Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

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Journalists, policymakers, diplomats and scholars discuss under-reported news, trends and topics from around the world. Named by The Guardian as “One of 27 Podcasts to Make You Smarter” Global Dispatches is podcast about foreign policy and world affairs.

Mark Leon Goldberg


    • Jan 27, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    • 739 EPISODES

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    Latest episodes from Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

    What Was Behind A Coup in Burkina Faso ?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 30:55

    On Monday January 24th, mutineers in Burkika Faso overthrew the democractically elected president, Roch Kabore.   This was the fourth military coup in the region in the past 17th months, including two coups in Mali and a coup in Guinea. To better understand the significance of the coup in Burkina Faso and its broader internaitonal and humanitarian implications, I am joined by three guests. Brice Bado is a political scientist and Vice-President for Academic Affairs, Center for Research and Action for Peace (CERAP)/Jesuit University, Abidjan, Cote D'Ivoire  Andrew Lebovich a policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations. Alexandra Lamarche, the senior advocate for West and Central Africa at Refugees International. 

    The Conflict in Yemen is Escalating Sharply

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 26:46

    After nearly eight years, the conflict in Yemen is getting worse. Scott Paul, the senior manager for humanitarian policy at Oxfam America, explains the significance of a recent attack in Abu Dhabi and the latest bombardment of Yemen's capital before having a broader discussion about the trajectory and impact of this years long crisis.  

    If Russia Invades Ukraine, How Should the United States and Europe Respond?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 39:10

    The likelihood that Russia will invade Ukraine seems to be growing by the day. If Russia indeed attacks Ukraine, how should the United States and Europe respond?    Joining me to take on that question and more are four excellent speakers: Andrew Weiss of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Nina Jankowicz the Woodrow Wilson Center Jim Goldgeier of Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation.   Melinda Haring of The Atlantic Council     Recorded live via Twitter Spaces. Follow me @MarkLGoldberg to be notified of the next live taping.       

    The Death of Press Freedom in Hong Kong

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:03

    Hong Kong used to have one of the most vibrant media ecosystems in all of Asia. But not today.  There is an ongoing crackdown on independent media in Hong Kong. Outlets large and small are being shut down, ostensible for violating newly enacted laws intended to suppress the pro-democracy movement.  On the line with me from Hong Kong to discuss the plight of independent media there is Austin Ramzy of the New York Times.  "For the Love of Hong Kong: A Memoir from My City Under Siege" by Hana Meihan Davis Austin Ramzy's New York Times story

    Bosnia is on the Brink of Political Disintegration

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 31:49

    Bosnia is facing its deepest political crisis since the civil war in the 1990s.   In 1995, the United States helped broker an agreement between the waring parties known as the Dayton Accords. This agreement created a new political order in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It has been an uneasy agreement, certainly tenuous at times, but it has held.      Now, the agreement is unraveling -- and very quickly.   On the line to explain why and how Bosnia is on the verge of potential political disintegration is Jasmin Mujanovic, a political scientist and analyst of southeast European and international affairs.    

    David Miliband on the "Systems Failure" in the World's Crisis Zones

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 17:06

    David Miliband is the president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, one of the larger global humanitarian organizations with relief operations around the world. At the end of 2021 David Miliband, the former Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom, delivered a lecture at the Council on Foreign Relations identifying and defining what he called a "Systems Failure" in global crisis response. This is the topic of much of our conversation today.   

    Kazakhstan Protests: Why They Started And What Comes Next

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 37:55

    For the last week, massive protests have swept across the large Central Asian country of Kazakhstan.  The spark was a decision by the government to increase fuel prices in the country, which is a major fuel producer.  But as my guests today explain, though the fuel price hike was the proximate cause of the protests, they are rooted in deep and widespread disaffection with Kazakhstan's ruling class.  Three Kazakstan political and security experts contribute to this episode:  Dr. Erica Marat, a professor at the National Defense University in Washington, DC.  Dr. Diana T. Kudaibergenova, a professor at the University of Cambridge  Dr. Jen Brick Murtazashvili a professor at the University of Pittsburgh  

    Somalia is in the Midst of a Deepening Political Crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 26:12

    Just before the start of the new year, Somalia's President Mohammad Abdulahi Farmaajo sought to arrest and remove from power Somalia's Prime Minister Mohammad Hussein Roble. This move added a layer of instability on top of an already fragile political and security situation. Somalia is both in midst of elections and fending off an insurgency by al Shabaab, which controls much of the countryside. On the line from Mogadishu is journalist Sakariye Cissman, who explains the current state of Somalia's political, constitutional and electoral crises. 

    The United Nations Year in Review

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 31:24

    As 2021 comes to a close, I thought it may be worthwhile to gather some veteran United Nations watchers to reflect on the key events that shaped the work of the United Nations this year.  I'm joined in this conversation by Margaret Besheer, the UN Correspondent for Voice of America, Anjali Diyal, Assistant Professor of International Politics in the Political Science Department at Fordham University, and Louis Charbonneau, UN Director for Human Rights Watch.  We recorded our conversation live via Twitter Spaces

    The International and Domestic Implications of Turkey's Tanking Lira

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 25:48

    Turkey is in the midst of a currency crisis. The Lira hit a new record low in December, trading about 15.5 lira to the US dollar. This compares to a year ago when the rate was about 7.5 lira to the dollar. In other words, the value of the currency had declined by about 50% in one year.   Meanwhile, inflation is soaring -- at a current rate of more than 20%.   On the line to explain the domestic and international implications of Turkey's tanking Lira is Sibel Oktay, associate professor and chair of the Political Science Department at the University of Illinois, Springfield, and a nonresident Senior Fellow of Public Opinion and Foreign Policy at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.  

    Is the Energy Transition an Opportunity or Risk for Climate Security? | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:21

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network. It is part of a series of episodes examining the relationship between climate and security. Today's episode takes a deep dive into how the transition to low carbon energy economies impacts security. The episode kicks off with introductory remarks by Jesús Quintana-Garcia () Director General, CIAT, Managing Director of the Americas, Alliance Bioversity International and CIAT, CGIAR I then moderate a panel discussion featuring a diverse group of experts on this issue, whom I introduce I the top of the moderated session.  https://climatesecurity.cgiar.org/

    Libya Faces Uncertain Elections and a Major Political Crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:55

    Libya is poised to hold its first presidential elections in the post-Gaddafi era. This was supposed to be the culmination of a year long peace process. However, there is mounting doubt that these elections will be held on time, amid a brewing political crisis that could lead to a return to armed conflict.   Podcast guest Mary Fitzgerald is a longtime Libya analyst and non-resident scholar at the Middle East Institute. She explains why these elections are so fraught with peril and what the international community can do to reduce the prospects of a return to civil war in Libya.   

    Afghanistan is in the Midst of a Humanitarian and Human Rights Catastrophe

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 25:20

    Afghanistan is in a humanitarian and human rights tailspin. Since the fall of the Afghan government to the Taliban in August, the Afghan economy has been in a tailspin. A major liquidity crisis is causing widespread suffering among the Afghan people including severe foos insecurity. Meanwhile, a new report from Human Rights Watch details a spate of summary executions and violence meted out by the newly installed de-facto Taliban government.  Guest: Patricia Gossman, Associate Asia Director for Human Rights Watch.  Become a premium subscriber:  https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches   

    Is Myanmar Sliding Towards a Civil War?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 31:12

    On December 6, Aung San Suu Kyi was handed down a prison sentence by a court loyal to Myanmar's military junta. Until February of this year, Suu Kyi was the de-facto civilian leader of Myanmar. Her party, the National League for Democracy, had just won re-election in a landslide victory -- the results of which were rejected by the military, which mounted a coup.  The military junta were not swayed massive protests throughout the country and began violently suppressing dissent. Now, violence seems to be escalating, prompting the UN's top human rights official to warn that Myanmar may be sliding into a civil war. My guest today, Matthew Smith, is the co-founder and CEO of Fortify Rights, a human rights organization long active in Myanmar. We kick off discussing the circumstances of Aung San Suu Kyi's criminal conviction before having a broader conversation about the escalating crisis in Myanmar.  Our conversation was recorded live on Twitter using the new Twitter Spaces platform. Twitter is partnering with the podcast to produce episodes recorded as Twitter Spaces. If you would like to participate in one of these live recordings, the best thing to do is follow me on Twitter @MarkLGoldberg.    

    Robert Jervis, From 2015

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 51:26

    Robert Jervis passed away on December 9th at the age of 81. He was one of the major figures of International Relations scholarship  -- in the entire history of International Relations as a field of study.   In October 2015, Robert Jervis sat down with me for a long interview about his life and career in which he discussed how his upbringing shaped his worldview from a young age.It was a long and thoughtful conversation about both his personal history and the origins of some of the big ideas that he brought into this world. This episode was behind a paywall of archived content, available at https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches         

    Putting Gender at the Heart of Climate Security | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 61:38

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network. It is part of a series of episodes examining the relationship between climate and security. Today's episode takes a deep dive into how gender impacts and is impacted by climate-security. The episode kicks off with introductory remarks by Nicoline de Haan, director of CGIAR GENDER platform.   I moderate a panel discussion featuring a diverse group of experts on this issue, whom I introduce I the top of the moderated session.   

    Could a New Pandemic Treaty Stop the Next Terrible COVID Variant?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 25:54

    For only the second time in its,  the governing body of the World Health Organization met in a special session. WHO, the World Health Assembly, gathered for a special session. The question at hand: Should member states of the WHO seek to create a new treaty, convention, accord or some sort of international instrument on pandemic preparedness and response?  The meetings occurred just as the new Omicron variant of COVID-19, was popping up in countries around the world, prompting travel bans focused on Southern Africa. On the line to help us understand what happened at this special session of the World Health Assembly and what it means for progress towards an international agreement of some sort on pandemic preparedness and response is Kate Dodson, Vice President for Global Health at the United Nations Foundation.    

    Is Russia About to Invade Ukraine? (Again)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 28:40

    Russian military forces are massing on the border of Ukraine. This has prompted widespread concern that Russia may once again seek to invade Ukraine. On the line with me to discuss this unfolding crisis is John Herbst, Senior Director of the Eurasia Center at the Atlantic Council and Former US Ambassador to Ukraine. We kick off with a conversation about what this military buildup may signal - or not - about Vladimir Putin's intensions on Ukraine before having a discussion about what diplomatic and military options exist to deter Russian aggression.  Links: John Herbst's article on the Atlantic Council's website. Access to a premium subscription and the crypto and global development podcast series.  https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches         

    Can Cryptocurrency Accelerate Global Development?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 40:50

    The most innovative cryptocurrency projects today are being built in the developing world (Sub-Saharan Africa in particular) to address real-world obstacles to economic development and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.  Cryptocurrency and the blockchain technologies they power carry big implications for global development, but are generally off the radar of the global development and foreign policy community. That may soon change as these technologies become more widely adopted.  Guest Garry Golden demystifies the world of crypto and explains the implications of this emerging technology for emerging economies and the business of global development.  This is a free episode of the new Cryptocurrency and Global Development podcast series and newsletter from Global Dispatches, which profiles crypto projects built to address common global development challenges.  Future episodes in this series will be exclusively available to paying subscribers to the Cryptocurrency and Global Development podcast series and newsletter.  Subscribe --> https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches

    Senator Chris Coons Discusses The Ethiopia Crisis and U.S. Policy Towards the Region | Live from the Halifax International Security Forum

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 12:47

    U.S. Senator Chris Coons is one of Congress's leading voices shaping U.S. policy on Africa. For many years he was the top Democrat in the Senate Sub-committee on Africa and earlier this year, President Biden tapped Senator Coons to be his special envoy to Ethiopia. (There is now a full time envoy for the Horn of Africa, Jeffrey Feltman) I caught up with Senator Coons in person at the Halifax International Security Forum, not long after governments around the world advised their citizens to leave Addis Ababa, ahead of a possible battle for control of Ethiopia's capital. Along with fellow journalist Robbie Gramer of Foreign Policy, we asked Senator Coons to explain U.S. policy towards the Ethiopian conflict, including whether or not the time was right to impose sanctions on government and rebel leaders.   

    Can the Iran Nuclear Deal Be Saved?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 27:12

    When Joe Biden came to office the Iran Nuclear Dead was on life support. Known formally as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, the Obama-era deal lifted US and UN  sanctions on Iran in return for Iran placing verifiable limits on its nuclear program. The deal was rejected by the Trump administration which re-imposed sanctions; and Iran has responded in kind by re-starting certain aspects of its nuclear program. Here to explain where things stand with nuclear diplomacy between the United States and Iran is Kelsey Davenport, director for non-proliferation policy policy at the Arms Control Association. We spoke ahead of planned talks in Vienna between the United States and Iran, scheduled for the end of November and early December.

    The Halifax International Security Forum: What You Need To Know

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 19:32

    The Halifax International Security Forum is a major annual meeting dedicated to fostering closer ties among the world's democracies. The Forum is organized by HFX, an independent public policy organization based in Washington DC dedicated to strengthening strategic cooperation among democratic nations. And on the line today, is Peter van Praig Founding President of Halifax International Security Forum, HFX to preview this year's forum, which runs from November 19 through 21st in Halifax, Nova Scotia. We kick off discussing this history of the Halifax International Security Forum and why it was created 13 years ago before having a longer discussion about the issues, topics and provocations expected at this year's meeting.   

    Was COP 26 a Success? Key Outcomes From the UN Climate Conference, Explained

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:38

    The major United Nations climate conference, known as COP26, went into overtime in Glasgow, Scotland. But on Saturday, November 13th agreement was reached on the text of an outcome document.   Pete Ogden, Vice President for Energy, Climate and the Environment at the United Nations Foundation explains the key outcomes from COP26, what was accomplished -- and what was left on the table -- at this major UN climate conference.   

    How Can Climate Science Support Peace in the Middle East and North Africa? | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 65:28

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience and produced in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network. It is part of a series of episodes that examine the relationship between climate and security. I moderate a panel discussion in which experts discuss how climate science can encourage and support peace in the Middle east and north Africa. The episode kicks off with some introductory remarks by Aly Abousabaa Regional Director for Central and West Asia and North Africa CGIAR, and the Director- General of the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas. I then introduce the panel and moderate a lively discussion about climate security and peace in the Middle East and North Africa.  To view other episodes in this series, please visit climatesecurity.cgiar.org

    Why Is There Still a UN Peacekeeping Mission in Cyprus, 50 Years Later?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 19:51

    The UN Peacekeeping Mission in Cyprus  is one of the world's oldest peacekeeping missions. Yet to this day, it is still serving a valuable role in preventing conflict between Greece and Turkey -- two NATO allies.  On the line to explain why this peacekeeping force is still needed after all these years is Peter Yeo, President of the Better World Campaign and Senior Vice President of the United Nations Foundation.  We kick off discussing the history of the mission before having a broader conversation of its still relevant work after all these years.      

    Madagascar is Experiencing The World's First Climate Change Induced Famine

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 22:28

    In Madagascar thousands of people in the southern part of the country are experiencing famine-like conditions. Over a million more are considered to be on the brink of famine. The crisis in Southern Madagascar is a direct consequence of climate change. This region has experienced successive droughts -- the rainy season is shorter, the lean season is longer and farmers are unable to plant their crops. This is widely considered to be the world's first climate-change induced famine.  On the line with me to explain the link between climate change and the famine like conditions in Southern Madagascar is Mandipa Manchacha, human rights researcher at Amnesty international's souther Africa regional office. We kick off with a discussion about Madagascar more broadly and the impact of climate change on the island before having a broader conversation about the brutal intersection of climate change and famine in Southern Madagascar.  

    What to Expect at COP26: The Biggest UN Climate Conference Since The Paris Agreement

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 25:38

    COP 26 is the most important international climate conference since the Paris Agreement of 2015.   On the line with me to offer a preview of what to expect from this major UN climate meeting is Pete Odgen, Vice President for Energy, Climate, and the Environment at the United Nations Foundation. He is a veteran of many previous COPs and in our conversation he discusses the key issues up for negotiation in Glasgow and the broader geopolitics of climate change diplomacy. This includes a deep dive into how both China and the United States are approaching COP26 and thorny questions around climate finance. 

    How Agriculture, Land Use and Food Systems Can Help the Paris Agreement's Climate Goals | Taped Live

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 26:31

    Today's episode was recorded live in partnership with the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) ahead of COP26 in Glasgow.   I moderate a panel discussion that takes a deep dive into the Nationally Determined Contributions as they relate to food and agriculture. The Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs, are the backbone of the Paris Climate Agreement. They are what each country brings to the table in terms of their own contribution to climate action. Collectively, it was the goal of the Paris Agreement that the NDCs would add up to put the world on track to limit global warming to under 2 degrees celsius.   We are not there -- yet.    But in today's panel discussion a diverse group of experts helps to explain what more can be done in agriculture, land use and food systems to drive ambition in climate change and give a needed boost to the NDCs so they can achieve the Paris goals.      

    A Sudden Coup in Sudan -- What Comes Next?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 22:45

    Since the overthrow of the genocidal dictator Omar al Bashir in 2019, Sudan has been lead by a transitional governing council made up of civilians and the military. On Monday October 25th 2021 the Sudanese military purged the civilians from their leadership positions, including arresting the prime minister. On the line with me to discuss this coup and what comes next is Cameron Hudson. He is a non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and former chief of staff in the office of the special advisor to Sudan at the US State Department. We taped our conversation live using Twitter Spaces. This is a new platform that Twitter has rolled out allowing audio conversations to take place on its platform. Follow me on Twitter to join the next live taping 

    Why Did Saudi Arabia Purchase Newcastle United -- Is "Sportswashing" the Next Frontier of Public Diplomacy?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:06

    In early October, a group lead by the investment arm of the sovereign wealth fund of Saudi Arabia purchased Newcastle United, the English Premier League soccer team.  The purchase caused a great deal of speculation that it was motivated by a desire to burnish the image of the Saudi ruler.  What is not speculation is that overnight Newcastle United  became the richest soccer team in the world. On the line with me to explain the significance of Saudi Arabia's purchase of Newscastle United is Alex Ward, national security reporter at Politico and anchor of the National Security Daily newsletter.

    How Can We Achieve Policy Coherence for Climate Security | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:42

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience and produced in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network. It is part of a series of episodes that examine the relationship between climate and security. I moderate a panel discussion in which experts discuss and explain the need for a coherent approach to climate security across multiple policy sectors. Introductory remarks are given by Rob Vos Director of Markets, Trade and Institutions Division, CGIAR who frames the conversation before I moderate the panel. To view other episodes in this series and to participate in a future live taping of the podcast please visit climatesecurity.cgiar.org.

    Humanity Gets A Malaria Vaccine!

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 22:05

    On October 6, the World Health Organization endorsed a malaria vaccine for the first time ever. After years of testing, the vaccine was shown to be safe and effective at preventing the deaths of thousands of children in Sub-Saharan Africa. The WHO's backing of this Malaria vaccine is both a breakthrough in scientific research and an important moment in human history. Margaret McDonnell, executive director of Nothing But Nets at the UN Foundation, explains why this new malaria vaccine is so promising    

    The Civil War in Ethiopia is Getting Worse

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:15

    The government of Ethiopia has expelled seven top UN officials from the country. This move comes as the federal government launches a new military offensive against the TPLF -- the Tigray People's Liberation Front.  William Davison of the International Crisis Group explains how the civil war in Ethiopia has evolved in recent weeks and describes the ongoing calamitous humanitarian impact of the conflict in Ethiopia.   

    How China Makes Foreign Policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:19

    The process by which China makes its foreign policy is often considered to be something of a black box, or at least very difficult for outsiders to discern.  Suiseng Zhao is a professor of International Studies and director of the Center for China-US Cooperation at the University of Denver. He has written extensively about the tapestry of Chinese institutions that inform foreign policy decision making, and in this conversation explains the key players that shape how Chinese foreign policy is made.   

    Migration, Climate and Security in Latin America | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 61:40

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience and produced in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network. It is part of a series of episodes examining the relationship between climate variability and security. In today's episode, I moderate a panel discussion in which experts discuss the relationship between climate variability, migration and security in Latin America.  To participate in future live tapings of the podcast as part of this series, please visit ClimateSecurity.cgiar.org  

    Will China's Evergrande Crisis Spark a Global Economic Contagion?

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 19:07

    The massive Chinese real estate company Evergrande is unable to pay its debts. This has sparked some rare protests in China and is spooking international financial markets. A key question now is whether or not the government of China will let Evergrande collapse -- and whether or not the collapse of this real estate giant will have knock on effects throughout the region and the world? Richard Vague is Secretary of Banking and Securities for Pennsylvania and an author who has written extensively about global financial crises. He explains how debt has fueled economic growth in China and discusses the potential international implications of Evergrande's insolvency. We kick off discussing how Evergrande got buried in such deep debt and what that says about the role of debt in fueling China's massive economic growth over the past decade. He then explains some policy options available to the Chinese government and some of the potential international implications of Evergrande's insolvency. Richard Vague's article in Democracy    

    A Coup in Guinea is the Latest of a Trend in West Africa

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 26:46

    On September 5th, a special forces unit of the Guinean military attacked the presidential palace in the capital Conakry, and deposed President Alpha Conde. This was the third coup in West Africa in the last 12 months. David Zounmenou, senior research consultant at the Institute for Security Studies, explains the circumstances that lead to this coup. He also explains how events in Guinea fit into a broader regional trends in which once duly elected presidents become authoritarian and are deposed in a coup.    

    How to Respond to Climate Security Crises in Africa? | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 65:47

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience and produced in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network.  The podcast has partnered with CGIAR for a special series that examines the relationship between climate and security and in today's episode we explore how Africa is experiencing and approaching the climate security nexus -- in particular how institutions in Africa and beyond are responding to climate security crises.  The episode kicks off with some introductory remarks from Harold Roy Mcauley, Regional Director, East and Southern Africa, One CGIAR, and Director General of the Africa Rice Center (AfricaRice). I then moderate a panel discussion. To participate in a future live taping as part of this series, please visit climatesecurity.cgiar.org  

    Live From UNGA -- Day 5 | ICRC Head Peter Maurer | UN Foundation President Elizabeth Cousens | Big Meeting on Energy Transitions

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 31:28

    The United Nations General Assembly is always one of the most important weeks of the diplomatic calendar. Each day this week we are bringing you live coverage featuring the latest news and analysis from UNGA, in partnership with the UN Foundation.  Today's episode was recorded Friday afternoon, September 24. Peter Maurer, President of the International Federation for the Red Cross, discusses ongoing diplomacy on the crisis in Afghanistan.  Elizabeth Cousens, President and CEO of the United Nations Foundation, discusses her key takeaways from this week in diplomacy. Kanika Chawla, Programme Manager with UN Energy, Sustainable Energy For All explains the significant outcomes from a major meeting on Energy and Energy transitions called the High Level Dialogue on Energy.  Link mentioned: https://ourfutureagenda.org/report/

    Live From UNGA -- Day 4 | Food Systems Summit | Security Council Meets on Climate-Security

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 28:34

    The United Nations General Assembly is always one of the most important weeks of the diplomatic calendar. Each day this week we are bringing you live coverage featuring the latest news and analysis from UNGA, in partnership with the UN Foundation.  Today's episode was recorded Thursday afternoon, September 23. Dr. Jemimah Njuki, Director for Africa at the International Food Policy Research Institute, discusses the significant outcomes from a much-anticipated Food Systems Summit. Ireland's Ambassador to the United Nations Geraldine Byrne Geraldine Byrne Nason explains why Ireland chaired a unique meeting on climate security at the Security Council and Richard Gowan of the International Crisis Group discusses the key outcomes from this meeting. 

    Live From UNGA -- Day 3 | Biden's Big COVID Summit | Plus, Panama's Foreign Minister Erika Mouynes

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 26:37

    The United Nations General Assembly is always one of the most important weeks of the diplomatic calendar. Each day this week we are bringing you live coverage featuring the latest news and analysis from of UNGA, in partnership with the UN Foundation.  Today's episode was recorded Wednesday afternoon, September 22. Kate Dodson, vice president for global health at the United Nations Foundation explains the big outcomes from a major COVID Summit convened by the White House. Also, Panama Foreign Minister Erika Mouynes gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the work of a senior diplomat during UNGA. 

    Live From UNGA -- Day 2 | Joe Biden's UN Speech | Antonio Guterres' Big Warning to the World | And More!

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 28:47

    The United Nations General Assembly is always one of the most important weeks of the diplomatic calendar. Each day this week we are bringing you live coverage featuring the latest news and analysis from of UNGA, in partnership with the UN Foundation.  Today's episode was recorded Tuesday afternoon, September 21. Richard Gowan of the International Crisis Group and Anjali Dayal of Fordham University discuss the key takeaways from speeches by world leaders, including Joe Biden and Antonio Guterres. We also discuss some important stories to follow from the United Nations during the week ahead. 

    Live From UNGA -- Day 1 | Deputy Secretary General Amina J. Mohammed | Climate Diplomacy Expert Yamide Dagnet

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 24:54

    The annual opening of the UN General Assembly is always one the most important weeks on the diplomatic calendar. The podcast has partnered with the United Nations Foundation to provide listeners with daily news and expert analysis about what is driving the diplomatic agenda at the United Nations during this key week. Today, we speak with UN Deputy Secretary General Amina J. Mohammed who articulates her priorities for #UNGA76. We then turn to climate diplomacy expert Yamide Dagnet of the World Resources Institute who explains the significant moments in climate diplomacy this week. 

    How Transforming Food Systems Can Inspire Action on Climate Change | Taped Live in Partnership with CGIAR

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 90:35

    This episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience in advance of a key meeting at the United Nations known as the Food Systems Summit.  This episode is produced in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network and features a panel discussion examining the links between food systems and action needed to confront climate change.   

    Angela Merkel's Legacy in International Affairs and Foreign Policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 24:40

    Angela Merkel steps down this month after having served as chancellor of Germany since 2005. Her time in office coincided with a number of major world events, including the global financial crisis; the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis; Brexit, Crimea, Trump, COVID, and much more.  Throughout it all, Angela Merkel has been the de-facto leader of the European Union. On the line with me to discuss some of the significant moments in Angela Merkel's 16 years as Chancellor of Germany is Constanze Stelzenmüller, the Fritz Stern Chair on Germany and Transatlantic Relations at the Brookings Institution. 

    What Happened at the United Nations on September 11, 2001

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 14:03

    Stephane Dujarric is a long serving United Nations spokesperson who on September 11th, 2001 was at his office at the United Nations when planes struck the World Trade Center. I've known Stephane Dujarric a long time and knew that he was in the building that day, but I'd not spoken about it with him until now.  He offers a grounds-eye view of what it was like to be at the United Nations that day, and as a long serving senior UN spokesperson he is able to give some perspective on how those attacks forever changed the United Nations.   

    What's Next For the United Nations in Afghanistan? | Mark Malloch Brown

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 29:20

    As Afghanistan enters a perilous and uncertain future, the United Nations has promised to "stay and deliver." The country's humanitarian emergency is getting more acute by the day, taxing UN agencies like the World Food Program. Meanwhile, the Security Council's role in managing the political transition in Afghanistan is unclear, and many of the Taliban's senior leadership are still under UN sanction On the line with me to discuss the UN's role in the new Afghanistan is Mark Malloch Brown. He is the President of the Open Society Foundations and had long career at the United Nations, including as administrator of the UN Development Program and as the Deputy UN Secretary General.  

    What Comes Next for Humanitarian and Development NGOs in Afghanistan?

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 28:40

    Zuhra Bahman was out of the country on a business meeting when the Taliban took control of Kabul. She is the Afghanistan country director for Search for Common Ground, an NGO that engages in community based peace-building work. I was eager to speak with her because it is very unclear to me and to the entire international community the extent to which NGOs will be able to operate under Taliban rule.  As Zurha Bahman explains, she is eager to get back to her work and life in Afghanistan -- but only if certain conditions are met. To that end, she is urging engagement with the Taliban to enable development and humanitarian NGOs to work in the country on behalf of the Afghan people. 

    How We Use Our Lands and Forests Can Fight Climate Change and Support Security (Or Not) | Climate Security Series

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 58:56

    Today's episode was recorded live in front of a virtual audience in partnership with CGIAR, the world's largest agricultural innovation network, as part of a series of episodes examining the links between climate variability and security.  The episode features a discussion amongst a panel of experts who explore the relationship between security and land use, including forestry. Visit https://climatesecurity.cgiar.org/ to register for the next live event in this series.     

    "They Are Missing Our Side Of The Story" -- An Afghan Human Rights Activist Speaks Out

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 24:52

    Zubaida Akbar is an Afghan human rights activist living in Washington, D.C. She is desperately trying to get vulnerable people out of the country, including a group of female journalists who are almost certainly marked for execution by the Taliban.  We kick off discussing what she is hearing from her friends in Kabul as people attempt to flee the Taliban's retribution.  We then have a very heavy conversation about the tragedy unfolding in Afghanistan.         

    Better Know The Climate Investment Funds

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 32:57

    Back in 2008, in the midst of both a global economic catastrophe and stalled progress on climate diplomacy, a unique multilateral platform called the Climate Investment Funds was born.   The G-8 created the Climate Investment Funds to support developing economies as they shifted to a less carbon intensive future. The Climate Investment Funds supports the development of clean energy markets and invests in projects and programs the enable clean energy transitions and adaptation to climate change. The CEO of the Climate Investment Funds, Mafalda Duarte is on the podcast today to explain the significance of this multilateral platform to the common global effort to confront climate change.

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