Podcasts about Jamaican

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  • 2,652PODCASTS
  • 4,373EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
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  • Oct 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Jamaican

Show all podcasts related to jamaican

Latest podcast episodes about Jamaican

Kill Me Now with Judy Gold
323: Wil Sylvince

Kill Me Now with Judy Gold

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:21


Wil Sylvince joins Judy on Kill Me Now this week! Get to know this born and bred New Yorker who's childhood was centered around his Haitian (not Jamaican) heritage. Also, Wil gets into drawing and building robots. Part 1 concludes with Wil getting his first taste for comedy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

What It Takes
Best of - General Colin Powell: My American Journey

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 58:03


Colin Powell, who died on October 18, 2021, wore many hats during his distinguished career in public service, among them: Secretary of State, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and National Security Advisor. And he was the first African-American to hold each of those positions. When he joined the Army in the 1950's, though, his only ambition was to be a good soldier. It was beyond the realm of possibility for the son of working class Jamaican immigrants to aspire much higher. In this episode, which originally posted in September of 2017, you'll hear Powell's stories about his journey from the South Bronx, to the jungles of Vietnam, to the Jim Crow South, to the highest reaches of government, and about the decades of American history he helped shape.

Tell Them What They've Won - America's Favorite Game Show Podcast

This week we are featuring the cooking reality game show, Top Chef and we get VERY specific about Emmy award categories. Plus we talk about McDonald's Cheeseburgers, some VERY special upcoming interviews and of course, Mike's fascination with western Jamaican fatback. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tellthemwhattheyvewon/message

Profile
Katharine Birbalsingh

Profile

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 14:08


The UK's ‘strictest' headteacher Katharine Birbalsingh has landed a new role as head of the Social Mobility Commission, a public body designed to boost the life chances of the country's most disadvantaged children. Born to Jamaican and Guyanese immigrants, Katharine Birbalsingh first rose to prominence at the 2010 Tory party conference. Her speech about Britain's “broken” education system received a standing ovation, but it also made her one of the most controversial figures in British education, and for a while she couldn't even get a teaching job. Then, in 2014, she founded the Michaela free school in north-west London, which has a zero tolerance behaviour policy. Pupils are penalised for forgetting to bring a pencil, or even for talking in corridors between lessons. The school has been deemed “outstanding” in all areas by Ofsted inspectors. Edward Stourton examines the life and career of Katharine Birbalsingh, and asks if her forthright personality and achievements as a headteacher will equip her to address issues of entrenched inequality. Producer: Nick Holland Researcher: Bethan Head

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary
Episode 402: Listen to the Podcast of The Jamaica & Caribbean Weekly News Summary for the week ending October 22, 2021

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 10:09


This is a Podcast of the 7 Jamaican & Caribbean News items for the week ending October 22, 2021. The JAMAICA WEEKLY News Summary Podcast is brought to you by Jamaicans.com . For more stories from this week's Jamaican/Caribbean Weekly News Summary please visit - http://www.jamaicans.com/new

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Music reviewer Grant Smithies

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 21:04


In this week's musical pick'n'mix, we'll hear a Northern Soul cover by Wellington's Jamie and The Numbers, some dubbed out cumbia from Egyptian-American multi-instrumentalist Mitchum Yacoub, a slab of dreamy exotica from Point Chev hip hop producer Cristophe El Truento and some sound advice about avoiding dodgy people from Jamaican duo The Pearls.

Dope Black Women
Creating a Legacy for the next Generation w/ Danusia Francis & Kapari

Dope Black Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 41:24


The sisterhood was in the air for this episode! This week Leanne has a chat with Danusia Francis, British-born Jamaican gymnast and Kapari, professional Ghanian tennis player and one of our own Dope Black Women members :).   Together they share stories of being young Black women in predominantly white sports, making the choice to represent countries outside of the UK and the aspirations they have to leave a legacy for other Black girls beyond the sport.   Twitter & Instagram: @danusiafrancis Instagram: leekapz Follow us @DopeBlackWomen1 on Instagram and @DopeBlackWomen on Twitter and Facebook.

Multiracial Whiteboy
Fanshen Cox / Development Executive and Producer Pearl Street Films

Multiracial Whiteboy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:33


 Fanshen Cox has been featured in the New York Times and on NPR, with OpEds published for Blavity, Shondaland and The Lily. Reared in Cambridge, Massachusetts by a Pan Africanist, Jamaican-born father and white Northwestern mother, Fanshen uses her family's heritage to spark conversation and challenge notions around race, class and gender. Fanshen talks to Kim about her dedicated work regarding the Hollywood Inclusion Rider, why she's critical of the mixed community, doing theater with Matt Damon and Ben Affleck and working with them years later at Pearl Street Films. 

Seriously…
The Black and the Green

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:06


British-Jamaican audio artist and DJ Weyland McKenzie-Witter explores the sometimes uneasy relationship between the Black and the Green, as political movements and ideas. It's the untold story of their longstanding relationship, first as political movements developing in the United States, a wariness that continues today between new organisations such as Black Lives Matter and Extinction Rebellion – the latter (along with the wider environmental movement) criticised for being overwhelmingly white, idealistic and middle-class. Climate activists meanwhile have sometimes dismissed what they've called ‘identity' politics as too parochial in terms of looming global climate disaster. It's a real tension, with very different emphases between local and global; material issues vs idealism. As radical movements, both the Black and the Green have their roots in 1960s political consciousness and activism. But there were key cultural moments when they came together, around the release of Marvin Gaye's classic 1971 album ‘What's Going On' and in the work of eco-conscious, Black Power spoken word group The Last Poets. Both artists addressed environmental racism within the ghetto and the promise of a new Black ecology. By drawing on his Jamaican lineage, Weyland explores the deeper affinity between the Black and the Green, symbolically joined by the Jamaican national flag, the Black of the People and the Green of the land are inseparable, crossed by the Gold of the sun. But Jamaica and the Caribbean are also highly vulnerable to the devastation of climate change. Weyland writes: ‘As the climate catastrophe becomes worse, the effect it is having on our homelands is something affecting Black people uniquely. With the face of climate activism being so predominantly white, and with Black political attention elsewhere, which voices will be heard?" This feature explores the differences and reasons for separation of the movements, but asks if there might be a growing alignment between the Black and the Green with new thinking around ‘climate justice'. Contributors include founding member of the Last Poets Abiodun Oyewole, barrister and author Ulele Burnham, Professor Michael Taylor, a climate scientist at the University of the West Indies, theatre maker and actor Fehinti Balogun, co-founder of Extinction Rebellion Dr Gail Bradbury, Black Lives Matter organiser Adam Elliott-Cooper, journalist Greg McKenzie, author on climate justice Jeremy Williams and Kevin Le Gendre, who has written extensively on the history of Black music. Produced by Simon Hollis A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4

Fresh Era
Krazy Drayz (Of Das EFX): Illegal Activity to Bum Stiggedy

Fresh Era

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:16


The contributions of Krazy Drayz and the iconic duo he created, Das EFX, are often overlooked. His rise from being an Jamaican-immigrant-turned-New-Jersey-resident into an iconic Hip-Hop superstar was so rapid and groundbreaking that it didn't take long for biters to swarm. If it wasn't for their innovative style, there would be no Kriss Kross "Jump". If it wasn't for their creative lingo, there wouldn't be a Blackstreet "No Diggity". And most notably, if it wasn't for their fashion sense, there wouldn't be an entire wave of NY streetwear. Come listen to how Drayz developed his persona and turned it into a legacy that will live on forever. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Home of Football
Arsenal Fan TV's surprising rise and struggles

The Home of Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:56


Arsenal Fan TV is one of our favourite football channels on Youtube, because their videos are always unfiltered. They changed the game when it comes to football fan representation on Youtube and social media. Arsenal Fan TV, or AFTV as they call themselves nowadays, became famous for rants by Arsenal fans in 2013. Since then it has grown into a little football media empire. If you've never seen or heard one of these rants, you definitely should.The man behind it all is Robbie Lyle, AKA Don Robbie. We want to know everything about the rise of AF TV, and the struggles Robbie had to deal with along the way. So we reached out to Robbie to get the full story. It's an inspiring story about Jamaican immigrants, reggae, football banter, Arsenal, racism, hard work and building your own media empire. - See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Another Black Owned Business
EP 451: MR BROWN'S LOUNGE

Another Black Owned Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 2:53


Mr Brown's Lounge is owned by Terry Meghie. Industry: Lounge services What is your business about?: This West Town destination for authentic Jamaican dishes, culture and nightlife was immediately embraced by the city. Recipes passed down through generations… Jerk chicken, rice and peas, fried plantains and Jamaican style cabbage have become mainstays for Chicagoans in the know. Authentic spreads including a Jamaican spiced mac & cheese has guests all likky-likky, a Jamaican term that captures the feeling of a meal so good that you are greedy about eating everything in sight. These secret family recipes have also graced the taste of American favorites, giving Mr. Brown's jerk Caesar salad and the jerk burger an island touch. Reggae rockas, rum punch and Red Stripe accent the evening at Mr. Brown's Lounge. A mood, a scene, a culture is celebrated with global live music, dj's and events. Phone: 7732784445 Business Email: info@mrbrownslounge.com Business Address: 2301 W Chicago Ave. Chicago IL Business Website: Mrbrownslounge.com Business Social Media: Instagram: @Mrbrownslounge What is one business tip you would suggest to a new entrepreneur?: Selling is not pushy, Winners take all. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/anotherblackownedbiz/support

KQED’s Forum
Colin Powell, First Black Secretary of State, Dies From COVID-19 Complications

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 21:00


Colin Powell, 84, died on Monday due to complications from COVID-19. Powell was one of the largest figures in American public, political and military life of the past four decades. As a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, secretary of state and national security adviser he helped craft modern U.S. foreign policy, including his controversial role in the lead up to the Iraq war in 2003. Born in Harlem, N.Y., to Jamaican parents, Powell was a pioneer in a number of his public service roles, including his time as the first Black Secretary of State and first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. When he endorsed Barack Obama for President in 2008, it was one of then-Senator Obama's most significant endorsements, particularly because of Powell's military credentials. We remember Powell's impact on American life, and how his role affected Californians of all political stripes.

Ojai: Talk of the Town
Ojai Storytelling Festival with Debra Ehrhardt & Friends

Ojai: Talk of the Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 55:56


For 22 years the Ojai Storytelling Festival (October 28-31 this year) has been bringing in the country's best practitioners of this ancient art form. We are joined by OSF founder Brian Bemel, next year's director Kara Lakes and Jamaican storytelling phenomenon Debra Ehrhardt for a lively romp through the festival's past and future. Debra will be the featured performer at the adult-rated Naughty Tales on the night of Saturday, Oct. 31st. She joins the all-star lineup including Kim Weitkamp, Bill Harley, Donald Davis, Bil Lepp and many more for four days of hilarity, humanity and creative expression. Tickets are available at ojaistoryfest.org and you can check out Debra's one-woman show, Jamaica Farewell, soon to be a major motion picture, at https://jamaicafarewelltheplay.com

Jamaica Talk
Talk Jamaican; Bob Marley beach

Jamaica Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 4:13


This is an introduction to a nice beach near city Kingston which is named after the late superstar. Joan, my views: Bob Marley Beach (joan-myviews.blogspot.com). Another in the series to teach you to talk like a Jamaican

KQED’s Forum
REBROADCAST: ‘Loud' Podcast Highlights the History of Reggaeton

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:37


This is an encore presentation of Forum: The story of reggaeton music is layered and complex, and, according to reggaeton pioneer Ivy Queen, “the real story of reggaeton is about la resistencia. Resistance.” Queen is also the narrator of the new podcast “Loud” by Spotify and Futuro Studios, which gives reggaeton the documentary treatment and explores its nuances. “Loud” journeys through reggaeton's origins in Jamaican dancehall to Panamanian reggae in español to “las calles” of Puerto Rico to New York and beyond. Once criminalized in Puerto Rico in the ‘90s and early aughts, reggaeton is now one of the most popular genres in the world -- reggaeton superstar Bad Bunny was Spotify's most-streamed artist in 2020. We'll take a critical look at reggaeton's origins and evolution, from its dancehall roots to the massive pop presence it has today.

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary
Listen to the Podcast of The Jamaica & Caribbean Weekly News Summary for the week ending October 15, 2021

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 7:27


This is a Podcast of the 7 Jamaican & Caribbean News items for the week ending October 15, 2021. The JAMAICA WEEKLY News Summary Podcast is brought to you by Jamaicans.com . For more stories from this week's Jamaican/Caribbean Weekly News Summary please visit - http://www.jamaicans.com/news

VONTE NYC
EPISODE 43: KEEP YOUR KANFYDENZ

VONTE NYC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 42:35


Today I have Jamaican Artist, Kanfydenz in the building! Subscribe to my patreon for video access to the interview: https://www.patreon.com/Vontenyc Pull up to SomethingLightMedia's open studio day! https://tapk.it/wtmboxoffice (2:02) BADNESS ARRIVED (3:05) Early days in Jamaica (4:20) first thoughts of America + first encounter with snow (6:12). is Jamaica responsible for hip hop? (8:30). Experimenting with sounds + meeting “Ms. Purple (10:00). Switching up the sound + adjusting to being a Jamaican and adopting a Brooklyn sound (13:20) I found out about Kanfydenz because he played Santa Clause, no really! (14:35) giving Wav3king his flowers (16:07). Taking the leap and dropping his first official record in 2019 + public reaction (17:25). Kanfydenz created a song in Spanish by learning the language on Google + credits Justin Bieber for wanting to do it. (18:30). Strategizing your releases as an artist (20:35) FREE WORL BOSS (22:05) artists Kanfydenz wants to work w. & more (26:22) Follow us on social Media Instagram.comkanfydenz Instagram.com/Vontenyc Catch Kanfydenz playing Santa https://youtu.be/wj8IS8ocDtg Catch out the latest video “Badness” & stream all of his music https://youtu.be/RGbVtCf1ong Mix by Selecta Sha Instagram.com/selectasha98 Have a good weekend !

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 524 | Green Agenda: NEW California Law BANS Lawn Mowers & Chain Saws

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:58


Culture appropriation is still a NO-NO in 2021, and the latest victim is singer Adele. In 2020, Adele was seen wearing a full-bore Jamaican flag-print bikini and bantu knots in her hair. How dare a white person wear a Jamaican flag? Senator Sinema is in the trust-but-verify category, but even as a liberal she doesn't deserve to be followed into the bathroom and harassed. When did we get to the point where anyone could say that's normal? California has a new law, and this new law BANS small off-road gas engines and includes lawn mowers and chain saws. Someone would say that this is a racist law if the state was a red state. This new law will affect about 50,000 small businesses, and if they want to remain in business, they must comply. Will this green agenda work? Minnesota father is concerned after a gender therapist coerced his autistic son into identifying as a “transgender lesbian.” Parents, are you paying attention? Today's Sponsors Your food will be shipped FAST, and it will arrive discreetly at your door in unmarked boxes for your privacy. Go to http://PrepareWithChad.com SAVE $100 on a 3-Month Emergency Food Kit. So if, like me, you believe that your data is your business, secure yourself with the number-one-rated VPN on the market. Visit http://ExpressVPN.com/watchchad, and get three extra months for free. Order NOW and get 50% off ALL Genucel Packages during the final days of their end of Summer Clearance Sale at http://lovegenucel.com/WATCHCHAD.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary
Listen to the Podcast of The Jamaica & Caribbean Weekly News Summary for the week ending October 8, 2021

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 10:20


This is a Podcast of the 7 Jamaican & Caribbean News items for the week ending October 8, 2021. The JAMAICA WEEKLY News Summary Podcast is brought to you by Jamaicans.com . For more stories from this week's Jamaican/Caribbean Weekly News Summary please visit - http://www.jamaicans.com/newsClick: “Save & Continue”

What's Left To Do?
Aaron: Still Being Written (Part 1)

What's Left To Do?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:03


Join us on Patreon for Part 2: www.patreon.com/whatslefttodo If Patreon isn't your thing, please join us in supporting this work with a contribution over at: www.whatslefttodo.com/support This week we have 1/4 of The Trillbilly Workers Party, with Aaron Thorpe, who is, ironically, originally a yankee. The son of Jamaican immigrants growing up in NYC was pretty apolitical until he began sneering at the denizens of Zuccotti Park during Occupy as a high minded employee of the DNC (!!), believe it or not. He picked up his sister's copy of The Communist Manifesto shortly after, and...well...you know the rest

BourbonBlog.com
No Time To Die: Rum that Daniel Craig Drinks and the Story behind it

BourbonBlog.com

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 20:07


The Rum that Daniel Craig drinks in No Time to Die is Blackwell Fine Jamaican Rum and Bourbon Expert Tom Fischer reviews it talks with Geoff Curley of Blackwell Rum. Curley tells the story of Jamaican native and rum founder Chris Blackwell, who as a young man, worked as a production assistant on Dr. No in 1962, later purchased Ian Flemming's Goldeneye estate, which became Goldeneye Luxury Resort. It all came full circle as Blackwell Run was featured in the new "Bond 25" movie along with a partnership of a limited edition Blackwell Rum 007 bottle and expression available for sale at select retailers and on their website. Also, find us on YouTube.com/BourbonBlog . Thirsty? We host Bourbon tastings, both virtual and in-person. Learn more on BourbonBlog.com/tastings. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bourbonblog/support

James Bond Radio: 007 News, Reviews & Interviews!
#216: No Time To Die Review (Part 5) - Valdo Obruchev & Bond in Jamaica

James Bond Radio: 007 News, Reviews & Interviews!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 31:48


It's time for part 5 of '30 Days of No Time To Die.' In today's episode, Tom & Chris discuss the raid on the secret MI6 lab. We meet Valdo Obruchev, and take a trip to Bond's Jamaican home, where we bump into an old friend.

Menace and The Man Show
EP121 Aljamain Sterling talks Petr Yan, Cory Sandhagen, Usman vs Covington, Wilder vs Fury & more

Menace and The Man Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 68:42


We open the show talking about Menace's recent bike accident, he has a slight echo that goes away a few minutes in, We catch up on Megan Fox & Machine Gun Kelly vs Conor McGregor (05:28), Aljamain joins us speaking Jamaican with his mom (08:30), Menace ponders if he knew Aljo or Kamaru Usman first &talks about how they both caught him off guard with their roots (09:10), The Amercian crowd booing Chad Mendes vs Conor McGregor (11:20), Does Aljamain feel like he is the champ? (12:37), His fight vs Petr Yan (14:17), Menace talks about sparring Aljo (17:40), How competitive the Yan fight was and the illegal knee sequence (18:12), Aljo's chin & Menace talks some more sparring vs Aljo (21:39), Joe Rogan & Daniel Cormier's commentary on the fight vs Yan (23:30), The right hand Yan dropped Aljo with in round 1 & his game plan going into the fight (25:56), We get into Herb Dean's inconsistent reffing, how fights are scored & the Kevin Holland head butt (29:00), The pressure of reffing and fighting & dealing with the criticism (32:10), What Petr Yan can expect in a rematch (36:30), Kamaru Usman vs Colby Covington (39:13), Aljo cross training at other gyms & having to pick your sparring partners carefully when you have a name (42:26), Aljo getting crap for having potential career ending surgeries (48:41), Any takeaways from the first fight with Yan (49:52), Aljo not getting cleared by the doctors for his next fight (52:59), Deontay Wilder vs Tyson Fury 3 (54:52), The potential of Aljo getting into commentary (56:26), Petr Yan vs Cory Sandhagen (01:00:18), Justin Gaethje's comments on Yan's illegal knee (01:04:31) & much more. Hope you enjoy!

The Reggae Podclash
The Reggae PodClash: Episode #43 - Hollie Cook - 10/07/2021

The Reggae Podclash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 88:14


British reggae and tropical pop singer Hollie Cook joins us to talk about her musical journey into Jamaican music. We dive into her time with The Slits, Prince Fatty, and stories about her father and Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook. What is Tropical Pop? Hollie has your answer!RECORDS OF THE WEEK:Rog's Record : Alton Ellis “Lord Deliver Us”Dev's Record : Leonard Dillon “Weekend Cowhead”SHOP PODCLASH MERCH! Every sale helps support the show. Thank you.https://rootfire-intl.myshopify.com/collections/the-reggae-podclashListen to Past Episodes: https://podlink.to/ReggaePodclash***Man-Like-Devin and Roger Rivas talk all things reggae with original and modern artists in the scene on http://Rootfire.net/tv​.#RootfireTV #TheReggaePodclash #HollieCookSupport the show (https://rootfire.net/tv/)Support the show (https://rootfire.net/tv/)

Wassup Wit It Podcast
Jamaican Tank Top

Wassup Wit It Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 128:49


The Wassup Wit It Kings are back and wild as ever. The topics this week include Lil Fizz, Motherless Baby showers, Meek Mill, Vax Bron, looking rich, nicknames saved in phones and much more, Sit back relax and enjoy the show. Remember to send your "Ask The Bro's Questions to WassupWitItPod@gmail.com   follow us on all social media platforms @WassupWitItPod

This Day in Maine
Oct 06, 2021: Scores of older Mainers were spared COVID thanks to vaccination; everyone is on the bench in Brunswick after hazing scandal, and big Jamaican flavor in Fort Kent

This Day in Maine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 19:06


Relationship Passa Passa
"Sex Education" | S3 Ep. 03

Relationship Passa Passa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:46


Let's talk about sex baby... from a Jamaican perspective. When did you first learn about sex... and from who? Do you even remember your Sex Ed class in school? In this episode, the ladies touch on their first knowledge of sex, how this knowledge (or lack thereof) has shaped their sexual experiences, and how it has shaped their perspective on passing knowledge down to their children. Be sure to follow our team on Instagram, Facebook and Youtube: @relationshippassapassapodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/relationshippassapassa/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/relationshippassapassa/support

Jerk, Jollof and Collard Greens Podcast
EP 27: Young Black Independent & Trying to Figure it Out! Part 2!

Jerk, Jollof and Collard Greens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 124:25


Wah Gwan? How you Dey? What's Good?! On Episode 27, the JJC panel delivers Part 2 of their discussion on life, dating, relationships, family and careers, with our returning guest panel of young, black, independent singles from Part 1 (Danie, Chandrelly and Champ “Early”).Part 2 of this discussion was focused on gathering the thoughts and opinions of our multi-generational cast regarding partner selection, the struggles of finding/keeping a long term relationship today, partner roles, and whether the institutions of “marriage” and “family” have declined or increased in importance today. We also revealed thoughts on whether having children played a pivotal role in completing today's standard family “make-up” and why some may opt to not include children into their potential family structure. Today's guests and host panel also ranked and identified the traits they felt were essential to make a relationship work, and why MARRIAGE is both an emotional and financial investment. If you missed Part 1, where we spoke exclusively on today's dating scene feel free to check out Episode#23 now to get caught up. Huge shoutout to our guest panel once more for returning and lending their insight on this discussion, be sure to show them some love using the tags below: Danielle a.k.a. Danie Photography/Business Instagram: @excellense.photography Personal Instagram: @ayo_stokely  Chandrell a.k.a ChanieInstagram/Facebook/Twitter: @chandrellly Champ “Early-Never Late”Instagram: @CHAMP_33Twitter: @extrodinaire8 REP' YOURs: Now I'm a Jamaican and that means we like big tings, yuh zimme, but I do have a heart for “Small Businesses” and with that said before we jump into today's discussion I'd like to dedicate this episode's “Rep Your's” shout-out to Top Hats and Tails, which is a black owned formal wear store located in Maplewood, NJ. Top hats and tails specializes in men's formal wear and casual attire, suit/tux rentals and tailoring to keep you in top shape and fitted in the latest drip for that next big event, date or special outing. I've personally shopped here and it's always been a pleasure working with the staff and  they've been my go-to source locally whenever I'm looking for unique finds or the seldom splurge on domestic and international designer fits. So, If you're attending or planning a wedding, or looking for some new fits, feel free to visit their website @tophat-tails.com for their latest specials or check out their brick and mortar location @ 1856 Springfield Ave in  Maplewood, NJ to show them some jjc love.

Across the Pond, a Premier League Podcast

The squad sits down after Chris runs across his kitchen celebrating Mo Salah's brilliant goal to talk Manchester City's ability to leave Anfield with a point, Everton's audacity to expose Manchester United, Andros Townsend making enemies, repenting Jacob, our first manager sacking, Prediction League, listener questions and an undecorated Jamaican apartment. Thanks for listening this season and if you rate us 5 stars and roast us in the comments, we'll be sure to read it on-air. Website: https://acrossthepond.co Twitter: https://twitter.com/acrossthepond IG: https://instagram.com/atpradio Twitch: https://twitch.tv/atpradio

Cannabis Talk 101
Jamaica's first resort-based medicinal dispensary, opens in the city of Negril.

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 53:11


HedoWeedo specializes in high-end cannabis products ranging from joints. flowers & oils which are all locally cultivated by licensed Jamaican farmers. Operating under and in compliance with Jamaica's cannabis laws, a medical card will be required to buy cannabis. Guests can obtain a card through the on-site doctor, or bring one from home. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing
ESN #324 : The Jamaican Agege Bread Episode

ESN: Eloquently Saying Nothing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 147:10


This week's topics: • Teni's album not getting the recognition it deserves • If Wizkid's Essence is overrated • Zeze Millz's come-up, change of attitude and natural beauty • How different cultures age • Beautiful families • Kardashian's plastic surgery • Hulk Hogan back in the Wrestling Hall of Fame • New AEW (All Elite Wrestling) entertainment and its challenge to WWE • Drug usage and mental problems of wrestling • The drug Khat and its effects • Which drugs we'd take if we had to take one • Nines jailed for two years after admitting to attempting to import £280,000 worth of cannabis • Is it alright for criminals to snitch • A bunch of The Wire love, recapping and spoilers • Moneybagg Yo's girlfriend buying him land for his birthday and the controversary around that • What one should do differently after marriage that they shouldn't do in a relationship • Breaking up with someone because they won't marry you • Being different after relationships • Who is the bigger artist, Michael Jackson or Drake • Michael Jackson being very - but discreetly - pro Black • If Prince or Stevie Wonder would be best to go against Michael Jackson in a Verzuz • Michael Jackson's best album • Stevie Wonder being unvalued • The Jamaican origins or Nigerian Agege Bread • R. Kelly found guilty for all of his nonsense • Public waking up to police abuse since the death of Sarah Everard at the hands of police • #StavrosSays : Afrofuturism: Blackness Revisualized Online Film Festival [https://allarts.org/programs/afrofuturism-blackness-revisualized/] Connect with us at & send your questions & comments to: #ESNpod so we can find your comments www.esnpodcast.com www.facebook.com/ESNpodcasts www.twitter.com/ESNpodcast www.instagram.com/ESNpodcast @esnpodcast on all other social media esnpodcast@gmail.com It's important to subscribe, rate and review us on your apple products. You can do that here... www.bit.ly/esnitunes

Rock's Backpages
E111: Miles Marshall Lewis on Kendrick Lamar + Wynton Marsalis + Bob Marley

Rock's Backpages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 80:50


In this episode, we welcome the excellent Miles Marshall Lewis to Zoom in from his native New York City. Co-hosts Barney, Mark & Jasper ask Miles about his formative musical experiences in the South Bronx, including the impact of his parents' superhip record collection. The conversation turns to hip hop, and then to the "mashing" of jazz and rap on the first three Tribe Called Quest albums — which leads circuitously to Kendrick Lamar's jazz-infused 2015 masterpiece To Pimp a Butterfly, and then to the biography (Promise That You Will Sing About Me: The Power & Poetry of Kendrick Lamar) that Miles has just published. Jasper asks the author about Kamasi Washington and other guest stars on Butterfly, after which we swing to the opposite end of the jazz spectrum and discuss Tony Scherman's 1996 interview with somewhat divisive traditionalist Wynton Marsalis — the week's new audio offering, from which we hear two clips. From jazz and hip hop we turn to reggae and to the week's featured artist Bob Marley. Prompted by the imminent London premiere of Marley musical Get Up, Stand Up!, we hear the voice of the Jamaican superstar as he speaks to Karl Dallas about 'I Shot the Sheriff', a mere day after the Wailers blew the roof off London's Lyceum theatre on 18th July, 1975. After bidding farewell to Status Quo bassist/cofounder Alan Lancaster and to George "Commander Cody" Frayne IV, the RBP team talk us through the 100+ pieces added to our library over the past two weeks. These include Lillian Roxon writing about L.A. in the aftermath of the 1969 Manson killings (before Manson has been arrested); Ronnie Hawkins in hot water with former charges The Band/Hawks (also 1969), Michael Watts in hot pursuit of Iggy Pop in 1977, Mark Rozzo revisiting "ultimate cult album" Big Star Third in 2006, and — bringing the episode full circle — our special guest on Baz Luhrmann's 2016 hip hop drama The Get Down... Pieces discussed: The Sound in Our Veins: Jazz, Kendrick Lamar, Wynton Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis audio, Bob Marley audio, Bob Marley, Status Quo, Commander Cody, Robert Shelton, Hollywood 1969, Blue Note Records, Ronnie Hawkins, The Band, Iggy Pop, Take That, Big Star, Gorillaz, John Coltrane and The Get Down.

Poetry Unbound
Jason Allen-Paisant — Right now I'm Standing

Poetry Unbound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 16:09


In a poem considering trees, Jason Allen-Paisant opens up many associations with trees: in a woodland, there's a dead tree, from which new forms of life are finding sustenance. He, a Black man in the woods, is aware of people looking suspiciously at him. The poem reflects on how trees were used for building the ships of enslavers, who considered countries and people their property. In light of this, he shares a nature poem about all the things that nature holds.Jason Allen-Paisant is a Jamaican poet whose first poetry collection, Thinking with Trees, was published by Carcanet Press in 2021. His work has also appeared in PN Review, the Poetry Review and Callaloo. He teaches in the School of English at the University of Leeds.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

Nice To Meet You
Episode 102 - Coming To America 3 with Javid

Nice To Meet You

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 66:28


Javid and I talk about his realization of race when he moved to America from Jamaica, and how it was never on his radar before he moved to DC to go to Howard University. He shares his high school experience at a boarding school located on a mountain and tells me how the Jamaican education system differs from America. We also chat about our ideal education systems and what we think needs to change in society. Javid's Social Media (IG: @Ja_Vid876

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary
Listen to the Podcast of The Jamaica & Caribbean Weekly News Summary for the week ending October 1, 2021

Jamaican and Caribbean Weekly News Summary

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 9:27


This is a Podcast of the 7 Jamaican & Caribbean News items for the week ending October 1, 2021. The JAMAICA WEEKLY News Summary Podcast is brought to you by Jamaicans.com . For more stories from this week's Jamaican/Caribbean Weekly News Summary please visit - http://www.jamaicans.com/news

Afropop Worldwide
The Gorgon, The Originator, and The Dub Master

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 59:00


During the last 60 years, Jamaican music has constantly reinvented itself, a handful of innovators pioneering distinct musical genres such as ska, rock steady, reggae and dancehall, as well shorter-lived subgenres. But Jamaica's musical trendsetters did much more than just shake up the island's music scene. At crucial intervals, their inventiveness has dramatically changed or even spawned a range of popular forms overseas—sewing seeds for rap via the deejay style and stimulating remix culture through dub. In "The Gorgon, The Originator and The Dub Master," producer David Katz leads a tour of indelible changes brought about by producer Bunny "Striker" Lee, Deejay U Roy and the engineer and sound system owner, King Tubby, to demonstrate how they changed popular music worldwide. All photos ©David Katz. Produced by David Katz. APWW #841

The Fix Productions
Ep. 161 - "Fraud Twins"

The Fix Productions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 77:52


In this podcast episode, Ari and Naro discuss Skillibeng revealing the release date and tracklist for his Crocodile Teeth album, Popcaan throwing shade at Alkaline (and possibly Skillibeng), Tanya Stephens speaking on being assaulted by a Jamaican artiste and more Buss Di Utes songs of the week: Ari: Kerissa - Heartless World: https://bit.ly/3CZJFT0 Naro: Jynaire - No Attachment: https://bit.ly/3oj0CDB

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson
Bernard Muir on Passion and Leadership

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 69:35


Bernard Muir is entering his 10th season as the Director of Athletics at Stanford University. Stanford has one of the best programs and departments in the country. During Bernard's tenure, he has seen 25 NCAA Championships and 34 national titles. He also has been involved with the Learfield IMG College Director's Cup, which recognizes the best athletic department in the country. Stanford has won it 7 times. In this episode, we discuss what's different about being an Athletic Director today than what Bernard imagined it would be like as a kid (6:53), why he was drawn to being an AD from a young age (8:35), what drew him to basketball (10:36), if people thought he was too serious when he was younger (13:12), where his belief in himself to dream big and be proactive came from (14:52), what he's learned from loss (17:02), Jamaican culture (20:35), how he thinks about his kids as a father when it comes to academics, athletics, and striving for excellence (23:21), if it's a blessing or a curse to know what you want to do with your life at a young age (25:01), what he's most curious about as the Stanford AD (27:33), how he leverages the university so that his student athletes at Stanford can thrive (29:27), how he thinks about greatness (32:06), what qualities he looks for when hiring people (33:16), if he notices anything in particular when he makes a mistake in hiring someone (34:55), advice for when you have to fire someone (36:01), who he serves and how he serves so many people (38:19), how he says yes and no to things (41:19), what he's most passionate about in the role he's in (43:09), Katie Ledecky (45:21), how he helps athletes think about their identities as athletes and beyond the sport (51:15), what he does to make sure he's healthy, good, and well so that he's best able to serve others (53:22), the business side of collegiate sports (55:41), how he's gotten through a strenuous and eventful last 18 months (1:00:23), and how he thinks about leadership and developing leaders (1:04:12). You can check out Bernard on Twitter @Stanford_AD. Thank you so much to Bernard for coming on the podcast! I wrote a book called “Shift Your Mind” that was released in October of 2020, and you can order it on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Additionally, I have launched a company called Strong Skills, and I encourage you to check out our new website https://www.strongskills.co/. If you liked this episode and/or any others, please follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers. Thanks for listening. -Brian

Once Upon A Food Story
How Your Cultural Heritage Influences Your Food Story with Shanika Graham-White

Once Upon A Food Story

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 47:22


Food can evoke powerful memories and feelings.  We all have dishes that remind us of a particular time and place, and eating that meal transports us back there. Maybe you gravitate to certain smells or flavors because they bring you to somewhere familiar or comforting.  We're talking about how your roots influence your food story when it comes to cooking and eating. Specifically, how do these foods make you feel? How can you stay true to all of those parts of your story that make you who you are and embrace and adapt them in a way that feels good to you today? Shanika Graham-White shares how her southern upbringing and Jamaican heritage are a part of her flavorful creations from her kitchen. While she doesn't come from a line of cooks, one of the main ways that her family often came together was through food, music, and laughter.  Today, Shanika is a food stylist and recipe developer whose blog, Orchids + Sweet Tea, is a go-to source for comfort food and sweets with a healthy twist. She creates dairy-free, gluten-free, and vegan versions of your old and new favorites that you can find on her blog and in her cookbook, Orchids + Sweet Tea: Plant-Forward Recipes with Jamaican Flavor & Southern Charm. One more thing: You're likely to get VERY hungry listening to our engaging and lively conversation. You've been warned! In this episode, you'll learn: How to appreciate the food culture you were exposed to as a child  Sustainable ways to transition into a healthier lifestyle  Tips to talk to kids who are picky eaters  An easy approach to adapt your favorite comfort foods for a healthier spin  When to go for the real deal and not try to “healthify” a recipe One piece of advice that will help you feel in alignment with your true self You'll be inspired to think about how your own roots have shaped your tastes and your experience around food, and how you can embrace those parts today. For complete show notes, click here. Podcast Partner: Pique Tea Use code ELISEM for a discount on your order! Learn more about Shanika Graham-White: Orchids + Sweet Tea Instagram: @OrchidsNSweetTea_ Facebook: @OrchidsNSweetTea Orchids & Sweet Tea: Plant-Forward Recipes with Jamaican Flavor & Southern Charm Available October 26, 2021 Learn More about Elise Museles: elisemuseles.com Instagram: @kaleandchocolate Facebook: @kaleandchocolate Resources: Classic Southern Banana Pudding

La Vie Creative
Ep 150: Chatting with a Jamaican writer based in France, Alecia McKenzie

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 28:30


Alecia McKenzie is a Jamaican writer based in France.Her first collection of short stories, Satellite City, and her novel Sweetheart have both won Commonwealth literary prizes. Sweetheart has been translated into French (Trésor) and was awarded the Prix Carbet des lycéens in 2017.Other books include Stories From Yard (first published in Italian translation as Racconti giamaicani), Doctor's Orders and When the Rain Stopped in Natland. Her most recent novel is A Million Aunties.​Her work has also appeared in a range of literary magazines and in anthologies such as Stories from Blue Latitudes, The Oxford Book of Caribbean Short Stories, Bridges, Global Tales, Girls Night In, and To Exist is to Resist.She was longlisted for the Sunday Times Audible Short Story Award in 2019.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

Loper & Randi in The Morning
9-28-21 Loper & Randi - Loper's Dead Battery, Matt Brown and AJ Dobson, R. Kelly Guilty, Treadmill Trivia, Jamaican Wasted, Demi Lovato

Loper & Randi in The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 131:38


Loper had a dead battery this morning that almost ruined the show. UFC Fighters, Matt Brown and AJ Dobson, join us in the studio. R. Kelly was found guilty and will spend a long time in prison. Randi tells the tale of Loper and the special milkshake in Jamaica. Demi Lovato claims to have had a close encounter in Joshua Tree. Plus, Brian Laundrie, John Hinckley, Netflix, Treadmill Trivia and more!

Chatting with The Experts with Paula Okonneh |Interviewing Business Experts Nationally & Internationally. Hear the Story behi

Marguerite Orane immigrated to Canada in 2009 and says that there is a lesson for immigrant women. " When we come to a new country, especially North America, the established diaspora - we are told, or we feel the need to assimilate, but I think it's very important to remain and stay true to who we are and the culture that we grew up with and to not hide that light under a bushel. Be proud of being Jamaican , proud of being Nigerian, proud of being Grenadian, Trinidadian, whatever it is, Ghanaian and whatever it is when we come over here because there is a lot that we do have to be proud about. "

The Innovative Mindset
Norm Snyder, CEO of Reeds, Inc. on Innovating in the Ultra-Competitive Soda Industry

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 74:37


Norm Snyder Discusses Innovating in the Ultra-Competitive Soda Industry This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm every day! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial.* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset If you love it as much as I do, you can get 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset Norm Snyder joined Reed's Inc. in September 2019 as the Chief Operating Officer. He was appointed Chief Executive Officer in March 2020. Prior to joining Reed's, Norm served as President and Chief Executive Office for Avitae USA, LLC, an emerging premium new age beverage company that markets and sells a line of ready-to-drink caffeinated waters. Prior to Avitae, he served as the President and Chief Operating Officer for Adina For Life, Inc., President and Chief Executive Officer of High Falls Brewing Company, and Chief Financial Officer, and later Chief Operating Officer of South Beach Beverage Company, known as SoBe. In prior experience, Norm served as Controller for National Football League Properties, Inc., and in various roles at PriceWaterhouse during an eight-year tenure. Norm earned a B.S. in Accounting from the State University of New York at Albany. Connect with Norm https://drinkreeds.com/ Drinkvirgils.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drinkreeds/ Episode Transcript [00:00:00] Norm Snyder: I have one prerequisite for people that come to work for us. You want to be there and it's just not a job, right? You want to be there to make a difference. [00:00:13] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Hi, and welcome to the innovative mindset podcast. I'm your host. Izolda Trakhtenberg on the show. You get my conversations with peak performing thought leaders, creatives, and entrepreneurs. We explore how you can innovate through creativity, compassion, and collaboration. I believe that innovation combined with compassion and creative thinking can save the world and I aim to bring you ways. [00:00:35] You can do it too. If you're enjoying the show, I'd be super grateful. If you could support it by buying me a cup of coffee, you can buy me a cup of@buymeacoffee.com slash Izolda tea. And now let's get on with the show. [00:00:57] Hey there and welcome to the innovative [00:01:00] mindset podcast. My name is Izolda Trakhtenberg. I'm super happy that you're here and I'm so honored and happy to have this week's guest on the show. Check this out. Norm Snyder joined Reed's incorporated in September of 2019 as the chief operating officer. He was appointed chief executive officer in March, 2020 prior to joining Reed's norm norm. [00:01:21] I love that norm served as president and chief executive officer of Avita USA, LLC, and emerging premium new age beverage company that markets and sells a line of ready to drink caffeinated waters prior to a VTA. He served as the president and chief operating officer for Edina for life. He was president and chief executive officer of high falls brewing company and chief financial officer. [00:01:44] And later chief operating officer of south beach beverage company known as Sobe in prior experience. Mr. Snyder, norm served as the controller for the national football league properties that tells us something about norm and in various roles at Pricewaterhouse during an [00:02:00] eight year tenure norm earned a BS in accounting from the state university of New York at Albany. [00:02:05] Wow. You have quite the resume norm. Thank you so much for being on the show. Welcome. [00:02:11] Norm Snyder: Thank you. Good to be [00:02:12] Izolda Trakhtenberg: here. I am. First of all, you have such a wide range of experience and you began. As an accountant, which I think is so it's so fascinating because accounting is in many ways, everything, knowing where you are, knowing where you want to go and knowing the sort of the, the numbers behind it is, is incredibly fascinating to me. [00:02:37] And I'm wondering, how did you get from? I started in accounting to, I am the CEO of one of my favorite beverage companies reeds. Cause I love the ginger beer and ginger ale. How did that [00:02:48] Norm Snyder: happen? Well, you know, it kind of goes back to the, before I went to school and, and figuring out what I wanted to do and I, I always had a pension for business [00:03:00] and, but I also thought I wanted to be a lawyer. [00:03:03] And somehow I threw that into a cup and shook it up and threw it out and accounting came out. And I thought, you know, the, the real basic premise behind it was, is it exactly you touched on if I understand the, you know, the numbers guide, every business, I understand where all the numbers are coming from. [00:03:21] It would be a great way to learn. It would be a star. So, you know, I spent the formidable part of my career, really working with big fortune 500 corporations and really got to see a lot how they operated and really use the numbers, how to, how to dig in and understand that. And then when I got on the business side, I loved it even more. [00:03:41] So I knew that, you know, businesses where I really wanted to be and, you know, in an operating role. And as I progressed, I just, I loved it more and more. And then I found at the end of the day, it really gave me a competitive advantage, being a CEO that understood [00:04:00] numbers and how things work. So I always felt like when it came down to financial negotiations, nobody could, nobody could top me. [00:04:06] So it was kind of a stepping, stepping stone or a ladder is how to start and where I wanted to go. Then once I got into that side of the business, I fell in love with it. And I just, you know, I knew that was that's where I wanted to be. And, and that's where I am now. [00:04:24] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, that's fascinating to me, this notion of having a springboard and then you innovated from there and you develop this incredible career from something that is as basic as numbers, but they can be really complicated and. [00:04:40] It's interesting to me because reads is I am going to be very I've. I've been drinking reads since the nineties, when I first heard about it and, and started, it was only available like in the natural health food stores type places, it wasn't widely available and yet you've been innovating and making it so much more [00:05:00] prevalent everywhere. [00:05:00] I would love it for, for those of you listening, who have not heard about reeds, you need to go out and get it's so good if you, especially, if you like ginger, but norm I would love it. If you would talk a little bit about reads where it was when you started and where it is today. And if you could tell just a little bit about what the company is, I would love that. [00:05:19] Norm Snyder: Well, let me just, let me, let me say a couple of things before I answer that. Number one. I started drinking it in the nineties too. So, you know, I've been in, I was a consumer long before I became involved with a company. The other thing too is, you know, throughout your career and I'll, I'll say this to any young people that are looking for advice, I've also had great mentors. [00:05:41] And one of the reasons why I'm here ironically, is a guy that I started working for over 30 years ago in NFL properties, named John bellow. And, and you know, if you look at spots on my resume, there's a lot of spots that he was involved with. And, and he has been very instrumental in my career in terms of [00:06:00] learning and pattering pattern things of him. [00:06:04] So that's important too. Now reads reads is a, a great company. And one of the things that I love about it and this, this is what makes me feel good when I wake up every morning. And I talk about. You know, we just came out with this campaign called Reno reads is real or reads. I got to make sure I get this right. [00:06:25] You know, real real is always better. That's it? And we, if you take a look at our ingredients panel and if you know how we make our products, they are so far superior than any of our competitors by far. And that makes me feel really good because we're offering consumers, you know, the best ginger beer, the best ginger ale, you know, the best craft sodas that we have. [00:06:52] And, you know, Reed's was, it's a 30 year old company started by a gentleman in Southern California named Chris Reed who had this [00:07:00] idea and he loved ginger. And that the world really knew nothing about ginger, except for maybe, you know, in a Chinese food menu. Right. And all the great properties that ginger has. [00:07:13] And created this all natural, better for you drink. And which started because if you go back in 30 years ago, the only, the only, the only channel that would carry such a thing was that were natural stores. Right? And then it morphed into grocery stores because groceries as natural stores became bigger and started stealing business from grocery stores, grocery stores said, wow, we've got to start offering more natural products, right. [00:07:39] And you know, most mainstream grocery stores today have a fairly large section of natural products or have natural products that are interspersed within the regular categories. So we kind of morphed off into that. And you know, we've been growing ever since because obviously [00:08:00] as people become more educated and understand the great properties that a lot of these products have and become more knowledgeable. [00:08:09] And want better for you products. You know, it's the classic supply meets demand scenario, and we've been able to fill that gap. [00:08:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm taking all of that in for a second because it's in many ways looking at it from, from an economics standpoint, that whole idea of supply and demand is it's as old as time. [00:08:32] And yet there are some innovations here that are, that are fascinating to me because the innovation, when Mr. Reed started the company was all natural ingredients as specially focusing on actual ginger instead of this sort of, oh, ginger, if you will. And, and that was different. That was really different. I remember thinking that when I first started drinking it and that, that it tasted like ginger, not [00:09:00] fo ginger, if you will. [00:09:01] And so. How does that work when you're starting something like this. And I know you haven't been with the company all that long, but, but you're still innovating. You're coming out with new campaigns. How does, how does somebody decide, you know what, I'm going to do things in a way that people aren't thinking about like all natural ingredients, actual, fresh ginger in the sodas, instead of fake ginger or whatever, what do you think the mindset has to be of someone who takes that kind of chance? [00:09:32] Norm Snyder: I think they truly believe in and stayed true to their convictions of this is what they want, and this is good. And I'm spin up persevere and educate as many people as possible. And hopefully they'll feel the way I do. I mean, obviously anybody that takes that type of risk, right. And anybody that creates something that sticks for 30 years has done something pretty tremendous my view. [00:09:56] And so one of the things we, we, we, we [00:10:00] haven't deviated. From its founding guiding principle that Chris started. And that's why, you know, it came back to this whole thing. That real is always better than, you know, 30 years we're still doing it the way he did it and his garage or his kitchen. Right. We were still using organic, real ginger that we import from Peru. [00:10:28] And we still make it the same way and we still make it the, what he refers to as the Jamaican inspired recipe, which is fruit juices. So we use pineapple, lemon, lime and honey. Right. And you know, what I've tried to do is just improve the efficiencies of how we put all that together. Right. And not deviate, but as you mentioned, innovate, so. [00:10:53] That's a great next step in you know, what, how we innovate is because if you look at the ginger beer category [00:11:00] relative to other beverage categories, it's, it's, it's kinda small. And, and a lot of competitors saw the successor reads as an up comment and obviously that takes market share. And if you look at, if you look at ginger beer consumers you know, it's kind of a mix and it's, it's, it's used as a mixer, obviously with the popularity of Moscow mules and dark and Stormys, and that's quite frankly how I met reads with overall Moscow over a few Moscow mules [00:11:30] Izolda Trakhtenberg: in [00:11:31] Norm Snyder: those special copper cups, but those copper mugs, right. [00:11:34] And then. But you have some folks that like, drink it, like I use the Jamaican inspired recipe. We had to make a woman that worked for us and how everybody makes their own home version. But, you know, they, they drink it like a soda. So it's a mix that, you know, people that drink it like a soda they use it as a mixer, actually, there's people that drink it because of that helps their digestion. [00:11:58] It helps them, they have [00:12:00] nausea. You know, we have a lot of like cancer patients, believe it or not that reach out to us because it helps them. So you know, kind of, that's sort of very limited type of audience. So, you know, one of the things that we thought of, which was kind of a natural is the ginger ale category, which people drink, drink ginger ale the same way. [00:12:21] I mean, my grandmother gave it to me one in an upstairs upset stomach and my mother gave it to. If you go to the hospital, they give it to you. Right. But it's a much broader category. It's not as you know, you don't have quite the ginger burn that you do in ginger beer. But we sent cheese. Why aren't we in the ginger ale cannon? [00:12:39] I mean, and as we peel back the onion a little bit, we found once again, that nobody's really using fresh ginger or real ginger, they're using ginger flavoring, ginger extracts. So we took that formula and applied it to our ginger ale. And again, it's one of our it's, it's probably our fastest growing product right now. [00:12:59] [00:13:00] And you mentioned that you would be drinking your zero calorie, ginger beer. I've been drinking like zero calorie, ginger ELLs, like they're going out of style. Right? I just love the flavor. You know, it's, you know, it's, again, it's a great product. We took the foundation of our ginger beer and created this. [00:13:19] You know, a great way we have innovated. Then we took it a step further and we came up with mocktails. Cause we found out that a lot of folks said, Hey, I want to go out, but I don't want to feel like I have to have an alcoholic drink in my hand. So, you know, and, and if I think in your, in your neck of the woods in Brooklyn, there's been non-alcoholic bars that have popped up, right? [00:13:39] People would go off that want to have fun and socialize, but don't want to feel like they have to drink. So we came up with these ginger rail based mocktails, surely temp on our versions called Shirley tempting and then transfusion, which is you know, which has been a very popular drink. So obviously if you want to mix it with alcohol, you can. [00:13:58] But if you don't, you have a [00:14:00] really great, healthy zero calorie beverage that you can enjoy and, and not feel like you have to have to have consume it with alcohol. So I think that's a great sort of three step, how we've really pivoted and innovative to give folks. A great quality product. It's all natural, but that they can drink at the, at the occasion that they'd feel the most appropriate. [00:14:23] And the reactions then really, really possible. [00:14:27] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And I'm so glad that you said that because I am not a huge drinker and I'm usually the designated driver, you know? So, so it's really nice to be able to go. I would like something that, that is going to taste great. It's going to, this is going to sound a little weird, but it's gonna look good if you see what I mean. [00:14:47] I [00:14:47] Norm Snyder: don't want to feel out of place. Right? You want to feel like you're you're, you're, you're, you're you're you fit in with everybody. And then that's the beauty of these things. And you know, one of the things that I do and I love part of my job is so [00:15:00] I, we have six production facilities across the country. [00:15:03] Every production run that they do, they should product. So my office looks like a collection of bottles, right. And I have a mini refrigerator and I drink, I try and both warm, ambient temperature and cold, but I drink multiple products every day from different locations where they're produced to locate for quality, be for consistency. [00:15:25] But I mean, I want to drink this stuff cause I want to know if a consumer says something, but I can say, look, I had that this is what I believe. Or, you know, do I detect there's an issue because if there's an issue we need to fix it. So I do that every day. I mean, I drink multiple products every day, seven, you know, all the time in the office, but I, but I have a collection of all of our production stuff, so I know what's going on and I know what our consumers are picking up. [00:15:55] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that. I, you know, it's funny going, going into a bar or [00:16:00] pub and ordering something, nonalcoholic feels sometimes I've had people say, oh, you must be in AA. And I'm like, no, just didn't want to drink. And so, so this it's, it's a weird way. It's a weird way of passing actually, because fewer people will talk to you about that sort of thing. [00:16:20] Not that it's any of their business, but yet something that, that is interesting to me about what you just said about making sure that the consumer experience is a positive one. That's, that's one of the, that's one of the results, right? Is that people feel more comfortable drinking it and something else that I would love to ask you about, you said, That you check in as far as whether or not things are going well from all the production facilities. [00:16:49] And I like to say that an innovator is a creative thinker on a mission. And it sounds to me like you're embodying that this notion of checking in, of being very [00:17:00] practical. Can you talk a little bit about what those steps are? How does that, how do you keep innovating while staying very practical in the evaluation and assessment process? [00:17:13] Norm Snyder: Well, because the innovation is the fun part, right? It really, it really is. I mean, you can, you can come up with a wackiest ideas and it's like a release, right? It's like, you can get all this stuff off your chest, off your mind. I mean, I'm like, it's kinda funny. It's ruined me forever being in the beverage business. [00:17:35] Cause I can't go into a store and just buy stuff. I've got to go to the beverage section. I got to go to the coolers. I got to check out what's going on. You know, I look at there's all this scan data. So it's syndicated data that either Nielsen or IRI puts out that shows by category what's selling. [00:17:53] What's not selling by package. I mean I love data too. So it's kind of like, see you assimilate all this stuff that [00:18:00] you're seeing, that you hear people talking about. I have I have three 20 year old children. Well actually I have five but three that are in their twenties and I'll watch what they drink and what their friends drank and what they talk about. [00:18:12] Like I said, when I go into stores, I, no matter what I'm doing, if I'm going on mission a, I always end up in the beverage outlet, check out what's going on. So it's the fun part is the innovation thinking, this is what I think people want. We do a lot of research this based on what the research tells us people want. [00:18:30] So we'll put together a product concept. This is what it becomes a little bit more formal, but a product concept, and then work with our R and D department to create something. And then the fun part is that, that first time that you taste it and does that product really reflect what you're trying to do. [00:18:50] Right. And sometimes you get there very quickly and sometimes it takes a dozen iterations. And sometimes you just say, can't get there. Can't get there. No, [00:19:00] one's gonna, no, one's going to drink this. So that's kind of the fun part. Because it's part science part our, you know, part into it in intuitive and, you know, and I do it with, you know, a lot of people within our organization. [00:19:14] Right. So it's just not me. It's everybody. And it's kind of like free flow. I've got to make sure I said that slowly free flow thinking where people can just kind of like, say what's on there. Right. And you know, you watch trends and you have data and you do other stuff and you try to put it all together and come up with a decision that makes sense. [00:19:35] But you know, we do that on the premise of who we are and what are our, what are our key values, right? It has to be within those because what if we deviate from what our values are then who are we really? Right. So we try to, we try to stay within that sort of bandwidth of who we are and what we want to be. [00:19:56] And, you know, some, like I said, sometimes it just feels really good. It's [00:20:00] like, boy, we nailed this. And sometimes it's like, well, it could be a stretch, but does it work? And sometimes we come back and just say, that's not us. So it's the fun part of the job. And it's the part that's unstructured and very loose and very flowing and it's fun. [00:20:15] And you know, I'm really, I'm really proud that as an organization, we have no shortage of really good ideas. And, and, and like, you know, we, we've got the next two to three years covered, right? Not saying that if we, if something new comes up that we could react quickly, but we have that, we have that many ideas that are, that are good. [00:20:37] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's fantastic. And I'm, I'm struck by the notion of including everybody that it's not just you making the decisions, it's you working with your team with, with the people who make up the company. And I'm wondering that that's in many ways, an innovative thing. Also, I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about [00:21:00] how you structure that if there is a, you said it's free flowing, but there has to be some sort of a, almost a process when you're doing something iteratively like that. [00:21:10] How do you do that? [00:21:11] Norm Snyder: Yeah, what we we've, we've developed, not that we want to be burdened with structure. But at the same time, it just can't be shooting from the hip. So we develop. Can can you to develop processes once we get to that formal stage of, yeah, let's do this. But so my job is which is hire as many good people as possible. [00:21:33] Right. And let them do the work and let me take the credit. Right. My, my job is to really kind of, I'm almost like the, the conductor in the orchestra and there's different sections and there's people with different strengths and different weaknesses. And after you work with folks, you get to, you get to know what their strengths are. [00:21:53] So, you know, when something comes up like this person or that person, or this group of people are the ones that [00:22:00] I'm going to listen to a little bit more, that's shut other people out because you know, there's been good ideas that come from from people, you know, you don't expect, but, and it's sort of it's, and I'll tell you, it's kind of spontaneous because. [00:22:14] I'll start on one project and it all either be bogged down or something else will come up and then I need a break and I'll just say, all right, let's cut. Let's taste. Right. Let's taste. We've got a bunch of stuff that we've been working on. Let's taste it and we'll sit there and you gotta be careful because you can't, once you taste too much, your taste buds become severely ineffective, as well as your ability to smell. [00:22:40] So you really got to kind of measure yourself, but it could be spontaneous. Like let's do it, or let's talk about this. Or then we, or we schedule, you know, we have we, we have weekly meetings and deal with all these things and a lot of it starts, but then we may say, let's just have a meeting dedicated to this one topic on X date.[00:23:00] [00:23:00] Right? So we, there is a little bit of spontaneity largely because of my schedule, but I think it works well. And sometimes people say, Hey, I've got this. What do you think? And I'm like, let's do it right now. So that, that makes it kind of fun too. But once we get serious, we do have a very documented process and we have people that are responsible for aspects of that development. [00:23:24] And we fine tuned it over the line. We have fine tuned the process over the last year and it's gotten really good, really good. Like we're working on a couple projects right now. And because of that, I think we're ahead of the game ahead of where we, where we should be, because we've done a real good job of tracking ourselves and communicating. [00:23:48] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I'm sorry. I'm pausing because I'm, I I'm taking all of it. Tracking yourselves and communicating those two are so collaboration to me is, [00:24:00] so it's people say it's a buzzword, but I think it's so important where everybody feels like they can contribute. And also that they're valued and valuable. So, so communicating their ideas, communicating through the process is fantastic. [00:24:13] But tracking that, that to me as, as, as more of a creative thinker, the notion of tracking things like that makes my head explode. Just because it's, it sounds like there potentially so many details. Can you talk a little bit about what the, what the ideas are behind traffic tracking and what it is that you're actually tracking? [00:24:35] Norm Snyder: I think you just answered the question. There's so many details, right? I mean, at the end of the day we build it forward, but I'm going to do it. I'm going to reverse engineer because I think this is easier to explain. Say you, you have this great concept and you know, right now everything's on cycle, right? [00:24:59] So [00:25:00] the, sell it into a channel or, or a retail chain, you know, they have their meetings on X day and then they make changes on Y date. Right. And they're pretty, I mean, think about this. Cause you're dealing with hundreds and hundreds, if not thousands of products and you just can't like do it every day and every week. [00:25:21] So they have these fixed periods. So you know what those are and see your work backwards. And you say, okay, we're going to launch X, Y, Z product at this retailer because this is where we really feel like we have to start. So, you know, the date that you can present, you know, the dates that, that they'll do resets at store. [00:25:41] Then you kind of work backwards and say, okay, what do we have to do to get to that point? Right. What are all the steps? And it's, you know, it's, it's starts at concept. The first thing is the liquid, you know, what's the liquid look and taste like, right. And what do you want that liquid [00:26:00] back to that whole, you know, that whole product brief, what does it represent? [00:26:05] And then you kind of go forward into, okay, when do we, you know, final product approval. And then from there artwork and labeling package configuration, and then you've got to produce it. So you have to have all your, you know, source all your raw materials and just about every piece of raw material, except for the liquid itself is branded. [00:26:28] And then, you know, legal, is it, you know, are we infringing in anybody's intellectual property? If not, is it available? Can we can. And then what sort of campaign are we going to have behind it? And then when are we w you know, when do we go, when do we actually scale up to a full production mode? And when can we have that product in our warehouses and when can we ship it? [00:26:51] So it's, you know, all these various aspects, which involves every department, right? Sales, marketing, [00:27:00] operations, finance. So it's a multi, multi departmental collaboration and meeting where we're tracking and making, checking the box. Do we have that covered? Do we have that covered? Do we have that covered then? [00:27:14] What's the timing? I mean, because depending on the package, if it's a specialized package, we may have to, we may have to put something in at the plant that produces it because they can't produce that package. So, so all these questions, you know, and, and where are you sourcing the ingredients and what's the lead times, right? [00:27:33] So. Yeah, and you want to kind of time it, right? Where you have product packaging, you know, artwork that you can share to sell it in and they can taste it. And then to be able to put a final product on their shelves the day, the day that they want it. And that's the process. And if you don't document it, you're going to miss something. [00:27:57] So, and it, you know, we have someone that [00:28:00] leads to that process that brings everybody together, then holds them accountable as to where do we stand with this? You're supposed to get back to us on that. Where do we stand on this aspect? Where's that aspect. And you know, again, it, it, it, it brings, you know, it brings the organization closer together. [00:28:17] I mean, we're not a big organization and, and you know what, not just, not just brands, make organizations successful it's people and how they, how they play off and interact with, with one another. So, you know, you can understand like what, you know today. I remember when I was a little kid and the Beatles were popular right. [00:28:37] Today, you put on a Beatles record and it sounds contemporary, right? Like they haven't lost anything. And, you know, granted they wrote great music, but together as a unit, what, what just, you know, one plus one plus one plus one was like 24 and I believe it, I believe organizations are the same way where if people click [00:29:00] together intellectually, if they, if they collect together spiritually, if they click together on so many different levels, you're more powerful. [00:29:09] Right. And, and this process really brings out the best in an organization. [00:29:17] Izolda Trakhtenberg: I love that you use the Beatles analogy. I mean, I agree the Beatles solo band on the run is a great album, but nothing can compare that they did solo two rubber soul and revolver. So I slightly completely take your point. And, and it's interesting to me how everybody, every person in your organization sounds again like, like they're encouraged to contribute and then also need to contribute. [00:29:43] And that you, someone who is an implementer, someone who is, or maybe an integrator who goes, yes, this is my job to make sure that that everybody is on track. And again, that's one of my challenges I sometimes take on too many projects. Have you ever found that happens [00:30:00] with the course? [00:30:01] Norm Snyder: How do you handle that? [00:30:04] It's difficult. That's that's something that you have to watch very, very carefully, but it's something that C C w. I have one prerequisite for people that come to work for us, you want to be there and it's just not a job, right? You want to be there to make a difference and you could be the guy that mops the floors, but you're going to make a difference. [00:30:26] Right? And I want everyone to feel empowered that they do make a difference in quite frankly, they do, because if one employee doesn't do their job, the whole company suffers. Right? So there's nowhere to hide. And I don't mean that to add pressure to people, but it kind of, it sets the, it sets the bar high, where I want you to be, want to be here. [00:30:49] I want you to want to make a difference and I want you don't want to contribute. And when you have people thinking at that level you get great results and then, but you're right. But then the negative side is [00:31:00] you gotta be careful that people don't take on too much because when they do that's when errors occur and errors, aren't good. [00:31:09] Because obviously it adversely impacts the company, but it adversely impacts that individual. Right. And I, you know, I also believe that look, I've, I'm a hard worker. I've worked hard my entire life. My family accuses me of being a workaholic. And there's been many Fridays when we're supposed to do something to grow some place and dad's still at work or on a phone and everybody's angry with him. [00:31:35] But I also believe that you need time off to refresh your batteries and to have fun and enjoy your family or whatever you want to do during your time off. So I really encourage that as well. But when you're here, I want 150%. Now I want you to want to be here, but you're right. That, that the tough part is I've had several employees. [00:31:56] I've had to, it's kind of funny. I've had to admonish and [00:32:00] say, I don't want you doing that. I want you to doing this. This is where you're the most effective. And I don't want you burnout. Or I had one employee. I told him if I saw an email from him after 11 o'clock at night, I was going to fire him because he was burning the candle at both ends. [00:32:18] And I'm like, I don't want you doing that. So that, that, that's something you have to watch. And then, you know, I never thought about it to you brought that up, but that's something that you definitely have to watch is that people get so caught up in it and they take on too much. And it's, and it's not that a desperation because they want to, and they can. [00:32:38] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Sure, but it doesn't matter does it because they can still burn out. Even if you care about something you can still burn out. So, so balance in all things I think is, is the way to go and something that I, speaking of balance, this is a weird transition, but here it goes. One of the things that I noticed as far as the packaging of reads, and this is because I'm a [00:33:00] artistic type person and I love colors from very early on. [00:33:03] I remember thinking, wow, the ginger ale is more yellow. The ginger beer is more green and then there's always an orange accent. This is yes. I noticed these things in here. It is. So, so I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about the design, how, if, you know, because you weren't at the company yet, but how did that all happen? [00:33:24] What w what were the colors chosen? I know that they're white, yellow, orange, but, but how does that all translate into how you're innovating now with the, with the way the product is presented? [00:33:38] Norm Snyder: I think we've, I mean, obviously we, we like that to sign cause we, we, we, we stay with it. I just think it sort of reflects that whole motif, you know, the Jamaican inspired ginger beer. [00:33:49] I think that's what if I had to put my finger on it, it kind of comes down to that and it sends off that whole sort of tropical image, [00:34:00] which is reflects that, you know, the style of the, of the Jew, our ginger beer, and then something that like, if you look at now, we really use the Palm trees and our ginger ale and our mocktails. [00:34:11] So we've kind of stayed true to that. And it just feels, you know, colors in the, in the whole creative element. Yes, I guess there is a bit of a science to it, but I look at a more of what's appealing to the eye and where, and where does your eye go and what, what does it catch and what does it reflect? [00:34:31] And, you know, obviously there's, you talked to a designer and they're going to tell you, you should paint your kitchen, this color, because it, it creates appetite and, and vibrancy. And this room, you want this color because it creates that and bedrooms, you want this color because you want them to be serene and comfortable. [00:34:48] And I think labels are kind of the same way. Right? And it just stayed on that whole sort of Jamaican slash tropical theme of who we were. And [00:35:00] the roots of it's really in the ginger beer. Right. And again, we haven't, you know, we've made it more contemporary, but we haven't deviated from that basic story. [00:35:13] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah, cause it works right. And it's instantly recognizable and that's something, that's something that was great for me again, when I started drinking reeds in the, in the nineties was that you could, oh, I could always find them. And, and I, I don't know how quite it was quite how to say it, but I'm just going to say it, it feels to me like the, the beverage industry is really crowded. [00:35:36] You've got the, the big giant. [00:35:38] Norm Snyder: Oh yes, it is. Yes. You know, you know, let me come back that for a second. The two things that are really haven't talked about is we've sort of dominated the conversation with our reads portfolio, but we also have another perhaps of portfolio called Virgil's. Right. Which is, you know, we bought it in 94, so that's [00:36:00] 27 years. [00:36:00] So it's, you know, it's in the same age group is reads and again, it's, it's. But the same basic premise, all natural non-GMO. And we haven't talked about, you know, this aspect where a lot of consumers now, and the trends are, are no sugar, right? Zero calorie, no sugar. They're keto friendly, certified keto friendly. [00:36:25] You'd mentioned you, you know, you consume the zero sugar, ginger beer. And I talked about the zero sugar ginger ale, but, you know, I drink a lot of I drink all of our stuff, but we've. Well actually reads had it. We brought it back, our doctor better, which is a pepper flavored item, but we have a great, you know, root beer among other flavors. [00:36:47] And you know, we have this proprietary sweetening system, that's all natural that tastes gray and has no aftertaste. So one of the things about [00:37:00] zero sugar items, people tend to plug their nose and they can taste it because it's zero sugar, but it has a bit of an aftertaste. And our son doesn't and we haven't really spent a lot of, and so in terms of innovation now, we're, we're looking for something that has mouth feel and flavor that emulates a full sugar drink, but has no calories and is all natural. [00:37:26] And, you know, again, that's a big part of our innovation. We're seeing a lot of growth at our zero sugar line, both reads and Virgil's, but you know, we think we have the best tasting zero sugar product, you know, on the market. And that's another thing where we've, I think done a really good job job of innovating. [00:37:48] And again, staying true to who we are all natural, but trying to give the best experience to our consumers as possible. And like I said, I drank these every day and sometimes [00:38:00] I drink and I'm like, I have to look at the, I have to look at the label and say, damn, did we do we put sugar in this all of a sudden, because it tastes that good in the muffins that good. [00:38:09] So those are two things, you know, virtuals and the zero sugar line, which we have across our entire portfolio. And we use, which I think gives a far superior taste and a taste. That really is the closest thing in the marketplace in Miami. That you can get to a full sugar equivalent. [00:38:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: It's so interesting. [00:38:32] You're talking about mouthfeel. And one of the things I, I, my husband accuses me of being a supertaster because I can taste certain things from a mile away and what I don't like, I definitely don't like if you know what I'm doing, and what's interesting to me about drinking breeds, first of all, I'm vegan. [00:38:50] And so the zeros, I know the other ones aren't vegan, but the zero sugar are vegan. There's no honey in them. And, and that makes me so very happy because now I can [00:39:00] drink reeds and again, and so what, what's fascinating to me about what you're saying this notion of, as I said, mouthfeel, is, is that it is about the experience, not just of drinking the drink, but how you feel after you've drunk it. [00:39:16] And that's a, and maybe because I'm not as familiar with the beverage industry as, as I could be. I didn't think that that was something that a company would be thinking about. I would think that it would be, and this correct me if I'm wrong, that it would be more like, oh, you know, our products, you like our products, you buy our products. [00:39:35] Yay. But mouthfeel is a post experience thing. Can you talk a little bit about what it is that you're trying to, what it is, what mouthfeel is just for clarification and also what it is that you're trying to achieve with the drinking experience for the person who's opened up a bottle of reeds? [00:39:55] Norm Snyder: Well, let me, let me just make a comment about supertasters. [00:39:58] They scare me, but I love [00:40:00] them at the same time, because it's a unique group of people. And I can tell when people comment I'm like, that must be a supertaster because they have the ability to taste things in both positive and imperfections. The vast majority of people don't taste. So that's always good. [00:40:18] And w we actually, we have a couple of supertasters in our office, which I love to bring them in to taste stop, because they can pick up imperfections that most people can't. So that's a great skillset. So mouthfeel the best way to describe it, describe it as like, so take a glass of water and take a chocolate milkshake. [00:40:37] Right. And those are like two extremes and how they're going to feel in your mouth. And it, and a lot of mafia is about what you perceive it to be. Right. So when you think about children and all my kids were really finicky eaters, it wasn't so much about taste. It's how that, that food felt in their mouth. [00:40:58] Right. [00:41:00] So, so if mom feels such an important aspect of it, and again, a lot of it's perception, but so. In a typical beverage and let's go back to before zero sugar diet sodas were, were there the best way to describe it, let me see if I can get this right. So the flavor is the music, right? But the sugar is the amplifier, right? [00:41:30] It takes it up a notch, it makes it loud. It makes it bold and it really gives it that mouthfeel. So you know, if you say you're vegan, I've been on a couple of these podcasts and other things with some other great entrepreneurial people in the food and beverage space. And when they talk about zero sugar for baking fill and mouthfeel are important because that's what you can't use, like Stevia at a banquet. [00:41:57] Right. It just, it's just awful. [00:42:00] So. When you think about sugar, not only gives it that flavor, that amplification of those flavors and makes it pop it gives it that mouthfeel that you expect that again, that you feel like you're like, you could almost chew it, but you don't bite into with it. It tastes that good. [00:42:17] And it's that satisfying? It's not just like, Kool-Aid, it's just not like flavored water. That's the big distinction between, you know, our craft sodas and our ginger beers is that mouthfeel. And when you take sugar out, right, and we use cane sugar. So cane sugar direct to me has better mouth feel than just regular sugar or high-fructose corn syrup, which the mass majority of mainstream beverages use. [00:42:43] You take away that. And with the zero sugar, you can get the flavor, but then it tastes like flavored water. So you need that mouthfeel, that sort of bite to it. Makes it feel like you're drinking a full sugar because it's not just the flavor, it's the feel. [00:43:00] Right. And we've, that's we really taste, you know, mouthfeel when zero sugar, not just flavor, but sweetness and mouthfeel. [00:43:10] It, does it feel light? Does it feel too heavy? Does it feel right? And we spent a lot of time on that and developing our zero sugar because we want it to emulate a full sugar taste. Most consumers have basically said, okay, I'll deal with a compromise on flavor. I'll compromise on mouthfeel. Cause I don't want sugar, make it to overstay. [00:43:35] Say I'm going to pick and choose where I get my calories. I'm going to pick and choose if I want sugar where I'm going to get it from many, say I don't, I want to eliminate sugar entirely from my diet. So we want to give them. That product that they feel like they're having that indulgence. Right, right. [00:43:54] Without the negative things that they're trying to avoid. And why should you have to, why should you have [00:44:00] to plug your notes are chunked down and just say, okay, the zero sugar, I'm going to accept it. Right. And we want to say to our consumers, or to all consumers, you don't have to compromise. You can have your cake and eat it too. [00:44:14] So to speak, right. Zero [00:44:16] Izolda Trakhtenberg: sugar cake. Yeah. [00:44:18] Norm Snyder: Look at, I drink and that's what I drink. Zero sugar. So I'm, you know, personally motivated because I want drink the best thing and I can drink and have the best flavor. So we really take that very serious. And that's what, again, stay true. Who do we are the best tasting, all natural, bold flavors, real as possible. [00:44:40] And when we develop products, that's the goal. And ML feels important because like I said, I've, I've opened a can of something I've drank it, like our black cherry. And I'm like, my God, this tastes so good. And I know what the answer is, but I still look at the back of the can to make sure it doesn't say sugar. [00:44:59] Right. [00:45:00] And that's, I want, you know, and I want to feel that way about all of our products and that's our, that's our goal for, you know, for, for zero sugar products, make them feel like they're full sugar, then there's no compromise in the base. Fabulous. [00:45:19] Izolda Trakhtenberg: That's awesome. And it's interesting to hear you talk about it with, with such passion about, about these products, because otherwise, why do it right if you're not going to, if you're, if you're not going to be really, really in love with, with the work and. And this is something that I, I love the way you described it. [00:45:45] It feels almost like drinking. The drink is a tactile experience in addition to being a taste experience with. Yeah, it is. It really is. It's fascinating. [00:45:55] Norm Snyder: I mean, even like look at our products are carbonated having the right carbonation [00:46:00] because that matters because people that like, I, I drink, I love carbonated products. [00:46:07] I drink sparkling water. Right. I drink our sodas. I love carbonation. And I'm very particular about carbonation. Carbonation is almost like sugar. It's like the tone, right? It's the base of the trouble, the music, if it's right, it makes everything perfect. If it's off it, throws it off and you know, that's another, another element of mouthfeel. [00:46:32] And then the attribute of the product that. We spend a lot of time in like sometimes when we do our samples, our samples lab can't get the carbonation level that we want. So we try to do our best with that, but it just shows you how important that aspect is too. And that we really watch and that's, and that's, you know, the thing I do when I open our product. [00:46:57] Oh, easy. Does that twist open? Does it [00:47:00] make that pop? When I poured in, does it, you know, do we get that? Do I see the level of carbonation and fall? Cause that's another really important attribute of our products. When we develop to make sure that they're in the range of carbonation that we think makes the most sense to really accentuate the flavor. [00:47:18] So it's really, I mean, it is, we are very passionate about it. You're right about it. And it's just not me. It's everybody in the organization. When we taste and we drink our stuff, but those are the things that. At that level and want to make sure that we have an absolutely perfect. So when consumers open that they feel the same way and there's, there's nothing more pleasurable when you get, when you get an email receiving an email from a consumer about your product and how they love it. [00:47:46] But at the same time, there's nothing like a kick to the gut when somebody has a bad experience. And I'll tell you what, when they have a bad experience, they reach us. We reached back out to them to try to make it better, to try to get, you know, get their input, maybe [00:48:00] clarify something, maybe, you know, sometimes somebody misinterprets what a product really is. [00:48:05] And you have to kind of help them get there. But, you know, that's that these are important aspects that we're very customer centric and want and are committed to put in the best quality products. And we take every aspect of those products very soon. [00:48:23] Izolda Trakhtenberg: And that makes sense, right? That, you know, no company has anything without its clients and customers, you vacuum. [00:48:29] So, and that's something that, that brings me to my next question. Cause norm, I'm going to keep you here for the next eight hours. I'm fascinated by the fact that people have their favorites, right? They, they might have their favorite as far as reads. They might have their favorite as far as Pepsi or Coke or whatever. [00:48:44] And REITs has this reputation for being a cut above. But how does that affect the average person who wants to drink are the people who you're serving as a, as an organization, as a company. Are they people who are more discerning in a certain way, or are they people who are [00:49:00] healthier or who want to be healthier? [00:49:02] How does all of that break down when it comes to what we were just mentioned a little while ago, there's pretty crowded beverage industry. [00:49:11] Norm Snyder: Well, I think they're definitely discerning and you know, some are kind of sewers that love our product. You know, we're still, we still have growth with all of our full sugar line in today's day and age, which to me, I find amazing. [00:49:29] I think most people are driven by healthier on natural. And I think that's really probably the mindset of our consumer. They want natural ingredients. They want healthier products. They don't want preservatives. They don't want artificial colors, artificial flavors. They don't want high fructose corn syrup if they're drinking sugar. [00:49:52] So I think those are the things that they clearly read labels are. I think our consumers are label readers, which [00:50:00] I think is great for us because they know what they want and they're not going to compromise. And I think that the trends are going that way. I think those are the you know, Where people want and they, you know, and when they indulge, they want to indulge in something that's good for, you know, that's good. [00:50:16] Not just something that's crap, that's artificial. So I think people are more, more educated obviously, and they know what they want in their diet, but they still, everybody still wants things that tastes good. Right. I mean, that's one thing that hasn't changed. So if you can deliver something that tastes fabulous but it's healthier and it's all natural. [00:50:38] That's, that's our consumer. But in terms of flavors, everyone's taste buds are different. You know, you could taste something and I could taste it and we taste two totally different things. So that's what you have to be careful. That's why I called you. We can't be the empire that listens to the crowd. [00:50:55] No, because the empire in a good day, when he makes 50% of the people happy. Right. [00:51:00] So we can't, you know, you're not going to make everybody happy with every flavor. Sure. People taste things differently and that's how they pick their flavors. But you hope that the flavors that they like that you satisfied it just, you know, the flavor spectrum and how people taste. [00:51:16] It is wild. And even when we do our tasting, how people react to what they pick up on, but I mean, you can't criticize people because that's what they perceive and that's what they taste. Right. And you can't tell them what they taste. So that's always the big challenge. So it's kind of like stick to what you're trying to, what you're trying to produce, whether it's an orange or vanilla cream or a root beer, that's our best. [00:51:40] And you hope that people like it, but you can't be. And then you can't get frustrated because people may have, I mean, cause what if somebody says, Hey, I bought this, this and this, I love this, but didn't like that. Well, you know, maybe you don't, that's not the flavor. Doesn't jive well with your, your, your taste buds.[00:52:00] [00:52:00] So you can't let that discourage you too much because you're never going to have people like everything across the board, as much as we strive to, it's just not going to happen. So you know, we try to whatever flavor it is, this is what, we're one of them. This is what we want to achieve and we're going to make it the best tasting. [00:52:20] So the people that like that will love our stuff, but you know, coming kind of back, I think that's where the trends are going. You know, obviously we talked about the non alcoholic beverage options, which is growing. We talked about all natural. We talked about zero sugar. And I think people just want healthier, better for you products. [00:52:38] And then. And in the case where our ginger beer is where we're using ginger, you know, there's some efficacy with ginger, right? And that's, I think what sets us apart with our ginger rail and our ginger beer is we're getting, you're getting real ginger and those products and real ginger has a lot of great properties that we hear from our [00:53:00] consumers all the time, all the time, why they drink our product and how grateful they are, that it exists. [00:53:06] And that, you know, we used real ginger in those products. [00:53:11] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Yeah. I mean, I love it. When I go on the few occasions, I've had to go sailing in my life. I bring reads, frankly. I know I sound like a commercial for you all, but, but I bring it because to, to stave off being seasick, it's wonderful for that. So, so yeah, absolutely. [00:53:28] I, I understand. And I love what you just said about perception and how. Your perception of what you're tasting is so unique to each individual person. I think that's, I think that's so important and, and you know, to me, something that's good for you and tastes bad is medicine and something is for you and tastes good. [00:53:48] Doesn't necessarily have to be that way. It can be something that you're just enjoying and, and yet, you know, we've just, we're, we're sort of coming out of this pandemic where a lot of people [00:54:00] have had all sorts of obviously obviously big issues and Reed's play has played a role. I'm sure in many people going, okay, I need my comfort and this is, this could be my ginger ale and my ginger beer. [00:54:13] What has gone on if you, if you can talk about it a little bit, what are some of the challenges that Reed's faced during the pandemic and, and the, how have you dealt with them and, and, and where are you going next with respect to this new future that we're going to be living. [00:54:30] Norm Snyder: That's a great question. I was thinking about this. [00:54:31] So I went out and I was at a one of our production locations yesterday. So traveling back, you know, you got a lot of time to think. So I'm thinking about that. And I'm like, man talking about the economy of two worlds. So during the pandemic, we actually benefited because people I think went back to brands, they could trust brands that reflect quality and brands that were healthier. [00:54:59] [00:55:00] And we had a really good year right now. What I didn't really see coming post pandemic. And I don't think anybody did for that matter was what's going on with the supply chain and transportation in this country. There's so much pent up demand. Right. And then with people losing jobs like I was in I was in And Philadelphia last night at the, at the airport and the place was jam packed. [00:55:29] Right. And I'm watching it. And I just, I love, I love seeing stuff happened and I've got a chance to talk to the manager. And you said, our business is up 30% over last year. Our staff has done 40%. I'm thinking, wow, that's, that's gotta be really taxing. So the point is the big challenge this year, which we had some issues that we, we, we, but we worked it [00:56:00] out. [00:56:00] Supply chain is, is just been very difficult to manage. I mean, for example, you can get cans in the United States. Every Ken manufacturer is at capacity. So people are importing cans from all over the world. Well guess what happens with that? There's all the ports of this country are congested. So. [00:56:21] What would normally be a four month lead time could be a seven, eight month lead time because we ordered something from Europe and it sat sad. The Pacific sat in the ocean for two months before it could even get a dock time. And then once you get a dock time to get through customs and get unloaded. So the supply chain it's been probably the most difficult I've seen in my entire career by far transportation. [00:56:47] I talked about the port congestion. I think I read something for every truck. There's 12 loads to go on that truck. Wow. So, you know, it goes back to what I talked about supply versus [00:57:00] demand. Our transportation costs have gone up of double of double. Wow. And it's like, wow, where did this come from? [00:57:09] Now? They're starting to come down and. Things are starting to look like they, by the end of the year, it could become more normal or at least in the first part of next year. But so requires you to plan things out more or you know, which we use for a raps in cardboard for containers have longer lead times. [00:57:31] There's been a shortage of steel for caps to put on your bottles. There's been a shortage of carbonation because the primary supplier carbonation or ethanol plants, and when nobody's driving, no one's using ethanol, right? So the by-product of that. So carbonation is even gone up. What's gone up with pallets that you stack your product now. [00:57:50] So virtually every aspect of our supply chain has been impacted. And we didn't see this during COVID, you know, we saw some tightening [00:58:00] labor is the other aspect to production facilities are having a hard time hiring people. So it's, it's really touched every facet of our business. So postcode, the post COVID year has been believe it, or not much more challenging than during the pandemic, which I thought once we got through the pandemic, the biggest challenge is going to be changing consumer preferences and tastes and how they shop. [00:58:28] And that would be enough to challenge us. That's really been, the supply chain has been turned sideways, right? And so when people ask me what keeps you up at night? That's what keeps me up at night, pasta transportation. And snafoos in our supply chain because as good as our people are, we have to think out longer periods of time to avoid issues. [00:58:56] And we've had a few, we've had a few of them [00:59:00] and it's really unfortunate because it's like, man never had to deal with this before. Not even close, like, as you get older and remember my parents talk about certain parts of life and yeah, I remember that, but we got through it, remember that and we got through it. [00:59:16] But now this is the most unique I've ever seen, but you know what, we'll power through it. I mean, it's not like we're defeated and, or are hanging our heads down and say, we can't do it. We just work twice as hard. And we know that it's going to return to some aspect of normalcy, but it's been a bigger challenge than most people think. [00:59:38] And if you pick up any financial press, it's in the paper every day, right. And look, every head impacts every aspect. I mean the buy cars, you can't buy a car, try renting a car. You can't even rent a car today. Right. Cause there's not available. Right. I tried to buy a steroid receiver. I couldn't find the, the brand and model. [00:59:57] My wife wanted a new washer and dryer, [01:00:00] but we got the last one in the store. The model that she, it, otherwise we had to wait like two months, right? If you want to buy faucets faucets, you must have were out of stock. I mean, so it's impacted virtually every consumer category. There is imaginable this whole supply chain. [01:00:17] So it's, it's been, it's been a struggle. Like I said, we'll power through it and we're not complaining, but it's, it's definitely changed how we, how we do business. [01:00:31] Izolda Trakhtenberg: Oh, sure. I imagine, I mean, whatever supply surplus there was pre pandemic got used up during the pandemic. And now all of a sudden, if you didn't have a supply surplus to carry you for two years, yeah. [01:00:44] You're going to be short. And, and who did, you know, no one ever thought during, during the pre pandemic or even during the beginning months, no one thought it was going to be this long. And so having to stay agile and having to stay sort of light on your feet[01:01:00] is, has become so important for so many companies. [01:01:03] And moving, as I said, moving into the future, it's going to be fascinating to see how we all do. If, and when something like this ever happens again, how will we plan for it? And, and that sort of leads me to my next question. And I w I promise I will, I have like a bunch more questions, but I will, I will, I will absolutely stop soon. [01:01:24] I, I was just wondering, what's your vision for reeds moving into the future? What is your vision for this company? [01:01:32] Norm Snyder: Well, you know, I, I think we, we've probably talked about this before we w we went on air that the thing that I've seen that I'm really proud of, but it feels good too, is that we're pivoting that we're, we're kind of, you know, the, where we're, we're migrating from, you know, the, what I'll call them all natural ginger beer company that kind of played in one [01:02:00] category to something that's much more. [01:02:04] Resonates with a much larger group of consumers that really satisfies their demand, but stays true to who we are. And it's been a subtle pivot, but you can see it in the products that are ordered. You can see it on what, you know, what's selling and what's not selling can see it in consumer feedback. [01:02:23] So I think, you know, the, the vision is continue to produce great tasting all natural beverages and, you know, that are both ginger base, but also our craft, our craft sodas that are healthier that we have, you know, continued to develop great zero calorie, zero sugar products. But, you know, to really look into maybe additional categories, either in the beverage or the food space, but to be sort of that company. [01:02:57] That really puts out [01:03:00] premium high quality, better for you all natural products. And you know, just like we were able to leverage and successfully grow our business, you know, on the whole premise of ginger, you know, there's other ingredients out there that, Hey, why can't reach, do that too? Right. So, you know, the future is, you know, being that company that really represents that product that consumers can trust that they enjoy drinking and they, they know comes from the finest ingredients source throughout the world. [01:03:37] And, but also that, you know, we, you know, and we've talked about this too, and it's the first time I touch on this that, you know, really looking at as most companies are that have a, a conscience. You know, aspect of our day-to-day living. And part of that's going to be sustainability, you know, that we're looking into in digging deeper, but, you know, just being a company that, [01:04:00] that reflects the times that we live in, that, you know, doesn't just die and go away because they stayed true to what they used to be. [01:04:10] I mean, there's so many great examples of that. So many products and companies when I was growing up that were like the big, big players that are just barely hanging on today. Right. And I don't want to be that company that doesn't recognize what consumers want and what are the current trends, but to be on the forefront of that. [01:04:30] And I think we've really done a good job of pivoting to do that. Right. And that's where I get that sense of what's going on in our company. And I really liked that feeling that we're, we're putting out products that people want and that are happy to have in their hands. But also enjoy tremendously, right. [01:04:49] And that are relevant to today's consumers. And that's what I want to be. I want to continue to be that way and, and, you know, start from this great idea that really was [01:05:00] innovative, ri

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | Rappin' Rita Wilson and Chet Hanks Jamaican Patois Accent @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 30:02


Weed joke / Global Citizen Live // Carson Aftershock//Rap//Rita Wilson//Chet Hanks interview on the Red Carpet//WHIP - Tom Hanks net worth//Hollywood Christmas parade//

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 4 | Healthy 50 Year Olds and Pink's Hot Dogs @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:46


Rita Wilson Rappin'//Rap is meant to be from the sould//Hanks should make a Jamaican sitcom//Castaway 2?//How to go into the 2nd half of your life//Healthy 50yr. old//Noory//Pink's Hot Dogs//Hot Dog cart//

Tosh Base with Shantol McIntosh
Covid -19 Survivor, 50 Days in a Coma and ICU with Nahjair Deslandes

Tosh Base with Shantol McIntosh

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 44:39


Good morning world, good afternoon, good evening, and good night! Welcome to episode #46 on Tosh Base. Happy Wednesday to you all! So in today's conversation, you will hear from a covid survivor, Nahjair Deslandes. He's a Jamaican living in Canada with his family. After getting his positive covid results and re-visiting the hospital - after they sent him home, he spent almost 2 months in a coma and intensive care. Nahjair shares that he wouldn't wish this experience for anyone at all. He also shares his experience about the encounter he had with God while in a coma. The doctors called him "Miracle Man" because they could not believe he recovered! He is now pro-vaccine and warning you to take covid seriously by practicing social distancing and sanitizing. Listen to hear more about his experience during and after covid.Enjoy episode 46, and be inspired to love and share your story today! You can connect with me on Instagram and Facebook @toshbasepodcast or email me at toshbasepodcast@gmail.com. Remember to download, share, rate, and subscribe. Tosh Base Jingle and Stinger by @oshanemais on Instagram.

British Murders Podcast
The Chicago Tylenol Murders | Killer British Murder Stories Vol. 3 | British Murders Feat. Killer Stories

British Murders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 38:51


In the third volume of Killer British Murder Stories, I discuss the case of The Chicago Tylenol Murders with Bobbie Holmes of Killer Stories.The Chicago Tylenol murders were a series of poisoning deaths resulting from drug tampering in the Chicago metropolitan area in 1982.The victims had all taken Tylenol-branded acetaminophen capsules that had been laced with potassium cyanide.A total of seven people died in the original poisonings, with several more deaths in subsequent copycat crimes, and no suspect was ever charged or convicted of the poisonings.This is the second of two collaboration episodes Bobbie and I recently recorded. To hear me tell the story of Jamaican murderer Ricardo Linton, check out Killer Stories.You can find and support 'Killer Stories' here:https://linktr.ee/KillerStoriesFollow British Murders on social media:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/britishpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/britishmurdersTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@britishmurdersTwitter: https://twitter.com/britishmurdersYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/BritishMurdersPodcastMerchandise available here:https://teespring.com/stores/britishmurdersSupport the show on Patreon for early access to ad-free-episodes:https://www.patreon.com/britishmurdersMake a one-off donation here:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/britishmurders All episodes are available on my website:https://www.spreaker.com/show/british-murdersPlease send any British murder case suggestions to:britishmurderspodcast@gmail.comIntro music:David John Brady - 'Throw Down the Gauntlet'https://linktr.ee/davidjohnbradymusicMy recording equipment:Shure SM7B Vocal MicrophoneCloud Microphone Cloudlifter CL1Focusrite Scarlett Solo USB Audio InterfaceRode PSA-1 Professional Studio Boom ArmRecorded in:ZencastrEdited in:AudacityMastered in:AuphonicBobbie's References:https://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/October-2012/Chicago-Tylenol-Murders-An-Oral-History/https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/tylenol-murders-1982https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Tylenol_murdershttps://www.crimemuseum.org/crime-library/cold-cases/chicago-tylenol-murders/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/16/us/tylenol-acetaminophen-deaths.htmlhttps://apnews.com/article/c501b46c160c342222d3414c286b74a1https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/cyanide-laced-tylenol-kills-seven

The Oh Hell No Podcast
Episode 214: Discover Jamaican "gypsy" Singer & Songwriter Chavell Yahyel

The Oh Hell No Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 29:20


On this episode Keisha Nicole sits down with singer and songwriter Chavell Yahyel.  Chavell Yahyel is a talented creative that oozes class & confidence. Dubbed as the “Jamaican gypsy,” the singer & songwriter who hails from Montego Bay, Jamaica but now resides in Fort Lauderdale is ready to take her vocal skills mainstream, doing so with finesse & cadence. Listen in as she shares a little bit about herself and her passion driven journey into the entertainment industry to bring her dreams to reality. To keep with with Chavell check her out on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/chavelyahyel/ or visit thecreativebae.com Check out The Oh Hell No Podcast & get the information you need to live your best life!www.ohhellnopodcast.comFollow on Instagram  @theohhellnopodcast Tell us what you want to hear...fill out our questionnaire! https://forms.gle/pLHjHLtv1SkgHRpF9Shop Bent Beauty 25% off Coupon Code: OHHELLNOwww.shopbentbeauty.com 

Latino USA
LOUD: The Nueva York Connection

Latino USA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 32:39


LOUD is a new podcast from Futuro Studios that tells the story behind Reggaeton. In this episode, El General arrives in Brooklyn in the mid-80s to find a booming dancehall scene underway and links up with Jamaican producers who start recording and promoting Panamanian artists. Around the same time, a Spanish-language hip-hop revolution is taking place as mixtapes fly back and forth from NYC and Puerto Rico, led by legendary rapper Vico C.