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  • 1,654PODCASTS
  • 1,980EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 18, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about equally

Latest podcast episodes about equally

The Mike Slater Show
Should Women & Men Be Treated Equally?

The Mike Slater Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 35:52


Bible Questions Podcast
Are All Parts of the Bible Equally Important?

Bible Questions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:55


Today we discuss a question that probably isn't asked enough: Do all parts of the Bible have equal importance? Are there some chapters, or verses, or even books that are more important than others? Interestingly, as Jesus Himself will tell us - some parts of the Bible are indeed more important than others, and knowing this will better prepare us to study the Bible in a more advantageous way.

Bible Reading Podcast
Are All Parts of the Bible Equally Important?

Bible Reading Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 24:55


Today we discuss a question that probably isn't asked enough: Do all parts of the Bible have equal importance? Are there some chapters, or verses, or even books that are more important than others? Interestingly, as Jesus Himself will tell us - some parts of the Bible are indeed more important than others, and knowing this will better prepare us to study the Bible in a more advantageous way.

40oz Fridays Podcast
What's In The Brew? Bender 2-All Toxic Fandoms Are Equally Toxic

40oz Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 76:36


The title says it all, all toxic fandoms are indeed created equal. CHECK OUT ALL OUR OTHER PODCAST TOO! 40oz Fridays Podcast (FoF)-Our main biweekly nerd news/opinions podcasts On The House (OtH)-Ocassional podcast after show. Drinking Tasting Sessions (DtS)-Review series. Talks On The Rocks (TotR)-Interviews With Friends. CHECK OUT ALL PODCAST EPISODES ON Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/40oz-fridays-podcast/id1509384740?uo=4 Google Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkLnBvZGJlYW4uY29tL3ByM2ZqcC9mZWVkLnhtbA YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNtnNZQ1zxMLNS2y6Xf2Ow FOLLOW US ON TWITTER (WE HATE IT THERE) Podcast: https://twitter.com/40ozFriPodcast HiK-Upp: https://twitter.com/kaelruiz13 Daze: https://twitter.com/DazedGhozt OTHER STUFF TO FOLLOW US ON HiK-Upp's FB Page: https://www.facebook.com/artproject13 Daze's Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/DazedGhozt --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/40ozfridays/support

Kottke Ride Home
Thu. 05/12 - 1st Image of Milky Way Black Hole & 1st Taco Bell TikTok Musical, Equally Important Events

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 17:57


Everything you need to know about the just-released first-ever image of the black hole at the center of our galaxy. Plus, is there sight after death? No. But kind of. And, in the most predictable news of the day, Dolly Parton is starring in a Doja Cat-inspired Taco Bell TikTok musical about Mexican Pizza.Sponsors:The Jordan Harbinger Show, jordanharbinger.com/start Indeed, Get a free $75 credit at Indeed.com/goodnewsLinks:We got it! Astronomers reveal first image of the black hole at the heart of our galaxy (National Science Foundation)The Milky Way's Black Hole Comes to Light (NY Times)Feast your eyes on the first image of the black hole at the center of our Milky Way (Ars Technica)This is the first image of the black hole at the center of our galaxy (MIT Technology Review)Scientists Have Revived a Glimmer of Activity in Human Eyes After Death (ScienceAlert)Light after death: scientists revive human eyes (Scripps Research)Life after death for the human eye: Vision scientists revive light-sensing cells in organ donor eyes (ScienceDaily)Dolly Parton to star in a musical on TikTok about Taco Bell's Mexican pizza (NBC News)Taco Bell is bringing back a fan-favorite menu item (CNN)Doja Cat's Mexican Pizza beat (Doja Cat, TikTok)Mexican Pizza: The Musical by Doja Cat. (Victor Kunda, TikTok)G-strings in the mist: 'You wouldn't expect Jane Goodall to be fronting a campaign for underwear' (The Guardian)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Digital Transformation Viewpoints
Drones and Robots in Process Industry

Digital Transformation Viewpoints

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 23:26


Drones and robots in process applications? Drones are just than flying robots, and robotic applications today go far beyond logistics and assembly. These mobile devices are used for inspection and gathering of data points in previously inaccessible places. Equally important is the back-office framework that manages and tracks robots and drones as they move about, enforcing safety norms, obtaining take-off clearances, and ensuring mission success.

Raiders of the Arcade - A Video Game & Movie Podcast

Were back at it with current events, revisit of The Batman, who gets arrested this week, and plenty of other stuff that I cant remember.

That's NOT Christian
Ep 151: CANELO Fight, Pastor Sues KANYE, DAVE CHAPPELLE Attacked

That's NOT Christian

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 101:16


Rapper Kanye West, also known as Ye, is being sued by a Texas pastor after he claimed parts of a sermon he gave were sampled without his permission. Bishop David Paul Moten claims that 70 seconds of his material were used on the track "Come to Life" from West's Grammy-nominated album "Donda." Moten is also suing G.O.O.D Music, Def Jam Recordings and UMG Recordings over the use of his sermon in the song. Dmitry Bivol, in one of the biggest boxing upsets in recent memory, scored a unanimous decision over the sport's top star, Canelo Alvarez, on Saturday at T-Mobile Arena. All three judges scored the fight 115-113, but the bout wasn't nearly that close. Still, Bivol needed to win the final rounds on all three cards to avoid a draw. Equally puzzling: All three judges scored the first four rounds for Alvarez. That's NOT Christian is a podcast by four urban believers who discuss current events and push the envelope on traditional religious subjects with a touch of humor. ►Become a Member: https://www.youtube.com/c/ThatsNOTChr... ►Shop: http://thatsnotchristian.com​​​ ► Telegram: https://t.me/thatsnotchristian​​​ ► Music by Ryan Little SPOTIFY: https://spoti.fi/2MmjRru​​​ ►Follow the Squad ANT: https://www.instagram.com/aptop25/​​​ JAY: https://www.instagram.com/jayacosta/​​​ JIMMY: https://www.instagram.com/jaeisla/​​​ SWITCH: https://www.instagram.com/switch_in_hd ►Podcast Equipment Streamyard: https://streamyard.com?pal=5046807178... Canon M50: https://amzn.to/2NP7s3G​​​ Logitech BRIO- https://amzn.to/379YCnN Logitech C920: https://amzn.to/36odZJ9​ Samson​​ Q2U: https://amzn.to/3tcv2aW​​​ Ring Light: https://amzn.to/3tbxApJ​ Light​​ Stand: https://amzn.to/2NKbg69​​​ Smart Lights: https://amzn.to/3aeU5kW​ Gaming​​ Chair: https://amzn.to/36nnFn0​​​ DISCLAIMER: This video and description may contain affiliate links which allow us to receive a small commission when you click on a product links. This helps support the podcast and allows us to continue to make videos like this. Thank you for the support! #thatsnotchristian #Kevinsamuels #roevwade --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thatsnotchristian/message

IT Visionaries
Respect All Your Clients' Dreams Equally With Miles Ward, CTO of SADA

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 41:47


If you're in a service industry, should you honor every client's dream equally? According to Miles Ward, the CTO of SADA, that's absolutely the correct business mindset. Miles also talks about the benefits companies are finding in the cloud and how it's valuable to be an engineer who communicates well too. He even shares a little about his passion for playing a musical instrument called the electric sousaphone.Tune in to learn:What's the history of SADA? (04:14)What does Miles see customers wanting to do in the cloud? (11:28)What innovations are exciting to Miles? (19:18)Does SADA build applications for themselves? (23:37)  Mentions:“What Twitter and friends prove about multi-cloud” (Check out “Miles-low's Hierarchy of Tech Needs”)IT Visionaries is brought to you by The Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

Parenting Unpacked
Is all yelling equally bad?

Parenting Unpacked

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 39:08


Welcome back crew! This week we chat about yelling at our kids. Is all yelling equally bad? Is some yelling worse than other yelling. Stay tuned to find out!

The Vida Podcast
Equally Powerful and Distinctly Different - Benjamin Diaz

The Vida Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 51:58


TonioTimeDaily
Metaphorical truths, symbolic truths

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 23:42


"I don't define divine the ways religion people does which is about earthly life tribalism and afterlife tribalism, I would define divine secularly (inner beauty is the definition.)" -Antonio Myers "The last section is an eye-opener. It deals with "Jesus for the Non-Religious," a phrase from Lutheran theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer who envisioned a new religionless Christianity. Bishop John Shelby Spong, like many others, laments the doctrines of conservative Christianity which have given rise to the religious anger that fuels the hatred of women, homosexuals, and non-believers in the inerrancy of the Bible. "I submit," he counters, "that this constant onslaught of ecclesiastical negativity comes directly from our theistic portrait of God, who has been traditionally understood as a punishing parent figure." The themes of guilt and degradation have been hammered home to believers in millions of sermons and Bible tracts. This religion-based anger is divisive and characterized by enmity for outsiders and strangers. Jesus offers another option. Spong sees him as the breaker of tribal boundaries. He presented to his disciples and others "a new and inclusive kind of life" outside of tradition and in solidarity with all people. Spong also sees Jesus as the breaker of prejudices and stereotypes, and this makes him really relevant to our times when race, gender, and sexual orientation are the major areas where hatred divides people from each other. And, finally, there is Jesus as the breaker of religious boundaries, which was, of course, the thing that got him into so much trouble." Equally controversial is Spong's assertion that religion is simply a human construct designed to reduce the inherent anxiety of being human. We are hard-wired for survival, so humans created a theistic God who would rule from the heavens, and formed a Christian religion designed to replicate the false security of an insular tribal structure. It's rather novel for an Episcopal bishop – a man who has devoted his entire life to Christianity – to reject the major teachings of his faith. While Spong is never unkind, he is not afraid to call out his fellow Christians on their antiquated beliefs, tendency towards righteous anger, and harmful prejudices. At the end of this fascinating deconstruction, Spong argues for a new understanding of Jesus that I found inspiring and moving. Jesus wasn't divine, but rather fully human – he lived life to its fullest, ignored social boundaries, preached inclusion, and “loved wastefully,” an expression that I rather like." Beth Andrews, September 2012 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Substitute Teachers Lounge
Are Substitute Teachers Treating All Students Equally?

Substitute Teachers Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 20:45


Are we ever guilty of stereotyping, consciously or subconsciously?Join our Facebook group, https://www.facebook.com/groups/substituteteachersloungeEmail your questions to mailto: gregcollinssubstitute@gmail.comBuzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE

Collectability Podcast
Evelyne Genta, wife of watch design legend Gérald Genta discusses his legacy with John Reardon

Collectability Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 47:42


Two of the most popular watches, the Nautilus and the Royal Oak were designed by one man, Gérald Genta. In this fascinating conversation with his wife, Evelyne Genta, John Reardon discovers how their partnership resulted in some of the most important watch designs in modern watchmaking history. Equally impressive is her own distinguished career. Since 2011, Her Excellency Madame Evelyne Genta has held the prestigious position as The Ambassador, Monaco embassy to United Kingdom. Born in Monaco, she was educated in London and has lived there for the past 15 years. Between 1983 and 1999, Evelyne and her husband ran the watch brand Gérald Genta. During this exciting and extremely innovative period, Evelyne managed two factories in Switzerland with 250 employees while developing new markets in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. This spring, Sotheby's is auctioning off a selection of Gérald Genta's paintings, including his original 1970 painting of the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak and his 1976 painting of the Patek Philippe Nautilus. In total, 100 pieces, personally selected by Madame Genta and her daughter Alexia from his treasure trove of over 3,200 works will be sold. Importantly, Sotheby's is selling each painting with an NFT which protects authentication and ownership. The sale is in honor of the 10th anniversary of the death of Gérald Genta and proceeds of the sale will go to the Gérald Genta Heritage Association of which Evelyne Genta is President and Chairperson. Selecting which artworks to auction was a monumental task. Gérald Genta's prolific design portfolio includes designs for all the great watchmakers: in addition to his iconic Royal Oak for Audemars Piguet and the Nautilus for Patek Philippe, he designed the SAS Polarouter for Universal Genève at the age of 23, The Constellation for Omega in 1959, The Ingenieur for IWC in 1976 and countless others for watchmakers such as Piaget, Cartier, Corum, Hermès to name but a few. In this Collectability Podcast, we learn how the pieces were selected for auction and hear extraordinary stories about the legend himself and the exciting life Gérald and Evelyne had during their 33 years of marriage. For more information on Sotheby's auction of Gérald Genta's work please go to https://www.sothebys.com/en/series/gerald-genta-icon-of-time

What Bitcoin Did
The Bitcoin Adoption Supercycle with Dan Held

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 63:37


“We have a lot of things that make me extremely bullish on Bitcoin… did I wish this to happen on the world? Absolutely not, I wish we didn't need to have Bitcoin because we could trust, but we can't.”— Dan HeldDan Held is the Growth Lead at Kraken. In this interview, we discuss the splintering and factionalization of the Bitcoin community, trying to be honest in a toxic environment, update on the Bitcoin supercycle, and Bitcoin application (selling, hodling, lending, and collateralizing).- - - - Bitcoin is under almost constant attack, but despite significant pressures, efforts to ensure the technology remains truly decentralised and open have been successful, in a large part, thanks to the toxicity within the bitcoin community. But those who have worked at close quarters to the Bitcoin ecosystem have witnessed a rapid evolution and segmentation of beliefs, business proposals, and market for what is still a nascent innovation. The original libertarian community that nurtured Bitcoin has been diluted by new groups. Conservatives and progressives have aligned themselves to Bitcoin with their own dogmas. In the wake of the maximalist victory in the Blocksize Wars new divisions have arisen based on divergent ideologies. Can we find a unifying narrative to coalesce these factions?Equally, the industry that has developed around the unique monetary and payment characteristics of the technology has resulted in an explosion of new products and features. No longer is Bitcoin merely a static store of value: hodlers can now lend, short, and collateralize their asset. Should we fully embrace the investment opportunities this asset can provide?Finally, the cyclical nature of the asset price has continued to evolve. Macro forces, game theory, and geo-political events are potentially aligning to create a supercycle: a new phase of adoption that could propel Bitcoin into becoming a global reserve currency to rival gold. Will those who have prevised such a future be proven right?Are we finally about to enter a phase when Bitcoin matures and becomes money for all? This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletCompass Mining - Bitcoin mining & hostingLVL - Bank on BitcoinBCB Group - Global digital financial Services-----WBD495 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

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Riderflex
Keith E. Glendon; Founder & Chief Cheerleader at LucidCoast | Riderflex

Riderflex

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 74:26


Keith E. Glendon; Founder & Chief Cheerleader at LucidCoast | Riderflex - Recruiting & Sourcing LucidCoast is a Technology, Strategy and Innovation Services company. They exist to have a direct and positive impact on the LucidCoasters' families, communities, the future of humanity and the sustainability of the world. Efforts are primarily through a focus on helping the energy & utility industry innovate, transform and evolve to meet the tremendous existential challenges of climate change and environmental degradation. They bring expertise in the management and security of enterprise IT assets and capabilities, along with an entrepreneurial mindset, methods and leadership to serve as trusted innovation partners to clients. Keith is the Founder, President, and Chief Cheerleader at LucidCoast. Equally at home in a board room, on a surfboard or officiating a roller derby bout - He is a perpetual cheerleader who's greatest purpose is to help people live on purpose. Keith has been in the technology game over 20 years, learning and growing every day. Watch the Full Interview: https://youtu.be/pRYj13IHZ0I On the Riderflex podcast, CEO Steve Urban interviews some of the most successful entrepreneurs, CEO's, and business leaders. Hear them tell the "REAL" stories of what it's like to start and lead businesses. Riderflex is a national, Colorado based, premier headhunter, RPO and employment agency; recruiting and searching the top talent for staffing your teams. Top Executive Recruiting Firm - https://riderflex.com/ Podcast sponsor: Marketing 360 is the #1 platform for small business and it's everything you need to grow your business. marketing360.com/riderflex #KeithEGlendon #LucidCoast #technology #podcast #interview #entrepreneur #ColoradoRecruitingFirm #TopExecutiveRecruitingFirm #staffingagency #employmentagency #headhunter #recruitingfirm #staffing #staffingfirm #Denver #Colorado #National #Riderflex --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/riderflex/support

The Dirobi Health Show
Bright Line Eating with Dr. Susan Peirce Thompson

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 53:42


Dr. Susan Peirce Thompson, founder of Bright Line Eating, is helping thousands of people successfully lose weight, even in cases involving addictive and disordered eating. For many people, this is the plan that "finally worked."On average, participants in her program lose a significant amount of weight in just two months and are able to maintain that loss for years to come. Equally astounding, published research shows that through her approach, post-menopausal women lose weight as quickly as women in their 20s and 30s. To date, 100,000 people from more than 100 countries around the world have participated in her online weight loss programs.Her first two books, including “Bright Line Eating: The Science of Living Happy, Thin, and Free,” becameNew York Times bestsellers and instant Hay House favorites. Her work weaves the neuroscience of food addiction with powerful insights from Positive Psychology, IFS, and 12-Step Recovery to outline a roadmap for achieving true integrity and self-authorship around food. The Bright Line Eating mission is to help one million people around the globe discover lasting food freedom and have their “Bright Transformations” by 2025.Listen in as I ask Dr. Thompson a variety of questions, and explore this fascinating world of Bright Line Eating.

KiranPrabha  Telugu Talk Shows
Sthanam Narasimha Rao | 'నటకావతంస' స్థానం నరసింహారావుగారు

KiranPrabha Telugu Talk Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 81:14


#KiranPrabha #Sthanam #TeluguNatakam Sthanam Narasimha Rao, popularly known as Sthanam (23 September 1902 – 21 February 1971), was an Indian actor known for his works in Telugu theatre. He was known for playing female characters and was a recipient of a Padma Sri Award. His depiction of the Sringara rasa as Satyabhama in Srikrishna tulabharam kept audiences spellbound. Equally enchanting performances in Roshanara, Deva Devi in Vipranarayana and the eponymous Chintamani made his place in Telugu theater permanent. Sthanam had over 1,500 performances to his credit. KiranPrabha narrates the most interesting anecdotes from the life of Sthanam Narasimha Rao Garu.

What Bitcoin Did
Is There a Moral Case for Fossil Fuels? with Alex Epstein

What Bitcoin Did

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 130:58


“If you have any influence on a situation, and you're using that influence to prevent or discourage low cost, reliable energy, I think you're contributing to the life catastrophe that is widespread poverty.”— Alex EpsteinAlex Epstein is a philosopher and author of ‘The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels' and ‘Fossil Future'. In this interview, we discuss how energy abundance has enabled humans to flourish, whether climate mastery has made us unnaturally safe, and the need for more low-cost reliable energy. - - - - According to a recent survey for the UN, 64% of people believe that climate change is a global emergency. News reports are dominated by stories of floods, heatwaves, droughts, hurricanes and other events, highlighted as potential signs of a warming world. The implicit assumption is that urgent reductions in the use of fossil fuels are required to minimise the potential impacts. But increasingly, a growing collective is questioning these opinions. Exploitation of fossil fuels is linked to civilisations' rapid development in the 250 years since the industrial revolution. Yet, billions still lack access to adequate levels of energy. The concern is alternative energy sources won't be able to meet current demands, let alone demands that aren't currently being met. Furthermore, there is scepticism regarding climate change projections and forecast impacts on societies. Those who hold such views are labelled as climate change ‘deniers', a pejorative term meant to imply resistance to science and facts. This is emblematic of how combative and polarised the two sides of the debate have become. Some are now refusing to engage.Perhaps, such division is understandable given the stakes. If global warming has the capacity to be an existential threat this century, then delays in curtailing fossil fuels could be catastrophic. Equally, if such warnings turn out to be wrong then we could be constraining the empowerment of billions of people. In our view, this is why we should remain engaged in the debate. This episode's sponsors:Gemini - Buy Bitcoin instantlyBlockFi - The future of Bitcoin financial servicesSportsbet.io - Online sportsbook & casino that accepts BitcoinCasa - The leading provider of Bitcoin multisig key security.Ledger - State of the art Bitcoin hardware walletCompass Mining - Bitcoin mining & hostingLVL - Bank on BitcoinBCB Group - Global digital financial Services-----WBD493 - Show Notes-----If you enjoy The What Bitcoin Did Podcast you can help support the show by doing the following:Become a Patron and get access to shows early or help contributeMake a tip:Bitcoin: 3FiC6w7eb3dkcaNHMAnj39ANTAkv8Ufi2SQR Codes: BitcoinIf you do send a tip then please email me so that I can say thank youSubscribe on iTunes | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | YouTube | Deezer | TuneIn | RSS FeedLeave a review on iTunesShare the show and episodes with your friends and familySubscribe to the newsletter on my websiteFollow me on Twitter Personal | Twitter Podcast | Instagram | Medium | YouTubeIf you are interested in sponsoring the show, you can read more about that here or please feel free to drop me an email to discuss options.

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CapX presents Free Exchange
Sam Ashworth-Hayes on party politics, Rwanda and the 'Granny State'

CapX presents Free Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 32:03


It's been quite a few weeks in British politics. After a brief Easter respite, the PartyGate saga reared its head again for Boris Johnson, who now faces a parliamentary probe on whether he misled the House of Commons. Equally controversial was his government's announcement last week of a deal to ship asylum seekers 5,000 miles away to Rwanda. Just what Brexit means for Britain's immigration system also became clearer this week with the publication of some fascinating Home Office figures on who has arrived in the UK since we fully severed ties with the EU in 2021.Joining us to make some sense of the political tumult on this week's topical podcast is CapX regular Sam Ashworth-Hayes. Sam is an economist, writer and policy analyst who has previously worked as Director of Studies at the Henry Jackson Society. He writes regularly here on CapX, as well as in outlets such as The Daily Telegraph and The Spectator. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Michelle Duffy Life Time Grand Prix

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 28:22


Recorded live at the Life Time Sea Otter Classic, we sit down with Michelle Duffy to discuss the 2022 Life Time Grand Prix. One race down, five to go in this season long series across XC MTB Races and Gravel Races.  It will be exciting to see how it unfolds.  Episode Sponsor: The Feed (50% off your first order of The Feed Formula) Life Time Grand Prix Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Michelle Duffy Lifetime [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the podcast. We're once again, live at the lifetime seawater classic. We're joined by Michelle Duffy. Who's the director of events, brand and content strategy at lifetime, and has been intimately involved in the lifetime grand Prix series. The grand Prix is a season long event series comprising of six lifetime events. Equally spread between mountain and gravel events that allow professional gravel athletes to battle it out over the year in a unique point series. I think it's going to be a lot of fun to watch and i wanted to make sure that we got michelle on just to talk about the ins and outs of the series and what she's excited about Before we jump in, we need to thank this week. Sponsor the feed. The feed is the largest online marketplace for your sports nutrition, offering the brands, you know, and love from scratch labs, Clif bar to Martine. Plus their athlete, customized supplements called the feed formula. Feed formulas. As I mentioned before, it's a daily formula individually wrapped that you have in a little box. She'd take out every day. And it gives you kind of the supplements you need as an athlete. The feed formulas are personalized supplements for athletes developed in part with Dr. Kevin Sprouse from EDF pro cycling team. He's the team doctor over there and it's following the same protocols that top athletes use. What I love about it is if you go over to the feed.com/the gravel ride, you can customize the individual supplements in your pill pack every day. So if you're needing a little extra recovery, or if you're an aging athlete, you can customize these for your needs in any given month. Right now gravel ride podcast listeners can get 50% off your first feed formula order. Just visit the feed.com/the gravel ride. These are best in class. Branded supplements, never generics. You get personalized recommendations based on your needs as an athlete. And it's all put together in a convenient daily pouch. So no more messy bottles on the counter. You can just grab a bag and go every morning. So I recommend you take a look at the feed. It's become my go-to source for all my hydration and gel needs. It's nice to have a single marketplace. That's really focused. On sports, nutrition. I often find myself in places where I'm just not really getting that focused offering. So I'm super comfortable recommending the feed.com for all your nutritional needs. Would that message behind us? Let's dive right into my interview with Michelle Duffy . At the lifetime seattle classic Michelle welcome back to the show. [00:03:07] Michelle Duffy: thank you, Craig. It's been a while. Yeah. [00:03:08] Craig Dalton: It's great to see you here at the sea Otter classic [00:03:11] Michelle Duffy: as well. And the flash is [00:03:13] Craig Dalton: this the kickoff to the lifetime sort of, I know it's the kickoff to the lifetime grand Prix. Is that your first event [00:03:18] Michelle Duffy: of the year? We've had a few road running events, but this is the first cycling event off-road event of [00:03:23] Craig Dalton: the season. And it's so exciting. Is this the biggest event in the calendar in terms of participation? [00:03:29] Michelle Duffy: Definitely. Yes. You know, we have. Sorry. We have road running events that are 15,000 athletes, but in terms of scale, 74,000 attendees here, 500 exhibitors, there's nothing compares to that. What year of [00:03:44] Craig Dalton: this yacht or classic is [00:03:45] Michelle Duffy: this? It started in 1991. So, [00:03:48] Craig Dalton: so I, I remember doing some of the races here, back in the mid nineties, on my [00:03:53] Michelle Duffy: mountain bike. Oh, I've heard some fascinating stories in those [00:03:57] Craig Dalton: days. Now the festival, I mean, Just this fascinating intersection of all the disciplines of cycling. It's hard to describe. I mean, if you, you name it, if it's on a bike, it's probably has an event here. [00:04:11] Michelle Duffy: Absolutely. I mean anything from e-bikes to gravel cross-country mountain bike, dual slalom, downhill and Duro. You name it. It's here. Kids races. We have a little bit of it all here. It's hard to tie it all together. Yeah. [00:04:23] Craig Dalton: Super cool. Watching the kids on the pump track, and it's just such a good family atmosphere here. [00:04:28] Michelle Duffy: And I think that was Frank Yohannan's goal. When he started the event really was how are we bringing families? And bike together. So often these bike races, it's hard to integrate your family into that experience, but here you can camp with your family. You can attend the festival, they can learn how to ride a mountain bike on the pump track, and you can participate in a race yourself. So I think. That's really how this started and what's made it so successful. We have families that have been here since 1991, and now they're taking their kids here and we were going to take their kids here. [00:05:02] Craig Dalton: Yeah. And the how many booths are here? The festival atmosphere. It's so unusual for consumers to get in front of so many manufacturers from the bike industry. Yeah. And [00:05:12] Michelle Duffy: vice versa for the, for the brands to have this many consumers here and there's over 500 brands. [00:05:18] Craig Dalton: That's amazing. Yeah. It's probably took me two days to kind of visit everybody across the booth [00:05:23] Michelle Duffy: after, and even still, like, you probably didn't get a chance to engage with them all. Yeah, [00:05:28] Craig Dalton: that's absolutely right. Interestingly, I talked to a couple of riders who were doing multiple events. They brought a couple bikes down, different disciplines, really making the most of their time here in [00:05:38] Michelle Duffy: Monterrey. Athletes. I heard some names today in the gravel event that participated in cross-country yesterday. We even have some pretty legit riders that took place in the e-bike race. So it's, it's always fun to talk to them and see what bikes they chose. Yeah. Uh, I participated [00:05:54] Craig Dalton: in am I, if I'm going to say it correctly, log Villa. Yeah, I, I should apologize in advance if I'm in articulate. Cause my brain is still rattled. [00:06:02] Michelle Duffy: I'm with you. It's been a long few days here, fun few days, but definitely zaps the brain. [00:06:08] Craig Dalton: It was definitely a fun event. And I would say I would characterize it as a bit unusual for the gravel races I've done because it was very single-track heavy, which I appreciated as someone, you know, obviously the lifetime produces a lot of events in a lot of different stuff. Was that intentional to kind of make it a little bit of a different type of event than some of the other events [00:06:27] Michelle Duffy: on the calendar. Thai the event, the overall experience of seawater. And it's important to us that all of our events around the country feel unique and also important us that all of our events here at seawater have their differentiators. So definitely was intentional. I know not all gravel cyclists have the best bike handling myself included. But it keeps it interesting. [00:06:50] Craig Dalton: Yeah. A hundred percent. So for the listener, it's very single track heavy course. Stunning views across the corridor. [00:06:56] Michelle Duffy: It's absolutely beautiful here. And after holding the event in October, in the fall, it was amazing to have everyone back together, but being back on the calendar at this time of year, when everything is green, the birds are chirping. The sun shining. Yeah, it's [00:07:10] Craig Dalton: stunning. Yeah. You get on these Ridge lines and despite how much my back was hurting, I was still appreciating it and enjoy it. Yeah. [00:07:18] Michelle Duffy: Yeah. It's it's great. [00:07:20] Craig Dalton: So I wanted to talk to you about the lifetime grand Prix. We haven't had anybody on the show talking about it yet. It's the inaugural race. Can you just give us an overview of the series and then we'll get into some more detailed questions? Yeah, [00:07:31] Michelle Duffy: absolutely. So the lifetime grand Prix comprise is of six of our events. Off-road events. Multidiscipline so, you know, cross country this weekend and we'll be doing. Out in Emporia next. We selected 60 athletes, so 30 men, 30 women who are competing for a quarter million dollar prize purse across the season. And the breakdown is we'll take their best five of six scores so they can choose to attend only five and assume the risk of finishing the others or we'll drop their lowest score. The point system's pretty. Easy to understand. And it's a sliding scale, 30 points to first place, one point to 30th place, and we'll score it that way across the season. [00:08:22] Craig Dalton: Gotcha. So many questions. W how, what was the decision-making process look like to decide, to have cross country mountain bike racing and gravel racing in the same series? [00:08:32] Michelle Duffy: I think it's just totally unique. There's Def there's mountain bike series. There's road. Series. I don't know if we've, well, we're starting to see, you know, the UCI coming out with the gravel series and that's not lifetime events are unique in that. They're all different. But we're seeing the same elite riders that are wanting to attend a mountain bike race, and a gravel event. And it's not for everyone. Some, some gravel riders are not interested in riding a mountain bike and they're going to come to our gravel events and they'll purchase participate. Those are scored the same way and all of our athletes will be treated in the same fashion. But when we look at our portfolio, it's like, wow, we, how lucky are we that we have the sea Otter classic and Unbound gravel and the Leadville trail, 100 mountain bike, race, and crushing the Tuscher in Toronto again in big sugar, gravel. And it goes on. And when we looked at our portfolio, we've been talking about this for a few years and I don't know if the timing was right. As we've seen more and more elites coming it's we've paused and been thinking like we're seeing mass participation grow. We're seeing these former world tour riders, former world champion mountain bike racers coming and participating in our events. And they're participating in our events because they want to stand on the same start line as the mass participant. It's good for them and their brand to connect with the consumers. They're enjoying the experience of standing on the same start line as the everyday rider and walking through an expo. These are things that they don't get to do in Europe. And, but what's missing is, you know, a few, a few decades ago, he lost a lot of faith in road cycling and that impacted fandom is the term that we're using internally of, of professional cycling in the U S. People don't care about those professional athletes, but in mass, we're not talking about cycling on ESPN on a regular basis. And I don't know if we'll get there, but we hope to we hope that this series helps north America reconnect with elite cyclists and these athletes start to become household names. And this is. I don't know, league of sorts. [00:10:45] Craig Dalton: I think it's a lot of fun. I mean, I think it pushes the rider's technical abilities. I've always been sort of griping about the ratification of gravel. So I love that these athletes are just going to have to find a different skill set, develop a different skill, set, understand how to ride a different bike. It's fun. Yeah. [00:11:04] Michelle Duffy: I mean, if you look at our. The crusher and the Tuscher is a gravel race, but the top riders wanted on a mountain bike last year. Right. So there, I think ratification can happen a little bit, especially when there's more elite riders. So there's more group riding. But the, the technicality of a lot of our courses it varies and it does require a different skillset [00:11:30] Craig Dalton: for the athletes who require. Just a lot of thought about the season, right? Preparing for an event like seawater and the cross-country style, mountain bike race is quite different than Unbound at 200 miles. [00:11:41] Michelle Duffy: Absolutely. And I think we saw a lot of our, you know, more traditional gravel cyclist road cyclist came here and they didn't come off the line the way a Keegan Swenson did. He was a man with a plan. Like he was out there to win that event and get his 30 points. But we did see a lot of other athletes. Came out here and we didn't have all 30 men and all 30 women. So they scored a few points, even if it was a, it was just survival. Consistency is going to be key throughout the season. And it was definitely fun to see some of our athletes that were really stretching themselves in a single track cross country event coming out. And they took the challenge on and I think that's really cool. It's they, they're not shying away from the challenge. Some falls out there yesterday, but that was part of it. And if any of these athletes knew what they were getting into, and I think it's something that excites them, the energy was really high. [00:12:33] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's super cool. I didn't get a chance to see the coverage yet from yesterday. I know who the winner is. I'm not going to put you on the spot for race commentary, but how would you characterize, like how the race unfolded? I know in a lot of mountain bike races, you got to get to that single track [00:12:46] Michelle Duffy: first. Yeah. What's funny, is that both the men's and women's race unfolded almost identically within the top three. So coming off the line, they they're on this racetrack Laguna Seca, and they hop on. Pretty wide dirt fire road and climb a hill. And it's just under a mile before they hit double track. So you could see I was in the lead out Mazda vehicle. You could see them fighting for position, especially the traditional mountain bikers. They wanted to get to the single track first, knowing that their bike handling skills were better. And they, they rode, it was pretty decided who was going to be. In contention about 10 riders deep yesterday on both the men's and women's side. It worked its way down to three writers, deep on both sides with only maybe six miles to go. The women definitely had a bigger group of five there that it was anybody's day. And then Mo Wilson put it down, climbing a hill and it was a risky move for her, but she. Came you just kind of watched everyone else come apart. And she was the strongest woman out there yesterday. [00:13:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I talked to her a little bit yesterday and she said that last hill made her, made the race for her. [00:14:02] Michelle Duffy: Yeah, it definitely did. And it was kind of amazing. We have flow bikes doing live coverage and they got it all on drone on the broadcast. And you could just see the race coming apart and the men's men's wear the same. It was, I don't know if you've talked to Keegan. But as he hit that climb, he went and Russell, Vince or Wilde said the same thing. He just, he gave it his all, but he couldn't stay with Keegan on that, [00:14:22] Craig Dalton: that, that climb has been part of this Jada classic for 30. As I approached it, I remembered it from decades [00:14:29] Michelle Duffy: ago. Well, w R M cross country mountain bike race was UCI sanctioned before this year and it, but it wasn't prior to that. And it used to be a longer loop cross-country style, mountain bike, race, and we wanted to get back to that. Let them let the riders see beautiful Salinas valley. And I think that. They got to experience a little bit more of that and got those traditional climbs in those traditional views. And we only saw them, it was a two lap race. So we just saw them at the halfway [00:15:00] Craig Dalton: point. Yeah. Yeah. No, I think it was a really fun course too. Yeah. [00:15:04] Michelle Duffy: As the writers. Yeah. Loose and loose at times, but overall and fairly good. [00:15:11] Craig Dalton: There's a lot of people hitting the whoops and saying, wow, that kind of stuff, which is great to see. Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about the selection process. Not necessarily like how it went down, but you seem to have selected a lot of diverse writers. I know we've got former Olympians on the women's side. Like Andrew and Amber Neven who know, not known for mountain biking or gravel racing at all, but [00:15:38] Michelle Duffy: coming right [00:15:38] Craig Dalton: off the Olympics. Yeah. Yeah. Which clearly, like she's a phenomenal talent. And then as I know, you've got some track people on the men's side as well, some of the traditional mountain bikers, some gravel riders. So what, what did that look like? And it must have been fun, hard, but. [00:15:54] Michelle Duffy: It was hard but fun. That's a good way to describe it. We weren't sure what was going to happen in the inaugural year. Like, are we going to get enough writers to fill the field? Is it going to be fast amateur riders and just hitting the refresh button on the application and watching the names that float in. We had over 200. Elite professional cyclists, that applied to be a part of the lifetime grand Prix that does make the selection process really challenging. And I mean, we're learning a lot, but this felt like the best way for us to do it this year with no year over a year learnings, yet to do an application, let's find out who is interested, who is telling us that they want to take on this challenge. They want to. Our goal again, is to grow cycling. Who's going to be a great ambassador for that. And we looked at race resume and those that we thought would be really competitive, like who truly has a challenge, a chance to be in the top 10 throughout the season was really important. And then just who is going to inspire people to follow the sport. But I think we have a lot of really amazing humans that do a lot of amazing things off the bike to. [00:17:07] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think it's going to be really fun. It's so cool that you have flow bikes doing the live coverage. So regardless of where you are, get on flow bikes, you can watch the series unfold. And I think we're going to see some of those just human interest stories about, you know, who's skilled on the mountain bike who hate, you know, who's having counseling and I [00:17:23] Michelle Duffy: hated mountain bikers had their day. And, and that was amazing to see. I mean, some of the lesser talked about names within the lifetime grandpa. We're finishing in the top five. And I loved to see that. I don't think there was that many surprises in the top three. But, but there also, there was no one's been talking about Alex wild and he's been due to have his day and it came for him yesterday. He wrote an amazing event. Like I loved seeing that. I loved seeing Evelyn dong, who finished in fifth on the women's side. She hasn't really been talked about as a favorite of the lifetime grand Prix. And she was up there with the women all day. Yep. [00:17:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I think it's going to be interesting transitioning eight weeks from now to Unbound 200 mile race. Definitely different skillset. But I imagine if you've got a top five here at. You've got a little extra motivation in you. Maybe like you didn't feel like you could be competitive at the 200 mile, but now you're saying, well, I've got a bunch of points in the bank and I got to go [00:18:16] Michelle Duffy: for it. Exactly. And we think, I think there's consistency is really going to be important. And as long as you score a bunch of points at the front, Showing up and Unbound is so interesting because the finisher rate is low. But I think now what's going to make that event interesting is there's more motivation to finish. So you might be having the heck of a day out there and normally pull the plug. But getting to the finish line is super important for you because you can still finish in the top 20, because inevitably we're going to have some writers that are going to DNF, and we do have some writers that are opting out of it. Yeah. [00:18:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's really interesting. I imagined as a professional athlete, just trying to figure out how to manage the diversity of races that you have to tackle. And I don't know if we mentioned this on air, but you can drop one, one event through the season. [00:19:10] Michelle Duffy: Some, some athletes are choosing to drop one event. Some actually were injured leading into sea Otter. And so that's their drop of this season. And. Then some are going to do all six and they get to drop their lowest performance. You have Pete Stenton unfortunately broke his wrist yesterday and he rode, he finished it in 21st, yesterday. So he got some points and he's hoping that this is the event that he can drop. Definitely equipped to be a top contender throughout the season, but it was to his benefit that he attended the event yesterday and still got something. Yeah. And [00:19:45] Craig Dalton: the, the Leadville 100 is on the docket as well. Right. So another just sort of unique, you know, has its own skillset required. High, high elevation. [00:19:57] Michelle Duffy: Yeah. One could argue. That Unbound gravel 200 is the most intimidating event because of the mileage. But then you look at an event like the Leadville trail, 100 mountain bike race, which is at high elevation and requires a ton of climbing. Yep. [00:20:11] Craig Dalton: Super intimidating for any athlete tackling that [00:20:13] Michelle Duffy: one. Although it's interesting because crushing the Tuscher is the event prior to that. And there's a lot of climbing at that event and it is also at elevations. It's kind of a good prep leading in crushers, the only mountain top finish in gravel and there they spend most of their day climbing at that race. [00:20:31] Craig Dalton: That's what I've heard. What's the, what's the time difference a gap between those two events and it's exactly a month. Okay. Yeah. And lentils after [00:20:40] Michelle Duffy: crusher. Yeah. So the order seawater obviously is this weekend. First or second weekend in April and we have eight weeks until Unbound, gravel and Emporia. And then after that we have six weeks, so crusher four weeks, and then we get on this four week cadence. [00:20:57] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It's going to be interesting to see the climbers, how they fair and Leadville versus Unbound. Just fascinating to me the whole thing. [00:21:06] Michelle Duffy: Yeah. I, I'm really excited to see some individuals that are just so. Talented within their discipline, have the opportunity to rise and have an amazing day like we saw yesterday, but then also excited for these athletes that are just going to be chipping away every week, landing themselves in the top 10. And and who that will be like, who from yesterday are going to be consistently in the top 10 for the rest of the [00:21:32] Craig Dalton: season. Yeah. And I think that the existence of this series and all the capital on the line. Is also providing a lot of motivation for athletes that didn't get selected this year to show themselves and say, Hey, you missed out on me. Yeah. Look at me. [00:21:44] Michelle Duffy: And, and I, I love that. I mean, it's, it was really hard to make the decision and especially knowing, you know, you have to put your business hat on because we are hearing from some athletes that this has changed their year. I mean, it's, we're occupying a lot of their schedule, but. They've been able to sign sponsors that they hadn't prior. And we've gotten that feedback from multiple athletes, which was part of, part of the goal is to help them be able to do this as a full-time job, but as we're making the selection, you know, that those that you're not selecting are not getting that opportunity. And we had do have a handful of athletes that are going to be showing up at a lot of these events and saying, Hey, actually I did deserve to be here. I'm finishing in the top 30. All of the events within the lifetime grand Prix. And that's amazing because this is not a one-year activation for us. This is a long-term long-term things. Yeah. Yeah. And I think, [00:22:40] Craig Dalton: I mean, you still have the opportunity to win any one of these races, regardless of whether you're selected for the lifetime [00:22:45] Michelle Duffy: grand Prairie. Exactly. Yesterday, it just so happened that the top three were all also lifetime grand Prix athletes, but I don't foresee that happening at Unbound gravel. I mean, you have someone like Ian Boswell, the raining. And Lauren D crescendo. They're not doing the lifetime grand Prix. But I expect to see them performing really well at Unbound gravel. Yeah. You've [00:23:07] Craig Dalton: got people who focus on the Leadville 100 as their jam. That's the [00:23:11] Michelle Duffy: one they want to win. But I think that's, that's, what's going to help keep it really honest because there's going to be varying goals at these big events. So. We've started to see lots of front of pack riding in a pack and coming down to a sprint finish, which is also amazing because this gravel community is about building community and comradery. And, but now that we have both all this money on the line, do the lifetime grand Prix and other athletes that are not participating and maybe have their own incentives with their separate brands. Seeing how the races unfold this year. I, I am predicting will be different because every point matters for the grand Prix athletes and those that aren't in the grand Prix. I have something to prove. And so I don't know. I don't know if we'll see as much. PAC riding sleep miles [00:24:06] Craig Dalton: in the days, coming up to the event here, you signed up a pretty big sponsor. [00:24:11] Michelle Duffy: Yes. We now have a presenting sponsor in Mazda. They we've been talking with them since late fall of last year and they just launched an off-road vehicle, the Mazda CX 50. And as they were doing their research, they, they view the cyclist as a target consumer for them. Okay. They also just, I mentioned earlier, amazing humans doing amazing things. That's what we've been spending all of our time, talking to Mazda about that's something that they want to be a part of. They're not interested in the super salesy tactics. They're more interested in like content reconnecting and connecting with, with this consumer base. And they're really passionate about the outdoors. And [00:24:51] Craig Dalton: is it a sponsorship just for the [00:24:53] Michelle Duffy: season? They are the presenting sponsor of big sugar gravel now. They're signing. It's a two or three-year deal. I shouldn't know that, but my brain's not firing, but they're on for multiple years with us. And then they've also become official sponsors of all of the events that are in the lifetime grant. But yeah, that's [00:25:09] Craig Dalton: super exciting. Yeah. It's just great to see money coming into the sport to support a series of this [00:25:14] Michelle Duffy: nature. If you read any interviews from chemo, Seymour, our president of events early on, he actually called out auto is one of the industries. Departed from supporting cycling. After just, you know, a few decades ago of a lot of brands are moving themselves from this sport and Mazda has done some things locally in California in a smaller scale. Just I think outside of that region, people weren't really aware that they've been slowly starting to get their feet wet in dirt and mountain biking. And to see an automobile company come back and believe in us and believe in this series. It says a lot for us as well. Like this is, we're doing it. Like this is going to be big. We have a really big brand that believes in us, our events, our athletes, our participants, our community. Yeah. It's super [00:26:06] Craig Dalton: validating and great to see. Thank you so much for all the time. I know it's been a [00:26:10] Michelle Duffy: super long week. Thank you. I'm glad we could connect and chat and talk in person better than zoom. [00:26:17] Craig Dalton: Yeah, absolutely. And I look forward to just watching the series on full. Again, a reminder to the listener. You can watch these events on flow bikes. You can follow them on social media. There's all kinds of great way to get access to what I think is going to be a great journey and a lot of fun stories throughout the year. Particularly as we have two or three events behind us, we're going to see who's in the lead who needs to catch up. Does it change their race tactics to try to get a win when they're behind? Yes, [00:26:45] Michelle Duffy: so much fun. I'm excited to see how everything [00:26:49] Craig Dalton: unfolds. I, for one hope that it comes down to big sugar. I [00:26:53] Michelle Duffy: do too. Let's keep it. Interesting. Amazing. [00:26:57] Craig Dalton: All right. Get some rest. Good to [00:26:58] Michelle Duffy: talk to you. Thank you. Thanks Greg. [00:27:01] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. I hope you enjoyed learning more about the lifetime grand Prix series from Michelle. I know as a fan of the sport, I'm excited to just watch and see how it unfolds. Next up for racing is Unbound. And I think that's about seven weeks out. At this point and you can go over to lifetime's grand Prix website to see the current standings of athletes and see what's coming up next in the calendar beyond Unbound big, thanks to our friends at the feed for sponsoring this week's episode of the gravel rod podcast. If you're interested in connecting with me, encourage you to join the ridership, just visit www.theridership.com. That's our free global cycling community. You can connect with myself and hundreds of other athletes from around the world and just. Chat about your love of gravel cycling and all things bikes. If you're interested in supporting the podcast, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated as well as any financial contributions via buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

Art Works Podcasts
Stanley Clarke

Art Works Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022


Bassist, composer, and 2022 NEA Jazz Master Stanley Clarke discusses his long and storied career in this tuneful podcast.  He had hoped to become a classical musician, but along the way discovered jazz. Equally adept on the acoustic and electronic bass, Clarke was a successful soloist, and his tune “School Days” is considered a bass anthem. He's worked with many musicians across genres, founding with 2006 NEA Jazz Master Chick Corea the jazz fusion group Return to Forever, teaming up with George Duke to record music that mixed pop, funk, and jazz, rocking with Keith Richards, Stewart Copeland, and Ronnie Wood, and touring with  Béla Fleck and Jean-Luc Ponty, while The Stanley Clarke Band  won the 2012 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album.   Additionally, Clarke has scored over 70 films and television projects, including Boyz ‘n the Hood and Romeo Must Die. In this podcast, Clarke talks about it all with humor and insight, including his partnerships with Chick Corea, George Duke, and John Singleton. Listen to the concert celebrating to 2022 NEA Jazz Masters! Follow us on Apple Podcasts!  

Creative Baggage
No. 69: Navigating Uncertainty (ft. Kensho Watanabe)

Creative Baggage

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 63:09


This episode is part of our series in collaboration with the hosts of the Classical Gabfest Podcast - conductors Tiffany Lu, William White, and Kensho Watanabe. Please go check out their show, and their episode featuring us! -- Emerging onto the international stage, Kensho Watanabe is fast becoming one of the most exciting and versatile young conductors to come out of the United States. Recently recognized as a recipient of a Career Assistance Award by the Solti Foundation U.S, Kensho will make his Metropolitan Opera debut next season, conducting Kevin Puts' The Hours. Assistant Conductor of The Philadelphia Orchestra from 2016 to 2019, Kensho made his critically acclaimed subscription debut with the Orchestra and pianist, Daniil Trifonov, taking over from his mentor Yannick Nézet-Séguin. He would continue on to conduct four subscription concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra in 2019, in addition to debuts at the Bravo! Vail Festival and numerous concerts at the Mann and Saratoga Performing Arts Centres. Recent highlights include Kensho's debuts with the London Philharmonic and Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestras, Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse, Rhode Island Philharmonic as well as his Finnish debut with the Jyväskylä Sinfonia. Kensho has also enjoyed collaborations with the Houston Symphony, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Detroit Symphony, Brussels Philharmonic and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, the Seiji Ozawa Matsumoto Festival, and the Orchestre Metropolitain in Montreal. Equally at home in both symphonic and operatic repertoire, Watanabe has led numerous operas with the Curtis Opera Theatre, most recently Puccini's La rondine in 2017 and La bohème in 2015. Additionally, he served as assistant conductor to Yannick Nézet-Séguin on a new production of Strauss' Elektra at Montréal Opera. This season, Watanabe will conduct Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro at the Seiji Ozawa Music Academy. Watanabe has previously been the inaugural conducting fellow of the Curtis Institute of Music from 2013 to 2015, under the mentorship of Nézet-Séguin. An accomplished violinist, Watanabe received his master of music degree from the Yale School of Music and served as a substitute violinist in The Philadelphia Orchestra from 2012 to 2016. -- We're super excited to announce that we're piloting a database of opportunities for creatives like you! The database features scholarships, grants, internships, & more. It will be updated monthly with new links, opportunities, and deadlines. All you have to do to access the database is sign up for our newsletter at creativebaggagepodcast.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/creative-baggage/support

The Rights Track
Using prison data to reduce incarceration

The Rights Track

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 22:22


In Episode 5 of Series 7 of The Rights Track, Todd is in conversation with Amrit Dhir, Director of Partnerships at Recidiviz – a team of technologists committed to getting decision makers the data they need to drive better criminal justice outcomes.  Transcript Todd Landman  0:00  Welcome to the Rights Track podcast, which gets the hard facts about the human rights challenges facing us today. In series seven, we're discussing human rights in a digital world. I'm Todd Landman, in this episode, I'm delighted to be joined by Amrit Dhir. Amrit is the Director of Partnerships at Recidiviz, a team of technologists committed to getting decision makers the data they need to drive better criminal justice outcomes. He has previously spent over a decade at the intersection of technology and new business development, working, for example at Sidewalk Labs, Google for Startups and Verily. Today, we'll be exploring the practical uses of technology and data in the criminal justice system. So Amrit, it's great to have you on this episode of the Rights Track. Welcome from California. Amrit Dhir  0:44  Thank you so much, I'm really glad to be here. Todd Landman  0:46  It's great for you to join us. And I want to start with a simple question. We had a guest - Sam Gilbert - on our last episode, we made this distinction between the sort of data for good and data for bad and there's a very large sort of argument out there about surveillance capitalism, the misuses of data, you know, behavioural microtargeting and all these sorts of issues. And yet I see that where you're working at Recidiviz there's a kind of data for good argument here around using technology and data to help criminal justice systems and the healthcare sector. So just briefly, could you tell us about this data for good and data for bad distinction? Amrit Dhir  1:19  Yeah, well, as with most things, I think it's difficult to pigeonhole anything into one of those camps, everything it seems, can be used for good or bad. And so data itself is not one or the other. I think it's about the use, I think that's what Sam was getting at with you as well. With Recidiviz, you know, what we've understood is that data that's been collected over a long period of time, especially in the context of the United States, and our unfortunate kind of race to mass incarceration, from basically the 1970s until about mid-2010s. We've collected a lot of data along the way, and we're not actually using or understanding that data. And so what we do at Recidiviz is we bring that data together, so make it something that can be better understood and better utilised, to help reduce prison populations to help drive better outcomes. So we're focused on taking data that's been, again, collected over quite a long period of time and consistently collected, but also making it better understandable. Todd Landman  2:17  So this sounds like big, messy, disparate, fragmented data, is that correct? Amrit Dhir  2:22  Most of those things, most of the time. It's definitely fragmented most of the time, it's not always necessarily what we'd call big. Because, you know, coming from Google, I think of big in the terms of, you know, search query type volume. So in corrections, it's not necessarily that big, but it is certainly messy, and it is certainly fragmented. Todd Landman  2:42  You know we had a guest on Rights Track, some while back, David Fathi from the American Civil Liberties Union, he explained to us the structure of the American sort of prison system, not justice in itself, but prison system with, you know, 50 state prison systems, plus a federal prison system and a mix of public and private prisons. So it's a mixed picture in terms of jurisdiction, the use of incarceration and of course, the conditions of incarceration. So what's the sort of data that's being collected that you find useful at Recidiviz? Amrit Dhir  3:13  Yeah, I'll actually add a piece of that as well, you're exactly right to say, you know, every one of the 50 states has a different system, the federal system is itself separate. But then there's also county jails. And those systems are running completely separately from even the states that they're in. So it is messy. And the data also extends, by the way, so we're talking about what we consider the back half of the system. So once someone has already gone to prison, we think of that as the back half. Whereas there's a front half of the system as well, which is the courts, your prosecutor and defence attorneys, and up to policing. And so all of those different segments have their different datasets as well. At Recidiviz we're starting at the back half, largely, because we think there's a lot more impact to be had there, at least for now. And the data extends to many things. So it can be first of all, admissions data. When someone comes into a facility, what sentence did that person come in with? Where is that person going to be in the facility? As in like, where's that bed? And then, as often happens, there are transfers between prisons, within prisons. That's another set of data. There are programmes that the person may be participating in. Some of these are built with the spirit of rehabilitation and reintegration into society. Those are important and knowing how they work and when they work, and if they work is important. And then when someone gets out of prison, that's not the end either. We've whole infrastructure of supervision. And broadly, those are grouped into two categories - parole and probation. And someone may be back out in their community and still under a degree of supervision that's more than what someone who has not been in prison goes through. They have to check in with their parole officer. They have certain requirements, they have certain restrictions. All of those are data points as well. How are you checking in with your parole officer? Did you have to take a drug test? Did you ask for permission to leave the state, all of those things. And as you can imagine, even just by the list I've given you, which is just a very small percentage of it, all of those are sitting in different data silos and are interacted with by different people within the system and it gets pretty tricky. Todd Landman  5:21  And you collect data on the sort of sentencing? So you know an analysis of that plus demographic makeup of the prison population, time served? And also, the use of the death penalty and or deaths in custody - is that data that you can collect? Amrit Dhir  5:37  Yes, so we can do all that. And I'm glad you pointed out racial and demographic data, because that's a big part of what we do and what we highlight, because you may not be surprised to hear that in the US, there are like pretty severe disparities when it comes to race, ethnicity. And these are things that departments of corrections. So those are the executive agencies within each state, we usually call them department of corrections, although they'll have different names in different states. They have this data, and they want to make better sense of it. Their stakeholders want to understand it better. So generally, these agencies report to the governor, but they're also accountable to the legislature. So there's a degree of sharing that data or better unpacking that data that's important. Then we also have, I would broadly, categorise, and we say these kinds of things a lot where there's broad categorizations and then there's also much more detailed ones. But broadly, you can think of this as public data, and then departments of corrections data. So the public data is what's available anyway - we can go out there and find without any data sharing agreement with any agency. As these are government agencies where this data is required to be public. And so you'll find researchers and universities and different organisations accessing this data and publishing it or analysing it, we do that also. But we also get data sharing agreements directly with departments of corrections, and help them unpack that as well. So there's a kind of complimentary interaction there between the two datasets. Todd Landman  7:09  I understand. And how do you actually reduce incarceration through data analysis? I'm perplexed by that statement you made quite early on when you were talking to us. Amrit Dhir  7:18  There's a couple things and I'll categorise this. My broad categories into three categories. There are leadership tools, line staff tools, and then public tools. So let me start with public tools, because I think that's more related to what we just talked about in the previous question. The public tools are ones that are available to you and me. And so there's two that you can look on our website and find right now. One is a public dashboard that we call spotlight. As of the date of this recording there are two that have been published one for North Dakota and one for Pennsylvania. I encourage everyone to go check those out. If you just Google, you know our name Recidiviz and Pennsylvania, you'll see it come up as the first result. And there you can see that all the data in a accessible way. So the 'viz' in Recidiviz stands for data visualisation. We worked with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections, to better represent the data that they have, so that the public can see it. And you can see the breakdown, by ethnicity, by district, by sex by other filters, and really get in there in some detail and see what's happened also over time. So that's one that's the public dashboard. That's largely to raise awareness. And it's something that when you talk to departments of corrections, you learn that they have lots of FOIA requests, which are Freedom of Information Act requests, so requests from media, from researchers, from the public, but also from the legislature. And so that's one thing that we do that just broadens the conversation. Another are what we call policy memos. If you go to our website, and or if you just type in Recidiviz.org/policy, these are one-page memos that we have our data scientists put together that assess the impact of a particular administrative or legislative policy proposal. So imagine that you are looking to Pennsylvania for example, wanting to make a change to geriatric parole, or if you want it to end the criminalization of marijuana, we can then and we have gone in there and analyse the data that's publicly available. And sometimes we also access our data with collaboration with the DOC. And we can tell you what the both impact on the number of basic liberty person years that are returned. How people will get out of prison earlier or not go to prison at all, as well as how much money the state in these cases will save. And so that's a great way to inform policymakers to say hey, this is actually a good policy or a bad policy, because it's going to get people out of prison and it's going to also save you money. Todd Landman  9:57  Yeah the concept it's like a variable called liberty person years that you use. And then of course, it's almost like a time series interrupted model where if you get new legislation, you can look at that liberty person years before the legislation and after to judge the degree to which that legislation may or may not have made a difference, right? Amrit Dhir  10:16  Exactly right. And I encourage folks just to go check, check some of those memos out, there's probably like 50 on there now. And they're very easy to understand, very easy to access. They're all one page. They're all very beautifully visualised. Because you can take this very, as you said, messy and fractured datasets, but actually come to some pretty simple insights. And I would say simple and actionable. And so that's what we do there. And that was a long description of public data, but I can go into the other two, if you're ready for it. Todd Landman  10:43  Yes, please. Amrit Dhir  10:44  Okay. So working backwards, we'll go to line staff tools. And so this line staff, meaning people who are working within corrections or on supervision. And let me take the example of supervision first, because one thing that's interesting and that I actually learned only while at Recidiviz is that half of prison admissions in the US every year, come from supervision. Meaning people who are getting their parole or probation revoked and are going back to prison. That's half of the emissions we get every year. And that's a huge number. Todd Landman  11:15  Wow. Amrit Dhir  11:15  And so this, you can think of this as the back end of the back end, it's the very last piece. And so for Recidiviz we were kind of assessing where we should start, that seemed like the right place to do so because the impact was just so great. Now, put yourself in the shoes of a parole officer. These folks have pretty difficult jobs in that they often have, you know, up to 100 and sometimes more, we've seen up to 120 people that they are I'll use a verb 'serving' as a parole officer. So the idea is you got people that have been returned to the community, they've been in prison, they now are trying to get jobs, they're trying to get job training. They're trying to reintegrate into their communities, and the parole officer is there to help them do that, and keep track of how they're doing. Now, that's one thing to do if you got 20 people, you want to keep track of and help and connect to the right resources, but if you've got 100, and you're supposed to meet with them every month, it becomes impractical. And that ends up meaning sometimes that parole officers aren't doing as good a job as they'd like to do. Because it's just too hard, just too much to manage. Todd Landman  12:22  You need a structured database approach. Amrit Dhir  12:24  Exactly. So that's where data can be very useful, because we can automate a lot of what a parole officer needs to do. And rather than having to check, you know, we've heard up to 12 different datasets to figure out where are the programmes my the people I'm serving are have available to them? When do I know if I need to do a home visit? Where do I find a list of employers that I can send them to? Where are housing options for them? All these are in different places, but we at Recidiviz, bring them all together, give them an easy-to-use tool, so that we can actually service them even you know, on their smartphones, in an app, to show them, hey, did you know that this person is actually eligible to be released from parole if they just upload a pay stub? And hey, do you want to just take a pay stub with your phone, and we can do it for you? I mean, how much easier that is than you having to go through all 100, figure out who's eligible based on your own recall or some other antiquated system and kind of struggle to try to help people. We can help you do that. And that's a big thing that we've done. Todd Landman  13:22  I mean it's almost like an E-portfolio approach that there's this way to archive parolees meeting certain milestones and conditions. And it makes the management of those cases so much more straightforward. Whilst there's also a record of that management that makes it easier for the parole officer to serve the people that they are serving. Amrit Dhir  13:42  Exactly. You got it exactly right. And by the way, there's, you know, a degree of nudging that can be done in this as well, if you're familiar with like the Cass Sunstein and others, behaviour psychology, but how, you know, instead of saying, hey, this person needs a drug test, and have that'd be the first thing that you prioritise. I mean you can say, hey, this person needs help finding a job. And here are some resources, here's some employers in the area that we know employ people who are formerly incarcerated. It's a great way to actually not only automate and make the life of the parole officer easier and better, but also to kind of encourage the better behaviours within those communities. Todd Landman  14:16  Now that makes sense. So what's the third channel then? Amrit Dhir  14:18  Ahhh the third one is leadership tools. And this is for the directors and their deputies, the most senior people in a department of corrections, they may come in. And actually what we're seeing now is that a lot of the people who are coming in today and are sitting in these roles are reformers. They believe that the size of our criminal justice system in the United States is just too large. And they are motivated to improve outcomes. And they're focusing on things like recidivism, which is a term for people coming back to prison after being released. And that's a number you want to have low naturally. But historically, what happens - actually not even you know what historically -what happens today. He is that these recidivism reports will come out maybe every three years. Yeah. So if you're a director, and by the time they come out, they're almost three years old. So you're almost like because the six year timelines, and you want to know, hey, I instituted this new reform this new programme, I want to know if it's been successful, you won't know until a couple years out whether it worked. And so what we do instead is to give you real time data, we can tell you what's happening on your team and in your agency on a real time basis. And also project out based on what we're seeing with some meaningful kind of population projections as well. So that helpful. Todd Landman  14:34  That's fascinating. And let me ask you just another technical question. So when people are released from prison, is it typical for them to also have a sort of GPS tag on their leg for a certain period of time? And does that form any of the data that you look at? Amrit Dhir  15:52  So it depends? It's a very good question. And it's one of the more controversial topics today in this space, and especially in the Reform Movement, there's a concern that we may be heading towards, from mass incarceration to mass incarceration, and that people will be monitored and supervised within their communities. And I think that is a very meaningful concern that we need to be careful of, because we don't want that to happen. But to broadly answer your question about the state of this today, it depends on where you are, it depends on the county depends on the state depends on all those things, in terms of whether you are wearing a device that electronically monitors, you know, we don't track that ourselves, that's something that we do or want to do. Our approach is to helping people get off of supervision and get into programmes and other kinds of initiatives that help them on their way. Todd Landman  16:43  Excellent. So this discussion really opened up into, you know, the bad side of the question, I guess, you know, you just have to go into this with our eyes open, I suspect that you're triangulating a lot of data. You're providing that in real time on dashboards, a lot of it's in the public domain. What are the risks around this? What are the pitfalls? What's the risk of re-identification? What's the risk of, you know, lapsing into kind of credit scoring philosophies? And just, as you said about the tags, there's worry about that kind of, you know, E-surveillance and E- carceration. Equally, someone could backward engineer some of your data and actually profile people. So, what's the downside of this approach? Amrit Dhir  17:21  Yeah, that was a great list. So there's certainly a concern of bias entering any analysis of a dataset. And we are very careful about that. So one thing to note is that everything that we do is open source. So it's open to the technology community to take a look at what's kind of under the hood. And that's important, because we would do want to make sure that we are not only participating and contributing to the broader ecosystem that are, in this case, tech and criminal justice ecosystem, but that we're also held accountable to them. So that's the first thing that we do, we also are very mindful and transparent about our data ethics policies, and how we handle those kinds of questions and sometimes ambiguities. So if you look at, for example, the spotlight dashboard that I mentioned that you'd find for Pennsylvania, North Dakota, you will see in the methodology that we explain what happens when there's a question. So for example, if someone puts down three different ethnicities, how do we manage that in the data visualisation that just shows them as one. Our approach there is transparency and engagement. Todd Landman  19:31   Have you done any links with the ACLU on this? Because they're quite interested in prison conditions. They're interested in incarceration, sentencing, etc. Do you do any kind of briefing with the ACLU? Amrit Dhir  20:16  Yeah, so two things actually on that. I will take them in reverse order. So first of all, we do work with ACLU. If you look at our website, on the policy page, which again, are those one page memos, the ACLU has requested a number of those. And there's naturally different chapters of the ACLU in different states in different parts of the country. And we work with different stakeholders within the ACLU as well on those. The other piece, though, get one of the back to what you said about three strikes. There's another piece of that I think people may not be as familiar with it. I certainly wasn't, which is this issue of technical revocations. So if you're on supervision, like I said, half of prison emissions every year are from revocation of your supervision, meaning you're going back to prison, from parole or probation. But half of those, so a quarter of all emissions every year are from technical revocations. And those are when someone breaks a rule, that is not a law for the rest of us. Right. So it's not that they stole something, it's not that they got caught breaking a law, that they broke a rule of their parole, and sometimes these are ones that you and I would feel horrified to learn of. So that, you know, we've got examples of people, for example, going to an open mic night where there was alcohol presence, and that person wasn't allowed to be around alcohol. Being in the wrong County. Being out past curfew. All of these things that are, and you know there are anecdotes all over the place of the kinds of things that send people back to prison that we as society would not tolerate. And those are also some of what we're reducing. Todd Landman  21:49  That's amazing, that sort of distinction to draw between, you know, breaking a rule and breaking the actual law, I guess the rules follow from the law. But I get your point in terms of, you know, how would somebody know if they crossed the county line, particularly if they're at an area they don't know well. So this has been a fascinating exploration with the ways in which you have triangulated datasets, made them more visible, put them into real time, and I have to reflect on what you said. I mean, I grew up in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. So I'm going to immediately read all your Pennsylvania data. I actually grew up near a prison in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, you know, so it'd be interesting to see how things have moved on from the time that I lived there many moons ago. I won't tell you how long ago that was. But, but this is a really good conversation for us to have around some of the ways in which different types of data can be leveraged for good. And also some of the challenges of that, or the misuse of that information, as well as the sort of things that you don't collect, you know, the fact that you don't collect data on these tags. And that that varies, of course, and the variation you see in terms of the population that you're collecting data on varies because of the fragmentation of the US prison system and the sort of federal system that the US is structured in, but also data that no one really brought together in one place before. And I think that when we hear this data for good argument, we hear a lot of people saying we're actually bringing datasets that haven't been brought together before in order to derive insights from those data and do something that is for good and brings about positive social changes result. So I just think this tour that you've given us today is absolutely fantastic. And on behalf of the Rights Track thanks so much for being on this episode with us today. Amrit Dhir  23:25  Oh, thank you for having me. It's been fun. Thank-you. Christine Garrington  23:29  Thanks for listening to this episode of The Rights Track, which was presented by Todd Landman and produced by Chris Garrington of Research Podcasts with funding from 3DI. You can find a detailed show notes on the website at www.RightsTrack.org. And don't forget to subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts to access future and earlier episodes.

Master Of Your Crafts
S3. Ep 52. Are our feet in the alligators mouth?

Master Of Your Crafts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 31:55


Dr. Yoho is a healthcare whistleblower. He recently published two books about medical corruption, Butchered by “Healthcare” and Hormone Secrets. He had a surgical practice in the United States until retirement three years ago. Dr. Yoho now writes and speaks about COVID and vaccine frauds full-time. Learn more about Dr Robert Yoho at RobertYohoAuthor.com to learn about my books, Butchered by “Healthcare” and Hormone Secrets. My podcasts are HERE. My essay with link to treatment and more is HERE. Also see: RobertYoho.substack.com. Additional mentions in the interview: Listen to Joe Rogan's interview with Peter McCollough. Equally good is Rogan's Robert Malone podcast. Another fantastic podcast about Tech Censorship and Maajid Nawaz on Rogan. "LEGAL” DISCLAIMER: Use the information here at your own risk. It is not medical advice. Make your healthcare decisions with the help of a physician or other licensed provider.

Girls in Marketing
Building a Career in SEO with Rejoice Ojiaku

Girls in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 46:37


Olivia is joined by Rejoice Ojiaku, SEO Manager and Co-Founder of B-DigitalUK. Rejoice chats all about how she's built a successful career in the SEO industry as well as giving tips and tricks for newbie SEO professionals. From running a community focused on giving opportunities to young black marketing talent, to running campaigns for multi-million-pound companies, Rejoice is an industry expert who has a lot of unique and interesting perspectives discussed throughout the episode. If you're someone who wants to learn more about building a career in the SEO and ASO industries, this is an episode for you. Equally, diversity and inclusion is a running theme of the podcast so it's a great listen for anyone wanting to learn more about this. Follow Rejoice on Twitter here. Find Out More About B-DigitalUK here.

Final Draft - Great Conversations
Book Club - Jane Rawson's A History of Dreams

Final Draft - Great Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 4:40


Jane Rawson is the author of novels, essays and non-fiction. She won the Aurealis Awards for Science Fiction for her novel From the Wreck.A History of Dreams transports the reader to Adelaide in the late 1930's.Margaret, Esther, Phyl and Audrey are finishing high school with dreams of what the future might hold. Margaret wants to attend university but her father forbids it as improper for a young woman.Within their lives and their families, each of the women is constrained in their own way by the society around them. The world seems to be pushing them towards marriage and nuclear families, no matter what they want for themselves. But Audrey has a way to fight back, a secret passed down through generations of spinster women. Audrey is going to teach the others witchcraft!The group form the Semaphore Supper Club and wield power over dreams to instigate changes in their social lives. Their influence begins as small changes. Shifting the perspective of the men in their lives; nodding them towards equality.Their mission becomes serious however when the club uncovers a conservative cell amongst a male poet's group. These men come together to tout national myths that erase all but those they deem worthy. Bent on power they are emboldened by events in Europe.Can a group of young witches with the power of dreams defeat a rising tide of authoritarianism that would have them all chained to the home?A History of Dreams hits a pitch perfect period atmosphere of early twentieth century Adelaide. In Margaret, Esther, Phyl and Audrey we are presented with four protagonists who are varied and sympathetic, whilst also pushing out against stereotypes of their position in their society.More importantly perhaps is that the novel reminds us that the rise of racist nationalism in the early twentieth century was not the exclusive provenance of an Austrian house painter. A History of Dreams shows how the frustrated ambitions of small minded men can be bent towards oppression no matter where they hail from.We travel alongside the quartet of witches as they grow into their power and their place in the world. Despite being able to manipulate dreams they find themselves stymied in making their own dreams a reality. We are shown that power and strength are held within institutions and despite the four's efforts they are always working from without.It's interesting to think on the ease with which male power wields itself within the novel. The men declaim their presumed superiority openly and with impunity.This sets up a tension between the magic of the Semaphore Supper Club and the power of institutions, the weight of societal expectation.The world of a History of Dreams parallels our own up to a point. Of course the witchcraft is an initial departure and this plays on the notion that women at that time had very little in the way of power. Young women seeking to influence their future might well have thought of choice or autonomy as being as fanciful as a dream. Equally they would have had to work subtly, changing minds through persuasion rather than exerting brute force.The metaphor of the exercise of power is extended as the Semaphore Supper Club's opponents are able to commend increasingly powerful forces. These are not foes who have to win hearts and minds. They exercise fear and sow division; a prominent arm of the authoritarian government is even called Orders and Borders and well, I'm not going to tell you how to interpret that…This is an alternate history of Australia and I'm not going to give up the secrets of the story, but suffice to say it has much to say about conservative flirtations with Nationalism and authoritarianism.The power to change dreams is an intriguing one. It involves crafting a frame of mind and way of thinking that will influence actions both big and small. It's about what we believe and how we take that belief out into the world. It's the opposite of big gestures, with little substance, and looks instead to the long term.I can't for the life of me imagine what Jane Rawson might be getting at with this?!Book Club is produced and presented by Andrew PopleWant more great conversations with Australian authors?Discover this and many more conversations on Final Draft every week from 2ser.

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
(Level 3)-Day_92 National Football League

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 5:51


在喜马拉雅已支持实时字幕关注公众号“高效英语磨耳朵”获取文稿和音频词汇提示1.franchises 特许经营权2.monopoly 垄断3.norms 规范4.possession 占有5.territory 领土6.frontiers 边界7.conquering 占领8.devised 设计9.stark 明显10.crucial 至关重要的11.conducive 有利于12.leverage 影响力13.legitimacy 合法性14.merger 合并15.enterprise 企业16.tailor 定做原文National Football LeagueThe NFL(National Football League)is one of the wealthiest and most powerful sports organizations in the world.Many of the single franchises or teams are worth 200-300 million dollars each.As such,each team should be thought of as a major corporation.American-style football,of which the NFL maintains a complete monopoly over the elite professional ranks,has its roots in English rugby,which was played in U.S. Eastern colleges and universities in the nineteenth century.However,rugby did not have features in keeping with American cultural norms.So U.S. football arose out of norms consistent with American society,such as clearly measured possession of territory and the expansion of frontiers through conquering new land.Walter Camp,a Yale player,devised the rules of the American game.In 1880,he introduced“downs”into the game,or breaks so that teams could re-assess their position and prepare for the next attack.This was in stark contrast to rugby's non-stop and more flowing play.This move would years later be crucial to the sport's success.With natural breaks in play,the game would be one conducive to American commercial television,which relies on advertisement breaks for the generation of revenue.Equally important was the later inclusion of the forward pass in the game.This made the game appear more offensive,and the famous“Hail Mary”long pass is to this day one of the most dramatic plays in sport.Football's success as a dominant American sport(alongside baseball)was secured in the 1960s with some important contracts with television networks.The ABC television network sponsored a rival “American Football League” to compete with other dominant National Foot League.ABC television did not hide the fact that the rival league was created for the sole purpose or creating more leverage with advertisers.After gaining greater legitimacy and earning more revenue,the up-start AFL was able to negotiate independently with other television networks and sign on big-name players.The most notable was star quarterback Joe Namath.With the AFL rising as a legitimate business competitor,the NFL and AFL negotiated a merger,resulting in the NFL league,as it is known to this day.Since the merger,the NFL has maintained almost a complete monopoly over American professional football.Football's success,then,has been a reflection of the ideals of American society and,more specifically,of American-style commercial enterprise.The league's success has,in no small part,been due to the relationship between the media and the sport.In a sense,football is a perfect example of a modern media-generated sport,successful linking American norms and values with a sport tailor-made for commercial profit.翻译国家橄榄球联盟美国国家橄榄球联盟(NFL)是世界上最富有和最强大的体育组织之一。许多单一的特许经营权或团队价值2 -3亿美元。因此,每个团队都应该被看作是一个大公司。由美国国家橄榄球联盟(NFL)在职业精英中保持着完全垄断地位的美式橄榄球,起源于19世纪在美国东部的大学和学院中进行的英式橄榄球。然而,英式橄榄球并没有符合美国文化规范的特点。因此,美国橄榄球源于与美国社会相一致的规范,比如明确衡量领土的占有和通过征服新土地来扩张疆域。耶鲁大学的运动员沃尔特·坎普制定了美国橄榄球的比赛规则。1880年,他在比赛中引入了“倒地”战术,即中场休息,以便球队重新评估自己的位置,为下一次进攻做好准备。这与英式橄榄球的不间断和流畅形成了鲜明对比。多年后,这一举措对这项运动的成功至关重要。如果比赛中有自然的休息时间,那么这款比赛将有利于美国商业电视,因为它依靠广告休息时间来产生收入。同样重要的是后来在比赛中引入了向前传球。这使得比赛显得更具攻击性,而著名的“万福玛利亚”长传至今仍是体育运动中最具戏剧性的动作之一。20世纪60年代,由于与电视网络签订了一些重要的合同,美式橄榄球(与棒球一起)成为了美国的一项主要运动,从而获得了成功。美国广播公司(ABC)电视网赞助了竞争对手——美国橄榄球联盟(American Football League),与另外占主导地位的美国国家橄榄球联盟(National Foot League)展开竞争。美国广播公司并没有掩盖这样一个事实,即竞争对手联盟是为了一个目的而创立的,或者是为了增加与广告商之间的影响力。在获得了更大的合法性和更多的收入后,新贵美国橄榄球联盟(AFL)能够与其他电视网络独立谈判,并与大牌球员签约。其中最著名的是明星四分卫乔·纳马斯(Joe Namath)。随着美国橄榄球联盟(AFL)逐渐成为一个合法的商业竞争对手,美国国家橄榄球联盟(NFL)和美国橄榄球联盟(AFL)达成了合并协议,从而形成了如今为人所知的美国橄榄球大联盟。自合并以来,美国国家橄榄球联盟几乎保持了对美国职业橄榄球的完全垄断。因此,橄榄球的成功反映了美国社会的理想,更具体地说,是美国式商业企业的理想。联盟的成功在很大程度上要归功于媒体和体育之间的关系。从某种意义上说,橄榄球是现代媒体创造创造的一个完美例子,它成功地将美国的规范和价值观与一项为商业利益量身定制的运动联系在一起。

Startup Marketing
Marketing Coach: Documentary Photography

Startup Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 80:49


This week's episode is a hot seat coaching session with Jenna Reich of https://jennareich.com (Jenna Reich Photography. ) I had so much fun and I am so invested in what Jenna's doing because it resonates with me as a mom. I tried to keep this to 30 minutes, but just couldn't! Learn how to position your business and create messages that convert your target audience. Jenna is a documentary photographer; instead of meeting your family in a meadow at golden hour, she comes to your home and spends the day with you. She captures what day to day life is like for kids and their parents--documenting all the little moments that families want to remember, like the way your toddler holds your hand when you walk to the kitchen or scoots onto your lap for story time. The way your teens laugh when they tell you a good joke. Equally as Instagram-able as the family photos we've all grown accustomed to, she helps you create a time capsule that you can look back on that brings you joy. Jenna's restarting her successful photography business after living overseas for several years. Her questions include: How to position her business to her target audience How to learn more about her target audience How to create messages that will teach people what she does and lead to booked sessions What to include in a nurture sequence Creative ways to get her name out in a new community We cover a lot of ground in this episode! Key takeaways for Jenna are: Interview past clients about why they worked with her Interview parents in her current network that can tell her why they'd consider documentary photography Create messages that are simple and precise to describe the experience she provides using the StoryBrand script of identifying and speaking to potential clients' external struggles (traditional photo sessions are stressful and nobody wants to remember the day), internal struggles (as moms we want to remember all the little moments we know make up our daily life with our kids and see ourselves on our motherhood journey) and philosophical struggles (families ought to be able to recall good memories when they see photos) Create a nurture sequence that introduces documentary family photography and overcomes objections clients may have Partner with local non-profits that support families to give a mini session away that the non-profit can promote on her behalf thus increasing awareness of her services I genuinely enjoyed unpacking all of this with Jenna! What she does speaks to my soul and I hope you enjoy today's episode! Music: Tuesday by Sascha Ende, Music.io

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
SIRO: Almost 63% of Irish consumers value energy saving

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 4:37


New research about attitudes to smart homes and technology commissioned by SIRO, the wholesale broadband operator delivering a Gigabit broadband network to 770,000 homes and businesses across the country, has found that almost two thirds (63%) of respondents believe that the energy-saving and environmentally friendly benefits are the most important factors of smart homes. Just over half (54%) of the survey participants stated that smart devices have helped them save money. Energy Saving and Environmental Benefits for Smart Homes Amid rising energy costs, the technology is particularly appealing to over 55s. The research revealed that that demographic is most aware (72%) of the energy-saving and environmentally friendly benefits of smart homes. 61% of over 55s also stated that the technology has helped them to lower costs, higher than any other age cohort. The research also revealed that high-quality broadband is the most important factor for those under 35s when considering their ideal home. Just over half of those aged under 35 (53%) surveyed singled out broadband as the deciding factor when purchasing a home, compared to the overall choice of the general public who placed a greater emphasis (40%) on a garden. Changing consumer habits and trends such as the shift to remote working and a fall in car ownership were evident from the research as factors like having a parking spot at their home (15%) ranked lower on the list. In the wake of the pandemic, a greater appreciation for high-speed quality broadband was also evident with 4 in 5 (84%) members of the general public flagging their support for a change in the Irish law to make it a requirement that developers must install high-speed broadband and infrastructure when constructing all new homes. The research also revealed the widespread adoption of smart devices in Irish households. Almost seven out of ten (67%) consumers own a Smart TV; with just under half (49%) of households in possession of a virtual assistant technology like Alexa; a third of the general public using smart home technology like digital heating controls and lighting; and a quarter using security devices like video doorbells. SIRO Noting the research findings, SIRO Head of Operations and New Developments Cian O'Mahony said:“At SIRO, through our work with developers to bring our high-quality fibre broadband to new developments, we see the huge appetite amongst the public for homes with smart and connected devices. Equally retrofitting existing homes with smart technology is a growing trend.” “Today's research brings to life the reasons people are opting for smart home technology. These can vary depending on life stages. Those in the older age demographics are more likely to view smart homes as important for environmental reasons, with younger groups valuing the convenience that they provide.” Commenting on the sustainability advantages, SIRO Director of Corporate Affairs Amanda Glancy said: “Smart home devices deliver numerous benefits. More sustainable living, achieving climate change targets, and enhanced security or savings on energy or heating bills are key attributes. The latter is very top of mind given the steep increases in energy prices.” “As fibre broadband networks continue to roll out across Ireland, this research indicates more individuals, families and communities will take advantage of the benefits of smart homes, particularly for environmental benefits and reducing the cost of living.” More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help promote your business. Why not drop us a line at Info@IrishTechNews.ie now to find out more a...

The Official Property Entrepreneur Podcast
070 - Be Someone Worth Remembering

The Official Property Entrepreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 36:19


"This will fundamentally change your life"   In this official Property Entrepreneur podcast I'm going to take you through some of the fundamentals of the Karma Credits™ blueprint that we covered in Episode 012 and share with you how doing the smallest things on a daily basis will not only separate you from the masses but it will make you feel good, it will make others feel good and by the energy of Karma Credits™ you will attract good things to your life.   Every day you have the opportunity to engage with people.  Some people will remember you and other people just won't. Think about the amount of people that you engage with on a daily, weekly, monthly basis and think about how many of those are actually worth you remembering.   1 in 1,000 people are different to the masses. They go about their day to day in a different way, engaging in a way that is warm and inviting and by virtue of this add value to all of those around them.   If you don't do this, you will live a life of fear, a life of scarcity, or a life of minimal/reduced results because you're not putting the easy things out into the universe. Equally, if you do do these things, I can absolutely guarantee you that not only will your day to day just be far more enjoyable but you will walk around with a smile on your face, you will feel warm, you'll feel engagement and you'll feel connected to everyone around you.  By going out of your way to do the tiniest things it will return the biggest enjoyment, value and results.    Are you somebody that's worth remembering? If you are this will take it to the next level. If you're not this is going to fundamentally change your life.   Success and failure are both very predictable.   I hope you enjoy.   Want to learn more?   If you've not already joined the 8.5k Property Entrepreneurs for FREE in the Property Entrepreneur Facebook Group, click here to join now:  The Property Entrepreneurs Community   If you're listening to this podcast but have not yet subscribed, click the subscribe button to listen to what Daniel and other industry leading guests have to say on a weekly basis on all things business, investment property and lifestyle: The Official Property Entrepreneur Podcas‪t    Keep up to date with Daniel's musings by subscribing on YouTube now : The Official Property Entrepreneur YouTube Channel   Follow Daniel on Social: Instagram: @propertyentrepreneur_  Facebook:  @PropertyEntrepreneurOfficial LinkedIn: @propertyentrepreneur

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker
PGK-Episode 161: How to Raise a Conservative Daughter (with guest Michelle Easton)

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 40:17


Michelle Easton is the founder and president of the Clare Boothe Luce Center for Conservative Women, which prepares young women for leadership in policy, civil society, and the family. The mother of three grown sons, she has hundreds of “daughters” whom she has helped launch into productive and fulfilling adulthood. A lawyer and laborer in the conservative movement since the early 1970s, Michelle worked through all twelve years of the Reagan-Bush administrations, including in presidential appointments in the Education Department. Tune into the conversation between Dr. Meeker and Michelle as they discuss Michelle's new book, How to Raise a Conservative Daughter.  MEG and GUEST MICHELLE EASTON (PART 1) Dr. Meeker and Michelle review Michelle's latest book, focusing on: - Why society praises liberal women and disparages conservative women - The origin of the feminist movement - Nonie Darwish, a former muslum who speaks on the dangers of misogyny and abuse towards women - Kellyanne Conway's character and the example she set as the Senior Counselor to former president, Donald Trump. BREAK  MEG and GUEST MICHELLE EASTON  (PART 2) Dr. Meeker and Michelle discuss Star Parker, who is another conservative woman of faith that made it into Michelle's book. Equally important to kindness and encouragement, Dr. Meeker and Michelle agree that a woman must have courage to speak into issues that truly matter. The two deliberate on the significance of women applauding virtue in other women and they also share why they are hopeful that younger generations of women will change the current liberal tide.  FROM THE PRODUCER Thanks for listening to Episode 161, How to Raise a Conservative Daughter, and for helping Dr. Meg's parenting revolution reach more than SIX MILLION downloads! Subscribe, rate, and leave a review for us on iTunes! Get Social with Dr. Meg on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @MegMeekerMD   Dr. Meg's parenting resources and tools are available at www.meekerparenting.com.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Founded & Grounded
Lost & Grounded: Culture in a Can

Founded & Grounded

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 43:37


"You can't buy culture".In this episode, Founded & Grounded visit the Lost & Grounded brewery and their co-founder Alex Troncoso, as we return to the world of craft beer. With new breweries and their tap rooms popping up on virtually every street corner, it's impossible to ignore the rise in popularity of craft beer.  Equally apparent has been the hit taken by the hospitality industry during the Covid pandemic. So how to position yourself in a crowded market - and futureproof the company also?Alex takes a holistic view, and how having 4 simple values intrinsic to every aspect of the operation, being among a minority of UK brewers to pay the living wage, and sticking to their principles, has helped Lost & Grounded successfully navigate its first 6 years.He also raises two fundamental questions for all businesses and their founders; why should you exist in a crowded market, and how big do you want to be?Presented by Andrew Parsonage, with analysis from Ollie Collard and listener feedback courtesy of Samantha Miles.

Catholic Diocese of Saginaw Podcast
Bishop Gruss: 'Our truest identity isn't something we create or build ourselves'- Week 5 Lenten reflection

Catholic Diocese of Saginaw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 5:40


One moment of success or a season of success can never define who we are.  It would be a false identity – one we have created ourselves.Greetings and blessings to all of you. Here we are for our fifth reflection as we continue our journey through this season of Lent. Thanks for joining me.Last week we spent time with the lie that “I am nothing more than my worst moment” and how we have all had bad moments in life. We have failed in some ways; we've made bad choices; we haven't lived up to other peoples' expectations. And how people often let these things define them. We have lived the lie, instead of living the truth that we are the “handiwork of God” – masterpieces of God, in fact.This week I want to talk about the fifth lie – I am nothing less than my best moment.Accomplishments in life are good things. They often times speak to the hard work and the dedication we have put in to some project, some venture, some mission. We all want to succeed at what we do, and perhaps get the accolades that come along with success – that pat on the back, that bonus in salary, or some other reward. It is only a natural human response to the efforts we put in to whatever it might be.But where we get in trouble is when we allow our successes to define who we are; when we allow them to give us our identity. People often create their identity on their successes and their greatest moments. Equally as dangerous as being nothing more than our worst moment, is an identity based on success because it is both fragile and fleeting. A moment or an achievement of success does not fully define us, as it likely won't endure and it can be eclipsed by the accomplishments of others.While failure is an event, success is a process, not the end game. Anything you may have achieved can be lost. Again, others can exceed you.Our doing does not equal our beingAnd even our best performances – as wonderful as they may be, are still external actions – even if they are done “in the name of Jesus.”  Our doing does not equal our being. We are always more than any good we do, even on our best day.  One moment of success or a season of success can never define who we are.  It would be a false identity – one we have created ourselves.I have accomplished many things both in my life and in my ministry. Imagine if I were to cling to them as if they were the most important things in my life, and I allowed them to define me. How could I then be open to any innovation of what the Lord wants to do through me? I would be trapped in the past, and not living in the hopeful expectation of a future that I cannot yet see that is in the mind of God. In other words, would I be open to God's imagination, creativity, and most importantly to his grace?We are defined by God's grace. In other words, having been created in God's image and likeness, out of love, reveals to the world that we are not the sum of our weakness, nor are we the sum of our successes. Both are fleeting, while our true identity can never be taken away, and can never be diminished.Our truest identity isn't something we create or build ourselves. It's a gift we receive whereby we become adopted children of God, partakers of his divine nature, given a new life in Christ, becoming a co-heir with him and a temple of the Holy Spirit.Friends, this is our true identity. Through this gift, we belong, no longer to ourselves, but to Christ who died and rose for us.Your deepest identity is in him – in Christ JesusTake some time with the Lord in prayer over this next week and reflect upon how we may have bought into the lie that “I am nothing less than my best moment.”  Ask Jesus to deepen in your heart the truth that your deepest identity is in him – in Christ Jesus.Pray with John 1:11-13 – “But to all who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were bo

Sibylline Insight Series
Discussing the Religious Festivals Coming Up in the Middle East and North Africa

Sibylline Insight Series

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 19:37


In this week's podcast, join your host Valeria Scuto, our Middle East, North Africa and Turkey Analyst, along with Rhiannon Phillips and Anastasia Chisholm, our Associate Analysts, discuss the multiple religious festivities in the Middle East and North Africa regions taking place over the coming month, amid a significant uptick in violent attacks and conflict escalations. Notably, Israel has witnessed one of the deadliest weeks in years, both in terms of ethno-religious and terrorist violence, heightening concerns over a return to protracted levels of inter-communal violence ahead of the holy month of Ramadan and the Jewish Passover. Equally, regional leaders express anxieties over the true longevity of the current ceasefire between the Houthis and Saudi-led Coalition, and whether any further escalation in the trajectory of the conflict will sustain the risk of cross-border attacks. Finally, the global economic fallout of the Russia – Ukraine conflict will likely place additional pressures on deepening food insecurities in the region, particularly in countries such as Egypt, Tunisia and Lebanon. As such, rising food prices and soaring inflation rates represent the primary drivers of civil unrest in the coming weeks.

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money
Is this the most important Golden Rule of property investing? With Stuart Wemyss

The Michael Yardney Podcast | Property Investment, Success & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 40:20


If you've been listening to my podcasts or reading my blogs, you'll know I have a number of rules and frameworks to help my property investing. By having these it takes the emotion out of investing and makes the results more predictable, but what's the most important golden rule of property investing? That's a question I'm going to ask today of leading financial advisor Stuart Weymss, who's written a book about the golden rules of investing so let's see which rules have stood the test of time. The Golden Rules of Property Investing What's the most important factor in your property investment success? Well according to leading independent financial advisor Stuart Wemyss the most important rule is the quality of your assets. But what does this really mean and can really be as simple as that? So, let's start with the obvious question - what does quality mean? Quality really means that a property will benefit from excessive demand. What investment-grade means The Supply-demand equation Limited supply Demand is diversified Look for properties that attract buyers that can and are prepared to pay more because of their higher incomes. Factors that drive demand. Amenities. This includes necessities such as supermarkets, family doctors, dentists, etc. Equally important are entertainment amenities including cafes and restaurants, entertainment venues, parkland including running and bike tracks, and so on.   Proximity to employment opportunities. There will always be substantially better employment opportunities in large capital cities for most industries. Schools. This can include sort after public school zones as well as desirable private schools. Proximity to schools can contribute a lot towards capital growth. Culture/community. It's a positive attribute for a location to have a good community vibe/feel. This is often present in local shopping strips and the mixture of businesses adds a lot to this attribute. Some inner suburbs lack this and it's to their detriment. Healthcare. Proximity to hospitals is important to some buyers, particularly older folk. Transpor This includes good public transport easily within walking distance as well as major arterial roads. Neighborhood Well also discuss playing the long game. Short term profit does not create long term value Three reasons short-term opportunities are inferior Risk-based returns Compounding capital growth Taxes Links and Resources: Michael Yardney Stuart Wemyss – Prosolution Private Clients Stuart's Book – Rules of the Lending Game & Investopoly Get the team at Metropole to help build your personal Strategic Property Plan Click here and have a chat with us Shownotes plus more here: Is this the most important Golden Rule of property investing? With Stuart Wemyss Some of our favorite quotes from the show: “Of the properties on the market at the moment, in my mind, there's probably less than 5% that I would class as investment-grade.” – Michael Yardney “Even when you buy a home, for most people it's not their final home. It's not their forever home, so they should still think like an investor.” – Michael Yardney “Enjoy the journey, because if you don't enjoy the journey, you're not going to appreciate the destination when you get there.” – Michael Yardney PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how

The Small & Supercharged Podcast
5 questions to ask a brand ambassador

The Small & Supercharged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 18:48


How do you decide who to have as a brand ambassador for your brand? And if you're an influencer, how do you pitch to a brand when it comes to working with them? On this episode of the podcast, I share five essential questions I would ask connected to anything brand ambassador. Not only are these questions useful, but they allow the influencer to really sell themselves and share what's special about them. Equally, these questions also allows brands to find out all about the influencer, and start to think about how they could, potentially, be incorporated into a  marketing plan. What questions do you ask? What did I miss? Let me know...

Blackout Podcast
Stephanie Joline - Writer/ Director

Blackout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 51:34


Stephanie Joline is an Indigenous writer, director, and producer based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her Indigenous roots come from her mother who is Inuit from Labrador; her father is French Acadian from the South shore of Nova Scotia. Equally adept at film and television, Stephanie's stories provoke conversation, break boundaries, and are deeply rooted in inclusivity and feminism. Her feature films include Night Blooms (starring Jessica Clement and Nick Stahl), a coming-of-age story set in the 1990s; and Play Your Gender, a documentary that pulls back the curtain on gender bias in the music industry, featuring interviews with Patty Schemel, Melissa Auf Der Maur, and Sara Quin. Stephanie has also directed for television and streaming platforms (Stream Me 2020, Amazon Prime; Farm Crime 2020 CBC Gem; Spirit Talker 2019, APTN). In 2020 she was awarded the Irving Avrich Award from TIFF recognizing rising Canadian talent. The following year she was long-listed for the DGC Discovery Award, and in 2022 she was nominated for her first Canadian Screen Award for best directing in the factual television category. Stephanie's feature, Night Blooms, is a gritty coming-of-age story set in the 1990s about 17-year-old Carly and her love affair with her best friend's Dad. An emotionally charged narrative that navigates the moral murkiness of agency, consent, and accountability. https://www.instagram.com/stephjoline/ (Find out more @stephjoline) https://www.instagram.com/night_blooms_movie/ (@night_blooms_movie)

My Favorite Mistake
Author & CEO Lauren Eckhardt Chose Business Partners That Didn't Share her Values

My Favorite Mistake

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 41:17


My guest for Episode #151 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Lauren Eckhardt, the CEO and Founder of Burning Soul Press. Episode page: https://markgraban.com/mistake151 An award-winning, and best-selling author and ghostwriter, she is passionate about helping impact-driven souls capture their life story in a book-led movement that changes lives. Lauren founded Burning Soul Press in 2020, after 12 years in the human resources field, to work with aspiring and career authors in pursuit of sharing a powerful and deeply impactful story or message. In today's episode, Lauren shares her “favorite mistake” story working with a business partner that didn't share her values. How did she discover the mistake? How did she repeat the mistake with another company before being able to put this behind her? We also talk about questions and topics including: Trying too hard to learn from other entrepreneurs, vs. figuring it out yourself? “Best seller” — a very loose definition??? Yes Helping somebody self-publish… doesn't literally mean “self” “Empowerment Publishing” Being a book coach vs full ghostwriter What's the origin of the Burning Soul Press name? Being a good storyteller? A better storyteller?? What is the SoulWriter Society? Helping somebody write the book and helping them sell the book? Equally important? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/favorite-mistake/support

Dear Pats Nation
Boston Media & Fake Insiders Patriots Coverage All Equally Suck

Dear Pats Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 59:36


The Boston Media has consistently been hard on the New England Patriots since the day Robert Kraft traded for Bill Belichick, but it's really starting to get ridiculous. The coverage of the Patriots free agency has been filled with negativity, hyperbolic takes, and just the perfect dose of toxicity. If you're a Boston sports fan, you've come to expect this from the usual suspects. However, the snarky tweets, hit piece articles, and B.S. takes seemed to have leaked into the reporters and analysts that are known for keeping a level head, and not feeding into the well oiled blame Belichick propaganda machine.  On the most recent episode of the Dear Pats Nation podcast with Ray Rauth, Producer Mike and I discuss the stupid y of the Boston Media, fake insiders doubling down on their fake analysis, the apparent change in the Patriots offensive philosophy, and the Cleveland Browns getting absolutely roasted for trading for Deshaun Watson.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Digging Deeper with Brian Hale
#465 - Vaccine War Headlines vol 20

Digging Deeper with Brian Hale

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 37:02


VAERS COVID VaccineAdverse Event Reports1,183,493 Reports Through March 11, 202225,641 DEATHS141,112 HOSPITALIZATIONS123,834 URGENT CARE181,687 DOCTOR OFFICE VISITS9,463 ANAPHYLAXIS14,721 BELL'S PALSY4,335 Miscarriages13,172 Heart Attacks36,662 Myocarditis/Pericarditis47,676 Permanently Disabled6,024 Thrombocytopenia/Low Platelet29,136 Life Threatening40,929 Severe Allergic Reaction13,012 ShinglesThe Rise in Childhood Illness Has Been off the Charts Since the Vaccine Injury Act in 1986We went from that [12.8%] in the 1980s to now, 54% of America's children have a chronic, permanent, life-long illness, either a neurological disorder or an autoimmune disease.Del Bigtree, The HighwireCOVID-19 Human Challenge Study finds only 50% of unvaxed develop symptoms when directly exposedDr. Aditi Bhargava explains a new COVID-19 human challenge study which gave healthy unvaccinated volunteers w/ no prior infection a dose of SARS-COV-2 directly up the noseOnly 50% became infected and none developed serious symptoms.Terrorist Doctors Executing Hostages: Patient Advocate Details Escape Plan From Medical MafiaPriscilla Romans is the founder and CEO of Graith Care LLC. “Graith” means “to be prepared,” and that's what Priscilla is all about. She's an RN and has a masters in nursing, but two years ago she walked away from our corrupt corporate health care system.Today, Priscilla's focus is on helping patients rather than serving the needs of a hospital or the CDC. Every day, she gets calls from people looking for medical advocates. She serves as a sort of health care sherpa. She tells them where to go, and what to say and do to get the care they need. She works with newborns, with the elderly, and of course, with people of all ages who have suffered adverse vaccine events.Priscilla has become an expert at navigating around the protocols that hospitals are imposing on patients, the protocols that are forcing them onto remdesivir, then on to a vent, then into a grave. More than one guest on this program has described their loved ones being held hostage by the medical system, and Priscilla understands that very well. She also describes these protocol showdowns as “hostage situations.” And just like when terrorists take over a building, there are doctors and hospital admins out there who have no problem executing their hostages.Open Letter on the WHO's Pandemic TreatyThe World Council for Health (WCH), a coalition of scientists, doctors, lawyers, and civil society advocacy organizations, opposes the World Health Organisation (WHO)'s moves to implement a power grab in the form of a global pandemic agreement, while the world's attention is diverted by the latest crisis.The proposed WHO agreement is unnecessary, and is a threat to sovereignty and inalienable rights. It increases the WHO's suffocating power to declare unjustified pandemics, impose dehumanizing lockdowns, and enforce expensive, unsafe, and ineffective treatments against the will of the people.The WCH believes that the people have a right to participate in any agreement that affects their lives, livelihoods, and well-being. However, the WHO has not engaged in a process of public participation, which is evidence that its priority is capturing more power for itself and its corporate accomplices, than serving the interests of the people. Without an unbiased democratic process, any agreement by the WHO, acting via the United Nations, will be unlawful, illegitimate, and invalid. Historically, the WHO leadership has failed the people. Among many examples, it approved the injurious H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine for a controversially declared pandemic. Equally, the WHO failed during the Covid-19 chapter as it encouraged lockdowns, suppressed early preventive treatments, and recommended product interventions that have proven to be neither safe nor effective. The WHO cannot be allowed to control the world's health agenda, nor enforce biosurveillance. While it receives funding from public sources belonging to the people, it is caught in a perpetual conflict of interest because it also receives substantial funding from private interests that use their contributions to influence and profit from WHO decisions and mandates. For example, the Gates Foundation and the Gates-funded GAVI vaccine promotion alliance, contribute over $1 billion a year. I've mentioned before a proposal that WHO would be granted sovereignty over each country which signs this new agreement, in the event there's a pandemic. This is the dumbest & least justified collective health excuse I've ever heard. They won't know better than 190+ countries what's best for each of them. Don't let them grab this power. They'll never give it back.Dr. Mike YeadonChildren in China Diagnosed With Leukemia After Taking Chinese COVID-19 Vaccines“But after the second shot, the father could tell something was wrong. Swelling appeared around his daughter's eyes and did not go away. For weeks, the girl complained about pains on her legs, where bruises started to emerge seemingly out of nowhere. In January, a few weeks after the second dose, the 4-year-old was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.My baby was perfectly healthy before the vaccine dose,” Li (an alias), from China's north-central Gansu Province, told The Epoch Times. “I took her for a health check. Everything was normal.”He is among hundreds of Chinese that belong to a social media group claiming to be suffering from or have a household member suffering from leukemia, developed after taking Chinese vaccines.”Dr. McCullough on the PBD Podcast [CLIPS]Early Treatment Was Suppressed to Promote Fear and Gain Acceptance for Mass Vaccination“Those who are actively working the hardest to suppress early treatment are the same people who are working overtime to promote the vaccines. The two are linked!”The Authorities Pushing the COVID Vaccines Have Broken the Law“We have laws that say that for any biological product, it must be presented in fair balance. There must be risks and benefits. No one can bark a command, “Get vaccinated'… Our president of the United States has broken the law.”There's No Other Explanation – The Vaccines are the Causing Death“They coded the deaths. They said, ‘Did the vaccine cause [death] or was there some other cause?' 86% of the time, there's no other cause. 50% of the deaths occur within two days of taking the shot; 80% occur within a week.”Glenn Beck & Dr Malone discuss our trust in public systems is shot [CLIP]On the March 12th episode of “The Glenn Beck Podcast,” Dr. Malone walks Glenn through all the complicated science behind mRNA vaccines, where he believes COVID-19 came from, and what he believes should have been done differently over the past two years. He also offers insight into the modern propaganda machine that has corrupted the scientific community.We've destroyed the legitimacy of the American pharmaceutical industry worldwide and its integrity… We've basically given our pharmaceutical industry and our vaccines enterprise to India and China. The economic impact of this stupidness is profound.Dr. MaloneImmunity Boost Protocol from Dr SimonAfter many followers asked me to sum up which supplements should be taken to compensate for common deficits, I created a simple graphic on how everybody can boost their immune system without lots of effort.In addition to this, a healthy Omega-3 index is required. So you either eat fatty fishy once or twice a week or consume 3g of EPA/DHA-rich fish/algae oil per day.So, it's up to you to take control of your health. Just don't rely on your government because they really don't care.

The Innovation Show
From Incremental to Exponential Part 2 with Ismail Amla

The Innovation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 39:38


Over and over, we see big legacy businesses getting beaten to the punch by energetic little start-ups. It seems like innovation can come only from the bottom up or from the outside in. But our guest today tells us that “big equals slow and stodgy” is a myth. Based on decades of experience working with both the world's leading brands and disruptive start-ups, his book explores the opportunity legacy companies have to create new markets, supercharge growth, and remake their businesses by combining the mindset and tool belt of start-ups with the benefits of incumbency: boatloads of customer data, decades of brand equity, robust distribution channels, enormous financial assets, and more. He goes deeply into why the pace and dynamics of innovation have changed so dramatically in recent years and show how companies can overcome obstacles like “the Eight Deadly Sins of Stasis”. Equally important, he provides a playbook on how to use these insights in your own company, team, or career. This fast-paced, anecdote-rich book rethinks modern innovation. We welcome the author of “From Incremental to Exponential: How Large Companies Can See the Future and Rethink Innovation”, Ismail Amla

fireengineering
SOTF Radio: What the Fire Ignited with Shay Eskew

fireengineering

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 81:00


On tonight's episode of SOTF Radio, we are joined by Iron Man and author of "What the Fire Ignited", Shay Eskew. Shay is an All American / All World ranked triathlete, former black bear researcher, burn survivor with scars over 65% of his body, Bestselling author and sought out motivational speaker. At the age of 8, Shay was set afire by a neighbor's child and credited with saving the life of his 7-year-old friend. Despite being told he'd never play sports again, enduring over 35 surgeries the last 36 years, Shay is a 4x IRONMAN, 4x member of Team USA, 25x IRONMAN 70.3 athlete, ranked top 1% of IRONMAN worldwide, and has competed in 11 triathlon World Championships in 7 countries on 4 continents, including the IRONMAN World Championships in Kona, Hawaii. Additionally, Shay is a sponsored triathlete of Newton Running and First Endurance and a long standing member of the IRONMAN Foundation ambassador team. Equally impressive, Shay is the proud father of 5 kids under 13. To find out more about Sons of the Flag visit https://www.sonsoftheflag.org/ You can also follow us across all social media! https://www.facebook.com/SonsOfTheFlag/ https://www.instagram.com/sonsoftheflag/ https://twitter.com/sonsoftheflag Sponsored by Tencate: https://us.tencatefabrics.com/

People Soup - psychology@work

Season 4 Episode 19 Hi there and a very warm welcome to Season 4 Episode 19 of People Soup. Yes I'm back - after an unexpected break due to catching Covid, which knocked me out for a few weeks. This episode a new type of episode - one aimed more at those who are workplace trainers or facilitators support adults in the development of new skills. It's a short cup/a/soup called Helping. Equally, it could be useful for anyone contemplating the helping relationship. Have you ever had the misfortune to fall over in public or witness somebody else taking a tumble. It's yes to both of those scenarios for me and in my experience - there's a common theme which relates to the helping relationship. It's inspired by one of my cycling adventures, the work of Edgar Schein and a reflection from my friend and colleague, Rich Bennett. Facilitators and trainers - I'd love to get your feedback on this episode - does this resonate with you and your experience? Would you like to see more episodes like this? Shownotes are at - www.rossmcintosh.co.uk Twitter https://twitter.com/PeopleSoupPod https://twitter.com/RossMcCOACH Instagram https://www.instagram.com/people.soup/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/peoplesouppod/ LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/ross-mcintosh-261a2a22/ Linktree - for links to many other podcast platforms and apps - linktr.ee/PeopleSoup And you can support the podcast by buying me a coffee! https://ko-fi.com/peoplesoup

Your Lot and Parcel
Not All CBD Oil is Created Equally

Your Lot and Parcel

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 44:11


The greatest hope of my guest is that people will try these products as part of a comprehensive approach and commitment to getting sober. Addiction is a life and death issue for millions of Americans, says Thomas, before adding, "If CBD can help someone get sober, can you imagine the countless marriages, families and jobs that can be saved? Therefore, I am doing this," he says.Thomas has long wanted to use his skills to contribute in some meaningful way to solutions to society's problems, to do work that stands to be effective in people's lives. Now he can, given CBD's richness of benefits, especially in helping people in recovery. www.ExactNature.comhttp://www.yourlotandparcel.org

The Innovation Show
From Incremental to Exponential with Ismail Amla

The Innovation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 57:22


Over and over, we see big legacy businesses getting beaten to the punch by energetic little start-ups. It seems like innovation can come only from the bottom up or from the outside in. But our guest today tells us that “big equals slow and stodgy” is a myth. Based on decades of experience working with both the world's leading brands and disruptive start-ups, his book explores the opportunity legacy companies have to create new markets, supercharge growth, and remake their businesses by combining the mindset and tool belt of start-ups with the benefits of incumbency: boatloads of customer data, decades of brand equity, robust distribution channels, enormous financial assets, and more. He goes deeply into why the pace and dynamics of innovation have changed so dramatically in recent years and show how companies can overcome obstacles like “the Eight Deadly Sins of Stasis”. Equally important, he provides a playbook on how to use these insights in your own company, team, or career. This fast-paced, anecdote-rich book rethinks modern innovation. We welcome the author of “From Incremental to Exponential: How Large Companies Can See the Future and Rethink Innovation”, Ismail Amla

Business Problems Solved Podcast
The Mindset To TEACH Improvement

Business Problems Solved Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 17:35


Lee has developed an acronym, TEACH, which can keep you informed on how to achieve consistent improvement by changing your mindset. Remember the five essential ingredients that can keep your development going.    KEY TAKEAWAYS First of all we have to be open to change and be willing to apply the lessons we've learnt. Mindset is the most important lesson of all.  TEACH stands for Teamwork, Engagement, Accountability, Communication and Humble leadership. If you start with these five areas and look to improve them then your productivity, cost challenge or quality challenge might be resolved as a direct result.  Teamwork. You may have a working team but you may not have teamwork. What can you do to build trust and have more constructive conflict in your team? Engagement. Only by having a proper relationship with your people can you gain trust, through full engaging discourse. Do they believe in your journey? Accountability. We need to have clarity on who is doing what and when they are going to do it. Communication. Ensure people's interpretations of your messages are correct by staying clear and consistent. Equally ensure you understand what is being said to you and it's intention. Humble leadership. Be selfless. Be there to help your people. It's ok to not know answers.    BEST MOMENTS ‘Those five things really are, for me, the five main things that this ‘improvement' thing that we all talk about could really solve. The symptoms of an ineffective system or environment create poor productivity, low customer satisfaction, poor quality, increased costs.'  ‘Trust is situational, its individual. I would trust some people to look after my children but I wouldn't trust them to record a podcast for me.'  ‘If we assign tasks to whole teams of people it adds an element of doubt, and we need to start to take ownership of the things that we can do.' ‘People will raise a problem, an idea, an opportunity but then they'll not be communicated back to, we'll not close the loop to understand why it can or cannot happen.'    VALUABLE RESOURCES Business Problems Solved Podcast            ABOUT THE HOST For the last 15 years, I have been a multi-sector internal or external business improvement consultant, building the improved capability of individuals, teams and businesses. In my spare time, I enjoy spending time with my two young children Jack & India. I also enjoy listening to and reading business & personal development material. Lee Houghton is “THE Business Problem Solver”, a Management Consultant, CX Specialist and Keynote Speaker.   CONTACT METHOD You can contact Lee Houghton on 07813342194 Lee@leehoughton.com  https://www.linkedin.com/in/lhoughton/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod
Backpacking and Bikepacking with Kevin Gong

The John Freakin’ Muir Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 12, 2022 85:03


Equally comfortable on the trail or on a bike, Kevin Gong drops in for a discussion of the Lost Coast, the Mountaineers Route up to Mt. Whitney, bike touring, the ultimate bathroom view, the Holy Trinity of Snacks, BLM camping, and how far you can actually make it on a doughnut tire. Tune in to find out. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/johnfreakinmuir/support