for the best TV shows. Dana White tried to get Tom Brady and Rob Gronkowski to come to the Las Vegas Raiders, but Jon Gruden messed that up. They also play a game called Right or Racist, which provided some additional details on the famed Crazy Horse's warriors, and we try our best to figure out how classified information can be declassified? Does it take more then just white out? Also the Meta (Facebook) AI Bot seems to be racist an thinks the 2020 election was stolen from Trump! Check out our main podcast and live streams every Monday on You Tube and check us out on social media and on TikTok before we get banned for good! Don't forget to subscribe and click the notification bell so you never miss a moment of the pod. Also if you like the show please hit that thumbs up! It let's Lee and Greg know that you care! Check out our webpage at takewarningpod.com Check out our sweet merch at takewarningstore.com. Email us at takewarningpod@gmail.com

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 168 Part 2: What It Like to See Celebrities Wearing Your Jewels

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 22:55


What you'll learn in this episode: Why being a jewelry artist is like being an engineer How Barbara got her jewelry in the hands of famous rock-and-rollers like David Bowie and the Rolling Stones  Why Barbara doesn't separate her jewelry into women's and men's lines Why talent is only a small part of what it takes to become a successful jeweler About Barbara Klar Barbara Klar was born in Akron, OH, with an almost obsessive attention for details. The clasps on her mother's watch, the nuts, bolts and hinges found on her father's workbench, the chrome on her brother's '54 Harley Hog...Barbara's love of hardware and metal and "how things worked" was ignited and continues to burn bright. Coming of age in the Midwest, Barbara was part of the burgeoning glam rock explosion making the scene, discovering Pere Ubu, DEVO, The Runaways, Iggy Pop and David Bowie in out-of-the-way Cleveland nightclubs. Cue Barbara's love of music and pop culture that carries on to this day. New York...late 1970's, early 80's. Barbara began making "stage wear" for friends in seminal punk rock bands including Lydia Lunch, The Voidoids and The Bush Tetras, cementing Barbara's place in alt. rock history as the go-to dresser for those seeking the most stylish, the most cutting edge accessories. She certainly caught the attention of infamous retailer Barneys New York, who purchased Barbara's buffalo skin pouch belts, complete with "bullet loops" for lipstick compartments. Pretty prestigious for a first-time designer! Famed jeweler Robert Lee Morris invited Barbara into a group show at Art Wear and Barbara joyfully began to sell her jewelry for the first time. Barbara opened her first standalone store, Clear Metals, in NYC's East Village during the mid - 80's. In 1991 she moved that store into the fashion and shopping Mecca that is SoHo, where it was located for ten years until Barbara has moved her life and studio upstate to the Hudson Valley. She continues to grow her business, her wholesale line and her special commission work while still focusing on those gorgeous clouds in the country sky. Barbara's work has been recognized on the editorial pages of Vogue, WWD, The New York Times and In-Style Magazine as well as featured on television shows including "Friends," "Veronica's Closet" and "Judging Amy." Film credits have included "Meet The Parents," Wall Street," "High Art" and The Eurythmics' "Missionary Man" video. Barbara has been hailed in New York Magazine as being one of the few jewelry designers who "will lend her eclectic touch to create just about anything her clients request, from unique wedding bands and pearl-drop earrings to chunky ID bracelets and mediaeval-style chains." Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Twitter Blog Photos available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Barbara Klar's jewelry has been worn by the like of David Bowie, Steve Jordan and Joan Jett, but Barbara's celebrity fans are just the icing on the cake of her long career. What really inspires her is connecting with clients and finding ways to make their ideas come to fruition. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the crash course in business she got when she opened her store in 1984 in New York City; why making jewelry is often an engineering challenge; and why she considers talent the least important factor in her success. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. If you haven't heard part one, please go to TheJewelryJourney.com. Today, my guest is Barbara Klar, founder and owner of Clear Metals. Welcome back.    So, is your studio inside your home now?   Barbara: Yes, it is. It always has been. One time, I tried to have my studio in the back room of my store in SoHo. That just didn't work at all. If they know I'm there, everybody is like, “Is Barbara here?” I could never get any work done. Eventually, I was able to get a building in Williamsburg and have my studios there. It was a great building because it had been a doctor's office in the 50s, so there was a little living space in the back and the front had been all the examination rooms. That worked out perfectly for my studio at the time.   Sharon: And you're in Woodstock, New York now?   Barbara: Yes, I am. I love it here.   Sharon: Had you moved there before Covid, or is that just an area you like?   Barbara: I've been here about six years now. I've been all over the Hudson Valley. I think I moved here prior to Covid. It's a very arty town and full of weirdos and like-minded people. It's a cool place. It has the history of Bird-On-A-Cliff, which was where all the Hudson Valley artists started. It started as an arts colony. So, it's got that history, and it's nice to be part of a history.    When I had my store—and I loved my store on 7th Steet in the East Village—I was so akin and felt such a vibe from the previous generations of jewelers that had stores on 8th Street in the West Village. It was a complete circle to me, and I feel that way now as well.   Sharon: So, you targeted Woodstock or this area to live in?   Barbara: No, I was going through a breakup. It was very painful. I found a place here. I knew it would be my home and my love. I was lucky. It's one of those guided journeys.   Sharon: Looking behind you, I can see you have quite a well-developed studio. You have all your tools. It doesn't seem like you'd be missing anything there.    Barbara: Definitely not. It's great.   Sharon: Did you start out that way? Did you collect the tools throughout the years?   Barbara: Since 1979, I've been collecting tools. There's always something else you need as a jeweler and a metalsmith. About 10 years ago I sold my house, which was a little bit south of Woodstock, and got rid of everything except my studio and my clothes. That's where I'm at now, and it feels so good to not be buried with stuff. I just have my workshop, and that's basically it.   Sharon: That's the important thing, having your workshop. I don't know if you still do, but you had a very successful line of men's jewelry.   Barbara: Yeah, I was one of the first to do men's jewelry. That was probably in the late 80s, early 90s. I've done a lot of men's. I had a lot of gay male clientele. They were always coming in, and they had a large disposable income. It worked out great. I love to see a man in jewelry. I love what's happened with the metrosexuals in the last eight or nine years. Even the nonbinary and straight males are feeling more comfortable with jewelry, and I think it's really great. Coming from a rock background, you see a lot of flamboyancy on stage, and you see a lot of guys flashing metal. I think it looks great.   Sharon: It that what prompted you to develop this line? Did you ever sell it? Was it a production line or was it one-off? How was it?   Barbara: It's limited production always. I had a friend ask me recently, “Barbara, on your website, why don't you have a category that's specifically men's jewelry?” I said, “I'll never do that because I can never tell what a man's going to like.” With all of this large spectrum of gender identity, I can't tell what somebody's going to like. That's not up to me, to decide what men's jewelry is. So, I never really bought into that, but I know men and kids seem to like my work.   Sharon: They look in your window and come in and say, “I'd like to try that on”?   Barbara: Yeah, especially some of the bigger rings. I was always surprised what was attractive to them. Also, there's a lot of word of mouth. I never relied on advertising. I got a lot of press, which didn't seem to do much, but mostly it's because of word of mouth that people come to me.   Sharon: Is the press how you developed your celebrity clientele? You were mentioning that you have quite a roster or that you've done a lot for celebrities.   Barbara: Yeah, that just kind of happened. In my store in SoHo, I used to have what I would call my “deli wall.” You know how you go into a deli in New York and you see all of the celebrities saying, “Oh, thanks for that corned beef sandwich. It was the best I had”? I had that in the background. Over time, celebrities would come in. A lot of stylists would bring celebrities. I developed the deli wall, and it was word of mouth again.   Sharon: I always wonder when I look at a deli wall if they ask people for their signatures, if they have a stack of photos in the back and say, “Would you sign this?” How did that work for you?   Barbara: I'd always ask them. It's hard to do sometimes. I don't want to overstep because every celebrity reacts differently to being recognized and interacting, but you've just got to do it. It's funny; I'm impressed, but I know they're human just like me. On my website, I sometimes look at the marketing stats, and that page is the most visited page. Here in America, we love our celebrities.    I know a lot of them had a big impact on me, so I get it. Once I waited in line for half a day because I made this belt for Tina Turner. She was signing records at Tower Records in New York City. I went up to her and showed her the belt, and I was so excited because she meant a lot me. She got me through a couple of breakups that were pretty devastating. So, I get it. I'm a fan. Definitely, I'm a fan.   Sharon: What did she say when she saw the belt?   Barbara: She was like, “Oh, I love it. I just love it.” She said, “I'm going to wear it.” I never saw her wearing it, but she was very kind and wonderful and gracious.   Sharon: That takes guts on your part, just to show a belt to a celebrity like that.    Barbara: It's not comfortable for me because I'm very shy. I'm really a shy person. I even tried being in bands. My friends were in bands. I work better behind the scenes, but sometimes you have to jump off that cliff. I'm one of these people that I might be shy, but I'm also brave. I'll take a risk. I think in these times, with the all the competition out there, especially for jewelry designers, you have to take a risk and you have to be brave.   Sharon: Yes, absolutely. It's amazing to me; so many people I talk to who make jewelry, they say they're shy, but you have to put yourself out there. You have to put your product out there. You can't just sit in your studio.   Barbara: You can't, and you also have to be able to talk about your work. There was a relationship I had at one time, and we had these arguments because he would make this incredible work. I would say, “What does it mean? How would you explain it? How would you define it?” and he would say, “Well, I'm not going to do that. If I have to do that, it negates everything. People should be able to draw their own opinions about what I'm saying.” I was like, “No, I don't agree. I think you should be able to say what your intention was, how you see it. If it's interpreted differently, that's an extra plus in my mind.” I think everybody should be able to talk about their work.   Sharon: Especially if you are doing what I'll call art jewelry. You're not walking into a place like Tiffany, let say. That's the only one of its kind.    Barbara: Exactly. The one-of-a-kinds are like that. When I had my store in SoHo, the greatest thing that was the most fun for me was making an inspirational thing that I thought nobody would ever wear or buy and putting it in the window, because that would get people to come in. They were outrageous; they were huge, and often I would sell those pieces. It was a shock to me.   Sharon: How did it feel to see celebrities, such as Steve Jordan, wearing what you made?   Barbara: It's pretty incredible. Once it leaves my hands, it takes on its own journey. It's an ego boost for a minute, but then you've got to make a living the rest of the time. I've been in this business so long, and you think, “Oh my God, I got my stuff on the Rolling Stones tour. It's so great.” It's impressive to people when you're at a party and you can say that. Ultimately, it means nothing. Has he mentioned my name or anything on the Rolling Stones tour? No. That may never happen, and that's fine. I don't care. It's fun.    Sharon: Is it validation to other people if you're showing your work or talking about it, and you say a certain celebrity wore it? Isn't that validation in a sense?   Barbara: It is. I try not to buy into that too much. The validation really comes from myself. I know what I'm doing. It's fine. I don't really need that, but that's an extra special perk, I must say.   Sharon: A validation for you, but also—I'm not sure it would sway me, but for a lot of people—it depends on who the celebrity is, but it could sway somebody. They might say, “If ABC person wore it, then I want one like it.”   Barbara: Oh yeah, definitely. It works that way. To a lot of my rock-and-roll friends, the fact that I've sold a lot of work to Steven Tyler or Steve Jordan means something. Sometimes they'll come to me with special commissions. One of my first commissions when I had my store in SoHo was for a client who had been to London, and he was obsessed with Keith Richards and the bracelet he always wears. He wears this incredible bracelet made by Crazy Pig Studios in London. He came to me and said he wanted me to make a bracelet like the one Keith Richards wears. I said, “Why would you have me do it? Why don't you dial Crazy Pig in London and get the same bracelet?” He said, “Oh, I was in there. They were mean. They were really intimidating. I don't want to give them my money.” So, I said, “All right. It's going to be a little different, but I'll make one for you,” and I made this incredible bracelet. I still sell it today. It's the Keith Richards bracelet. It's a fun story.   Sharon: Wow! Yeah, that is a fun story. You're also writing a book now. Tell us a little about the title.   Barbara: Titles are interchangeable, but this has been the title for a while. It's called “You're So Talented.” I'm not sure what the subtitle is going to be exactly, but it could be “It Takes More Than Talent” or “Confessions of a Worker Bee.” It's basically about my stories, my experiences not being a businessperson and being more of an artist, surviving New York. A lot of stories. It's geared towards kids who have a lot of talent, but that's not all it takes. Talent is like two percent of what it takes to be successful and to be creative and to be a survivor.    Surviving in New York City was such an incredible challenge, especially when you're living and working on the street level. You can't control what comes into your space. You don't know how business is done. I had just opened my store in the East Village. I was 24 or something, and this big bruiser guy comes into my store and is like, “You gotta pay me for sanitation pickup.” I said, “What? I have to pay for sanitation? I thought the landlord took care of that.” He said, “No, we pick it up.” I'm like, “Well, how much do you want?” He said, “We want $75 a month.” I said, “What? I can't pay that. I can barely pay my rent.” He said, “Well, how much can you pay?” and I said, “Well, I can pay like $15.” He said, “O.K.” and he walked out. Wouldn't you know, every month he was there for his $15. It was crazy.   Sharon: You were honest, but you had to become a businessperson over the years.   Barbara: It was such a challenge. I have to tell you, another successful designer once said to me, “Nothing teaches you about money like not having any.” I think that was one of the wisest words, because I learned how to become my own bookkeeper, my own press person, my own rep. I also had to pay all the employee taxes, navigate the business end of it, try to get business loans. That was such an experience. I heard 2Roses talking about this on your podcast, too, about how business should be included in art school training. I was totally thrown out there and totally naïve.   Sharon: It sounds like the school of hard knocks.   Barbara: Definitely.   Sharon: And that's what the book is about?   Barbara: Yes. People say, “You're so talented.” If I had a quarter for every time somebody said that to me, I'd be rich. No, it's not about that. It's about perseverance, and it's about hearing a lot of “no's.” It's about coming through the back door instead of the front door. The book is about things that were on my journey that were important and meaningful to me, and that I think young people could learn something from about moving to New York as an artist. It's very different now. I don't claim to know the ins and outs of New York City at this point in life, but I think my journey is still relevant.   Sharon: Definitely. I'm curious how you took the “no's,” because you must have heard a lot of “no's.”   Barbara: So many. It gets you to that next point. A no is actually good, because you're forced to meet up with another solution or another path. I'll never forget; I wanted to be like Robert Lee Morris, who had his work everywhere and bought a ranch in New Mexico and everything. I remember being tested for QVC in the 80s. They were having young designers on QVC. I did the test, and I heard them in the background saying, “I don't know if she works well on camera. She might be a little too quirky. Her work is a little too eclectic.” I was like, “Oh God, really?” So, I was like, “You know what? I don't care. That's my thing. Maybe I don't want to be a production person.”    I looked into having my work made overseas and all of that, and I realized, in the end, I would just be a manufacturer. For me, the art was more important. The hands-on making was more important. The person-to-person contact, communication with my clients and my employees was really important to me. I enjoy that way more than if I had been basically a business owner.    Sharon: It's having the mark of the hand on it. If I know that you crafted it or somebody crafted it, it has much more meaning, I think.   Barbara: Absolutely. It means a lot to me. Recently I had a client whose mother was a big jewelry collector and had a couple of Art Smith rings. The client had lost one of the rings in the pair in Provincetown. It went into the ocean, gone. I was able to hold the matching ring in my hand and look at it and see a signature, because the client wanted me to recreate this ring, which I did do. But the whole time I was making this ring, I kept imaging Art. The ring was covered in dots of silver and pink gold and yellow gold. It's a beautiful ring, very asymmetrical. The dots were raised like a half a millimeter off the band, and there were like 50 dots on this ring. So, I'm thinking of him making this ring in his studio. Every dot had to have a peg soldered onto the back before it was soldered onto the band. I did that 50 times, and I'm thinking, “My God, this guy was tenacious.” I had a lot of respect.   Sharon: How did you decide to start writing a blog?  You write a blog. How did that come about?   Barbara: I really enjoy writing, and there are things I wanted to say that the work couldn't say by itself. One of the things I've always been obsessed with since I was a child are charms. When I was five, Sherry Carr across the street from me had a shoebox full of charms, like the bubblegum charms, and I coveted that box. I was obsessed with that box. Every time I would see it, I would be like, “Show me the charms.” I wanted to knock Sherry out so I could get that charm. I started collecting charms at a very young age. They mean a lot to me, and they mean a lot to my clients. I talked about that in one of my blog posts. I think that was one of my first blogs, talking about charms and the meaning they hold for us. I think the spiritual side is important to me, the emotion you put to it and how it goes on the body. It's for the body.   Sharon: Well, you have very eclectic jewelry, very unique jewelry. Barbara, thank you so much for being here today.   Barbara: I loved it. Thanks so much.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Rock 'n' Roll Grad School
Rock n Roll Grad School #86- David Bowie at 75 with Martin Popoff

Rock 'n' Roll Grad School

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 42:45


This year would have been David Bowie's 75th birthday. Famed rock writer Martin Popoff has put together a wonderful present for us all- Bowie @ 75 is his new book, a look at the many phases of Bowie's multifaceted career.David Bowie @ 75 is available wherever you get your books on September 6th. For more information on Martin, to listen to his podcast, or to get copies of his many other books, check out his website.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 168 Part 1: What It Like to See Celebrities Wearing Your Jewels

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 19:25


What you'll learn in this episode: Why being a jewelry artist is like being an engineer How Barbara got her jewelry in the hands of famous rock-and-rollers like David Bowie and the Rolling Stones  Why Barbara doesn't separate her jewelry into women's and men's lines Why talent is only a small part of what it takes to become a successful jeweler About Barbara Klar Barbara Klar was born in Akron, OH, with an almost obsessive attention for details. The clasps on her mother's watch, the nuts, bolts and hinges found on her father's workbench, the chrome on her brother's '54 Harley Hog...Barbara's love of hardware and metal and "how things worked" was ignited and continues to burn bright. Coming of age in the Midwest, Barbara was part of the burgeoning glam rock explosion making the scene, discovering Pere Ubu, DEVO, The Runaways, Iggy Pop and David Bowie in out-of-the-way Cleveland nightclubs. Cue Barbara's love of music and pop culture that carries on to this day. New York...late 1970's, early 80's. Barbara began making "stage wear" for friends in seminal punk rock bands including Lydia Lunch, The Voidoids and The Bush Tetras, cementing Barbara's place in alt. rock history as the go-to dresser for those seeking the most stylish, the most cutting edge accessories. She certainly caught the attention of infamous retailer Barneys New York, who purchased Barbara's buffalo skin pouch belts, complete with "bullet loops" for lipstick compartments. Pretty prestigious for a first-time designer! Famed jeweler Robert Lee Morris invited Barbara into a group show at Art Wear and Barbara joyfully began to sell her jewelry for the first time. Barbara opened her first standalone store, Clear Metals, in NYC's East Village during the mid - 80's. In 1991 she moved that store into the fashion and shopping Mecca that is SoHo, where it was located for ten years until Barbara has moved her life and studio upstate to the Hudson Valley. She continues to grow her business, her wholesale line and her special commission work while still focusing on those gorgeous clouds in the country sky. Barbara's work has been recognized on the editorial pages of Vogue, WWD, The New York Times and In-Style Magazine as well as featured on television shows including "Friends," "Veronica's Closet" and "Judging Amy." Film credits have included "Meet The Parents," Wall Street," "High Art" and The Eurythmics' "Missionary Man" video. Barbara has been hailed in New York Magazine as being one of the few jewelry designers who "will lend her eclectic touch to create just about anything her clients request, from unique wedding bands and pearl-drop earrings to chunky ID bracelets and mediaeval-style chains." Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Twitter Blog Photos available on TheJewelryJourney.com Transcript: Barbara Klar's jewelry has been worn by the like of David Bowie, Steve Jordan and Joan Jett, but Barbara's celebrity fans are just the icing on the cake of her long career. What really inspires her is connecting with clients and finding ways to make their ideas come to fruition. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the crash course in business she got when she opened her store in 1984 in New York City; why making jewelry is often an engineering challenge; and why she considers talent the least important factor in her success. Read the episode transcript here.    Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today, my guest is Barbara Klar, founder and owner of Clear Metals. Barbara began her work as a jeweler in 1980 in New York and has grown her business from there. She has a roster of celebrity clients. She has also developed a successful line of men's jewelry. Steve Jordan, who replaced Charlie Watts throughout a recent Rolling Stones tour, sported her jewelry throughout. Most recently, Barbara has become interested in reliquaries. She is also writing a book. We'll hear more about her jewelry journey today. Barbara, welcome to the program.   Barbara: Thank you, Sharon. I'm so happy to be here talking about my favorite subject, jewelry.   Sharon: So glad to have you. I want to hear about everything going on. Tell us about your jewelry journey. Did you always like it?   Barbara: I was obsessed with my mother's jewelry box. She wasn't a huge jewelry collector, but she had some gemstone rings from the time my father and her spent in Brazil in the semiprecious capital, Rio. I just loved her selection and got obsessed.    Sharon: Did you decide you wanted to study jewelry then?   Barbara: No, I really didn't. My sister was the artist in the family, and I was always trying to play catch-up with her. Eventually I took a class at Akron University in Akron. Well, I made some jewelry in high school out of ceramics. I loved to adorn myself. I loved fashion. I loved pop culture. I was always looking at what people were wearing, and jewelry was so interesting to me because it was so intimate. It was something you could put on you body, like a ring. You could look at it all the time, and it became part of your persona, part of your identity. Sometimes it represented the birth of a child.    I used to go to the museum in Cleveland a lot, and I started seeing these top knuckle rings on women in the Medieval and Renaissance paintings. I ran home and went to my mother's jewelry box because I remembered she had my sister's baby ring in there. I put it on my little pinkie finger. She saw me wearing it and she got very upset, but I started scouting flea markets until I could find my own top knuckle ring. I wear a lot of them at this point in life.   Sharon: Wow! We'll have to have a picture of that. I can see your fingers. You have a ring on every finger, it looks like.   Barbara: Practically.   Sharon: So, you went to the Cleveland Institute of Art. Did you think you'd be an artist or a graphic designer? What did you think you'd do?   Barbara: Like I said, when I went to Akron University, I studied beginning jewelry. My teacher at the time noticed I had an aptitude, and he said, “If you really want to study jewelry making, you should go to the Cleveland Institute of Art.” At that point, I made an application and I got in.   Sharon: Did you study metalsmithing there? When you say jewelry making, what did you study?   Barbara: It was called metalsmithing. It was a metalsmithing program, and at that point in time, Cleveland had a five-year program. You didn't really hit your major until your third year, so you had a basic foundation of art history and drawing and painting. It was really a great education. I feel like I got a master's of fine arts rather than a bachelor of fine arts. When we studied, our thesis was to do a holloware project. A lot of people did tea sets. I did a fondue set and it took me two years to complete. It was a great training, but it was also very, very frustrating because it was a very male-dominated profession.   Sharon: Do you still have the fondue set?   Barbara: I do. I entered it into a show, and they dropped it and it got dented. I have yet to repair that. Over the years, the forks have gone missing, but I have incredible photographs of it, thank God.   Sharon: Wow! So, you were the only fondue set among all the tea sets.   Barbara: Yeah, I was. I had to be different.   Sharon: You opened your own place right after you graduated. Is that correct?   Barbara: Pretty much. All my friends were moving to New York City, so I said, “Hey, I'll go.” I'd been commuting there because my boyfriend at the time was Jim Jarmusch, and he had moved to Columbia to study. I had been going there off and on for a couple of years and when everybody moved to New York City. I was like, “Why not?” So, I went.   Sharon: How far is it from Cleveland or where you were going to school?    Barbara: It's about 500 miles.   Sharon: So, you would fly?   Barbara: No, I would drive. Those were the days you could find parking in the city.   Sharon: That was a long time ago. I'm impressed that you would open your own place right after you graduated. Some people tell me they knew they could never work for anybody else. Did you have that feeling, or did you just know you wanted your own place?   Barbara: No, I didn't. It took me a couple of years. I was in New York a couple of years. I moved in '79 and I opened my store in '84. One thing I did discover in those five years is that the jobs I did have—thank God my mother insisted that I should have secretarial skills to fall back on in high school. She said, “You're not going to depend on any man.” So, she got me those skills, and I became a very fast typist. I realized eventually that to save my creativity, I needed to have a job that was completely unrelated to jewelry work. I would work during the day, and I found a jewelry store where I could clean the studio in exchange for bench time. I started doing that. A lot of my friends were in rock-and-roll bands, and I started making them stage ware when I could work in the studio for free. It just evolved into that before I opened my store.   Sharon: Tell us about your jewelry business today. Do you still make it?   Barbara: Oh yes, I still make everything. I have one part-time assistant. I no longer wholesale. I do a little bit of gallery work. I wish there was more, but I consider myself semi-retired. I'm trying to work on my book. Mostly I do commission work, and I do maybe one or two shows a year. I like to say I have a cult following that keep me in business.   Sharon: When you say you have a cult following, do rock-and-rollers call you and say, “I need something for a show”? How does that work?   Barbara: Pretty much. I'm lucky enough to have been in this business since 1984, so a lot of my private clients, now their children are shopping with me and they're getting married. It's really nice. I feel very blessed to have that.   Sharon: Yeah, especially if it's a second generation.    Barbara: That means something to me because they have a different sense of style. The fact that they would find my work appealing moves me, makes my heart sing.   Sharon: Do you find that you go along with their sense of style? If you have one style you were doing for their parents, let's say, do you find it easy to adapt? Do you understand what they're saying?   Barbara: I do. I try to understand. First of all, I listen. I'm a good listener, but I'm still old-fashioned. I still like streetwear. I still love pop culture. A lot of times I'll ask them what they're looking for, and I can always tell. Even when I had my store, when somebody would walk into the store, I can get a sense of their style. I'm one of these designers who can design very different, very eclectic work, from simple and modern to intricate and whimsical. That used to be a problem for me in my early days because the powers that be—I had a rep. They were like, “Barbara, your work is so different. Why don't you try to make it coherent?” I couldn't. I tried to and I came up with beautiful lines, but for me, the joy is the variation and never knowing what I'm going to come up with.   Sharon: Is that what's kept your attention about jewelry?   Barbara: I think so. And being challenged by commission work and by getting an idea and trying to make it come to fruition. I actually think jewelry designers are as much architects and engineers as anything else, because you get an idea and you're like, “How am I going to make that happen?” That keeps me inspired and challenged.   Sharon: I remember watching a jeweler making a ring. This was several years ago, but they were talking about how jewelry is engineering because of the balance and all of that.    Barbara: Oh yes, totally. There was time when I really wanted to study CAD. I looked into it a bit, and I realized you also have to be able to draw in order to do CAD. It really helps if you have some knowledge of metalsmithing or jewelry making before you enter into a program like that, because you have to be able to visualize it and see how it's going to come together, how it's technically going to work. That interests me a lot.   Sharon: So, that's not a problem for you. You can do that in terms of visualizing or seeing how it would come together.   Barbara: It's a challenge. I'll find myself getting inspired by an idea and spending a couple of days or even a week thinking about how it's going to be engineered, how it's going to fit together. I made a tiara for the leader of a local performance group. He's very flamboyant, and he sings and has a beautiful band. I made him a crown out of a crystal chandelier that I got at a flea market. It was an engineering challenge. It was really fun.   Sharon: It sounds like it. I don't know if I could even imagine something like that. I wanted to ask you about something you said a little while ago, that you wished there were more galleries who wanted your work. What was it you said?   Barbara: I've been making my living doing limited-production items that sell very well. I have a classic piece—I call it the pirate, which is a lockdown mechanism earring that is kind of my bread and butter. But what I've been doing in my off time is making, like you mentioned in your opening, reliquaries or pieces that are more art than jewelry specifically. That's what I've been doing during Covid and everything. It's like a secret group of pieces I've been working on. It would be nice to have a gallery to show them in, but they're very unique and different, so I haven't found that yet.   Sharon: Tell us a little bit about the reliquaries. Tell us what they look like and what they're supposed to represent.   Barbara: I got obsessed with reliquaries when I was going to the Cleveland Institute of Art because right across the street was the Cleveland Museum of Art. I spent a lot of time there, and they have a fabulous armor hall for armor and a 17th century room that's filled with religious reliquaries. I was fascinated by how these fragments of bone or hair were incorporated into jewelry and what they represented as objects, how people would pray to these things or display these items with great meaning. It really moved me, and I started making them in college covertly. I continued that living through the AIDS crisis and now Covid.    I did some pieces recently for people who had lost their loved ones, incorporating pieces of hair or fragments of letters from their loved ones. I find that so meaningful because you have something to hold in your hands that gives you a link to this person whom you've lost. I made a beautiful reliquary for an ex of mine which was based on the dog they lost. Buddy was its name. I got a piece of the dog's tail when he died and made a little charm out of it. It was under a little window. Then I had another artist make this beautiful portrait of the dog when it was a baby. I made a little locket-type thing that could be put on your desk, or it could be hung on the wall or you could wear it. That's what I describe as tabletop jewelry.    Sharon: That's interesting. When I think of a reliquary, I think of exactly what you're saying, but without the jewelry—a piece of bone, hair, whatever, that people venerate.    Barbara: Yeah, absolutely.   Sharon: How do you incorporate it? You're saying for this piece you put it in a locket, but how else have you incorporated it?    Barbara: Pretty much lockets, things that open. I have another piece I made that was based on a monk. I found a little porcelain painter's image—it was about three inches tall—at a flea market years ago. I could hardly afford it. It was hand-painted porcelain. I kept it in my bench drawer for years, 20 years probably, and one day I pulled it out and thought, “You know, this monk needs to be seen.” So, I made a beautiful locket. It's probably about four inches long that you too can display it on your desk. It has little doors that open, and you can hang it on your wall or you can wear it. It's a very large piece, obviously, if you're going to wear it, but it's a statement piece and it's very precious.   I did this piece actually about 10 years ago after living through the AIDS crisis. My friend, one of my clients, looked at this monk and said, “I know who that is.” I did the research. It's on my blog. It is this monk who was from a very wealthy family that gave his life to treat lepers in Spain. He was the patron saint of healers. It touched me so deeply that I was creating this piece after everything I'd watched and lived through with Covid, with the AIDS crisis.   Sharon: Wow! Do pieces hit you as you're going through a flea market? Do they hit you and you say, “That would be perfect”? How is that?   Barbara: I'm a collector. I collect things. I'm fascinated. I love to look at things. One time at a flea market when I had my store in Soho, I found this—I didn't know what it was. It was like a little skeleton paw. It had no fur on it. It was a little skeleton about two inches long, probably a racoon's hands. I used to make incredible windows to get people to come into the store. It was Halloween. At the same flea market, I had gotten some of the old-fashioned glass milk containers that used to have the paper caps on top. So, I had gotten those, and I thought, “I'm going to do a Lizzie Borden window.” I made Lizzie this incredible watch fob, and hanging from that was this little skeleton paw inside the milk container. It was great. You never know. I sometimes hold onto things until it's like, “Whoa, O.K. Now's the time.”   Sharon: I'm imaging it. It's a drawerful of things, a shoebox full of things that you paw through and say, “Oh, this would be perfect.”   Barbara: Absolutely. That's the great thing about being an artist. You never know when it's going to hit. Like I tell people, I would never not have my studio inside my home, because you never know when you're going to be inspired and have to make something.

AccuWeather Daily
Summer that was a hot 'gritty nightmare' inspired famed Pulitzer-winning novel

AccuWeather Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 5:44


AccuWeather Daily brings you the top trending weather story of the day - every day.

Why? The Podcast
Why? Episode 210- David Bowie at 75 with Martin Popoff

Why? The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 43:49


This year would have been David Bowie's 75th birthday. Famed rock writer Martin Popoff has put together a wonderful present for us all- Bowie @ 75 is his new book, a look at the many phases of Bowie's multifaceted career.David Bowie @ 75 is available wherever you get your books on September 6th. For more information on Martin, to listen to his podcast, or to get copies of his many other books, check out his website.Empowering NonprofitsMy mission is to empower those who empower others! Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify I Don't Know RunningThe I Don't Know Running podcast is about sharing our experiences as runners. Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

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"PUT ON A STACK OF 45's"- ERIC BURDEN AND THE ANIMALS- "MONTEREY" - CHAPTER NINETY EIGHT - Dig This With The Splendid Bohemians - Featuring Bill Mesnik and Rich Buckland -The Boys Devote Each Episode To A Famed

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Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 32:35


"ERIC'S MONTEREY BURDEN":https://bestclassicbands.com/eric-burdon-animals-monterey-6-5-17/

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - ANNETTE MARTIN - The Famed Psychic Detective

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 41:28


The Psychic Detective - What's it like to get inside the mind of a killer, or to experience the terror and pain of a murder victim? Annette Martin knows. Annette works as a psychic detective/medical intuitive and ghost detective work and has helped more than 60 law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, for over 40 years solve heinous crimes. She even became the first psychic sworn in as an expert witness in a court of law for a murder case. Annette has been termed by the media as the "Radio Psychic" due to being the hostess of the 1st psychic radio talk show, in 1976, on the airwaves across the US. She has been a featured guest on hundreds of radio programs in the US and abroad. Her predictions are uncannily accurate. In a reading requested by John Denver, she said she saw him flying a small craft that would tumble into the ocean. Fifteen years later he would die exactly that way. Annette, has authored several books, "Discovering Your Psychic World," a children's book, "Annie Sunshine and the White Owl of the Cedars," and 2 meditation CD's, "Peaceful White Light," - http://www.annette-martin.com and http://www.closure4u.com

Timcast IRL
Timcast IRL #598 - Famed Leftist CEO RESIGNS After Assault Allegations w/Will Chamberlain & Shane Cashman

Timcast IRL

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 125:18 Very Popular


Tim, Ian, and Lydia host lawyer & senior counsel at the Article 3 Project along with Timcast author and podcaster Shane Cashman to discuss the hypocritical leftist CEO accused of rape, the feminist SheHulk clip, billionaires' nuclear bunkers, and what the majority thinks of Biden's FBI. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Zen(ish) Mommy
Reclaim Dinner Time and Bless this Mess with famed food blogger Melissa Griffiths

Zen(ish) Mommy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 36:21


Hey mamas! Have you ever dreamed of making a business out of food blogging? Whether you're an accomplished home chef or just want to whip up something delicious for your family's next meal, you must listen to our next guest. Melissa Griffiths is a food blogger, recipe developer, and food photographer who loves helping busy families reclaim dinner time! Her blog, Bless this Mess, reaches over one million people each month. She is a mom to five, living on a farm in Southern Utah, and she is here today to tell us exactly what it's like to be a well-known food blogger, what you need to know about weeknight meals, and so much more. Thanks for tuning in!Key Points From This Episode:An introduction to today's guest, food blogger Melissa Griffiths (Bless this Mess). The story of how she turned blogging into a business in 2012.Her main aim is to help busy families enjoy their time together over daily meals.How improving your cooking skills will get your kids to eat well.Melissa's experience of family meals growing up, doctoring her mother's pasta sauce with vegetables and herbs from the garden.Her cooking style: quick, easy, and family-friendly.What Melissa loves to bake.How homeschooling her five children has changed Melissa's experience in the kitchen.Breakfasts in Melissa's home: oatmeal, eggs, and pancakes, depending on the day of the week.Melissa's lunches: tuna, quesadillas, and grilled cheese.Dinner categories in her home: Mondays are comfort food, Tuesdays are tacos, Wednesdays are slow cooker, and more.Her master list includes everything she knows how to make according to category.The batchwork involved in getting four to eight recipes ready to cook, shoot and edit.How she has built her audience through leveraging Google search terms.Melissa's view on starting a food blog today: the competition is big, but the resources are better than ever.What lies ahead for Melissa: bringing more of herself into her brand.Connecting to ingredients through growing them in your own garden.Advice for novice gardeners: grow green beans, tomatoes, and cut flowers, starting with Zinnias.The lost art of seasonality.Seeds and where to purchase them.Advice for women who want to slow down: exercising outside is magic, and so is gardening!Why it is so powerful to do what your heart loves.Tweetables:“You don't have to be a Michelin star Mom. Be proficient at it so that you don't hate it!” — Melissa Griffiths [0:04:15]“If you're doing pretty well in the kitchen, your kids are going to respond. I promise. They will eat things.” — Melissa Griffiths [0:05:09]“If you can brain dump a list of things you can make, then that will help your variety. Then if you create a one-month meal plan, your kids aren't going to care if you make something once a month, that's only twelve times a year!” — Melissa Griffiths [0:17:20]Links Mentioned in Today's Episode: Bless this Mess Bless this Mess on FacebookTMAC Fitness. 20 Minute Home Workouts Beginner and Advanced Workouts. No equipment. Each Workout Ends with a Meditation. BrandGo to ahimsahome.com to get your set of smart stainless steel dishes for your kiddos. Use code "ZENMOM" for 15% offexclusions on bundles, gift cards, and moveable meal collectionsSupport the show

The Common Sense Show
RED ALERT!! JIM RICKARDS, FAMED ECONOMIC INSIDER, WARNS ABOUT WHAT IS COMING!.

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 12:29


RED ALERT!! JIM RICKARDS, FAMED ECONOMIC INSIDER, WARNS ABOUT WHAT IS COMING!.

The Thinking Practitioner
Fascia & Pain: What We Know (with Helene Langevin)

The Thinking Practitioner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 43:57 Very Popular


Famed fascial researcher Helene Langevin MD talks with Til and Whitney about what we know (and _don't_ know) about the role of tissue stiffness in pain; the effects of stretching on cell function and inflammation; contextual effects and placebos; and much more. Get the full transcript at Til or Whitney's sites:  Whitney Lowe's online Clinical & Orthopedic Massage Courses Til Luchau's courses at Advanced-Trainings.com  Resources: Fascia Mobility, Proprioception, and Myofascial Pain (Langevin 2021) National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) site NCCIH Director's Page Sponsor Offers: The 6th International Fascia Research Congress in Montreal, Sep 10-14, 2022 at https://fasciaresearchsociety.org.  Books of Discovery: save 15% by entering "thinking" at checkout on booksofdiscovery.com. ABMP: save $24 on new membership at abmp.com/thinking.  Handspring Publishing: save 20% by entering “TTP” at checkout at handspringpublishing.com.  About Whitney Lowe  |  About Til Luchau  |  Email Us: info@thethinkingpractitioner.com (The Thinking Practitioner Podcast is intended for professional practitioners of manual and movement therapies: bodywork, massage therapy, structural integration, chiropractic, myofascial and myotherapy, orthopedic, sports massage, physical therapy, osteopathy, yoga, strength and conditioning, and similar professions. It is not medical or treatment advice.)

Radio Labyrinth
S7 Ep32: Radio Labyrinth Presents Voice Over Artist and instructor Shelly Shenoy

Radio Labyrinth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 38:42


Shelly has been a career Voice Over Artist since 2003. Famed for starring as Kate Garcia in The Walking Dead, Shelly also voiced 24 characters in Cartoon Network's Casper the Friendly Ghost, and has voiced over 200 different television, radio commercials & feature films. In 2021, Shelly was the voice of the United States Female Gymnastics team for the Tokyo Olympics, The Weather Channel's new platform PATTRN, as well as voicing national campaigns for Smart Water, NY Lotto, Zales, Beauty Rest & more. In 2022, Shelly is proud to be the voice of HBO Max, and all the new The Little Mermaid Commercials. Shelly has continued her successful video game career, notably in Batman Returns, Game of Thrones, Minecraft and is proud to announce her role as Madam Irene in Rockstar's Red Dead Redemption 2, which sold more than 23 million copies within 2 months of it's release. Shelly is reachable through her website, www.ShellyShenoy.com, or www.NycVoCoach.com Instagram: @ShellyShenoy Twitter @ShellyShenoy Facebook: @ShellyShenoyOfficial and @VoiceOverCoach #ShellyShenoy #VoiceOver #VoiceOverCoach #NYC _________________________________________________________ Checkout the Video Version this episode: https://youtu.be/GJ74ftJ7guo _________________________________________________________ Guest: Shelly Shenoy Interviewer: Tim Andrews Podcast edited and produced by Dustin Lollar _________________________________________________________ Subscribe! Leave a Comment and a Like! Follow our Audio Podcast: Radio Labyrinth Podcast on Spotify, iTunes, Audible or any podcatcher! Follow our YouTube page! https://www.youtube.com/radiolabyrinthpodcast Become a Radio Labyrinth Patron! https://www.patreon.com/Timandrews Our website! https://radiolabyrinthpodcast.com/ Social Media: Twitter - https://twitter.com/radio_labyrinth Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/radiolabyrinth/ Instagram - @RadioLabyrinthPresents and @RadioLabyrinth TikTok - @RLPodcast

Reasonable Faith Podcast
Famed professor John Warwick Montgomery comments on Dr. Craig's work on The Atonement

Reasonable Faith Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 23:50


Carolina Outdoors
Famed Fly Fisherman, Simon Gawesworth

Carolina Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 21:07


(From 08.06.22, Segment 3) One name that is certainly worth knowing is Simon Gawesworth! Simon is a famed fly fisherman known for his beautiful casting techniques and association with the Far Bank brand! He is coming to Jesse Brown's Outdoors on August 18th from 3:00 to 6:00pm! Come on in to hear him speak, teach, and demonstrate key fly fishing techniques as well as learn about the latest fly fishing gear! After taking in a wealth of tips and tricks, enjoy a cold beverage and fly fishing games with Sage/Rio prizes! We hope to see you guys there!

Quanta Science Podcast
Deep Learning Poised to 'Blow Up' Famed Fluid Equations

Quanta Science Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 21:55 Very Popular


For centuries, mathematicians have tried to prove that Euler's fluid equations can produce nonsensical answers. A new approach to machine learning has researchers betting that “blowup” is near. Read more at quantamagazine.org. Music is “Pulse” by Geographer.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
08-03-22 - Lamenting The Loss Of Famed Baseball Broadcaster Vin Scully - Who Are Current Broadcasters Who Could Become Legends - Painting The Picture w/Words Is Lost Art

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 29:49


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Opening Break - Wednesday August 3, 2022

China Stories
[Caixin Global] Opinion: The hard-won wisdom of famed lawyer Zhang Sizhi

China Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 8:46


Zhang Sizhi died at the age of 95 after a lifetime of contributions to the legal profession. His career mirrored the fate of his country.Read the article by Si Weijiang: https://www.caixinglobal.com/2022-07-13/opinion-the-hard-won-wisdom-of-famed-lawyer-zhang-sizhi-101912525.htmlNarrated by Nandini Venkata.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast
Mark Thompson: SF's Famed Zuni Cafe Got Rid of Tips - Now Servers Want Them Back

The Mark Thompson Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 19:37


San Francisco's famed Zuni Cafe recently got rid of tips. But Mark Thompson explains why the servers want them back.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

48 Hours
The Missing Millionaire: A “Tiger King” Mystery

48 Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 42:36 Very Popular


A new look into the disappearance of Carole Baskin's husband. Famed lawyer investigates “meat grinder” theory. "48 Hours" correspondent Richard Schlesinger reports.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

One Stop Co-Op Shop
336 | Helping European And American Gamers Understand One Another | with Jason and Bruno Faidutti

One Stop Co-Op Shop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 62:52


Famed game designer Bruno Faidutti joins the show for a civil discussion about our different perspectives as gamers and game creators. We discuss the differences between American and European tastes and sensibilities, how things have changes over the years, and how different gamers get different messages when they engage with a game on the table. This was a wide ranging and interesting conversation between two people who don't see the world in quite the same way, but who were able to find some common ground. I hope this serves as a model for similar types of conversations in our hobby moving forward. Shelf Stories YouTube (with video of this recording) - www.youtube.com/shelfstories __________________________________ YouTube - www.youtube.com/onestopcoopshop www.youtube.com/channel/UCPCIkULbgzMEW612cSdUX7Q Discord - discord.gg/p4jX8AF Facebook - www.facebook.com/onestopcoopshop Donate to One Stop Co-op Shop - www.patreon.com/onestop Email - onestopcoopshop@gmail.com

Stereo Chemistry
Bonus: For John Goodenough's 100th birthday, we revisit a fan-favorite interview with the renowned scientist

Stereo Chemistry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:01 Very Popular


Famed lithium-ion-battery pioneer and Nobel Prize–winner John Goodenough has achieved yet another milestone—a century on Earth. Goodenough celebrates his 100th birthday on July 25, 2022. In honor of the occasion, Stereo Chemistry host Kerri Jansen and C&EN reporter Mitch Jacoby revisit their 2019 interview with the renowned scientist, recorded at his office at the University of Texas at Austin just prior to his Nobel win. In the expansive and candid conversation, Goodenough tells Stereo Chemistry about childhood adventures, infernal exams with Enrico Fermi, and his path to the innovation that enabled an electronics revolution. A transcript of this episode is available at bit.ly/3otFrh3. Music credit: “Happy Birthday To You (Orchestral)” by beanstalkaudio/Pond5.com Image credit: Mitch Jacoby/Robert Bryson/C&EN/Milano M/Shutterstock

Dreamland Podcast – WHITLEY STRIEBER'S UNKNOWN COUNTRY
There's Connection between Roswell, Planet X and the Coming of the Visitors

Dreamland Podcast – WHITLEY STRIEBER'S UNKNOWN COUNTRY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 65:55


Famed astrologer Ray Grasse returns with a totally new vision of what might herald the coming of the visitors, what this has to do with the planets, and when it might happen. Over the years, there have been many claims regarding the date and reasons that the visitors will finally make themselves known. Many of us have the sense that something important is on the horizon – could this really be it? Then, Whitley and Ray discuss the incredible discovery of a new Roswell witness to ANOTHER crash and what the year 1947 has to do with both the appearance of the Nag Hammadi manuscripts AND the Roswell Incident.

Dreamland Podcast – WHITLEY STRIEBER'S UNKNOWN COUNTRY
There's Connection between Roswell, Planet Nine and the Coming of the Visitors, and It's Astrological!

Dreamland Podcast – WHITLEY STRIEBER'S UNKNOWN COUNTRY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 65:55


Famed astrologer Ray Grasse returns with a totally new vision of what might herald the coming of the visitors, what this has to do with the planets, and when it might happen. Over the years, there have been many claims regarding the date and reasons that the visitors will finally make themselves known. Many of us have the sense that something important is on the horizon - could this really be it? Then, Whitley and Ray discuss the incredible discovery of a new Roswell witness to ANOTHER crash and what the year 1947 has to do with both the appearance of the Nag Hammadi manuscripts AND the Roswell Incident. We often hear of the present described as "uncertain times" - but perhaps some chaos is needed to allow everything to fall into place. Ray's insight, predictions, and deep understanding of the subtleties of the human journey offer a valuable window into what the future may hold for us. Grasse's websit is RayGrasse.com. To get When the Stars Align, click here. Join our great social media groups, enjoy ALL of Dreamland and get access to SO MUCH MORE! Click here today!

The Chris Stigall Show
A Political Boomerang Is Coming for Democrats

The Chris Stigall Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 66:05


Join Stigall for fantastic conversation to round out the week as Col. Kurt Schilchter discusses his brand new book “We'll Be Back: The Fall and Rise of America” now a top seller on Amazon and an optimistic view of the wins ahead for the country.  Famed political strategist Dick Morris has a new book “The Return: Trump's Big 2024 Comeback” in which he's confident the “bull in the China shop” isn't something to shy away from, rather embrace in 2024.  And he will surprise you with what he thinks Republicans need to do in battling the mail-in votes that have swamped the system and does he think Democrats can craft a strategy for the Fall to win?  Plus an important new book on what is real and what we've learned about COVID in two and a half years from Population Research Institute President Steven Mosher's new book: “The Politically Incorrect Guide to Pandemics.”

Life on Planet Earth
INFLATION'S NEW RECORD: Internationally renowned money & taxation expert NATHAN LEWIS, author, INFLATION, joins famed bank analyst, DICK BOVE, to explain the causes and cures of our soaring prices

Life on Planet Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 58:36


NATHAN LEWIS, an internationally renowned expert on money and taxes, is the co-author of the Inflation: What It Is, Why It's Bad, and How to Fix It. The book explains what's behind the worst inflationary storm in more than forty years—one that is dominating the headlines and shaking Americans by their pocketbooks. The cost-of-living explosion since the COVID pandemic has raised alarms about a possible return of a 1970's-style “Great Inflation.” Some observers even fear a descent into the kind of Weimar-style hyperinflation that has torn apart so many nations. Is this true? If so, what should be done? How should we prepare for the future? According to the publisher Inflation answers these and other questions in an engaging discussion that draws on the singular expertise of Steve Forbes, chairman of Forbes Media, acclaimed for his insights on money and the economy; Nathan Lewis, internationally renowned expert on money and taxation; and author and journalist Elizabeth Ames. Website: www.amazon.com/Inflation-What-Why-Its-Bad/dp/1641772433 DICK BOVE is the chief strategist at Odeon Capital Group and covers the bank sector. He is among the most prominent bank industry analysts in the US, often controversial, with a keen and practical sense of history and of events that are often translated into his analysis. Bove attended Stuyvesant High, N.Y., and is a graduate of Columbia University, 1962, majoring in political science. BOVE began his career in 1965, working for a series of firms including Wertheim, Shearson, Raymond James, Hoefer & Arnett and Punk Ziegel, before it was purchased by Ladenburg Thalmann. Later, Bove joined Rochdale Securities and then eventually moved to Odeon Capital. A widely quoted analyst with some five decades of experience behind him, Bove relies on common sense and macroeconomic trends to forecast markets. He appears regularly on business shows on TV and radio, and is frequently cited in media coverage of Wall Street. On the popular weekly ODEON CAPITAL CONVERSATIONS with MAT VAN ALSTYNE, BOVE provides in-depth analysis and commentary on many of the big market and global trends of our times. ODEON CAPITAL CONVERSATIONS is hosted by JOHN AIDAN BYRNE. Bove is the author of Guardians of Prosperity: Why America Needs Big Banks (December 26, 2013) Website: https://www.odeoncap.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-aidan-byrne0/support

The Ancients
The Rise of Cleopatra

The Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 60:21 Very Popular


Famed across the ages and around the world - everyone knows the name Cleopatra. But how did she become one of the most infamous women in history?Born in 69BCE, a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Hellenistic Egypt, Cleopatra VII lived a tumultuous life. Within two turbulent decades of taking the throne of Egypt, Cleopatra had emerged the victor of a brutal civil war. She won the hearts of two of Rome's most powerful men, and successfully restored a golden age for her kingdom - she was a force few dared to reckon with.In this episode, Tristan is joined by Professor Joyce Tyldesley, Dr Chris Naunton, and Dr Glenn Godenho, to discuss the rise of Cleopatra.Produced by Annie Coloe. Edited and sound designed by Thomas Ntinas.For more Ancients content, subscribe to our Ancients newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today!To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weird Darkness: Stories of the Paranormal, Supernatural, Legends, Lore, Mysterious, Macabre, Unsolved

JULY 03, 2022 #WeirdDarknessRadioShowSubscribers to the podcast get to hear the radio show days before it actually airs on the radio! And Patreon members (https://WeirdDarkness.com/patrons) get the commercial-free version! HOUR ONE: When it comes to finding aliens, you're more likely to find them not by looking up – but by looking them up… on the internet. And one particular grey skinned creature got a lot of attention when he showed up on the web in 2011, a being who eventually got hung with the name “Skinny Bob”. (Skinny Bob) *** Imagine not remembering getting married – because one of your multiple personalities was in control at the time. That's just one of the strange things one woman had to live with all her life, for she had 17 distinct personalities residing within her mind. (The Woman With 17 Personalities) *** It is often said that there is a fine line between genius and madness. It can also be argued that there is an even finer line between dashing rogue and out-of-control menace to society. And that pretty much describes a man by the name of Thomas Pitt. (The Holy Terror, Thomas Pitt) *** AND MORE!SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“Skinny Bob” by Brent Swancer for Mysterious Universe: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/cfk48f22 (VIDEO OF SKINNY BOB: https://weirddarkness.com/archives/10675) “The Woman With 17 Personalities” by Justin Andress for Ranker: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/2ty3astb “The Holy Terror, Thomas Pitt” from Strange Company: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/5xdu66jy = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =HOUR TWO: Within the arena of Cryptozoology there are a number of stories of people having allegedly been killed by strange creatures. True? False? Legend? Hoax? We'll look at a few of the cases. (Killed by Cryptids) *** Almost everyone is curious about what happens beyond the grave. Some are so eager to know that they try to reach the other side before they pass. But in many cases that's a very… very… bad idea. (Scary Seance Stories) *** AND MORE!SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“Killed by Cryptids” by Nick Redfern for Mysterious Universe: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/5f7nf6ar “Scary Seance Stories” by Melissa Brinks for Graveyard Shift: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/43v9eefc “Bowler Hat Ghost Haunts Hethro” from Unexplained-Mysteries.com: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/eyvjudvf “The Internet is Fake” from Unexplained-Mysteries.com: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/4w26699n = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =SUDDEN DEATH OVERTIME: Louisville, Kentucky. Famed for the Kentucky Derby, Muhammad Ali, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Louisville Slugger baseball bats, and a blue quasi-humans roaming the streets. Guess which one we'll be talking about. (The Blue Man of Louisville) *** AND BLOOPERS!SOURCES AND ESSENTIAL WEB LINKS…“The Blue Man of Louisville” from Strange Company: https://weirddarkness.tiny.us/87bste29 = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =Weird Darkness theme by Alibi Music Library. Background music, varying by episode, provided by Alibi Music, EpidemicSound and/or AudioBlocks with paid license. Music from Shadows Symphony: https://tinyurl.com/yyrv987t, Midnight Syndicate: http://amzn.to/2BYCoXZ, Kevin MacLeod: https://tinyurl.com/y2v7fgbu, Tony Longworth: https://tinyurl.com/y2nhnbt7, and/or Nicolas Gasparini/Myuu: https://tinyurl.com/lnqpfs8 is used with permission. 

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =WeirdDarkness™ - is a production and trademark of Marlar House Productions. Copyright, Weird Darkness.00:11:18.620, 00:18:20.056, 00:34:00.586, 00:39:09.982, 00:49:16.159, 00:57:30.017, 01:10:16.327, 01:18:20.052,