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Best podcasts about Nobel

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Latest podcast episodes about Nobel

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas
Inside the Push to Remake “the Fed”

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:54


The Federal Reserve, better known as “the Fed,” has been in the spotlight quite a bit in recent weeks, following an apparent insider trading scandal embroiling several high-level officials at America's central bank. And in the latest shoe to drop, disclosure documents made public in recent weeks reveal that the scandal of stock trading during the pandemic extends all the way up to the chair of the Fed himself—Jerome “Jay” Powell.  With Chairman Powell's term ending in January 2022, a growing chorus of progressives, climate activists, advocates for racial justice, and economic heavyweights from Nobel Prize–winning economist Joseph Stiglitz to Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren are calling on President Biden not to renominate Powell and instead to use what could be as many as four open seats on the Fed's all-white, seven-member governing board to reshape the agency into an institutional force for racial, gender, climate, and economic progress—and bring some long-overdue racial and gender diversity to a critical institution that's been run nearly exclusively by white men. “Is the Biden administration going to fulfill what is at the heart of its agenda? Then it should not be Powell,” said Stiglitz in an interview with Reuters last month. The Biden White House has not yet announced what they plan to do when Powell's term ends, though a decision is expected any day now.  With an historic debate brewing over what to do with the Federal Reserve, we at Off-Kilter thought it would be useful to pull together something of an explainer on the nation's central bank, how it operates, and why it's so important to economic and antipoverty policy—and to go inside the push to remake the Fed in the wake of the wave of recent scandals. So Rebecca sat down with Saqib Bhatti, co-executive director of the Action Center on Race and the Economy, better known as ACRE—and one of the groups leading the charge—to break it all down.  For lots more on this: Read more from Saqib and his ACRE colleagues Brittany Alston and Vasudha Desikan in “President Biden Must Appoint a New Fed Chair Who Is Serious About Racial Equity.” Read Vasudha Desikan and Liberation in a Generation's Solana Rice in Ms. Magazine: “We Need More Women in Leadership at the Fed: Personnel Is Policy.” Here's more on the pandemic stock trading scandals, from The American Prospect's Bob Kuttner. Here's why Nobel economist Joseph Stiglitz says Powell should go.  And here's Senator Elizabeth Warren's speech making the case for new leadership at the Fed. 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.22.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


"The war for our minds (con'd)." The colonization of independent media.    Patrick Lawrence THE SCRUM  Oct 21       21 OCTOBER—Watch and listen, O you with open eyes and ears. The national security state's long, very long campaign to control our press and broadcasters has taken a new turn of late. If independent media are what keep alive hope for a vigorous, authentic Fourth Estate, as argued severally in this space, independent media are now subject to an insidious, profoundly anti-democratic effort to undermine them. The Independent Consortium of Investigative Journalists, Frances Haugen, Maria Ressa: Let us consider this institution and these people. They are all frauds, if by fraudulent we mean they are not what and who they tell us they are and their claim to independence from power is bogus. The Deep State—and at this point it is mere pretense to object to this term—long ago made it a priority to turn the mainstream press and broadcasters to its purposes—to make a free press unfree. This has gone on since the earliest Cold War decades and is well and responsibly documented. (Alas, if more Americans read the many excellent books and exposés on this topic, assertions such as the one just made would not arrive as in the slightest outré.)    But several new realities are now very evident. Chief among them, the Deep State's colonization of corporate media is now more or less complete. CNN, filling its airtime with spooks, generals, and a variety of official and formerly official liars, can be counted a total takeover. The New York Times is prima facie government-supervised, as it confesses in its pages from time to time. The Washington Post, owned by a man with multimillion-dollar CIA contracts, has turned itself into a comic book. For reasons I will never entirely fathom, corporate media have not merely surrendered their legitimacy, such as it may have been: They have actively, enthusiastically abandoned what frayed claim they may have had to credibility. The national-security state incorporates mainstream media into its apparatus, and then people stop believing mainstream media: The thrill is gone, let's say.  In consequence of these two factors, independent media have begun to rise as … independent media. They accumulate audiences. A little at a time, they acquire the very habits of professionalism the mainstream press and broadcasters have let decay. Gradually, they assume the credibility the mainstream has lost. The media ecosystem—horrible phrase but there it is—begins to take on a new shape.  Certain phenomena engendered by independent media prove popular. There are whistleblowers. People inside Deep State institutions start to leak, and they turn to independent media, most famously WikiLeaks, to get information out. While the Deep State's clerks in mainstream media keep their heads down and their mouths shut as they cash their checks, independent media take principled stands in favor of free expression, and people admire these stands. They are, after all admirable. Those populating the national-security state's sprawling apparatus are not stupid. They can figure out the logical response to these developments as well as anyone else. The new imperative is now before us: It is to colonize independent media just as they had the mainstream in previous decades. There are some hopelessly clumsy cases. I urge all colleagues to stop bothering with The Young Turks in any capacity. Those running it, creatures of those who generously fund it, are simply infra-dig. As Matt Taibbi pointed out over the weekend in a piece wonderfully headed, “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Deep State,” they've now got some clod named Ben Carollo proclaiming the CIA as an accountable force for good, savior of democracy—this in a video appearing under the rubric “Rebel HQ.” As an East European émigré friend used to say, “Gimme break.” Democracy Now! is a subtler instance of colonization. The once-admirable Amy Goodman drank the Russiagate Kool-Aid, which I counted the first indication of covert intervention of one or another kind. Then she caved to the orthodoxy on the chemical-weapons scam during the Syrian crisis, and lately—you have to watch to believe—Goodman has begun broadcasting CNN “investigative” reports with unalloyed approval. The debate in this household is whether Ms. Goodman had a long lunch in Langley or her donors started threatening to delay their checks. I have no evidence of either but tend to the latter explanation. The three recent phenomena suggested at the top of this piece are indications of the Deep State's latest tactics in its assault on independent media and the culture that arises among them. It behooves us to understand this.  Two weeks ago, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published “The Pandora Papers,” a “leak” of 12 million electronic documents revealing the tax-fiddling, money-hiding doings of 300–odd political figures around the world. “The Pandora Papers” followed publication of “The Panama Papers” in 2016 and “The Paradise Papers” a year later. There are many useful revelations in these various releases, but we ought not be fooled as to the nature of the project. Where did the ICIJ get the documents in “The Pandora Papers,” and how?  Are they complete? Were names redacted out? They have been verified? Explaining provenance, authenticity, and so forth is essential to any investigative undertaking, but ICIJ has nothing to say on this point. Why, of all the people “The Pandora Papers” exposes, is there not one American on its list? As Moon of Alabama notes in an analysis of this release, it amounts to a list of “people the U.S. doesn't like.” The ICIJ vigorously insists on its independence. But on close inspection this turns out not to be so by any serious understanding of the term. Among its donors are the Ford Foundation, whose longtime ties to the CIA are well-documented, and the Open Societies Foundation, the (in)famous George Soros operation dedicated to cultivating coups in nations that fall outside the fence posts of neoliberalism.  The group was founded in 1997 as a project of the Center for Public Integrity, another institution dedicated to “inspiring change using investigative reporting,” as the center describes itself. Among its sponsors are Ford, once again, and the Democracy Fund, which was founded by Pierre Omidyar, bankroller of The Intercept (another compromised “independent” medium). Omidyar is, like Soros, a sponsor of subversion ops in other countries masquerading as “civil society” projects. ICIJ's other sponsors (and for that matter the Democracy Fund's) are comprised of the sorts of foundations that support NPR, PBS, and other such media. Let us be crystal clear on this point. Anyone who assumes media institutions taking money from such sponsors are authentically independent does not understand philanthropy as a well-established, highly effective conduit through which orthodoxies are enforced and public discourse circumscribed.  What are we looking at here? Not what we are supposed to think we are looking at, certainly. I will return to this question. There is the case of Maria Ressa, which I considered briefly in a previous commentary. Ressa is the supposedly courageous, speak-truth-to-power co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a Filipina journalist who co-founded The Rappler, a web publication in Manila. The Nobel committee cited Ressa for her “fight for freedom of expression.” Who is Maria Ressa, then, and what is The Rappler? I grow weary of writing this sentence: She and her publication are not what we are supposed to think they are. Ressa and The Rappler, each insisting on independence just as the ICIJ does, are straight-out lying on this point. The Rappler recently received a grant of $180,000 from the National Endowment for Democracy, a CIA front—this according to an NED financial report issued earlier this year. None other than Pierre Omidyar and a group called North Base Media own nonvoting shares in the publication. Among North Base's partners is the Media Development Investment Fund, which was founded by George Soros to do what George Soros likes to do in other countries. Does a picture begin to emerge? Read the names together and one will. You have to figure they all party together. Nobel in hand, Maria Ressa has already declared that Julian Assange is not a journalist and that independent media need new regulations, as in censorship. Henry Kissinger got a Nobel as a peacemaker: Ressa gets one as a defender of free expression. It's a fit. This brings us to the case of Frances Haugen, the former Facebook exec who recently appeared before Congress waving lots of documents she seems to have secreted (supposedly) out of Facebook's offices to argue for—what else at this point?—increased government regulation of social media, as in censorship. Frances Haugen, you see, is a courageous, speak-truth-to-power whistleblower. Never mind that her appearance on Capitol Hill was carefully choreographed by Democratic Party operatives whose party simply cannot wait to censor our First Amendment rights out of existence.  It is hard to say who is more courageous, I find—the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, or Frances Haugen. Where would we be without them? The culture of independent media as it has germinated and developed over the past decade or so gave us WikiLeaks, and its effectiveness cannot be overstated. It gave us all manner of gutsy journalists standing for the principles of a genuinely free press, and people listened. It gave us whistleblowers who are admired even as the Deep State condemns them.     And now the national-security state gives us none other than a secret-disclosing crew of mainstream hacks, a faux-independent journalist elevated to the highest honors, and a whistleblower who was handed her whistle and taught how to toot it—three crowd-pleasers, three simulacra. These are three frauds. They are to independent journalism what McDonald's is to food.  There is only one defense against this assault on truth and integrity, but it is a very good one. It is awareness. CNN, Democracy Now!, the ICIJ, Maria Ressa, Frances Haugen—none of these and many other media and people are properly labeled. But the labels can be written with modest efforts. Awareness and scrutiny, watching and listening, will prove enough.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
Abdulrazak Gurnah the winner of The Nobel Prize for Literature

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 14:43


Guest: Abdulrazak Gurnah | Author and Nobel Prize Literature Prize 2021 John is joined by the winner of the 2021 Nobel laureate for literature.  Abdulrazak Gurnah is a Tanzanian-born novelist and academic who is based in the United Kingdom.   The Swedish Academy shared the news on October 7th. They praised “his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugees in the gulf between cultures and continents.”  Gurnah has published 10 novels and is the 7th African to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, following Albert Camus (1957), Wole Soyinka (1986), Naguib Mahfouz (1988), Nardine Gordimer (1991), J.M Coetzee (2003), and Doris Lessing (2007).  The win is landmark. Gurnah is only the fourth black person to win the prize in its 120-year history.  Gurnah grew up on Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania, in the 1950s and 60s.  Several of his novels deal with leaving, dislocation and exile. In Admiring Silence, the narrator, though he builds a life and family for himself in England, finds himself neither English nor any longer Zanzibari. Prominent themes of his literature include exile, displacement and belonging, alongside colonialism and broken promises on the part of the state.  Most of his novels focus on telling stories about social and humanitarian issues, especially about war or crisis affected individuals living in the developing world that may not have the capability of telling their own stories to the world - or documenting their experiences.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Thursday, October 21, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:00


Today is the birthday of the inventor of dynamite, Alfred Nobel (1833). Nobel, to prevent his legacy from being one of death, established the Nobel Prizes to celebrate humankind's greatest achievements.

Españolistos | Learn Spanish With Spanish Conversations!
Episodio 253 - Marie Curie: La Primera Mujer en Ganar un Premio Nobel

Españolistos | Learn Spanish With Spanish Conversations!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:00


¿Sabías quién es Marie Curie? Fue una científica polaca nacionalizada francesa. Fue pionera en el campo de la radiactividad y fue la primera persona en recibir dos premios Nobel en distintas especialidades: Física y Química. También fue la primera mujer en ocupar el puesto de profesora en la Universidad de París. Hoy aprenderás sobre éstos y muchos otros datos interesantes sobre la vida de esta mujer, quien impactó la ciencia y dejó un gran legado. Get the entire transcript here: https://www.espanolistos.com/marie-curie ¿Quieres mejorar tu español con estructura y rutina? ¡Entonces únete a nuestra membresía! Regístrate aquí: https://spanishlandschool.com/member Tendrás clases en vivo cada semana, acceso a 24 cursos de gramática clasificados por niveles, un podcast privado, ejercicios de escritura, videos, diálogos, canciones, respuestas a tus preguntas y mucho más.

Frango Fino
FRANGO FINO 347 | PRÊMIO IGNOBEL 2021

Frango Fino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:43


No Frango Fino 347, Doug Bezerra, Doug Lira e Rafa Louzada conhecem os ganhadores do Prêmio Nobel 2021 e também os vencedores do Prêmio IgNobel, que homenageia pesquisas inusitadas. Arte do episódio por Italo Silva (@italosilvb). Apoie o Frango!! PIX:frangofinopodcast@gmail.com Padrim:https://www.padrim.com.br/frangofino PicPay:https://picpay.me/frangofino Patreon:https://patreon.com/frangofino  Comentado durante o programa: Entrevista Doug Bezerra no podcast Abrindo Cabeças ASSINE O AMAZON PRIME E AJUDE O FRANGO! Não perca mais as lives das gravações! Siga o Bezerra em twitch.tv/dougbezerra Assine nosso canal no YouTube Instagram dos Frangos: Doug Bezerra (@dougbezerra), Doug Lira (@liradoug) e Rafa Louzada (@rafaelouzada) Grupo do Frango no Facebook Frango Fino no Spotify Playlist do Frango Fino no Spotify Frango Fino no Deezer Para falar com a gente: WhatsApp: 11 91031 0573 E-mail: frangofinopodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @frangofinopodcast Twitter: @frangofino Padrim: https://www.padrim.com.br/frangofino

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 233】#625 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【諾貝爾經濟學獎 > 勞動力經濟學;喀什米爾 > 1947年至今的爛攤子;中國山西省洪災;法國 LVMH 集團發大財】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:38


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Duprat Cast
5 sinais de pessoas inseguras e como lidar? Prêmio Nobel de medicina 2021 e suas possíveis aplicações práticas. [Saudação da Semana] #181

Duprat Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 11:54


Pronto para mais algumas gotas de conceitos para nosso cérebro? Neste audio pocket abordaremos: Como lidar com pessoas inseguras? 5 sinais de insegurança e como reconhece los? Premio nobel de medicina e fisiologia 2021 e suas implicações práticas Porquê a Vacina de RNA não ganhou o prêmio? Boa semana a todos!

Why This Universe?
38 - The Nobel Prize's Greatest Misses

Why This Universe?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:45


In honor of Nobel prize season, we remember some people whose important work in the past has been overlooked by the Nobel committee.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/whythisuniverse

444
Három bugyibuci maszk és gumi néküli Blitzkriegja

444

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 66:57


Kedves bugyibuci hallgatóink! Kampul a durvány. Hazaárulók haza! Lefelé megy a rendszer? Poltot miért betonozzák? Traktorbelsőn a Nobel-díjig. Valamint továbbá satöbbi. A távolból Bede, közelebbről Uj, Winkler.    Az alábbiak szerint: 00.25: Jött huszonöt meztelen férfi maszk és gumi nélkül. 02.00: Alkalmi resort-árfolyamok Koh Lantán. 07.00: Prachuap Kiri Khanban is sokat fejlődhetett az infrastruktúra. 08.10: Kertek alatt, Latin-Amerikába. 09.20: Castro kienged 125 ezer kubait traktorbelsőn Floridába: Mariel boatlift, 1980. 12.00: Igen, a kubai tutajbalhé részátfedésben ment az iráni túszdrámával. 12.25: Hősünk, a rockandroll-KDNP-s, Hölvényi György 16.00: Tisztelt Bugyibuci Márki-Zay Péter! 17.30: Hogy lesz jó Viktornak, hogy elk*rták, és nem Márki-Zayról csináltak lejárató mozifilmet? 21.00: Belekeveredünk a valamerre lejtő pálya-metaforába, aztán jön UP szokásos pesszimista ajvékolása. 21.15: Polt Pétert miért betonozzák? 23.20: Gyurcsányt szembe merem küldeni Orbánnal, Dobrev Klárát nem. 25.00: Azért egy pillantást vessünk a kiállásszámlálóra is! 32.00: Bronzkori, vaskori, és 18. századi fosófantomok a bányában. 32.40: Értelmiségi ustawka az Újlipótvárosban: kutyások a gyerekesek ellen. 34.00: Gyurcsány sms-eit betámasztod a silóba Simicska atombombája mellé. 38.00: Van-e értelme a sportwashingnak, vagy csak egy hobbi? 41.20: Anna Dello Russo Londonban a Carpathian Brigade-del pózol, feketében. 44.00: Akkor mé' van náluk gumibot? 45.00: Már megint a TikTok titka. 46.30: Óriási színvonalemelkedés a baromságok készítésében. 48.00: Valakinek el kell vinni a balhét, és megnézni a Gyurcsány-filmet, de szidjuk inkább a Squid Game-et, meg az Élősködőket. 53.00: Hú, de rossz a versengés! 54.40: Mit is kutatott ki a friss Nobel-díjas a kubai partraszállók munkaerőpiaci hatásaival kapcsolatban? 59.18: Daniel Craig 2008-ban, a Quantum és a Cowboyok és űrlények között oroszos kiejtéssel alakít angolul belorusz zsidót. 59.50: De vajon mi az a Blitzkrieg, logisztikailag?

Eigenbros
Eigenbros ep 136 - Physics Nobel Prize 2021

Eigenbros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 65:06


Juan & Terence discuss the winners of the 2021 Nobel prize in physics and why they were the winners. Complex systems, Replica symmetry breaking, and spin glasses are discussed during the episode.

CNN MUNDO
Paulo Guedes defende estabilidade do Brasil em Washington, a crise energética chinesa e mais do mundo

CNN MUNDO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 34:25


CNN Mundo #38 - 2ª temporada: Neste episódio do CNN Mundo, Lourival Sant'Anna analisa os principais momentos da passagem do ministro da Economia, Paulo Guedes, pelos Estados Unidos nesta semana durante a reunião anual do FMI (Fundo Monetário Internacional). O episódio também trata da crise energética na China, que pode ter impacto na oferta de alimentos no Brasil em 2022. A pesquisadora Tatiana Prazeres, da Universidade de Negócios Internacionais e Economia de Pequim, faz uma análise do tema e das medidas que estão sendo adotadas pelo governo chinês. Você ouve ainda um depoimento da economista Monica de Bolle, do Instituto Peterson, em Washington, a respeito dos ganhadores do Nobel de Economia.  Com apresentação de Lourival Sant'Anna, este podcast é produzido pela Maremoto para a CNN Brasil. Você também pode ouvir o CNN Mundo no site da CNN Brasil. E aproveite para conhecer os nossos outros programas em áudio. Acesse: cnnbrasil.com.br/podcasts.

Entendez-vous l'éco ?
Prix Nobel d'économie : le sacre de l'expérimentation ?

Entendez-vous l'éco ?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 58:50


durée : 00:58:50 - Entendez-vous l'éco ? - par : Tiphaine de Rocquigny - Le Prix Nobel d'économie a mis à l'honneur, en 2021, trois représentants de l'économie expérimentale. La montée en puissance de cette discipline constitue une révolution au sein de la science économique de par la remise en cause des modèles théoriques sur lesquelles elle était initialement fondée.

Fiat Vox
87: How Nobel winner David Card transformed economics

Fiat Vox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:14


The labor economist and UC Berkeley professor of economics, who won the 2021 Nobel Prize in economics, talks about why his research on the economics of the minimum wage, immigration and education was so controversial — and how it continues to be today. Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (UC Berkeley photo by Keegan Houser) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Incubation Time
6. It Runs In The Family (Nobel 2021)

Incubation Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 49:03


Its that time of year again! Sit down with Priyankaa and Lexus as they discuss the latest Nobel Prizes in Medicine, Chemistry and Physics as well as giving you the science news of the week and the woman in science of the week (she's related to one of the laureates this year!) Woman of the week: Christiane Volhard (1995 Nobel Prize winner) Science family tree: https://academictree.org Timepoints 14:20-Medicine Prize 31:30-Chemistry Prize 42:14-Physics Prize Sources: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2021/advanced-information/ https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2021/advanced-information/

Economist Radio
Port, and a storm: sectarian violence in Lebanon

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:22


The effort to investigate last year's port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon's worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year's Nobel peace prize, about what the award means to him, and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to snap up English football clubs.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Port, and a storm: sectarian violence in Lebanon

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:22


The effort to investigate last year's port explosion in Beirut has fired up political and religious tensions—resulting in Lebanon's worst violence in years. We speak with Dmitry Muratov, a Russian journalist who shared this year's Nobel peace prize, about what the award means to him, and to press freedom. And why autocratic regimes like to snap up English football clubs.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

French Podcast
News in Slow French #555- Easy French Conversation about Current Events

French Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:31


Nous commencerons la première partie de notre programme avec l'appel lancé à la Commission européenne lundi par 10 pays de l'UE pour considérer l'énergie nucléaire comme une énergie verte. Ensuite, nous commenterons l'attribution du prix Nobel de la paix 2021 à deux journalistes d'investigation indépendants. Puis nous discuterons d'une étude publiée dans le numéro d'octobre du Lancet Planetary Health, qui révèle que la consommation quotidienne de viande au Royaume-Uni a chuté de 17% au cours de la dernière décennie. Nous discuterons également de la publication à Anvers, en Belgique, de la liste de 2021 des 50 meilleurs restaurants du monde.    Cette semaine, nous discuterons de l'opération « Un mois sans ma voiture » déclenchée par la ville de Lyon. Nous parlerons pour finir de la mort du dernier compagnon de la Libération à l'âge de 101 ans. - La crise de l'énergie que traverse l'Europe alimente davantage le débat sur l'énergie nucléaire - Le Prix Nobel de la Paix est décerné à des journalistes indépendants qui critiquent leur gouvernement - La consommation de viande rouge a chuté de 17% au Royaume-Uni - Les deux meilleurs restaurants du monde sont à Copenhague - Des Lyonnais expérimentent « un mois sans voiture » - Décès de Hubert Germain, le dernier compagnon de la Libération

WhiskyCast
Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon: The History of Buffalo Trace

WhiskyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 75:02


Today's Buffalo Trace Distillery started out 164 years ago when Daniel Swigert started making whiskey on the banks of the Kentucky River. His distillery didn't really have a name back then, and the site's had many names over the years as part of its history...one that includes legendary names like Taylor, Stagg, Blanton, and Lee. F. Paul Pacult's latest book, "Buffalo, Barrels, & Bourbon" dives deeply into that history, and he joins us on this week's WhiskyCast In-Depth. In the news, tariff talks between the U.S. and the European Union are coming down to the deadline again, and that has Bourbon makers nervous. Distillers in Ireland are proposing to update the legal standards for Irish Whiskey, and the world's oldest whisky goes on the auction block. 

The Brian Lehrer Show
Paul Krugman Says Things Are Getting Better

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:36


Paul Krugman, Nobel laureate in economics, New York Times columnist, distinguished professor at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and the author of (now in paperback) Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future (W. W. Norton & Company, 2020) talks about the debt ceiling, the long-term economic picture and more.

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 231】#620 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【美國中情局成立中國任務中心;愛爾蘭心裡最軟的那一塊 > 全球最低企業稅;諾貝爾文學獎 ft. 後殖民作家;美國就業市場 >

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:08


❗⁠您的一杯咖啡錢 = 我們遠大的目標!捐款支持我們:https://pse.is/3jknpx

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
Novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah: ‘Colonialism and its consequences are still with us'

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021


Nobel novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about what motivates him to continue to explore the ongoing consequences of colonialism in his literary works — and the power of literature to help us understand the plight of the other. 

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
What's Next for The Real Estate Market? With CoStar's Senior Economic Consultant Joseph Biasi | EP74

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:31


Joseph Biasi spends his Days Analysing Economic Trends and their Relationship with Commercial Real Estate for CoStar – the Leading Real Estate Data Analytics and Aggregator in the US.  In this episode we talked about: Joseph's Bio & Activity Commercial Real Estate Market Outlook Retail Property Analysis Industrial Real Estate Overview Interest Rates Government Policy Single Family VS Multifamily Real Estate The Effect of Inflation on Real Estate Investors Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.costar.com Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. All right, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to working capital the real estate podcast. My special guest today is Joseph Biassi. Joseph spends his days analyzing economic trends and the relationship with the commercial real estate sector. And he works for CoStar advisory services. For those of you that don't know what CoStar is, they're the leading real estate data analytics and aggregator in the us. And I'm not sure if Canada as well, but I wouldn't be surprised we use them pretty much every day. They're our go-to for analytics, for properties, for research and a part of our underwriting process. Joseph, how's it going? Great. How are you doing? I'm doing great. Do I have that right, Joseph, in terms of CoStar where they're at today, maybe you could, you could let the audience know a little bit about your position there and CoStar in general and what you guys do. Sure. Yeah. Joseph(1m 10s): CoStar is a data analytics platform and a data vendor. We, we track pretty much every commercial building that we can at least get research on across the United States. We are moving into Canada as well, more and more. We're getting better coverage in Canada and as well as Europe, my job in particular is I sit on top of that data as a consultant. I'm a senior consultant with advisory services. And my job in particular is to advise client both developers as well as investors on macro economic and commercial real estate trends Jesse (1m 45s): Right on. Yeah. What I've noticed is we have, I think 84, 85 offices now, and we've, we've pretty much switched over completely to CoStar and that goes for Canadian and, and us markets, but it's definitely come a long way in terms of the coverage that we have at least, you know, in our major markets, you pretty much, you've got everything covered there. Speaker 1 (2m 7s): Yeah. I mean, we've been really pushing research recently. Speaker 0 (2m 11s): So this was, this was something we were at, we were at this panel and in new Orleans this past, I guess two weekends ago now, and we were talking about, you know, where, where people can find information, those people looking for deals in the market and a lot of, a lot of what we do on the investing side and not just in brokerage, but we'll, you know, when we tried to track down owners, a lot of times we're looking at properties on CoStar trying to find the beneficial, the true owners and reach out to them directly for off market deals. Speaker 1 (2m 38s): Yeah. So I, I, before actually, before I worked at CoStar, worked in brokerage. And so I was, I I've been a user, it's a fantastic site for anybody who wants to do any kind of real estate deals, right. On a little biased, but Speaker 0 (2m 52s): Yeah, a little biased. So in terms of the, the actual market, I thought what would be, will be just that would be useful and educational for our listeners is talking a little bit about what's been going on in the market over the last year or two and the outlook for the next, let's call it a mid to mid to longterm. And by longterm for me, I think five years, I don't think longer than that, but yeah. You know, let's talk a little bit about the commercial real estate market in general, over the last two years, how have things changed in terms of the data that you're seeing in terms of the way you approach the market and, and your analysis? Speaker 1 (3m 31s): Great question. Yeah. So, you know, when the pandemic hit, I think there was a lot of fear going around and that translated into a lot less commercial real estate deals, particularly in the office sector. Everybody began to work from home. We knew, we noticed a pretty steep drop off in transaction activity, which has since returned. And that's, that's pretty much been the story is we had this initial 20, 20 decline, a couple of, a couple of quarters of, you know, pretty severe transaction volume decline. And it's all become back effectively, but it's come back in a very different way. And that's the actual story behind what's happening in the commercial real estate market is if you look at the macro macro numbers, you know, total amount of transaction, the total transaction volume is back. But if you look at where that's happening, it's very different. For example, the Dallas Fort worth had more transaction activity in 2020, the first half of 2021 than New York. That's not normal. We're seeing, we're seeing those rooms moved down to, if you're talking about retailer, multi-family, we're seeing them move down to the south, the study United States, as opposed to, you know, the new York's and the San Francisco's of the world. Phoenix is another market we've seen, which is, I suppose, as a Western market, those, those Sunbelt markets are where we're seeing the most demographic growth. We're seeing the most transaction activity. And we're seeing the biggest pricing gains across all four, four major property types Speaker 0 (4m 55s): In terms of the, to go from geographic to the property types, if, you know, starting with retail, I guess. Cause that's, that's the one where when the pandemic first started, there was the big question of retail, which I think for, for the most part has been overbuilt. I don't think it's a surprise in the U S Canada. Canada's pretty. Yeah. I mean, we are as well, but I think we're somewhere in between the U S and in most European countries on a per square foot basis. But talk about retail, you know, how has that analysis been over the last, you know, call it a year to two years? Speaker 1 (5m 29s): I think retail, it, at least in my opinion is one of the most fascinating property types. Like, yeah, you're absolutely right. There needs to be some level of rationalization. If the landscape has changed, it is no longer the place where people go deep. The only place people go shopping to buy goods, that doesn't mean it's going away and there's still, I would argue opportunities. And I think that's the way we've been trying to, to talk about retail, which is look, you know, you're not, if you're looking at a class B or class seem, all those are going to struggle, but if you're looking at, you know, there's still good opportunities and you just, there's a lot more nuance and a lot more detail that you need to look into for a retail building the tenants matter so much in a retail building, even more than an office or an industrial building, because if you have a good grocery anchor, a neighborhood center in a well-populated area, that's still a good asset. And that, that I think has kind of been, under-reported just due to the fear around retail during the pandemic and the fear around retail because of e-commerce. Speaker 0 (6m 36s): Yeah. It's a, it's one of those things that we've always talked about that, you know, good grocery store, anchored retail. I can't imagine in a lot of these markets, if anything, they were a bit, some of those properties were buoyed by the fact that the only places that were open were the Walmarts or, you know, these grocery stores that were anchored. Speaker 1 (6m 54s): Exactly. And we're, you know, we are seeing, you know, returns to normal leasing patterns in the Southern states where, you know, where retail really does follow rooftops. And in those Southern states, we've seen pretty much a full recovery, and we've seen a pretty much a full recovery in terms of pricing as well. Whereas if you talk about, you know, these, these tertiary markets in the Midwest, or some of these coastal gateway markets that have really struggled during the pandemic, there's still, there's still losing people. They're still struggling to kind of recover. Speaker 0 (7m 25s): So have you seen, I know you, you track a lease terms and different differently structures. Have you seen a difference in the way that retailers are approaching their leases? You know, where you could have some retailers in the past doing 5, 10, 15, 20 year leases, has that, has that shifted or is it, is it too early to tell Speaker 1 (7m 43s): It's a, it's a little early to tell, just because we're, we're finally kind of getting back at least down south, but the, the tenants that they're looking for at certainly become far more focused on either, you know, necessity based retail, certain tenants like dollar stores. So these, these discount stores are doing really well. And then experience-based tenants have done are something that landlords are really looking into as a long-term longer-term play. At some point, this pandemic will become less and less, have less and less of an effect on the economy. And a lot of landlords believe that the future of real estate of retail is experiential. That you're drawing people there for something more than just a shopping experience. Speaker 0 (8m 28s): Does CoStar track the rezoning or reclassification of buildings in terms of, for example, one of the, one of the, the guesses that, you know, that we have is that retail and, and certain types of office buildings may be converted, maybe switch the use might be switched even in hospitality, potentially hospitality going to multi-family. But if do you track that type of thing? Speaker 1 (8m 54s): Yeah. It hasn't occurred as much as you would think, given the amount of airtime, not an ink that's been spilled on it. It really hasn't happened. It does happen, you know, so I went to college in Worcester and the Greendale mall in Worcester got turned into an Amazon distribution center, but that isn't really the rural quite yet. They're still working on that because, you know, it's, a lot of people think that a mall is going to turn into an industrial center, like a distribution center, and it's more likely to be knocked down and turned into multi-family center because it's still the highest and best use is, is multifamily for a dense urban area. We're, we're, we're starting to see some of these malls really struggle. Speaker 0 (9m 36s): Yeah. I think you're absolutely right with the amount of ink that's been spelled as a that's been spilled on it because it is one of those things, I guess, more of an academic thing. It's logical to think that okay. But I think the reality is you get in transaction costs the actual time it takes to convert these things. There's a little bit more that goes on with it. If you, if you kind of slide from retail, move into the, the office space. So my partner and I on the brokerage on predominantly work in office investment sales, as well as leasing, they, I don't, you know, despite some of, you know, what, what has been said last year, that markets haven't been affected. I just think a lot of people were saying certain things were, what we saw was a large, large drop-off in office. And not surprisingly, I'm assuming that's, that's what you S what you've seen. And if not, maybe you could provide some insight there. Speaker 1 (10m 26s): All right. No, absolutely. I, I, if you look at where most of the transaction activity has fallen off, it's been an office and it really has a lot to do with uncertainty. Right. It's, you know, what will work from home look like in five years from now, because if you, and you know, this probably better than I do, if you're buying an office for your leasing office, it's, it's a five to 10 year lease or three to 10 years typically. So you're, you're really guessing what's going to happen down the road. So when you're buying office, it's, it's a little scary right now. And I, I understand that the shop view for CoStar advisory services, and I do not speak for all of CoStar district health, say for CoStar advisory services, is that, you know, the office, there will be less demand for office because I work from home, but we don't believe this is the death of office everybody's going to be working remotely. And we also don't believe that. And I personally don't believe that, you know, these downtown offices are going to, you know, go away anytime soon. I I've in that downtown, these downtown clusters are going to severely struggle. I think the actual concern for office, if we want to think about where, where we might see struggle is those class B offices in urban areas that have less, that don't have as good a commutability score that aren't dark, aren't able to draw. Don't have the same amount of amenities. Those, I think are the ones that well, we think are going to struggle a little bit more. Yeah. It's funny. You Speaker 0 (11m 53s): Mentioned that I was having a conversation with a, with a colleague of mine. And I was, we were talking about that specific thing where a lot of suburban markets actually, haven't been doing particularly poorly with office and then these downtown connected, but there's, these Midtown markets are like these markets that are tertiary markets, that if, unless they have good connectivity, it's a really, you know, there's a question mark about how they'll do well, we've also seen though, is that the, the office side, like you were saying before, the underwriting has changed to the extent that, you know, we, they want to see is what type of tenant, what, you know, where are they in the lease? What are their rights? And, and it's funny too, that you mentioned five-year and then kind of went back to three-year because what we've seen is that, you know, when I started in brokerage, really, it was rare to find even three-year head leases. It was typically a five-year minimum. Where now, if one thing has happened from COVID, we've seen all kinds of different lease lease terms. Speaker 1 (12m 47s): Yeah. I mean, if you, if you think about going to selling a building, occupancy matters more than anything else, even, you know, that's the, that's the first and only thing I, if you have to take some rent losses, you'd rather take some rent losses and lose occupancy. So peop landlords are for office buildings are, you know, it is definitely a tenants market right now, but we, in terms of the, the urban areas, I think the reason they lose out is because the downtown offices have that commutability and then the suburban offices have that advantage of being able to drive to them. If I'm in, I'm in Boston, which is a famously difficult Metro to drive in. And there's no way I'm going to go drive to, let's say Brighton, which is just outside the main city to go to an office there, but I'd be willing to go to suburban office and I'd be willing to take the T down to than the downtown crossing, for example. Speaker 0 (13m 37s): Yeah, for sure. And you, you know, one thing too, is like we've had, what we've seen is that the CFO or COO, depending on, or the real estate, you know, facilities manager, whoever's dealing with the company's real estate. It has been a lot of like kicking the can down the road, because like you said, it's, it's, you're making a decision. That's going to impact five, 10 years. Whereas if you're buying an investment, one thing you can say is that interest rates are where they're at right now. You can, you can, you know, logically pursue maybe a little bit more risky investment, but for the people that work at a company, they're like, I'm not going to make a decision where in a year from now I could look like this was the terrible, the worst thing I did for the company. Speaker 1 (14m 12s): Right. Right. Exactly. Speaker 0 (14m 14s): So if we, okay, so that's retail office. If we switch now to, to industrial, because one thing that was really a cool stat that I saw when, when COVID just happened was the fact that retail sales did not decrease. It's just where the sales happen changed. Right. There was a pivot to online sales, total sales didn't D decrease, at least at the beginning of the pandemic, the data that I was looking at. So I'm curious, I mean, I think it's no surprise industrial's doing pretty well today. Speaker 1 (14m 48s): Yeah, no, it's not. It's no surprise. And it continued to do well. The pandemic, you are somehow seeing cap rate declines, which I think if you said two years ago, most people would be like, there's no way, but I just given how quickly we begun to really shift into e-commerce and the, you know, the room to run in terms of e-commerce. If you look at Europe, Europe uses e-commerce far more than the United States does still, but kind of going back to your point about retail sales it's, I've been tracking it very closely for that specific reason. If you look at retail sales, and this is because, you know, the government stepped in and enacted a lot of stimulus by, by June of 2020 retail sales had more sales than you would expect, given what you would expect pre pandemic. So if you forecast it out pre pandemic, but retail sales should be, and it's a fairly linear trend, you would expect them to have, you know, X amount of retail sales. And we're, we've seen exceed that basically since June of 2020, and about 35% of that is e-commerce, which is impressive when only 16% of retail sales is e-commerce right now. So e-commerce is pushing along, is pushing along retail sales. And realistically there's only, only it can only go up in terms of e-commerce. I want to be careful in saying that, because I know that's gotten people in trouble before. It can only go up in terms of e-commerce industrial is starting to become, starting to see a lot of construction. If you want to talk about the property type in particular, we're starting to see more speculative construction, but on the, at the, at the, at the other end of it, you can make the argument that it's pretty easy to turn off the industrial tap. If you it's just, you're building a big slab of concrete and yeah, exactly. It's a slab of concrete. Got you build a box and you're good to go. And there's a lot of reasons to believe that structural shifts from retail, from onsite retail to e-commerce means strong sales, and that's not even getting into three PLS and manufacturing tenants that we do also expect to do quite well. Amazon alone accounts was one, a hundred million square feet of absorption in 2020. And I, I don't know if they're going to do that again, but they are already, they're already in the, you know, they continue to be the player in the market and continue to push industrial. So do you think, Speaker 0 (17m 20s): Look at the, on the topic, the three PL or third, third party logistics and last mile delivery, like, do you, do you, do, do you break down industrial into these sub categories for your analysis? Speaker 1 (17m 31s): Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you almost have to, right, because that's how, that's how tenants think about it. You have these big distribution centers and then you have these last miles and, you know, these last miles tend to be these, these crappy frankly buildings that are in well better located areas. And the great thing, if you're looking from an standpoint about these last miles, they're not usually the highest and best use. So there isn't a ton of new construction in the last mile, despite the huge amount of demand for the last mile, at least according to what we're seeing. Speaker 0 (18m 5s): So in terms of the, the actual investment sales side of the industrial coin, when, you know, we see in our market, which I think pre pandemic, we were at 2%, I know Toronto is, I know LA and Toronto you'd know better than I would, but I know that we were at the top and north America with the, in terms of how lower vacancy rates were and continue to be on the industrial side. And what we've seen on the investment sales side is there's only so much product that, you know, you've seen, oh my God, that thing's traded again, that's traded three times in the last year. Are you seeing that same stuff in these really hot markets where properties have, basically, I'm assuming it's a constraint on the, on supply right now. Speaker 1 (18m 45s): Yeah. I mean, I, you know, everybody is out for industrial and they're continuing to increase their allocation. It's it's, you know, when we talk to clients, it's the first thing they always say is don't worry, we're going to increase our allocation to industrial really? Usually at the cost of office and retail. Well, not usually, always at the cost. No. Yeah. It, it, you know, that's, that's the other side of the coin, right? Is we saw 6% rent growth so far in 2021, we can be concerned about construction and market specific. If you look at like, you know, inland empire, for example. Yeah. There's a lot of construction or, you know, Las Vegas, for example, there's a decent amount of construction, but at the same time, the amount of demand that we're seeing come in and given it's a structural shifts, it means that you could, you should expect continued demand. That being said, we're getting to a point where cap rates are going to struggle. Maybe a little bit to continue to decline. Speaker 0 (19m 45s): I was going to say, it's for reminds me like economics 1 0 1. We're like, no, that the shift it's the whole demand curve moving, not just going up along, right? Like there's a, there's an innovation here. There's, there's a structural shift to less retail and more, more industrial distribution. Speaker 1 (20m 0s): I was actually trying to the other day to think of a, a good comparison. And I think we landed on radio for retail retail's radio where it it's still gonna have a use, but it's not the same use that it used to have an industrials TV now, the television. Cool. That's the entertainment. Yeah. Speaker 0 (20m 22s): So where does, where does vaulty Rez line up with that? If we, if we go to multi Rez, which you have to think that, you know, prior to the pandemic, we were like, can cap rates keep going down? And then they kept going down. And even right now, buoyed by I'm sure interest rates are multi-res team. I think, did their, did their had a banner year for 2020, like a record year for them? Speaker 1 (20m 46s): Yeah, we we've hearing that a lot is that, you know, 20, 20 and now 2021 in particular, it's been a great year. 2021 saw the largest increase in rent we've ever seen quarters for Q3. So we just finished up two, three, we're still finalizing the results, but shaping up that Q2 Q3 and Q1 of 2021 are the top three years in terms of demand for multi-family. And it, you know, that's across the board. However, if you start breaking it down by markets, the south in particular is really, really very strong. I mean, I'm going to keep harping on myself just because it is as strong as it is, but you know, multi-family is price per unit has gone up by 30% compared to pre-recession averages in Sunbelt markets rents in, like, for example, Austin increased by 15%, six months, you get, you kind of become to begin to become worried more about affordability than anything else, which is at some point, this becomes a economic macro economic problem, which of course then comes back to haunt investors. You know, a lot of that gain has already happened and really have seen a deceleration, which you would expect given seasonal trends in multi-family. And, you know, in some of these markets, you really are beginning to hit the, the affordability limit. And that's where you can start making a great argument for like, for manufactured homes or for mobile home parks. For example, particularly in the south, the Southern states, they don't work as well in the Northern states. I would argue at least mobile home parks. Speaker 0 (22m 27s): Yeah. Neither up here. Speaker 1 (22m 30s): It gets a little chilly. I know, but it's, multi-family has done, has probably been the outperformer, which, you know, given all the news around how well single-family pricing has done is isn't that surprising. And if you, if you look at single family, a single family price growth compared to multi-family rent growth, single family price growth in almost every single market has grown faster. So it's not like your, your other options is getting any easier to, to afford. Speaker 0 (23m 8s): Yeah. And in terms of like your outlook on this, in terms of the actual properties themselves, like, are we finding that in these markets that there are underperforming assets that are now being utilized to their, to their, you know, market rents, you know, value, add deals. Do you think that is what's happening in a lot of these markets? Or do you think that the pressure of lower interest rates is, is what's fueling most of, most of the acquisition in, in multifamily being an asset class that's pretty much being subsidized or was subsidized for the last year, year and a half by the government in most in countries. Speaker 1 (23m 46s): Yeah. I mean, that's a huge part of it. And then on top of that, I think lower interest rates is extremely helpful for multi-family acquisitions. You know, part of it is it, some of it has to be just the inflation hedge that you'd get for multi-family. If, if you were to all concerned about inflation and you want to look in real estate multi-family is probably your best bet just given. And we can talk about this at some point, just given the short lease term is, but the, the eviction moratorium also, at least in our opinion, has had a pretty big effect on multifamily demand because on one end, you're, you know, you are seeing a huge spike in terms of demand, but then we kind of scratch our heads at it for a while. But then if you think about it, we weren't evicting anybody. There's 800,000 evictions in the U S per year. I don't know what it is for Canada. That's 800,000 units that aren't going, that aren't in negative demand. We aren't, we aren't building, you know, these, these class C units were, if we're building anything, it's, it's a class, a, a, that's the only thing you can really afford to build right now that will, that will pencil. So, you know, people are, people are basically sitting in their home, sitting on their apartments, they're unwilling to move. So we aren't seeing that, that negative demand. And on the other, the other side, we're seeing a huge uptick in people separating how tools, if you're, let's say you're a 22 year old kid and you you're living with four roommates, we're seeing people decouple those households and begin to move out into their own places. All of that kind of leads to these, this huge spike in, in multi-family. Speaker 0 (25m 36s): Yeah, I guess the real question, like you said before, it's, it's the affordability aspect you have, like you said, 30% increase, I think in evaluation, but 15% increase in rental rates. And there is, there is a certain level where, you know, you, you just hit a, you hit a wall in terms of affordability from the, from the consumer point of view. Speaker 1 (25m 56s): Yeah. I think it's, it's going to have, it was a concern even before the pandemic was, you know, a home affordability shelter affordability, and it certainly did not get better. Speaker 0 (26m 8s): And on the construction end, you, you, you mentioned class a, are you seen quite a bit of construction on the multi-family side? Generally, Speaker 1 (26m 14s): It's pretty, it's pretty much in line with the last couple of years, to be honest with you, which was pretty significant. But on the other end, we saw a huge amounts of construction delays even before the pandemic. And it, it kind of acted as this filter for, for supply being added, frankly, especially, especially down south where there's huge amounts of demand, there's huge amounts of supply waiting to be added. But at th at the same time, they just can't get it out. Whether it be supply costs, labor is certainly a problem. Anybody and anybody who's trying to build multi-family right now has told me that labor is almost impossible to find at this point. Yeah. Speaker 0 (26m 51s): I mean, just even on the small scale or we're doing projects in our area, it's, it is extremely slow. And, you know, you talk to anybody in the construction industry. They'll, they'll tell you the same thing right now. Not just supplies, but labor as well. If we shift over to, to that piece on inflation, it's been a hot topic in terms of ink spilled. I'm sure it was one of those things that, yeah, the over the last little while there's been enough fuss bulled over on, on the inflation side, what's your view from the data that you guys are seeing? Speaker 1 (27m 25s): Yeah. I, I take the view that I am in agreement with the bond market and the fed that it is transitory. I think the definition of transitory has been changing pretty significantly because at first I think it was six months and now it's probably going to be a little bit longer than that. Kind of where I begin to split a little bit from the fed at least, is that it's inflation is likely to be higher for longer. I don't think it's going to be quite as high as it has been. A lot of that. A lot of the reasons it's been high currently, it has a lot more to do with the pandemic and kind of short-term factors. You know, you can think about shortages and chips. You can think about shortages and car parts, for example, or appliances, as well as transportation demand, which should burn itself off and on top of the stimulus. But the fed changed how it does it targets inflation. And I think it really went under reported. I think a lot, it, it didn't really make as much noise as it should have because what they're essentially doing now is they're saying, okay, we need to make up for really chronically low inflation in the, the last cycle. So we're going to allow inflation to run hot, to get the labor market gains that we saw at the end of the last cycle. Because if you look at between 2018 and 2020, the federal site statistics around minority wage gains, for example, it didn't really begin to appear until the economy was basically at full employment. What that three, 3.5, 3.4% unemployment rate. They want to see that again, that's Jerome Powell has basically explicitly stated that that's what they're looking for. That being said, the fed has begun to sound a little bit more hawkish. Cause I think they, I know they were taken by surprise by the how high inflation got, and they're, they're likely going to raise rates by the end of next year. All of that said, I, I still believe the fed is willing to let inflation run above that 2% mark for the next couple of years. Speaker 0 (29m 30s): So for those that don't know what you're referring to in terms of the under-reporting is the fact that they've, they've broken off of the, the, what they used to be the 2% target, is that right? Speaker 1 (29m 40s): Yeah, I, yeah. I mean, I was in colleges, every continent was, you know, they target 2%, they adjust rates based off of that. That's obviously a little more complicated than that, but now they're targeting a longer term inflation average of 2%. And because inflation from 2010 to 2019 ran between, you know, according to their measure of inflation PC around between 1.5 and 1.8% for most of that, they view allowing it to run from two to 3% as making up for some of that loss, those loss pricing increases over the last cycle. Speaker 0 (30m 15s): So in terms of, from the investor perspective, if your outlook as to how that informs your decisions from a real estate point of view, you know, what does, what does that leave us with in terms of the discussion that we've had even today in terms of the different asset classes and how you view economic decisions and investment decisions? Speaker 1 (30m 35s): Yeah, I mean, look, inflation is here to stay at, which is actually fair, especially since it's not, you know, hyperinflation I, where the fed is going to be forced to raise rates quickly. Hopefully, you know, it's actually good news for real estate. Real estate is a real asset, you know, I'm sure, you know, everybody, every economist has said this at some point, you know, real estate is a real asset. It, it benefits from a real value gains and holding real value, which means that in an inflationary environment, commercial real estate itself is a good play within those property types. There are some that are better than others, especially if you're unsure of how stable and the inflation rate is going to be the shorter, the lease term, especially in a higher demand property types that, you know, you can think about industrial or especially multi-family, it means you can adjust your, your rent increases to match inflation. If you look at, and we've seen this actually in the market, if you look at NOI gains real NOI gains from Nate grieve since 1990, there was only two real periods of actual real NOI gains from the nineties to the, from early nineties to the late nineties and from 2010 to 2015. Other than that, if you deflate real and alive for multi-family, it's basically flat, which, which essentially means that NOI is just, is, is working as an inflation hedge. You get the same real return year after year. That that makes multi-family really attractive. Industrial actually has not done that well, based on that same measure up until very recently. Speaker 0 (32m 12s): Yeah. I liked the idea. I was always told by a mentor of mine there where, you know, real estate is one of those few industries investment that you can download inflation to your, to your customer, you know, pretty much one for one. Speaker 1 (32m 27s): Yeah, you can, it, it is extremely easy to just pass on that inflation to the investor, unlike pretty much any other asset class. I mean, if you think about bonds, for example, you can't do that for the most part. You just, you know, if you invest in a bond, you you're losing real value every, every coupon payment. Speaker 0 (32m 44s): Yeah. And I th and I think to your point earlier where you have those shorter terms with multifamily, it's obviously easier to do, but I was just reading a lease yesterday that was kind of the old school lease where the, it was over 10 years, but the, the bump ups, the step-ups and rent were basically the CP attached to a CPI inflator. So we haven't seen those as much, usually landlords, if anything, at least prior to the pandemic, they would just say, okay, it's, you know, 10 bucks a square foot now 12 bucks 14. And usually that would be more than inflation, but they have some mechanism in there. Speaker 1 (33m 17s): Yeah. Well, I was going to say, the other thing landlords might want to start thinking about is, is indexing it to inflation and that's, that's actually the great part. I mean, that's why we target a specific inflation rate is because then you can make these easy decisions. I know inflation is going to be 2%, it's a very stiff assumption. So, you know, we can, we can just assume a 2% going forward. Now you have to start thinking about, okay, is it, you know, is it going to go, you're making a bet. Is inflation going to be long-term? Is this higher inflation could be long-term or is it going to come back down? How much is it going to come back down? It's really difficult. And while it does sound really nice to indexed, to inflation, if you're an office, a landlord right now, I think you struggle a little bit because you don't have the negotiating power necessarily that you did two years ago. Speaker 0 (34m 5s): Yeah, absolutely. So in terms of, so in terms of that, how that view informs the interest rate discussion, the way that, you know, the fed will respond, if, you know, if employment is higher than, or full employment, or if changes in inflation that, that they're measuring, how, how do you see that impacting the interest rate decisions? Speaker 1 (34m 27s): Yeah, so I, I I'm, I think I'm in the minority here, at least in terms of the broader economics where I really don't see interest rates increasing significantly. And I know that's a really economist answer to touching it a little bit, but I don't see interest rates hedging or increasing significantly because one of what the feds, the fed said about how they're going to react to inflation, they said, they're willing to let inflation run hot. They care more about the labor market gains right now on that needs us more liquidity in the system for longer, which, you know, can go only a few places. It can, it can drive. And we have seen equity increase by multiples. And then the only other place we can go really is bonds for, you know, those multi-trillion dollar that multi-trillion dollar liquidity pool we have right now. I mean, it's at the point where the banks just basically don't know where to put the money. All of that, to me suggests a, you know, short, you know, lower interest rates on top of that. If you think about the demographic factors that are affecting the United States, you know, slower demographic growth going forward, that's not going to change. That's baked in effectively. Unless people begin to move here in a mass on top of technological change, you know, you would expect to see more automation going forward. I think it's coming faster than a lot of people like to acknowledge that pushes down prices, which then pushes down interest rates. And I know globalization is no longer it, maybe isn't moving forward as quickly or as moving forward at all. But globalization still means a lower interest rate environment. You know, the fed in 2018, tried to push interest rates to 2.5% and ran into huge liquidity problems in the market. There isn't there, they don't and they view, and this is their view. They don't view the neutral interest rate as much higher than rate where they're no longer stimulating nor creating drag on the economy is much higher than two or two and a half percent. So all of that, to me suggests maybe slightly higher interest rates from what was the tenure at. At one point I, you know, 50, 50 basis points, but maybe not, it's probably gonna be lower than it was before, before the pandemic. Speaker 0 (36m 45s): Would there be something that would change that view for you or, or a few factors that would change that view for you in terms of where interest rates could go? Cause, I mean, that's usually the big thing where a lot of people say, oh, if inflation is going in this direction, interest rates have to, you know, come up to that, you know, come up as a result of that. But yeah, what are, what are, what are some factors that may, may kind of give you pause to, to think it might go the other way or at least increase over what you're, what you're talking about? Speaker 1 (37m 13s): That's a great question. And, you know, as inflation has continued to stay high, it's been something I've been thinking more and more about, but the, you know, inflation first and foremost above all else, if inflation gets out of hand, it, it becomes a inflation spiral. That's when I think, you know, you'll begin to see interest rates really start to hike. The other, the other concern would be the fed. It depends on who Biden dominates next year for the fed. If we get someone who's hawkish, if we see you're going to see some more hawkish fed governors, I think that in a more hawkish fed chairman that could change my view on interest rates. And finally, we begin, we begin to S you know, removing chewy really begins to drain liquidity faster than I thought it would. No we're right now, we are still buying billions of dollars of bonds every month. I don't expect removing QV would do that, but that could drive interest rates higher if the, if the market begins to react to, or begins to become concerned about liquidity in the us, into global bond markets. Right. I, I sh I should mention real quick that also there are wars and pandemics that I can't predict. I learned that last year. Speaker 0 (38m 40s): Yeah. That was a, it was, I remember two, two or three years ago. And I won't say who the company was, but, you know, I remember it was couched almost as a joke, you know, barring any geopolitical disputes or a global pandemic. And I was like, oh my God. But yeah, those are always the things you're like, you know, there's these extra exogenous factors that you're not going to be able to, to forecast these black swans. So I guess the, you know, from the real estate perspective, that's a good overview of where we're at today in terms of the different asset classes. And we're, you know, the view of the economy is just want to be mindful of your time. Joseph, we have four questions. We ask everybody before we, we end the episode. So if you're okay with that, we'll kick it off. Speaker 1 (39m 25s): Absolutely. Speaker 0 (39m 26s): What's something, you know, now in your career, you wish you knew when you started. Speaker 1 (39m 32s): That's a great question that it's okay to be wrong and it's okay to make a mistake. I think I was, at least at the beginning of my career was a little more concerned about mistakes and being wrong. If you're, if you're an economist, if you work in economics, you know, if you work in real estate and you're trying to forecast trends, you're, you're going to be wrong and that's okay. It's just, just, don't be wrong. You just learn from the mistake. Don't make the same mistake twice, twice, I think is what I needed to learn as opposed to you have to be right the first time. Speaker 0 (40m 1s): Yeah. It's all always lies. I camera it was like Truman or something that said, ah, give me a one-handed economist. Everyone says on the, on one hand, on the other hand, but yeah. I Speaker 1 (40m 11s): Mean, I'm certainly, I'm certainly guilty of that Speaker 0 (40m 15s): While you want to be precise with your answers in terms of mentorship, what would you tell younger people coming into the industry or your views of mentorship in general? Speaker 1 (40m 25s): Oh, I would not be where I am without mentors. I think it's so important to talk to people who that are in a place that you want to be, or are doing things that you want to do. I've had some fantastic mentors for both in real estate and in, in economics before, before I worked in commercial real estate, I was working in banking regulation. I was thinking regulation research, I suppose I worked with some fantastic economists that taught me everything I knew, including, you know, my, my advisor in college. I, I, you know, like find someone that you think is worthwhile to talk to and then just bug them. I think I was my first job. I was in the chief economist office, every opportunity I could just asking questions, being curious, trying to learn as much as I could cause that, and it's, it's paid dividends for me. Speaker 0 (41m 25s): Awesome. Are there any recommendations you could give a book recommendations, podcasts, I guess, with the spirit of this conversation, maybe in real estate or economics? Yeah. Speaker 1 (41m 34s): There's, that's not a good question. There's two, there's two, there's two that I, one that I love just for all time, which is thinking fast and slow by data economy, which, you know, I, I like to think that I don't necessarily subscribe to the, the basic, the, what a lot of mainstream economists think about in terms of models. I think there's more to it than that. And David Kahneman does a really good job of breaking down how people think and how that relates to economics. Fantastic book. It's a really interesting read, even if you're not an economist and the other one is the rise and fall of economic of us economic growth. I believe it's, I'm reading it right now. So I should know the name. Speaker 0 (42m 17s): Yeah. We'll put a link. I think I know the one, the one you're talking about, Speaker 1 (42m 23s): I, you know, the first economist I worked under was an economic historian. So he instilled that interest in me. And it basically shows that, you know, the century from 1870 to 1970 was a period of unbelievable technological change and economic growth. And I it's really fascinating and it informs a lot of what I think will happen going forward in terms of slower, you know, slower but steady economic growth. We're not going to see those four to 5% GDP gains without, you know, huge amounts of stimulus anymore. And it was good. Speaker 0 (42m 54s): Yeah. I have a, if it's Robert Gordon, is that a that's right? Yep. Okay. We'll put it. Speaker 1 (43m 0s): I think it's a fantastic book. I really like it. If you liked economics, I would suggest that it's. Speaker 0 (43m 6s): Yeah, no, it's, it's one of those things where I w was interested in reading, but unless you get like a recommendation, sometimes you go down a rabbit hole, but the Conaman that's I think, correct me if I'm wrong. I think Conaman was the first non economist to win the Nobel prize in economics. Speaker 1 (43m 23s): Yeah. He was a psychologist and I it's, it's a lot about how the brain thinks and makes decisions and you know, it really attacks that idea of rationality and really looks at why people actually make decisions. It's, it's a great book. It really changed how I thought about, you know, economic modeling and where I work, how we, how markets work. Speaker 0 (43m 45s): Very cool. We'll put a link to both last question. First car, make and model. Speaker 1 (43m 51s): Oh, I had a 2004, a Honda accord, which is it. And it was, it had a bigger engine than it was supposed to have, which was great because if you've ever driven in Massachusetts, all of the on-ramps are about five feet long, so you have to really gun it. And so that was a fantastic car. I missed that car still. I would rather drive that than when I'm driving now. Speaker 0 (44m 20s): Right on. I feel like a lot of engines were stuffed into those older Accords and civics, Joseph, for people to connect with you or a, you know, anything related to the information or data you do with CoStar work and they reach out, Speaker 1 (44m 34s): Yeah, we have a website, I'll send it to you for blankets, CoStar advisory. You know, you can always find me. I write a lot of articles for the website, so you'll see me on CoStar, if you have it, which I would suggest otherwise, you know, just I'm on LinkedIn. Speaker 0 (44m 54s): My guest today has been Joseph Biassi Joseph. Thanks for being part of working capital. Speaker 1 (44m 59s): Thank you for having me. Speaker 0 (45m 10s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse, for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five-star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.

Economist Radio
Money Talks: A real-world revolution

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:03


This year's Nobel prize celebrates the "credibility revolution" that has transformed economics since the 1990s. Today most notable new work is not theoretical but based on analysis of real-world data. Host Rachana Shanbhogue speaks to two of the winners, David Card and Joshua Angrist, and our Free Exchange columnist Ryan Avent explains how their work has brought economics closer to real life.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Money talks from Economist Radio
Money Talks: A real-world revolution

Money talks from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:03


This year's Nobel prize celebrates the "credibility revolution" that has transformed economics since the 1990s. Today most notable new work is not theoretical but based on analysis of real-world data. Host Rachana Shanbhogue speaks to two of the winners, David Card and Joshua Angrist, and our Free Exchange columnist Ryan Avent explains how their work has brought economics closer to real life.Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Here & Now
Nobel laureate Abdulrazak Gurnah; Virginia governor's race tightens

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:20


2021 Nobel laureate Abdulrazak Gurnah's novels center on themes of migration, identity and effects of colonialism in East Africa. Gurnah joins us. And, polls show the Virginia governor's race tightening between former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe and GOP businessman Glenn Youngkin. Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report and Kyle Kondik of Sabato's Crystal Ball join us to analyze the campaigns.

Advanced Italian
Advanced Italian #309 - International news from an Italian perspective

Advanced Italian

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 5:56


- Scontro tra Polonia e Unione europea - Sale la tensione tra Cina e Taiwan - Elezioni amministrative, i romani bocciano Virginia Raggi - Cambiamenti climatici, arriva il caffè siciliano - Giorgio Parisi vince il Nobel per la Fisica

Maman, j'ai raté l'actu !
Maman, j'ai raté l'actu ! # La fête de la science, le centre d'internet et comment éviter des images violentes

Maman, j'ai raté l'actu !

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 24:18


Everyday Ubuntu
Ep.22: Dawn Gifford Engle | Co-Founder, Activist and Filmmaker | Acts of Peace

Everyday Ubuntu

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:18


Today's guest is Dawn Gifford Engle. Dawn is a filmmaker, an activist, and Co-Founder of The PeaceJam Foundation. She has been recognized for excellence in filmmaking, a well-decorated director, Dawn is the recipient of 12 Best Director awards. She wrote and directed the award-winning documentary films, Rigoberta Menchu: Daughter of the Maya, Desmond Tutu: Children of the Light, Adolfo Perez Esquivel: Rivers of Hope, Oscar Arias: Without a Shot Fired, Betty Williams: Contagious Courage, The Dalai Lama -- Scientist, and Shirin Ebadi: Until We Are Free. In addition, she co-authored the book, "PEACEJAM: A Billion Simple Acts of Peace", which was published by Penguin in 2008, and she has been nominated 17 times for the Nobel Peace Prize.The PeaceJam Foundation is creating the next generation of Nobel Peace Laureates, and in this episode, Dawn shares how the foundation came to be, the inspiring projects the youth have created, and what the most rewarding part of her work is. She also speaks about how she feels lucky to have reached her full potential, having started her career as an economist and has since added the titles - activist, author, filmmaker, mother and grandmother to her repertoire. She and Mungi discuss the Nobel laureates that have direct impacts on their lives and the promise of youth looking to bring about peace in our world.……..Visit mungingomane.coFollow Mungi on InstagramFollow The Brand is Female on Instagram

En Caso de que el Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD

La misteriosa dama que pide raite a orillas de la carretera. Radio que se enciende sola y luces que titilan. Noticias Del Mundo: Superman, súper escándalo - Los Fernández de Argentina - Giorgio Parisi, Nobel de Física, y la ciencia aplicada - El huracán Pamela amenaza la costa de Sinaloa - Reducción de Desastres - Felicidades Club América Historias Desintegradas: La salida del pueblo - Moda fantasmal - El automóvil poseído - Aventón en carretera internacional -Energía que se manifiesta - La historia del Apallimay - Un mito quechua - El niño de la bicicleta embrujada - Las escopetas de Tlaxcala - Lagañas de Perro - Creencias peligrosas - Ejercito de tenedores - Mudanza con duendes - El altar de la vecindad - El lago marciano y más...  https://www.canaltrans.com/ecdqemsd_podcast_2021/5108_la_mujer_del_pantano.html En Caso De Que El Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD Daily Podcast

Molecular Podcasting with Darren Lipomi
#56 – Thinking Like a Nobel Prize Winner: Into the Impossible with physicist Brian Keating

Molecular Podcasting with Darren Lipomi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 59:14


My guest in this episode--my first ever livestream--is my UCSD colleague, Professor Brian Keating. Brian is a Chancellor's distinguished professor of physics at UC San Diego, co-director of the Arthur C Clarke Center for the imagination, host of the Into the impossible podcast, YouTuber with 30k subscribers, and writer of the scientific memoir “Losing the Nobel Prize.” Brian is joining me today to discuss his new book, Into the impossible, thinking like a Nobel prize winner. Lessons from Laureates to Stoke Curiosity, Spur Collaboration, and Ignite Imagination in your life and career. The book is a distillation of conversations with nine different Nobel prize winners in physics on his podcast, into the impossible. The book deals not with the technical details of their discovery, but rather with the collaborations involved, the importance of working in a team, curiosity and the process of discovery, and also personal insecurities. Topics include: Is this a science book or a self-help book? Why should we care about Nobel Prize winners? Do they really suffer from the Imposter Syndrome or know what it is? Does high-level academic work allow service? That is, were any of these people ever Department Chair or Associate Dean? Did any of them have a podcast? ;) Is partisanship and rivalry helpful in advancing science?

The Indicator from Planet Money
A Nobel prize for an economics revolution

The Indicator from Planet Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 9:03


Joshua Angrist, Guido Imbens and David Card won the economics Nobel on Monday. On today's show, we talk to the Princeton professor who mentored two of the winners.

Babbage from Economist Radio
Babbage: Rocks in space

Babbage from Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:33


A probe to study the Trojan asteroids is expected to take off this week, but what will this mission uncover about the formation of the solar system? Also, we explore new technology to observe asteroids, as well as a mission to deflect an incoming celestial object. And, we hear from the Nobel co-laureate in Physiology or Medicine, Ardem Patapoutian, about temperature and pressure sensing. Alok Jha hosts. For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Babbage: Rocks in space

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:33


A probe to study the Trojan asteroids is expected to take off this week, but what will this mission uncover about the formation of the solar system? Also, we explore new technology to observe asteroids, as well as a mission to deflect an incoming celestial object. And, we hear from the Nobel co-laureate in Physiology or Medicine, Ardem Patapoutian, about temperature and pressure sensing. Alok Jha hosts. For full access to The Economist's print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.Terms and conditions for the book competition featured in this podcast are available at economist.com/podcast-contest. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Liberi Oltre & Michele Boldrin
Il Premio Nobel all'Economia a Angrist, Card e Imbens... cosa premia esattamente?

Liberi Oltre & Michele Boldrin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 74:27


Il Premio Nobel all'Economia 2021 a Angrist, Card e Imbens, cosa premia esattamente? Michele Boldrin, Andrea Moro, Sandro Brusco e Alberto Bisin - la vecchia redazione di noiseFromAmerika - si confrontano con le motivazioni dei colleghi svedesi che hanno deciso il premio Nobel all'Economia 2021.

Angu de Grilo
Ciência e casamento às cegas #106

Angu de Grilo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 43:46


Boa terça, angulers! Essa semana, abrimos o episódio #106 falando sobre os cortes no orçamento da ciência. Com redução de 92% do orçamento, a pesquisa brasileira respira por aparelhos. Depois, comentamos a versão brasileira do reality Casamento às Cegas, um queridinho do angu kkkk. Aproveitamos a deixa do feriado para recarregar as energias e recomendamos músicas e outras séries que temos ouvido e assistido. Por fim, um breve comentário sobre o prêmio Nobel. O da Paz foi entregue a dois jornalistas, Maria Ressa e Dmitry Muratov, um aceno de esperança para uma profissão que anda sendo tão castigada. Sirva-se!

Snacks Daily

The artist behind Chubbies' shorts is going public, but it's really a fraternity. Southwest Airlines just canceled so many weekend flights that its stock dropped (and the mysteries began). And the Nobel Prize for economics just tested an ancient theory: Would a $15 minimum wage make McDonald's lay off their burger crew? $DTC $LUV Got a SnackFact? Tweet it @RobinhoodSnacks @JackKramer @NickOfNewYork Want a shoutout on the pod? Fill out this form: https://forms.gle/KhUAo31xmkSdeynD9 Got a SnackFact for the pod? We got a form for that too: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe64VKtvMNDPGSncHDRF07W34cPMDO3N8Y4DpmNP_kweC58tw/viewform Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

La Brújula de la Ciencia
La Brújula de la Ciencia s11e08: Nobel de Química 2021 a los catalizadores que distinguen "izquierda" y "derecha"

La Brújula de la Ciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 4:59


El último de los Nobel de ciencias, el de Química, ha premiado a los descubridores de nuevas herramientas para fabricar moléculas. Benjamin List y David MacMillan han dedicado su carrera a desarrollar nuevos catalizadores, sustancias que permiten "dirigir" las reacciones químicas, de forma que se generen las sustancias que a nosotros nos interesan. Pero no sólo eso: los catalizadores de List y MacMillan están hechos de carbono, oxígeno, nitrógeno o azufre, los elementos que están presentes en todos los seres vivos. Los catalizadores tradicionales suelen incorporar metales, que cumplen muy bien esa función, pero son más caros y más contaminantes. Y todavía tienen una ventaja más: con estos catalizadores orgánicos podemos seleccionar de forma natural si queremos producir una sustancia "hacia la izquierda" o "hacia la derecha". Os explicamos lo que significan estas expresiones con un pequeño experimento para el que sólo necesitaréis... vuestras manos. Si queréis aprender más sobre catálisis y su gran importancia en la química buscad los capítulos s04e23 y s03e34, en los que hablamos con mucho más detalle de qué significa que una molécula pueda "dirigir" una reacción química. te programa se emitió originalmente el 6 de octubre de 2021. Podéis escuchar el resto de audios de La Brújula en la app de Onda Cero y en su web, ondacero.es

The Naked Scientists Podcast
Particle Problems and How to Solve Them

The Naked Scientists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:33


This week, we're journeying into the world of the smallest objects known to humanity: the tiny particles that make up us and the entire universe around us. Plus, in the news, getting the world vaccinated against COVID-19 - half the global population have been jabbed so far, but the many countries in the Global South lag far behind; the Nobel prizes are announced; and, have scientists finally solved the biggest problem of them all: leaves on the line delaying trains... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

The John Batchelor Show
1756: The Nobelist Dmitry Muratov is a protege of Mikhail Gorbachev and the late Professor Stephen F. Cohen. Katrina Vanden Heuvel @TheNation

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:15


Photo:  The Academy's Documents.   The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, officially the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, is an economics award administered by the Nobel Foundation. Laureates are selected by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. .. The Nobelist Dmitry Muratov is a protege of Mikhail Gorbachev and the late Professor Stephen F. Cohen.  Katrina Vanden Heuvel @TheNation https://www.thenation.com/article/world/muratov-nobel-prize/ https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Nobel-panel-to-announce-2021-peace-prize-16518290.php

Live from AC2nd
Election Shock Therapy - Episode 132: Happy Nobel Week!

Live from AC2nd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 24:49


The EST gang recognizes the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics and discusses the prospects for a Nobel Prize in Political Science.

Real Coffee with Scott Adams
Episode 1526 Scott Adams: Dave Chapelle, Nobel Prize Craziness, and More Surprises

Real Coffee with Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 55:59


My new book LOSERTHINK, available now on Amazon https://tinyurl.com/rqmjc2a Find my "extra" content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Groups of people who don't like being pushed around Southwest Airline employees Dave Chappelle's latest on Netflix Travel and women Nobel prize for economics shoulda been me Fake News Identifier Filter https://tinyurl.com/2esjzm23 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, including micro-lessons on lots of useful topics to build your talent stack, please see scottadams.locals.com for full access to that secret treasure. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/scott-adams00/support

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1526 Scott Adams: Dave Chapelle, Nobel Prize Craziness, and More Surprises

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 56:00


Find my “extra” content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: Groups of people who don't like being pushed around Southwest Airline employees Dave Chappelle's latest on Netflix Travel and women Nobel prize for economics shoulda been me Fake News Identifier Filter https://tinyurl.com/2esjzm23 If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus content from Scott Adams, … The post Episode 1526 Scott Adams: Dave Chapelle, Nobel Prize Craziness, and More Surprises appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

World Business Report
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 26:28


This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work. Also in the programme, with high energy prices leading to the suspension of steel production in parts of Europe, we ask Portuguese Member of the European Parliament, Pedro Marques, what governments can do to help deal with the situation. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the economic importance of donkeys to sub-Saharan Africa. Plus, we hear from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, about whether business is doing enough to tackle climate change. Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Benjie Guy. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)

5 Things
One-fourth of US infrastructure is at risk of flooding

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 9:35


That's according to a new report out today, the latest bleak climate news in recent weeks. Plus, a Minnesota shootout leaves at least 1 dead, the Nobel prizes come to a close, a growing number of cities replace Columbus day with Indigenous Peoples Day and a new-look Boston Marathon returns.(Audio: Associated Press)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

En Caso de que el Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD

La Caja de Pandora era aquella que una vez abierta liberaría todos los males del mundo provocando caos, confusión, terror y escándalo. Pandora Papers La semana del escándalo - Los papeles de Pandora - Famosos y políticos del mundo involucrados - Paraísos fiscales y fuga de capitales - Nobel de la Paz - Libertad de expresión - Castillo relanza su Gobierno - Quién manda en Guayaquil Ecuador - Frase de Abdulrazak Gurnah - La irracionalidad y las pseudo verdades.  Noticias Del Mundo: Plan de Seguridad entre México y Estados Unidos - Tensión entre Taiwán y China - Un peso pesado - Francia campeona de Europa - Lo que dijo Paul McCartney - Quién disolvió a The Beatles - Killer Queen por Freddie Mercury. Historias Desintegradas: El mundo suspendido - Regresan los Conciertos - Una lista envidiable - Retómenos - Luna Park fila cinco - Al Cirque Du Solei - Guns and Roses - En el Palacio de los Deportes - Varios años después, en Tijuana - Canjeo Mis Quince - Festivales Piñata - Feria del pueblo - Y que me suspendían a Rammstein en Ciudad de México - Glorioso desintegrador - Los loros argentinos invasores - Las guardias hospitalarias y el gato negro - El duende salteño y más...  En Caso De Que El Mundo Se Desintegre - ECDQEMSD Daily Podcast

The John Batchelor Show
1754: The Kremlin charge of Europe and China winter. H. J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 14:46


Photo: View of one of Bröderna Nobel's limited company drilling rigs - for extraction of oil by pumping (Ausschöpfen). Balachani 1883 .. (More text can be found on the back of the photograph). The photograph is in red cardboard with the text - Pictures from some facilities within Nafta-Produktionsaktiebolag Bröderna Nobel. @Batchelorshow The Kremlin charge of Europe and China winter. H. J. Mackinder #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-10/world-s-energy-chaos-turns-russia-into-top-emerging-market-pick?srnd=premium-europe&sref=5g4GmFHo

Coffee With Scott Adams
Episode 1524 Scott Adams: Don’t Miss My Impression of Kamala Harris as the Harry Potter Golem, But More Optimistic

Coffee With Scott Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 48:55


Find my “extra” content on Locals: https://ScottAdams.Locals.com Content: NYC George Floyd statue defaced BLM, Antifa, police shootings, all quiet now Nobel prizes, Pulitzer, Reuben awards No criticism of President Trump's policies 4 Options for a vaccine passport Kamala Harris cringey video with young girls If you would like to enjoy this same content plus bonus … The post Episode 1524 Scott Adams: Don't Miss My Impression of Kamala Harris as the Harry Potter Golem, But More Optimistic appeared first on Scott Adams Says.

Kottke Ride Home
Fri. 10/08 - Is The Nobel Prize Bad For Science?

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:33


The winners of the Nobel Peace Prize have been announced! As well as the winners in Chemistry and Literature. More on each winner, as well as a question about whether we really need the Nobel Prize. Plus, the remnants of the oldest Black church in the US have been uncovered in Colonial Williamsburg. And a Google AI has recreated famous works of art by Gustav Klimt that were lost in World War II.Sponsors:Novo, BankNovo.com/kottkeLinks:Maria Ressa is only the 18th woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in its 126-year history. (NY Times)The Nobel Peace Prize 2021 - Press release (Nobel Prize) Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win Nobel Peace Prize (Washington Post)Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to Scientists for Creating a Tool to Build Molecules (NY Times)Abdulrazak Gurnah wins the 2021 Nobel prize in literature (The Guardian)The flaws in the Nobel Prizes in medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics (Vox) Why COVID vaccines didn't win a science Nobel this year (Nature)Remnants of Black church uncovered in Colonial Williamsburg (AP)Colonial Williamsburg Project Unearths Foundation of First Baptist Church (NY Times)The Quest to Unearth One of America's Oldest Black Churches (Wired, 2020)Google used AI to recreate Gustav Klimt paintings burned by Nazis (Mashable)Klimt vs. Klimt (Google Arts & Culture)'The case remains open': FBI rebuts claim Zodiac Killer case is solved (NBC News)'Hot Garbage': Zodiac Expert Calls 'Bulls---' on Possible ID of Infamous Serial Killer (Rolling Stone)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Economist Radio
Strait of tension: Chinese jets test Taiwan

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 22:05


China has sent more than 100 planes to probe Taiwan's air-defence zone. We explain why Beijing has chosen this moment to send a message across the strait. The WHO has approved a vaccine against malaria—a turning-point in fighting a disease that kills 260,000 African children a year. And if you want a Nobel prize, it helps to be lauded by a laureate. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.