Podcasts about Fordham University

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

American university

  • 856PODCASTS
  • 1,293EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 3, 2021LATEST
Fordham University

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Fordham University

Show all podcasts related to fordham university

Latest podcast episodes about Fordham University

Divorce Dialogues
Making the Holidays Magical for Your Children After a Divorce With Dr. Kathryn Smerling

Divorce Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 26:30


The holidays are a particularly challenging time for divorced parents. How do we navigate our own feelings of loss without passing that heartache onto our children? Can we create new traditions and still make the holidays a magical time for our kids? Dr. Kathryn Smerling is an educator and psychologist with a PhD from Fordham University and master's from Cornell. She started her career as an early childhood educator, creating the Instep curriculum for preschoolers in the State of New Mexico before completing the psychoanalytic program at the National Institute for Psychotherapies. Dr. Smerling has maintained a private practice as a family therapist in Manhattan since 1998, and she holds certificates in Divorce Mediation, Divorce Collaboration and Relational Therapy. On this episode of Divorce Dialogues, Dr. Smerling joins Katherine to explain what divorced parents can do to navigate feelings of loss during the holidays and find new ways to celebrate with our children. She discusses why it's crucial for coparents to be collaborative and offers advice on how to approach holiday planning with a difficult ex-spouse. Listen in for Dr. Smerling's insight around religion as a source of conflict for coparents during the holidays and learn how to talk to your children about creating new traditions after a divorce. Topics Covered What divorced parents can do to navigate feelings of loss during the holidays Dr. Smerling's advice on finding new ways to celebrate the holidays after a divorce Why it's crucial for coparents to be flexible and collaborative re: holiday plans Why Dr. Smerling suggests including children in creating new traditions The pros and cons of alternating holidays and examples of creative alternatives How to approach holiday planning with a high-conflict ex-spouse Using the BIFF system (Brief, Informative, Firm and Friendly) to communicate with a difficult coparent How religion can be a source a conflict for divorced parents around the holidays The role a parenting coordinator can play in making holiday plans Dr. Smerling's advice for divorced parents facing the holidays for the first time Connect with Dr. Kathryn Smerling Dr. Smerling's Website: https://drksmerling.com/ Connect with Katherine Miller The Center for Understanding Conflict: http://understandinginconflict.org/ Miller Law Group: https://westchesterfamilylaw.com/ Katherine on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/kemiller1 The New Yorker's Guide to Collaborative Divorce by Katherine Miller: https://www.amazon.com/New-Yorkers-Guide-Collaborative-Divorce/dp/0692496246 Email: katherine@westchesterfamilylaw.com Call (914) 738-7765 Resources Ackerman Institute for the Family: https://www.ackerman.org/ National Institute for Psychotherapies: https://nipinst.org/

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 104 | NFL Vax: Antonio Brown Is No Aaron Rodgers | Senator Ron Johnson Defends Waukesha Comments

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 85:34


Senator Ron Johnson appears on the show to defend his comments about not politicizing the Waukesha parade massacre. Does Whitlock stand behind his column from Monday criticizing the senator? What do Jason and “Fearless” contributor Steve Kim think about Antonio Brown's fake vaccination card? Is Brown's punishment unfair compared to that of Aaron Rodgers? “Hate Crime Hoax” author Wilfred Reilly gives the latest on the Jussie Smollett case and analyzes the collegiate racial controversies at Fordham University and Coastal Carolina University. “Fearless” columnist Delano Squires gives the scoop on his Twitter battle with race-baiter Brittney Cooper. Plus, Uncle Jimmy and Jason mix humor into their analysis of Coach Deion Sanders' decision to have Instagram model Brittany Renner inspire his Jackson State team.   ​​Today's Sponsor: Get with Good Ranchers today and support American farmers! Visit https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS to get $20 dollars OFF and FREE express shipping.   Save 20% on “Fearless” swag! Use Promo Code Fearless20 at: https://shop.blazemedia.com/fearless to make yourself an official member of the “Fearless Army.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

40 Plus: Real Men. Real Talk.
149: You're Never Too Old To Say – Judge Me Not – James Merrick

40 Plus: Real Men. Real Talk.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 36:15


From a young age, the fear of God caused him to tremble in his boots about his secret. Then, in his 40's he could no longer live within that secret, and he realized he had to be who he was, a gay man. Then he made national headlines by taking a stand as a gay educator, fighting for the right to teach in his classroom, when parents saw him as a threat to their children. All because people judged who he was and who he was meant to love and share a life with. James Merrick shares is truth and his journey about being judged as a 40 Plus gay man. About James https://www.amazon.com/Judge-Me-Not-Memoir-Discovery-ebook/dp/B09CLK91N5/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&qid=1634326132&refinements=p_27%3AJames+Merrick&s=books&sr=1-1 ()James Merrick lives in Bakersfield, California, with his husband Juan. He Graduated from Fordham University with a PhD in Curriculum and Teaching. In 1999, he won a nationally televised battle to keep students in his classroom. Writing has been an essential part of his professional life. Judge Me, Judge Me Not. is his first memoir. He is currently drafting his first novel. Hey Guys, Check This Out! Are you a guy who keeps struggling to do that thing? You know the thing you keep telling yourself and others you're going to do, but never do? Then it's time to get real and figure out why. Join the 40 Plus Men's Circle. Learn about about - http://40plusmenscircle.com/ (Click Here!) Break free of fears. Make bold moves. Live life without apologies P.S. get your free My Bold Life Manifesto, right here - https://rickclemons.com/manifesto/ (rickclemons.com/manifesto/) You can also listen to the podcast on… https://apple.co/2Q4nnbt ()   https://open.spotify.com/show/3D4LvaRQjd5EcHWW4nKmQp ()https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/rick-clemons/forty-plus-real-men-real-talk ()   http://tun.in/pjrug ()https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/40-plus-real-men-real-talk-854094 ()   https://radiopublic.com/40-plus-real-men-real-talk-WoBlp5 ()  

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
Finding God at a Rock Show with Tom Beaudoin

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 58:35


Why do some "secular" music or art experiences feel sacred? Guest Tom Beaudoin, Ph.D., is a theology professor at Fordham University has spent a lot of his career exploring this question. He joins host Mike Jordan Laskey to talk about encountering the divine in music, plus a conversation on Tom's new research project on the effects the ancient Pantheon temple (now a church) in Rome has on its visitors. Learn more about Tom: https://sites.google.com/site/tmbeaudoin/ AMDG is a production of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. Subscribe to AMDG wherever you get podcasts.

Reading Women
Interview with Kyle Lucia Wu

Reading Women

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:27


In this week's episode, Kendra talks with Kyle Lucia Wu about her book, Win Me Something, which is out from Tin House. Check out our Patreon page to learn more about our book club and other Patreon-exclusive goodies. Follow along over on Instagram, join the discussion in our Goodreads group, and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more new books and extra book reviews! Books MentionedWin Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu Kyle Recommends Such a Fun Age by Kylie Reid Overpour by Jane Wong Ghost Forest by Pin-Shuen Fung The Atmosphereians by Alex McElroy About the AuthorKyle Lucia Wu, author of Win Me Something, has received the Asian American Writers' Workshop Margins Fellowship and residencies from Millay Arts, The Byrdcliffe Colony, Plympton's Writing Downtown Residency, and the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center. She is the Programs & Communications Director at Kundiman and has taught creative writing at Fordham University and The New School. She lives in New York City. Website | Instagram | Twitter CONTACT Questions? Comments? Email us hello@readingwomenpodcast.com.  SOCIAL MEDIA Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website Music by Miki Saito with Isaac Greene Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Florida Bar's LegalFuel Podcast
Professional Etiquette in the Zoom Era

The Florida Bar's LegalFuel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:32


The Florida Supreme Court has partnered with the Bar to declare November “Legal Professionalism Month” and is asking members to rededicate themselves to the highest ideals of professionalism and civility in all they do.  To close out the month and as reference going forward, we thought we'd discuss how to navigate the new normal as it pertains to our virtual or socially distanced workplace interactions with colleagues and clients. In today's episode hosts Christine Bilbrey and Karla Eckardt are joined by Mr. Manners himself, Thomas Farley, to discuss all our modern professional etiquette dilemmas.Thomas P. Farley is a keynote speaker, workshop leader, syndicated columnist, and TV commentator. His clients have included the United States Department of Commerce, the Estée Lauder Companies, JPMorgan Chase, the Walt Disney Corporation, Bank of America, the American Automobile Association (AAA), the U.S. Army, Viacom, Toyota, and UPS. Thomas is a regular and popular guest on the NBC Today show, where he fields questions on modern-day manners issues. In 2017, he debuted “Manners on the Move,” a special multi-part Today show series that examined incivility in America. His syndicated weekly column, “Ask Mister Manners,” appears in Tribune publications throughout the United States. His insights appear regularly in other media as well, including the Rachael Ray show, Inside Edition, Dr. Oz, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Wired and Money magazines, USA Today, CNN, VH1, and ABC. Thomas is a graduate of New York's Fordham University. He has been a guest lecturer at New York University's School of Continuing and Professional Studies, and he edited the anthology “Modern Manners: The Thinking Person's Guide to Social Graces.”This podcast has been approved by The Florida Bar Continuing Legal Education Department for 1 hour of General CLE credit including 1 hour of Professionalism CLE credit. Course #5680.REFERENCED RESOURCES:Thomas P. Farley - Mister MannersWorkshopsAsk Mr. MannersThe Florida Bar's Henry Latimer Center for ProfessionalismLegal Professionalism in the Electronic AgeBest Practices for Professional Electronic Communication

New Books Network
Raymond C. Kuo, "Following the Leader: Alliance Design, Security Strategies, and Institutional Emulation" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:17


Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo argues that nations do not consistently construct contextually appropriate military alliances. Rather, they often ignore their own security interests and follow the dominant alliance strategy. The author uses case studies and advanced statistical analysis to evaluate the period between 1815 and 2003, finding that hegemons who emerge after each collapse of the international system set up core military partnerships to target their key enemies. Secondary and peripheral countries, instead of forging novel alliances of their own, emulate the template set by the hegemon, thereby demonstrating their need for credibility and status. Dr. Raymond Kuo is an expert in international security and East Asia. He is currently a Political Scientist with the RAND Corporation. He has published two books this year: Following the Leader on military alliances and Contests of Initiative on China's maritime gray zone strategy. Dr. Kuo was a tenure-track professor at Fordham University and the University at Albany, SUNY. He previously worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan). He holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Raymond C. Kuo, "Following the Leader: Alliance Design, Security Strategies, and Institutional Emulation" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:17


Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo argues that nations do not consistently construct contextually appropriate military alliances. Rather, they often ignore their own security interests and follow the dominant alliance strategy. The author uses case studies and advanced statistical analysis to evaluate the period between 1815 and 2003, finding that hegemons who emerge after each collapse of the international system set up core military partnerships to target their key enemies. Secondary and peripheral countries, instead of forging novel alliances of their own, emulate the template set by the hegemon, thereby demonstrating their need for credibility and status. Dr. Raymond Kuo is an expert in international security and East Asia. He is currently a Political Scientist with the RAND Corporation. He has published two books this year: Following the Leader on military alliances and Contests of Initiative on China's maritime gray zone strategy. Dr. Kuo was a tenure-track professor at Fordham University and the University at Albany, SUNY. He previously worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan). He holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in History
Raymond C. Kuo, "Following the Leader: Alliance Design, Security Strategies, and Institutional Emulation" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:17


Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo argues that nations do not consistently construct contextually appropriate military alliances. Rather, they often ignore their own security interests and follow the dominant alliance strategy. The author uses case studies and advanced statistical analysis to evaluate the period between 1815 and 2003, finding that hegemons who emerge after each collapse of the international system set up core military partnerships to target their key enemies. Secondary and peripheral countries, instead of forging novel alliances of their own, emulate the template set by the hegemon, thereby demonstrating their need for credibility and status. Dr. Raymond Kuo is an expert in international security and East Asia. He is currently a Political Scientist with the RAND Corporation. He has published two books this year: Following the Leader on military alliances and Contests of Initiative on China's maritime gray zone strategy. Dr. Kuo was a tenure-track professor at Fordham University and the University at Albany, SUNY. He previously worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan). He holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Film
Raymond C. Kuo, "Following the Leader: Alliance Design, Security Strategies, and Institutional Emulation" (Stanford UP, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 54:17


Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo argues that nations do not consistently construct contextually appropriate military alliances. Rather, they often ignore their own security interests and follow the dominant alliance strategy. The author uses case studies and advanced statistical analysis to evaluate the period between 1815 and 2003, finding that hegemons who emerge after each collapse of the international system set up core military partnerships to target their key enemies. Secondary and peripheral countries, instead of forging novel alliances of their own, emulate the template set by the hegemon, thereby demonstrating their need for credibility and status. Dr. Raymond Kuo is an expert in international security and East Asia. He is currently a Political Scientist with the RAND Corporation. He has published two books this year: Following the Leader on military alliances and Contests of Initiative on China's maritime gray zone strategy. Dr. Kuo was a tenure-track professor at Fordham University and the University at Albany, SUNY. He previously worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan). He holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Aditya Srinivasan assisted with this episode. Lamis Abdelaaty is an assistant professor of political science at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She is the author of Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees (Oxford University Press, 2021). Email her comments at labdelaa@syr.edu or tweet to @LAbdelaaty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

Buried Secrets Podcast
Ghost Priests (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 53:49


A look at some stories of ghost priests in an old library and classroom building. Plus, something strange that supposedly happened in the cemetery while The Exorcist was being filmed nearby. Highlights include: • A 1980s ghost priest who apparently knew computer programming • A cemetery (and human remains) that was relocated twice • Phantom voices heard by security guards • Lightning striking a cemetery Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Calmfidence with Patricia Stark (11/23/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 66:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/CQJzf028fVo  www.calmfidencebook.com Learn how to communicate —inside and out—with calm, confidence, no matter the circumstances, with a collection of tips, tools, natural remedies, client stories, and on-the-spot exercises from PATRICIA STARK, Communication Expert, and Personal and Professional Development Trainer. CALMFIDENCE: How to Trust Yourself, Tame Your Inner Critic, and Shine in Any Spotlight By Patricia Stark Just Released! ABOUT THE AUTHOR Patricia Stark is President of Patricia Stark Communications and Calmfidence® Workshops. Clients include, ESPN, NASA TV, Glamour, Amazon, BET, Turner Broadcasting, CBS, OWN, NASCAR, Conde Nast, Spotify, Quaker Oats, Discovery Channel, E! News, NASCAR, and the Miss American Organization. Patricia works with closely with celebrities, corporate executives, authors, news anchors, social media influencers, and others whose careers rely on their ability to communicate confidently. Patricia has extensive experience as a Health and Wellness Anchor and Television Host, National & International News Anchor and has served as a contributor for the History Channel and the Huffington Post as well as a guest television expert. Patricia is a guest lecturer at colleges and universities including Fordham University and LIU on the topics of Communication Skills, Calmfidence®, Public Speaking Skills, Interpersonal Skills Interview Skills and Stress and Anxiety Busters. She lives in New York. For more, see PatriciaStark.com and Calmfidencebook.com Praise for CALMFIDENCE “A unique take on self-help that everyone should read. 

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 3 (11/22)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:26


Ken is solo while John is on vacation. Steven Greenhut comes on the show to talk about the Biden administration calling out California over their pension program for state employees. An update on California's unemployment department, EDD. Welcome to Bidenville. A Fordham University professor is suing over a claim that he pleasured himself on Zoom in front of the class & the student who complained is also suing.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – November 21, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 159:41


The High Five Champion joins us, Michigan v. OSU week, Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, Britney v. Xtina, Kyle Rittenhouse acquitted, new Kid Rock, Drew Crime, and everyone is old.The Detroit Lions lost again. Marc somehow thinks they're "close" despite having no talent. An asphalt company is being attacked by the Lions for running truthful commercials during their games.The Michigan State Spartans were exposed by the Ohio State Buckeyes. Good luck, Michigan.Drew loved the 2021 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.Lyla's streak is back to 0 due to "human error".Britney Spears is really mad that Christina Aguilera didn't make the Latin awards about Britney Spears.HBO released the Alanis Morissette Music Box: Jagged documentary. No one can figure out why Alanis was so upset at the filmmakers. Mathew Moroun was the latest billionaire to hang out in the Red Shovel Studios.Kyle Rittenhouse was found not guilty on all charges. GoFundMe refused to raise funds for Rittenhouse. A police officer was fired for donating $25 to his defense. His attorney is getting death threats and he wants Don Jr. and Matt Gaetz to shut up. Nicholas Sandmann wants to be his bestie. Joe Biden called Rittenhouse a white supremacist, so everyone wants Kyle to sue him. Trevor Bauer makes it all about himself.Alec Baldwin is having a great time post murder.Meghan Markle did the most embarrassing comedy bit on Ellen.Jonah Falcon is so tired of being asked about his massive dong.Jim Acosta vs Tucker Carlson.Janet Jackson has a new "victim documentary" out. Morning radio paid the ultimate price for her wardrobe malfunction.48 Hours covered the 1987 murders of Tanya Van Cuylenborg and Jay Cook.High Five Man aka, Teddy McHuggin aka, Jeff Ondash joins the show to brag about his new world record giving high fives and predicts a huge OSU victory over Michigan. Jeff is also the hugging champion of the world.Some people are saying there was some "point manipulation" going on in the Michigan/UNLV basketball game.Turns out our store is being mean to Canadians. Please buy our merch.Roger Clemens' son is a Detroit Tiger. Carlos Correa is too expensive for Detroit.Vaccines: The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are passing the buck on Antonio Brown's fake vaccination card. Kyrie Irving hates the COVID vaccine so much that he's just going to wait until this blows over. Stellantis is require the jab... for salaried employees only because they aren't in a union. TSA has a deadline coming up.Martin Luther King Jr. High School students walked out because their school is not ready to operate during the pandemic.Don't you dare order late at the Southgate Tim Horton's drive thru.Some people are saying Drew complaining about CVS has led to 900 closures.The booster shot gave Drew diarrhea.Nobody is going to watch Paris Hilton's stupid wedding video streaming on Peacock.Kid Rock dropped a new a tune and it rocks. TMZ cries about it.Fordham University is wrapped in a Zoom "masturbation" scandal.Killer Cares is December 2nd.Gary Hoey will join us tomorrow.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Energy Policy and Efforts to Combat Climate Change

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Jason Bordoff, cofounding dean, Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University, leads a conversation on energy policy and efforts to combat climate change.   FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I am Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's discussion is on the record. And the video and transcript will be available on our website, CFR.org/academic. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have with us today Jason Bordoff to talk about energy policy and efforts to combat climate change. Jason Bordoff is cofounding dean of the Columbia Climate School, founding director of the Center on Global Energy Policy, and professor of professional practice in international and public affairs at Columbia University. He previously served as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for energy and climate change on the National Security Council, and he has held senior policy positions on the White House's National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. He is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and is often on TV and radio. So, we're really happy to have him with us today. So, Jason, thank you very much. We are just coming off the COP26 conference that took place in Glasgow that started on October 31, I believe, and concluded last Friday, November 12. Could you talk about what came out of the conference at a high level, if you think that the agreements that were reached went far enough or didn't go far enough, and what your policy recommendations are to really advance and fight the countdown that we have to the Earth warming? BORDOFF: Yeah. Thanks. Well, first, thanks to you, Irina, and thanks to CFR for the invitation to be with you all today. Really delighted to have the chance to talk about these important issues. I was there for much of the two-week period in Glasgow representing the Energy Center and the Climate School here at Columbia. I think it's kind of a glass half-full/glass half-empty outlook coming out of Glasgow. So I think the Glasgow conference was notable in several respects. We'll look back on it, I think, and some of the things we will remember are—some of the things we'll remember—(dog barking)—sorry—are the role of the private sector and private finance, I think, was much more prominent in Glasgow this year. I think there were commitments around some important things like methane, a very potent greenhouse gas, was much higher on the priority list in this U.N. climate meeting than in prior ones. You had pledges on deforestation and other things that are important. And then the final agreement did have some important elements to it, particularly around Article 6, how you design carbon markets around the world. But the glass half-empty outlook is still we are nowhere close to being on track for the kind of targets that countries and companies are committing to: net zero by 2050 or 1.5 degrees of warming. I think there were—there should be hope and optimism coming out of COP. The role of the youth—at Columbia, we were honored to organize a private roundtable for President Obama with youth climate activists. It's hard to spend time with young people in COP or on campus here at Columbia or anywhere else and not be inspired by how passionately they take these issues. So the activism you saw in the streets, the sense of urgency among everyone—activists, civil society, governments, the private sector—felt different, I think, at this COP than other COPs that I have attended or probably the ones I haven't attended. But there was also for some I saw kind of we're coming out of this and we're on track for below two degrees. Or, you know, Fatih Birol, the head of the International Energy Agency, tweeted that when you add up all the pledges we're on track for 1.8 degrees Celsius warming. He's talking about all of the pledges meaning every country who's promised to be net zero by 2050, 2060, 2070, and at least from my standpoint there's a good reason to take those with a grain of salt. They're not often backed up by concrete plans or ideas about how you would get anywhere close to achieving those goals. So it's good that we have elevated ambition, which is kind of one of the core outcomes of the COP in Glasgow. But it is also the case that when you elevate ambition and the reality doesn't change as fast or maybe faster than the ambition is changing, what you have is a growing gap between ambition and reality. And I think that's where we are today. Oil use is rising each and every year. Gas use is rising. Coal use is going up this year. I don't know if it's going to keep going up, but at a minimum it's going to plateau. It's not falling off a cliff. So the reality of the energy world today—which is 75 percent of emissions are energy—is not anything close to net zero by 2050. It is the case that progress is possible. So if you go back to before the Paris agreement, we were on track for something like maybe 3.7 degrees Celsius of warming. If you look at a current outlook, it's maybe 2.7, 2.8 (degrees), so just below three degrees. So progress is possible. That's good. If you look at the nationally determined contribution pledges—so the commitments countries made that are more near term, more accountability for them; the commitments they made to reduce emissions by 2030, their NDCs—we would be on track for about 2.4 degrees Celsius warming, assuming all those pledges are fulfilled. But history would suggest a reason to be a little skeptical about that. The U.S. has a pledge to get to a 50 to 52 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, and look at how things are working or not working in Washington and make your own judgment about how likely it is that we'll put in place the set of policies that would be required to get to that ambitious level of decarbonization by 2030. And I think the same healthy dose of skepticism is warranted when you look elsewhere in the world. But even if we achieve all of those, we're still falling short of below two degrees, nevertheless 1.5 (degrees). And so, again, I think the outcome from COP for me was optimism that progress is possible—we have made a lot of progress in the last ten years—but acute concern that we're nowhere close to being on track to take targets like 1.5 degrees Celsius or net zero by 2050 seriously. And we just need to be honest as a climate and energy community—and I live in both of those worlds; there's a lot of overlap between them, obviously—about how hard it is to achieve the goals we are talking about. Renewables have grown incredibly quickly. Optimistic headlines every day about what is happening in solar and wind. Costs have come down more than 90 percent. Battery costs have come down more than 90 percent in the last decade. But solar and wind create electricity, and electricity is 20 percent of global final energy consumption. The outlook for electric vehicles is much more promising today. Lots of companies like Ford and others are committing to be all-electric by a certain date ten or twenty years from now. Cars are 20 percent of global oil demand. About half of the emission reductions—cumulative emission reductions between now and 2050 will need to come from technologies that are not yet available at commercial scale and sectors of the economy that are really hard to decarbonize like steel and cement and ships and airplanes. We're not—we don't have all the tools we need to do those yet. And then, in Glasgow, the focus of a lot of what we did at Columbia was on—we did a lot of different things, but one of the key areas of focus was the challenge of thinking about decarbonization in emerging and developing economies. I don't think we talk about that enough. The issue of historical responsibility of loss and damage was more on the agenda this year, and I think you'll hear even more about it in the year ahead. The next COP is in Africa. There was growing tension between rich and poor countries at this COP. I think a starting point was what we see in the pandemic alone and how inequitable around the world the impacts of the pandemic are. Many people couldn't even travel to Glasgow from the Global South because they couldn't get vaccinated. We need, between now and 2050, estimates are—a ballpark—$100 trillion of additional investment in clean energy if we're going to get on track for 1.5 (degrees)/net zero by 2050. So the question that should obsess all of us who work in this space: Where will that money come from? Most of it's going to be private sector, not public. Most of it is going to be in developing and emerging economies. That is where the growth in energy is going to come from. Eight hundred million people have no access to energy at all. Nevertheless, if you model what energy access means, it's often defined as, you have enough to turn on lights or charge your cellphone. But when you talk about even a fraction of the standard of living we take for granted—driving a car, having a refrigerator, having an air conditioner—the numbers are massive. They're just huge, and the population of Africa's going to double to 2.2 billion by the year 2050. So these are really big numbers and we need to recognize how hard this is. But we should also recognize that it is possible. We have a lot of the tools we need. We need innovation in technology and we need stronger policy, whether that's a carbon price or standards for different sectors. And then, of course, we need private-sector actors to step up as well, and all of us. And we have these great commitments to achieve these goals with a lot of capital being put to work, and now we need to hold people accountable to make sure that they do that. So, again, I look back on the last two weeks or before, two weeks of COP, the gap between ambition and reality got bigger. Not necessarily a bad thing—ambition is a good thing—but now it's time to turn the ambition into action. We need governments to follow through on their pledges. Good news is we have a wide menu of options for reducing emissions. The bad news is there's not a lot of time at our current rate of emissions. And emissions are still going up each and every year. They're not even falling yet. Remember, what matters is the cumulative total, not the annual flow. At our current rate of emissions, the budget—carbon budget for staying below 1.5 (degrees) is used up in, around a decade or so, so there's not much time to get to work. But I'm really excited about what we're building with the first climate school in the country here at Columbia. When it comes to pushing—turning ambition into action, that requires research, it requires education, and it requires engaging with partners in civil society and the public sector and the private sector to help turn that research into action. And the people we're working with here every day on campus are the ones who are going to be the leaders that are going to hopefully do a better job—(laughs)—than we've done over the last few decades. So whatever you're doing at your educational institution—be it teaching or research or learning—we all have a role to play in the implementation of responsible, forward-thinking energy policy. I'm really excited to have the chance to talk with you all today. Look forward to your questions and to the conversation. Thank you again. FASKIANOS: Jason, that's fantastic. Thank you very much for that informative and sobering view. So let's turn to all of you now for your questions. So I'm going to go first to—I have one raised hand from Stephen Kass. Q: OK. Thank you. Jason, thank you for the very useful and concise summary. What specific kinds of energy programs do you think developing countries should now be pursuing? Should they be giving up coal entirely? Should they be importing natural gas? Should they be investing in renewables or nuclear? What recipe would you advise developing countries to pursue for their own energy needs? BORDOFF: It's going to need to be a lot of different things, so there's no single answer to that, of course. And by the way, I'll just say it would be super helpful if people don't mind just introducing yourself when you ask a question. That would be helpful to me, at least. I appreciate it. I think they need to do a lot of different things. I think I would start with low-hanging fruit, and renewable electricity is not the entire answer. The sun and wind are intermittent. Electricity can't do certain things yet, like power ships and airplanes. But the low cost of solar and wind, I think, does mean it's a good place to start, and then we need to think about those other sectors as well. I think a key thing there comes back to finance, and that's why we're spending so much time on it with our research agenda here. Access to financing and cost of capital are really important. Clean energy tends to be more capital-intensive and then, like solar and wind, more CAPEX, less OPEX over time. But attaining financing in poor countries is really difficult and expensive. Lack of experience with renewable energy, local banks are often reluctant to lend to those kinds of projects. And then foreign investors, where most of that capital is going to come from, view projects often in emerging markets and developing economies particularly as more risky. Local utilities may not be creditworthy. There's currency inflation risk in many developing countries, people worry about recouping their upfront investment if bills are paid in local currency. There's political risk, maybe corruption, inconsistently enforced regulations. And it can be harder to build clean energy infrastructure if you don't have other kinds of infrastructure, like ports, and roads, and bridges and a good electrical grid. So I would start there. And I think there's a role for those countries to scale up their clean energy sectors, but also for policymakers and multilateral development banks and governments elsewhere—there was a lot of focus in Glasgow on whether the developed countries would make good on their promise made in Copenhagen to send $100 billion a year in climate finance to developing countries. And they fell short of that. But even that is kind of a rounding error, compared to the one to two trillion (dollars) a year that the International Energy Agency estimates is needed. So there are many other things besides just writing a check that government, like in the U.S. or elsewhere, can do. The Development Finance Corporation, for example, can lend to banks in local and affordable rates, finance projects in local currency, expand the availability of loan guarantees. I've written before about how I think even what often gets called industrial policy, let's think about some sectors—in the same way China did with solar or batteries fifteen years ago. Are there sectors where governments might help to grow domestic industries and, by doing that, scale—bring down the cost of technologies that are expensive now, the premium for low-carbon or zero-carbon cement or steel. It's just—it's not reasonable to ask a developing country to build new cities, and new highways, and all the new construction they're going to do with zero-carbon steel and cement because it's just way too expensive. So how do you bring those costs down? If we think about investments, we can make through U.S. infrastructure or other spending to do that, that not only may help to grow some domestic industries and jobs here, that can be its own form of global leadership if we're driving those costs of those technologies down to make it cheaper for others to pick up. So I think that's one of the places I'd start. But there are a lot of other things we need to do too. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question—and let me just go back. Stephen Kass is an adjunct professor at NYU. So the next question is a written question from Wei Liang, who is an assistant professor of international policy studies at Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey. And the question is: I wonder if you could briefly address the Green Climate Fund and individual countries' pledge on that. BORDOFF: Yeah, I mean, it touches a little bit on what I said a moment ago about the need for developed countries to provide climate finance to developing countries. And so I think that's—it's important that we take those obligations seriously, and that we, in advanced economies, step up and make those funds available. And but, again, we're talking—the amount we're still talking about is so small compared to the amounts that are needed to deal both with the impacts of climate change, and then also to curb climate change, to mitigate climate change. Because we know that developing countries are in the parts of the world that will often be most adversely impacted by climate impacts—droughts, and heat waves, and storms, and food security issues—from a standpoint of equity are the parts of the world that have done the least to cause this problem, responsible for very few emissions. If you look cumulatively at emissions since the start of the industrial age, about half—nearly half have come from the U.S. and EU combined. Two percent from the entire continent of Africa. So they are using very little energy today, haven't therefore contributed to the problems, and have the fewest resources, of course, to cope with the impacts, and also to develop in a cleaner way. Sometimes it's cheaper to develop in a cleaner way. Renewables are often today competitive with coal, even without subsidy. But there are many areas where that's not the case, and there is a cost. And we need to help make sure that, you know, we're thinking about what a just transition looks like. And that means many different things for different communities, whether you're a coal worker or an agricultural worker in California that may, you know, be working outside in worse and worse heat. But it also means thinking about the parts of the world that need assistance to make this transition. So I think we need to be taking that much more seriously. FASKIANOS: Next question is a raised hand from Tara Weil, who is an undergraduate student at Pomona College. Q: Hi. So, given that developed nations are the largest contributors to carbon emissions, as you've said, how can larger powers be convinced as to the importance of addressing global inequality with regards to climate change? And thank you so much, also, for giving this talk. BORDOFF: Yeah. Thank you for being here. I don't have a great answer to your question. I mean, the politics of foreign aid in general are not great, as we often hear in events at CFR. So I do think one—we need to continue to encourage, through political advocacy, civil society, and other ways, governments in advanced economies to think about all the tools they have at their disposal. I think the ones that are going to be—I'm reluctant to try to speak as a political commenter rather than a climate and energy commenter on what's going to work politically. But part of that is demonstrating what—it's not just generosity. It is also in one's self-interest to do these things. And just look at the pandemic, right? What would it look like for the U.S. to show greater leadership, or any country to show even greater leadership and help cope with the pandemic all around the world in parts of the world that are struggling to vaccinate their people? That is not only an act of generosity, but it is clearly one of self-interest too, because it's a pretty globalized economy and you're not going to be able to get a pandemic under control at home if it's not under control abroad. Of course, the same is true of the impacts of climate change. It doesn't matter where a ton of CO2 comes from. And we can decarbonize our own economy, but the U.S. is only 15 percent of annual emissions globally. So it's not going to make a huge difference unless everyone else does that as well. There is also the potential, I think, to—and we see this increasingly when you look at the discussion of the Biden infrastructure bill, how they talk about the U.S.-China relationship, which of course are the two most important countries from the standpoint of climate change. It is one of cooperation. That was one of the success stories in Glasgow, was a commitment to cooperate more. We'll see if we can actually do it, because it's a pretty difficult and tense U.S.-China relationship right now. So the question is, can you separate climate from all those other problems on human rights, and intellectual property, and everything else and then cooperate on climate? It's been hard, but there's a renewed commitment to try to do that. But also, a recognition that action in the clean energy space is not only about cooperation but it's also about economic competition. And you have seen more and more focus on both the Republican and Democratic sides of the aisle on thinking about the security of supply chains, and critical minerals, and the inputs in lithium and rare earth elements that go into many aspects of clean energy. To my point before about aspects of industrial policy that might help grow your own domestic economy, I think there are ways in which countries can take measures that help—that help their own economies and help workers and help create jobs, and that in the process are helping to drive forward more quickly the clean energy technologies we need, and bring down the cost of those technologies to make them more accessible and available in some of the less-developed countries. So I think trying to frame it less as do we keep funds at home, do we write a check abroad? But there are actually many steps you could do to create economic opportunities and are win-win. Without being pollyannish about it, I think there is some truth to some of those. And I think we can focus on those politically as well. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take an international question from Luciana Alexandra Ghica, who is an associate professor for international cooperation at the University of Bucharest. What type of topics do you think we should address immediately in university programs that provide training in climate, development, global policies, or international public affairs, so that a new generation of leaders really pushes forward the agenda on climate change? BORDOFF: Yeah. Well, I'll say a quick word about what we're doing at Columbia, and maybe it's relevant to that question, because Columbia has made this historic commitment to build a climate school. There are many initiatives, and centers, and institutes. There was not only a handful of schools—law school, business school, medical school, engineering school. And it is the largest commitment a university can make to any particular topic, is something on the scale of a school with degree-granting authority and tenure-granting authority, and all the things that come with a school. And it's just the scale at a place like Columbia, and many other places, is just enormous. That's what we're doing on climate. We have created a climate school. And I'm honored President Bollinger asked me to help lead it. And we're going to build a faculty. We have our first inaugural class of masters' students, about ninety students that are going through the program right now, and we have a building in Manhattan for the climate school, and on and on. The idea—but the question is, what is climate, right? Because academia has been historically organized into traditional academic disciplines. So you have people who you hire through a tenured search, and they go to the engineering faculty and build their lab there. And there's law professors, and their business school professors, and on and on and on, social work. But for climate, you need all of those, right? They all kind of need to come together. And, like, interdisciplinary doesn't even sort of do justice to what it means to think about approaching this systemic—it's a systemic challenge. The system has to change. And so whatever solution you're talking about—if you want to get hydrogen to scale in the world, let's—you know, for certain sectors of the economy that may be hard to do with renewable energy, or in terms of renewable energy and, say, green hydrogen. You need engineering breakthroughs to bring down the cost of electrolyzers, or you need new business models, or you need financial institution frameworks that figure out how you're going to put the capital into these things. You need the policy incentives. How are you going to—you need permitting and regulation. How do we permit hydrogen infrastructure? It's barely been done before. There are concerns in the environmental justice community about some aspects of technologies like that or carbon capture that need to be taken seriously and addressed. There are geopolitical implications, potentially, to starting to build a global trade in ammonia or hydrogen, and what security concerns—energy security concerns might accompany those, the way we thought about oil or gas from Russia into Europe. I have an article coming out in the next issue of Foreign Affairs about the geopolitics of the energy transition. So we need disciplines that come together and look at a problem like that in all of those multifaceted dimensions, so we can figure out how to get from a lab to scale out in the world. And so when we think about the areas of concentration here, climate finance, climate justice, climate in society, climate in international security—I mean, a range of things that I think are really important to help people understand. And that's going to be a major focus of what we do at the climate school here. FASKIANOS: Fantastic. Let's go next to Sean Grossnickle, who has raised his hand. A graduate student at Fordham University. Q: Speak now? Hi, this is not Sean but Henry Schwalbenberg, also at Fordham, where I teach in our international political economy and development program. I went to a conference about a month ago in Rome. And there was a physicist from CERN. And he was a big advocate of something I'd never heard of, and this is this thorium for nuclear reactors. And he was going through all the pros, but I wanted a more balanced perspective on it. And I'm hoping that you might give me a little pros and cons of this thorium nuclear reactor technique. BORDOFF: Yeah. I will be honest and say that nuclear is not my area of focus. We have a pretty strong team here that works in nuclear, and I think is optimistic about the breakthroughs we're going to see in several potential areas of nuclear—advanced nuclear technology, that being one of them, or small modular reactors, and others. At a high level, I will say I do think if you're serious about the math of decarbonization and getting to net zero by 2050, it's hard to do without zero-carbon nuclear power. It's firm, baseload power. It runs all the time. Obviously, there are challenges with intermittency of solar and wind, although they can be addressed to some extent with energy story. Most of the analyses that are done show not necessarily in the U.S. but in other parts of the world significant growth in nuclear power. The International Energy Agency just modeled what it looks like to get to net zero by 2050, and this pathway that got a lot of attention for saying things like we would not be investing in new oil and gas supply. The world has to change a lot pretty quickly. And they have about a hundred new nuclear plants being built by 2030, so that's a pretty big number. So we're going to need all tools—(laughs)—that we have at our disposal. And unfortunately, I worry we may still fall short. So I think at a high level we need to think really hard about how to improve nuclear technology. The people who know that really well I think are optimistic about our ability to do that. And I will follow up on thorium in particular with my colleagues at Columbia, and happy to follow up with you offline about it. FASKIANOS: Great. I'm going to take a written question from Stephen Bird, who's an associate professor of political science at Clarkson University. He thanks you, and he wanted you to talk a little bit more about political will. The overall dollar amounts are clear. Much cheaper to address climate change than to ignore it. That said, countries are, clearly, lagging. Is it a case of countries just don't want to take action now because of issues of fairness or because of lack of domestic political support, i.e., citizens aren't convinced that they should pay costs now with payoffs that come later, and what might we do to improve that issue in terms of persuading or arguing for more political will? BORDOFF: Yeah. It's a question for, you know, a political scientist as much as an energy or climate expert, and I wish I had a better answer to it. I think it is—climate is one of the trickiest problems for so many reasons but one of those is there is no acute event now that you sort of respond to, hopefully, and pull everyone together. It's a set of things that, you know, of course, there would have been storms and droughts before but we know they're intensified and made worse. It's hard to rally public support. We often respond to a crisis kind of proverbial, you know, frog in the boiling water kind of thing. So that makes it hard. There are huge issues—we talked about a just transition a few minutes ago—there are huge issues with intergenerational equity when we talk about climate. There are, clearly, climate impacts and damages today but some of the worst will be in the future, including for people who may not be born yet, and we don't do a great job in our political environment about thinking about those and valuing them today and how you do that, and from an economic standpoint, of course, there are questions about discount rates you apply and everything else. I think, politically, one of the things that has mobilized stronger climate—support for climate action, so it is encouraging that if you look at polling on climate change, the level of urgency that the public in many countries, including the U.S., broadly, ascribe to acting on climate has gone up a lot. It's higher today than it was, you know, a decade or so ago. That's a result of people seeing the impacts and also advocacy campaigns and political campaigns. It is often tied to—it's like a win-win. Like, President Biden says when he thinks of climate he thinks of jobs, and so we're going to deal with climate and we're going to grow the economy faster and we're going to create jobs, and there is truth to that. It is also the case that there are costs. The cost of inaction are higher, but there are costs associated with the transition itself. So if you survey the American public, I think, climate, according to the latest YouGov/Economist poll I saw, you know, it was number two on the list of things they cared the most about. That's much higher than in the past. And then if you ask the American public are they willing to pay $0.25 a gallon more at the pump to act on climate, 75 percent say no. And you look at the challenges the Biden administration is having right now sort of thinking about a really strong set of measures to put in place to move the ball forward on climate, but acute concern today about where oil prices are and inflation and natural gas prices as we head into the winter. If the weather is cold then it's going to be really expensive for people to heat their homes in parts—some parts of the country like New England, maybe. So that's a reality, and I think we need to—it was interesting, in the roundtable we did with President Obama with climate activists, that was a message he had for them. You know, be impatient, be angry, keep the pressure on, but also be pragmatic. And by that he means, like, you know, try to see the world through the eyes of others and people who are worried about the cost of filling up at the pump, the cost of paying their heating bills. They're not—some of them may not be where you are yet. They may not have the same sense of urgency with acting on climate that many of us on this Zoom do and need to take those concerns seriously. So I think that's a real challenge, and it can be addressed with good policy, to some extent, right, if you think about the revenue raised from a carbon tax and how it could be redistributed in a way that reduce the regressive impacts. I've written about how, at a high level—I'll say one last point—if we get on track for an energy transition, which we're not on yet, right. (Laughs.) Oil and gas use are going up each and every year. But imagine we started to get on track where those were falling year after year. It's still going to take decades, and that process of transition is going to be really messy. It's going to be really volatile. We're going to have fits and starts in policy from Obama to Trump to Biden. We're going to make estimate—we're going to make bets on technologies and maybe get those technologies wrong or misunderstand the cost curves, the potential to shut down investment in certain forms of energy before the rest are ready to pick up the slack. If it's messy and volatile and bumpy, that's not only harmful economically and geopolitically, it will undermine public support for stronger climate action. So you see, like, in Washington they're selling off the Strategic Petroleum Reserve because we're moving to a world beyond oil and also we have all this domestic oil now with shale. We need more, not fewer, tools to mitigate volatility for the next several decades if we're serious about making this transition, and I think the same is true for thinking about sort of buffers you could build into geopolitics, foreign policy, and national security, because there will be—in a post-oil and gas world, you know, you may say, well, we're not going to worry as much about the Middle East or about, you know, Russia's leverage in Europe. But there will be new risks created and we can talk about what some of those might be, and we need new tools of foreign policy to mitigate those potential foreign policy risks. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question. Raised hand from Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct instructor at NYU. Q: Hey, can you hear me? BORDOFF: Yes. Thank you. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hi. Chloe Demrovsky, adjunct at NYU and president and CEO of Disaster Recovery Institute International. Thanks for being with us, Jason. So my question is about the feasibility and your thoughts on artificially altered clouds or solar geoengineering. What are the ethical and geopolitical implications of, perhaps, using this to buy a little time for our energy transition? Thanks. BORDOFF: Yeah. A super interesting question, and I will say, again, I'm sort of—think of myself as an energy expert. So that is where I spend more time than thinking about tools like solar geoengineering. I guess, it seems there's, obviously, huge risks associated with something like that and we need to understand them. We need to do research. We need to figure out what those risks may be. There are global governance concerns. It's actually pretty cheap to do solar geoengineering. So what happens when some country or some billionaire decides they want to start spraying stuff into the atmosphere to cool the planet? And for those who don't know that, you know, solar—I mean, you think of after a volcano the planet cools a little bit because of all the particulates up in the atmosphere. When you model in an energy system model how much phasing out coal will reduce warming, you, obviously, have much less carbon dioxide emissions but that's offset slightly—not completely, of course—it's offset a little bit by the fact that you have less local air pollution, which is a good thing from air pollution. But air pollution has a slightly cooling effect, because you have these little particles floating around that reflect sunlight. So the idea is can we create that artificially and cool the planet, and you can imagine lots of reasons why that could go wrong when you're trying to figure out what—how much to put in there, what unintended consequences could be. You still have other impacts of carbon dioxide like ocean acidification. Maybe you go too far in one direction, that's like you're setting the thermostat. That's why one of the companies doing carbon removal is called Global Thermostat. You're kind of figuring out what temperature it should be. But I will say so it's an area that needs research and I think, given how far we are away from achieving goals like 1.5 and net-zero 2050, I guess what I would say is in the same way that when I worked in the Obama administration it was—I wouldn't say controversial, but there were some people who didn't want to talk about adaptation because it was kind of a more—there was a moral hazard problem there. It was, you know, less pressure to mitigate and reduce emissions if we thought adaptation was a solution. People worry about that from the standpoint of solar geoengineering. But the likelihood—I hope I'm wrong, but the likelihood that we roll the clock forward, you know, later this decade and we realize we've made progress but we're still pretty far short, and the impacts of climate change in the same way the IPCC 1.5 report said, you know what, 1.5 is going to be pretty bad, too, and that's even worse than we thought, the more we learn about climate the more reason there is to be concerned, not less concerned. It seems very plausible to me that we will kind of come to a growing consensus that we have to think about whether this technology can, as you said, buy us time. This is not something you do permanently. You need to get to net zero to stop global warming. But if you want to reduce the impacts of warming on the rate of Arctic sea ice melt and all the rest, can you buy time, extend the runway, by doing this for some number of decades. And I think—I don't have a strong view on the right answer to that. But I think it's something we, certainly, need to be thinking about researching and understanding what the consequences would be because we're going to have to figure out how to take more abrupt actions to close that gap between ambition and reality unless the reality starts to change much more quickly than is the case right now. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I saw a raised hand from Maya but she lowered it. So if you want to raise your hand again, please do so. And in the meantime, I'm going to take a written question from Jennifer Sklarew, who's an assistant professor of energy and sustainability at George Mason University. Was CCS/CCUS, which carbon capture and storage/carbon capture utilization and storage, to write out those acronyms, promoted as a climate change solution in Glasgow and was there a pushback against this technology option as both a climate change solution and a support mechanism for continued fossil fuel use? BORDOFF: There was some pushback but, I think, actually, more in the other direction. So I think there has been a growing recognition from many in the climate world that carbon capture technology, carbon removal technology, need to be part of the solution. I think there's almost no climate model at this point that shows how you would get to 1.5 degrees or net zero—1.5 degrees without huge amounts of negative emissions—carbon removal. Some of that can be nature based, but a lot of it will be—some of it will be technology based as well and focusing on what we care about, which is the emissions, is the most important thing. So and this is not, I don't think, the primary thing you're going to do. You want to do the things that are easiest and cheapest and present the fewest risks. So putting a lot of renewables into the grid, getting electrification into the vehicle fleet—there's a lot of things that you would do before that. But if you think about some of the sectors in the economy we talked about before that are hard to decarbonize like steel and cement, it may well be the case that carbon capture is part of the technology there. There was a big announcement yesterday from the NET Power Allam Cycle gas plant in Texas that they had finally come online with delivering net-zero power to the grid. It was sort of a milestone in that technology. So we need to advance this technology and figure out how we're going to—how we're going to get where we need to be. We need to hold that kind of technology accountable to make sure that it's actually meeting the standards we're talking about so that it actually is very low, if not zero, carbon. But if you look at, you know, most of the scenarios I'm aware of, whether it's—Princeton did the study “Net-Zero America,” how we get to net zero by 2050 in the U.S. The International Energy Agency, as I said, did it for net zero globally. There is a meaningful role for carbon capture, to some extent, in the power sector in these heavy industry sectors like steel and cement, and then making, say, hydrogen some of that will be blue hydrogen. Most of it, eventually, will be green, but there may be some role for blue hydrogen, which is—which is gas with carbon capture. So I think, if anything, there's been a growing understanding that we need all tools on deck right away and, again, I fear even with all the tools we may still fall short. FASKIANOS: Great. There's a written question from Laila Bichara, who's at SUNY Farmingdale, international business. There was a New York Times article, “Business Schools Respond to a Flood of Interest in ESG,” talking about the issue of the scarcity of skills in recent graduates to help with social impact, sustainable investments, climate finance, and social entrepreneurship. And she wanted to know if there are resources that you could point the group to in terms of foundation courses or certification that would provide all students with a basic foundation. BORDOFF: Yeah. That's a really good question and it's a growing area of focus and I think universities should be doing more in. The Tamer Center of Columbia Business School does a lot of work in ESG. We hosted a really interesting roundtable at the Center on Global Energy Policy yesterday on ESG and actually been doing a lot of work thinking about that in the context of state-owned enterprises and national oil companies, which we don't talk about enough. But they're a really, really big part of the problem we're talking about. We tend to focus more on these very well-known private sector companies or financial institutions in places like New York. So there—Bloomberg Philanthropies has done a huge amount in this space. I think there's some really good educational programs with some universities and business schools that have done a lot in the ESG space. But I think it's a need, to be frank. I mean, the fact that you're asking the question and I'm pointing to a few examples, but not a huge number, and it is something that universities need to educate themselves about but then is an opportunity for us to educate others. Maybe a revenue one, too, with executive education or something. But there's a lot of companies and financial institutions that want to understand this better. I worry that while there's a huge growing focus on climate, which is a good thing, in the financial community, the phrase ESG kind of means so many different things right now. It's this alphabet soup of regulations and standards and disclosure requirements, and some may make a difference and some may not and it's hard to figure out which ones matter, and for people who want to do the responsible thing what does that really mean. That's an area where research is needed. I mean, that's a role for what we do every day to think about if the SEC is going to regulate what makes a difference and what doesn't, if you're going to create green bonds. If you're going to call everything green in the finance community, what's real and what's not? What moves the needle? What doesn't? What are the returns for greener portfolios? How is that affecting the cost of capital for clean energy versus dirty energy? You know, on and on. I think those are important research questions for us to take on and then it's our job to help educate others as well. FASKIANOS: Great. So the next question I'm going to take from—oh, OK. Good. Maya Copeland (sp) has written her question. She's a political science major at Delaware State University. Do you believe developed nations like the U.S. have done a lot in reference to climate change or mostly talk? If you believe nations like the U.S. have dropped the ball in this aspect, what do you think it would take to get those powerhouses serious about environmental change? BORDOFF: I think advanced economies have done—many have done a lot. I mean, the European Union has taken climate seriously and has reduced emissions and has pretty strong measures in place with a carbon market, for example, with a pretty high carbon price right now. The politics of this issue are not quite as favorable in the U.S., but the U.S. has seen emissions decline more than most over the last decade and a half, in part because of policy measures that have, you know, advanced renewable energy and brought the cost of that down as well as cheaper natural gas displacing coal for a while. But at a broader level, you know, have we done enough? The answer is no one's done enough—(laughs)—which is why emissions are still going up every single year. So that—so the answer is no, we haven't done enough. Almost no country has done enough at home to be on a trajectory for net zero 2050. You saw the announcements from countries like India saying, we'll get to net zero by 2070, and, you know, people said, oh, well, that's terrible. They're not saying 2050. And implicit in that is sort of saying, well, if you want to get global to net zero by 2050 we're not all going to move at the same speed, right. Some countries have advanced with the benefit of hydrocarbons since the Industrial Age and some haven't. So, presumably, the pathways are going to look different, right. And, you know, that's not always how countries in the advanced—in the developing—in the developed world talk about it. The commitment from the Biden administration is net zero by 2050. So I would say there's been—there are some models to point to of countries that have taken this issue seriously but we're not doing enough and partly because the political will is not there and partly—I come back to what I said before—this problem is harder than people realize. So you say which countries are doing enough, like, point to some models, right, and somebody might point to Norway, which, you know, the share of new vehicles sold that are electric in Norway went from zero to, I think, it's 70 percent now. I mean, that's amazing. Seventy percent of new car sales are electric. And if you go back to the start of that trajectory, about a decade or decade and a half, oil demand is unchanged in Norway. So we can talk about why that is and it's because a lot—as I said earlier, a lot of oil is used for things other than cars, and it's increased for trucks and planes and petrochemicals. It takes time for the vehicle fleet to turn over. So when you start selling a bunch of electric cars, you know, average car is on the road for fifteen years so it takes a while before that—the vehicle stock turns over. So I saw that kind of mapped out on a chart recently, just two lines—one is electric vehicle sales going straight up and then the other is oil demand in a flat line. It's a reminder of how unforgiving the math of decarbonization is. The math of climate is really unforgiving, like, you know, the kind of harmful impacts we're going to see with even 1.5 degrees warming. But the math of energy and decarbonization is really unforgiving, too. It's—and we just need to be honest with ourselves about what it takes to get where we need to go. Because I think it's good to have optimism and ambition, but I worry there should be optimism but not happy talk. We should recognize that there's a lot of work to do and let's get to work doing it. FASKIANOS: Great. So there are several questions in the chat about China. I'm going to start off with Andrew Campbell, who's a student at George Mason University. Is LNG—liquefied natural gas—a bridge toward renewable energy still being considered? If not, how are India and China's expected growth and increase in coal use going to be addressed? And then there are a couple of other comments or questions about China. You know, what's your take on China as the biggest emitter and return somewhat to coal? Can we actually even make stated and adequate new goals? And, you know, given the relationship between U.S. and China, which is contentious, you know, what is the cooperation going to be between U.S. and China on climate? So there's a lot packed in there, but I know you can address it all. (Laughs.) BORDOFF: Yeah. I think the China question is really hard, as I said earlier, this kind of, like, competition and cooperation and we're going to try to do both, and I think there was a hope early on—Secretary Kerry said it—that climate could be segmented from the broader challenges in the U.S.-China relationship, and I think that has proven harder to do than people had hoped, in part, because, you know, you need both parties to want to do that. I think China has signaled it's not necessarily willing to segment cooperation on climate from lots of other issues. And then these things bleed together where, you know, there's measures being taken in Washington to restrict imports of solar panels from China, that there were concerns that were made with—in ways that have human rights abuses associated with them with forced labor or maybe have unfair trade practices in terms of subsidies. China is—you know, the leadership in China takes climate seriously. This is a country that recognizes, I think, climate change is real and that needs to be addressed. They have a set of national interests that matter a lot, obviously, to them in terms of economic growth, and the pathway to get there is challenging. So it's a country that's growing clean energy incredibly quickly, as we're seeing right now, in part because there's a(n) energy crunch throughout Europe and Asia. They are ramping up the use of coal quite a bit again, but also taking some pretty strong measures to advance clean energy and, over time, hopefully, move in a lower carbon direction for reasons both about concerns over climate but also local air pollution, which is much, much worse in many parts of China than it is here and that's a huge source of concern for the public there. So when it comes to things like coal they need to figure out how to address those air pollution problems. And then for reasons of economic competition, like I mentioned a minute ago. I mean, China dominates the global market for refining and processing of critical minerals for solar panels, and there are economic and national competitiveness and strategic reasons to do that. So all of those things motivate them to move in the direction of clean energy, but they need to be moving faster to phase down hydrocarbon energy for sure. And then you ask a really hard question about—not hard, but one of the most contentious questions is about the role of natural gas in the transition, and we can have a whole separate session about that. I think there is a view of many in the climate community and many in developing countries—in developed countries that there's not space left in the carbon budget for natural gas, and you saw the Biden administration recently declare through the Treasury Department that, except in very rare cases of the poorest of the poor like Sierra Leone or something, they would not finance natural gas projects through the multilateral development banks. The vice president of Nigeria, I think, responded—speaking of CFR—in Foreign Affairs by writing that this was not fair and you need to think about a viable pathway for a country like Nigeria to develop and it just—it doesn't work to get there that fast. There has to be a bridge. The role of gas looks very different in different parts of the world. It looks different in the U.S. than it does in an emerging or a developing economy. It looks different in the power sector, where there are a lot more alternatives like renewables than it does in heavy industry or how we heat our homes. It looks different for, say, in the Global South, where you're talking about people who are still using coal and charcoal and dung for cooking to think about solutions like liquefied petroleum gas. So all of those things are true, but we need to think about gas also with the carbon budget in mind. I mean, the math is just the math. (Laughs.) If you're going to build any gas infrastructure and not have it blow through the carbon budget, it's going to have to be retired before the end of its normal economic life and you need to think about how that might look in different parts of the world. So you need to be fair to people, to allow them to grow, but also recognize that the math of carbon, you know, is what it is. FASKIANOS: Great. I just want to credit those last—the China questions came from Lada Kochtcheeva at North Carolina State University and Joan Kaufman, who's director of Schwarzman Scholars based in China. We are really at the end of our time—we started a couple minutes late—and I just wanted to go back to—there are students on the call who are following with a professor on the webinar who wanted you just to comment on blue hydrogen, whether or not it is contributing or helping to reduce greenhouse gases. BORDOFF: I think the answer is it can. You just need to make sure that it actually does. So the question of—and by blue hydrogen we mean, you know, using gas with carbon capture to create hydrogen. It needs to have very low methane leakage rates. It needs to have very high capture rates, and we know that is technically possible. It doesn't mean it will be done that way. So if people are going to pursue blue hydrogen as part of the solution in the—particularly in the near term, you need to make sure that it's meeting those standards. I think in the long run my guess and, I think, most guesses would be that green hydrogen is going to make more sense. It's going to be cheaper. The cost is going to come down. And so if we have a significant part of the energy sector that is hydrogen and ammonia in, say, 2050, more of that's going to be green than blue. But there can be a role for blue if you make sure it's done the right way. You just have to actually make sure it's done the right way. FASKIANOS: Great. And, Jason, we are out of time, but I wanted to give you one last, you know, one-minute or thirty seconds, whatever you want, just to say some parting words on your work at the center or, you know, to leave the group with what they can do, again. So— BORDOFF: Well, I would just say thanks for the chance to be with you all and for the work that you're doing every day. You know, I think Glasgow was a moment when the world came together to elevate ambition and roll up our sleeves and say this is—this is the decisive decade. Like, we'll know ten years from now—(laughs)—if we got anywhere close to making it or not. And so it's time for everyone to kind of roll up their sleeves and say, what can we do? We're doing that, I think, at Columbia with the creation of this new climate school. We do that every day at the Center on Global Energy Policy. And so just in all of your institutions, you know, what does that mean for you? What does it mean for the institution? What does that mean for your own research and time and how you allocate it? How do we step up and say, what can we do in the biggest and boldest way we can? Because we need—we're creating a climate school because I think the view is—you know, a hundred years ago there were no schools of public health and now it's how would you deal with a pandemic without a school of public health? So I think our view is decades from now we'll look back and wonder how we ever thought it was possible to handle a problem as complex and urgent as climate change without universities devoting their greatest kind of resource to them. And the measure of success for universities has to be research and new knowledge creation. It has to be education. It has to be serving our own communities. For us, it's, you know, the community here in New York, Harlem. But also are we focusing the extraordinary resources and capacity and expertise of these great institutions to solve humanity's greatest problems? That has to be a motivating force, too, for much of—maybe not all of but a lot of what universities do. So I'd just ask all of us to go back and think about how we can do that in our own work every day. and we have to do it through partnerships. I think universities don't work together as well as they need to. But this is only going to work if we work together. FASKIANOS: Great way to end. Thank you very much, Jason Bordoff. We really appreciate it. We'll have to look for your article in Foreign Affairs magazine, which is published by CFR. So, we are excited that you continue to contribute to the magazine. You can follow Jason Bordoff on Twitter at @JasonBordoff. Very easy to remember. Our final academic webinar of the semester will be on Wednesday, December 1, at 1:00 p.m. (ET). Michelle Gavin, who is CFR's Ralph Bunche senior fellow for Africa policy studies, will talk about African politics and security issues. So in the meantime, follow us at @CFR_Academic. Come to CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for research and analysis on global issues, and we look forward to continuing the conversation with you. Take care. BORDOFF: Thank you. (END)

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Peter Bergen: The Rise and Fall of Osama Bin Laden

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 109:24


Peter Bergen is an acclaimed journalist, terrorism and national security analyst, and author of the new book, The Rise and Fall of Osama Bin Laden, which examines the life, philosophy, influence, and personal contradictions of the infamous leader of al-Qaeda. Bergen famously interviewed bin Laden in 1997. Bergen currently serves as the Vice President for Global Studies & Fellows at New America and is New America's director of the International Security and Future of War programs. He is also a national security analyst for CNN and a professor at Arizona State University where he co-directs the Center on the Future of War.  Bergen is a member of the Homeland Security Experts Group and a fellow at Fordham University's Center on National Security, and serves on the editorial board of one of the leading scholarly journal in the field of counter-terrorism: Studies in Conflict & Terrorism. He has previously taught at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. Along with his latest, Bergen has written and edited three New York Times best-selling books, along with four books that have been named among the best non-fiction books of the year by The Washington Post.  He is also an Emmy winning documentary filmmaker. His works include Manhunt: The Ten-Year Search for Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad, United States of Jihad: Who Are America's Homegrown Terrorists, and How Do We Stop Them?, The Longest War: The Enduring Conflict between America and Al-Qaeda, Trump and His Generals: The Cost of Chaos, Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, and Policy, and more.   You can follow him on Twitter @peterbergencnn      Sponsors: SIG Sauer: Today's episode is presented by SIG Sauer. Schnee's: When you shop at Schnees.com use the promo code JACK21 for 10% off your next pair of boots   Featured Gear: Makai Metal Works Blades  Adaptive X Slash Kit (Dynamis Alliance)

International Horizons
How UN Peacekeeping Failures Shape Peace Processes with Anjali Dayal

International Horizons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:43


Why would warring parties turn to the UN, even when they don't have an interest in guaranteeing peace? Have rebel groups learned to manipulate the UN peace process to further their military goals? How can peace keeping missions adapt their approaches to better accomplish their goals? Anjali Dayal, assistant professor of international politics at Fordham University, talks to RBI Fellow Jenna Russo about her new book Incredible Commitments: How UN Peacekeeping Failures Shape Peace Processes and how peacekeeping dynamics have evolved over time. You can find the book here: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/incredible-commitments/42CBF9FB8770469896CA1F72E352D8AA You can find a transcript of the episode here: https://ralphbuncheinstitute.org/2021/11/15/how-un-peacekeeping-failures-shape-peace-processes-with-anjali-dayal/

Buried Secrets Podcast
The Exorcist Dorm (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 57:08


After a scene in The Exorcist was filmed in Hughes Hall, a former dorm at Fordham University, urban legends began to spring up about the building being haunted. Rumors of "cultish" graffiti, tales of a young boy's ghost, stories of a mysterious black dog, and more weird urban legends circulated about the building. This episode seeks to tease out why some of these legends may have grown up around the building, which began as the old prep school, was turned into a dorm as a "stopgap" measure that lasted for decades, and has since been completely gutted and turned back into an academic building. Plus, a look at some of the weird connections that The Exorcist had to Fordham. Highlights include: • The Fordham University professor who was an influence on The Exorcist • What it was like to be one of the last people to live in Hughes Hall (spoiler: it was bad) • The ghost of a prep school student • Satanic Panic-type urban legends Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Midnight Train Podcast
Cursed Movies

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 119:32


 In a world, where the midnight train podcast is at the top of the podcast game, one thing has the power to destroy everything they have worked for. This week their world will come crumbling down as everything they've achieved will be tested and possibly destroyed due to the madness that is (dun dun duuuuuuuunnnnn) cursed Movies!!! Tonight on the midnight train we are combining two of our favorite things…. This podcast and lots and lots of beer…YEAH! Oh wait, we do that every week… Oh, that's right, it's this podcast and….moooovies!! But… In true midnight train fashion, we can't just talk about movies…. We're gonna talk about cursed movies!!! That's right we are going to look at movies that for one reason or another have led to tragedy during and after the movies were made! Everything is on the table from health issues like cancer, accidental deaths while filming, people going crazy after filming, and just about everything else you can think of. Should be a fun and creepy ride discussing all these movies with you passengers and, in case you're wondering, yes we're still going to have a movies list at the end.    Ok so let's get into this and see what we have as far as cursed movies!   We're gonna start it with a big one since we just covered the subject matter of the film! The first cursed movie on our list is the exorcist. The filming of THE EXORCIST was done over nine months. The main set, a reproduction of the Georgetown home, was built in a warehouse in New York. During the filming, several curious incidents and accidents took place on the set and plagued those involved with the production. In addition, the budget of the film rose from $5 million to more than twice that amount. Obviously, any film production that lasts for more than a month or so will see its share of accidents and mishaps, but THE EXORCIST seems to have been particularly affected by unforeseeable calamities. Coincidence? Perhaps, but it left the cast and crew rightfully shaken.    The first incident occurred around 2:30 a.m. one Sunday morning when a fire broke out on the set. There was only one security guard at the Ceco 54th Street Studios when the McNeil house set caught fire and burned. The fire was the result of a bad electrical circuit, but it shut down filming for six weeks while the set was reconstructed from scratch. Ironically, as soon as the new set was ready, the sprinkler system broke down, causing an additional two-week delay.    Few of the actors in the film escaped personal troubles during the shoot. Just as Max Von Sydow (who played Father Merrin) touched down in New York to film his first scenes, he received a phone call saying that his brother died unexpectedly in Sweden. Von Sydow himself later became very ill during the filming. Irish actor Jack MacGowran (who played Burke Dennings) died only one week after his character was killed by the demon in the movie. Jason Miller (who played Father Karras) was stunned when his young son, Jordan, was struck down on an empty beach by a motorcyclist who appeared out of nowhere. The boy ALMOST died. THAT'S GOOD NEWS! Ellen Burstyn (who played Chris McNeill) wrenched her back badly during one scene when she was slapped by the possessed girl. The stunt went badly awry and she was laid up in bed for several weeks afterward, causing more delays in the filming. They had a rig attached to her where a guy offscreen would pull a rope that was tied to her to get that “smacked hard as shit and launched across the room” look the director wanted. Apparently, the director didn't like the first take or two and told the guy with the rope to yoke the living piss out of her. He got his shot. She screwed up her back.    In New York, one of the carpenters accidentally cut off his thumb on the set and one of the lighting technicians lost a toe. This was all over the news at the time due to the mixup at the hospital where they put the wrong appendages on the wrong patients. Yep, they switched the toe for the thumb. And if you believed that, well… I'm not sorry even a little bit. Anyway, The exorcist's location trip to Iraq was delayed from the spring, which is relatively cool, to July, the hottest part of the summer, when the temperature rose to 130 degrees and higher. Out of the eighteen-man crew that was sent there, Friedkin lost the services of nine of them, at one time or another, due to dysentery (which is super shitty) or sunstroke. To make matters worse, the bronze statue of the neo-Assyrian winged demon Pazazu, which was packed in a ten-foot crate, got lost in an air shipment from Los Angeles and ended up in Hong Kong, which caused another two-week delay.    "I don't know if it was a jinx, really," actress Ellen Burstyn later said. "But there were some really strange goings-on during the making of the film. We were dealing with some really heavy material and you don't fool around with that kind of material without it manifesting in some way. There were many deaths in the film. Linda's grandfather died, the assistant cameraman's wife had a baby that died, the man who refrigerated the set died, the janitor who took care of the building was shot and killed … I think overall there were nine deaths during the course of the film, which is an incredible amount… it was scary." Unholy shit, batman!   Things got so bad that William Friedkin took some drastic measures. Father Thomas Bermingham, S.J., from the Jesuit community at Fordham University, had been hired as a technical advisor for the film, along with Father John Nicola, who, while not a Jesuit, had been taught by Jesuit theologians at St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois. Friedkin came to Bermingham and asked him to exorcise the set. The priest was unable to perform an actual exorcism, but he did give a solemn blessing in a ceremony that was attended by everyone then on the set, from Max Von Sydow to the technicians and grips. "Nothing else happened on the set after the blessing,” Bermingham stated, "but around that time, there was a fire in the Jesuit residence set in Georgetown." And while nothing else tragic occurred on the set, strange events and odd coincidences were reported during the post-production work on the film. "There were strange images and visions that showed up on film that were never planned," Friedkin later claimed. "There are double exposures in the little girl's face at the end of one reel that are unbelievable."   As we talked about in previous episodes, The film opened on December 26, 1973, to massive crowds. Within weeks of the first public screenings of the film, stories started to make the rounds that audience members were fainting and vomiting in the theaters. There were also reports of disturbing nightmares and reportedly, several theater ushers had to be placed under a doctor's care, or quit their jobs, after experiencing successive showings of the movie. In numerous cities that were checked after THE EXORCIST had run for several weeks, reporters found that every major hospital had been forced to deal with patients who reported, after seeing the film, severe cases of vomiting and hallucinations. There were also reports of people being carried out of theaters in stretchers. What do you think, passengers? Mere publicity stunts, or was this the real thing?    The info for this cursed movie came from a great article on americanhauntingsink.com check them out!   Next up we're gonna dive into a sweet little movie about a tree, a child's toy, and REAL SKELETONS IN THE SWIMMING POOL! Yep, you guessed it, poltergeist! The curse of Poltergeist spawned many theories about why the movie and its sequels were cursed with so much tragedy, with one suggesting the use of real-life human bones in the original film caused the hauntings.   Actress JoBeth Williams - who played the mother, Diane Freeling - is seen dropping into a pool of skeletons in one spooky scene and she later reveals the bones were real. She told TVLand: "In my innocence and naiveté, I assumed that these were not real skeletons.   "I assumed that they were prop skeletons made out of plastic or rubber . . . I found out, as did the crew, that they were using real skeletons, because it's far too expensive to make fake skeletons out of rubber."   Just four months after the film's release, tragedy struck with actress Dominique Dunne, who played the family's eldest daughter Dana, who became the victim of a grisly murder. On the day before Halloween in 1982, the actress, 22, was strangled by her ex-boyfriend John Thomas Sweeney outside their home in West Hollywood. She survived the attack but was left in a coma. She never regained consciousness and died five days later. Sweeney was later convicted of voluntary manslaughter and spent three and half years of a six-year sentence behind bars for the killing. He changed his name to John Maura so if you want to let him know what a twat he is, I mean… we can't stop you.   In the years after the film's release movie bosses plowed ahead with plans for a sequel and Poltergeist II: The Other Side hit cinemas in 1986. Among the cast was Will Sampson, best known for playing Chief Bromden in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest opposite Jack Nicholson. The actor - cast as shaman Taylor in the movie - was concerned about the use of real skeletons in the first film and offered to perform a real-life exorcism. He's believed to have conducted the ceremony alone and in the middle of the night, but the cast reportedly felt relieved afterward. However, less than a year after the film's release - the curse had claimed another victim. Sampson had long-term health problems as he suffered from a degenerative condition called scleroderma, which affected his heart and lungs. He underwent a heart and lung transplant in the summer of 1987 but died of post-operative kidney failure on June 3.    Ok, this one is sad and you've probably heard of it. The most famous victim of the Poltergeist curse was Heather O'Rourke. She appeared as Carol Anne in the first two films as well as the third installment, Poltergeist III, which hit cinemas in 1988. She died just four months before the movie's release at only 12 years of age. In January 1988, Heather fell ill with what appeared to be flu-like symptoms. She collapsed at home the following day and was rushed to the hospital. She suffered a cardiac arrest but doctors were able to revive her and they diagnosed her with intestinal stenosis - a partial obstruction of the intestine. She underwent surgery, but went into cardiac arrest again in recovery and doctors were unable to save her. She passed away in February 1988, just weeks after her 12th birthday, and it was later reported she died from congenital stenosis and septic shock. Absolutely heartbreaking.   Character actor Lou Perryman became the second cast member to fall victim to murder. He played Pugsley in the original movie and suffered a brutal end in 1992 when he was hacked to death with an ax aged 67. A convict recently released from prison, Seth Christopher Tatum, confessed he had killed Perryman at his home after coming off his medication and going on a drinking binge. Tatum pleaded guilty to his murder in 2011 and was sentenced to life in prison.   Actor Richard Lawson played one of the parapsychologists, Ryan, in the original film (not the guy who ate the chicken with the maggots… you're welcome) and he came close to becoming another victim of the curse in 1992. He was involved in a terrifying plane crash in 1992 when the USAir Flight 405 crashed into New York City's Flushing Bay on route to guess where? Cleveland friggin Ohio. The crash claimed the lives of 27 of the 51 passengers, but Lawson was among the survivors. He put his lucky escape down to a last-minute seat change that saved his life. Lawson went on to be part of showbiz royalty when he married Beyonce's mother, Tina Knowles in 2015.   Info for this movie was taken from mirror.co.uk.    Next up how about… Hmm…. Oh, I know… The omen! The 2976 version of course. Obviously, Moody is a time traveler and saw the upcoming remake, 955 friggin years in the future! No! It was 1976! Of all the world's cursed film productions, The Omen is considered to have one of the worst movie curses of all time. The 1976 film tells the story of a man who accidentally adopts Damien the Antichrist as his son and the movie remains one of horror's most successful franchises. But what was so odious about the set that led producers to believe the devil was punishing them for making the movie? Is The Omen really cursed? The Omen film set haunting includes death, injury, and lots of lightning bolts: after all, the creator himself warned the cast and crew that Satan wasn't going to like what they were doing. Here's what happened behind the scenes of The Omen movie and why, despite its several sequels and a 2006 remake, it remains one of history's movies that indeed may have angered Satan himself!   In June 1975, Gregory Peck's son, Jonathan Peck, killed himself with a bullet to the head, two months before filming was to start. Several strange events then surrounded the production.   For protection on the set of "The Omen," Bernhard wore a Coptic cross. In an interview, Bernhard spoke about the production's eerie events, which included the death of an animal trainer.   Precisely one day after they shot the sequence involving the baboons at the animal center, Bernhard said that a tiger seized the animal trainer by the head, causing his death immediately. Whhhaat the fuuuuuck?   One of the most haunting stories surrounding The Omen didn't happen during the shoot, but during the production of the World War II epic A Bridge Too Far. John Richardson, who did special effects on The Omen, was involved in a head-on collision that beheaded his girlfriend, eerily mirroring the decapitation scene with David Warner. Supposedly, after the crash, Richardson saw a street sign that said, "Ommen, 66.6 km." This accident occurred after The Omen had wrapped production, but many of course linked it to the evil aura of the film.   Several planes were also set ablaze, including the plane carrying Peck and screenwriter David Seltzer. Meanwhile, Bernhard said they had to land in Nova Scotia after flying back from England. He added:   "We had the film on board... Dick [Donner] and I were very, very nervous." IRA bombs ripped through a hotel, in which executive producer Mace Neufeld and his wife stayed, and another in which prominent executives and stars, including Peck, were to have dinner.   Once word got back to Fox about all the terrible incidents that plagued production, the studio saw it as a great way to drum up a ton of publicity and add to the film's ominous aura. They also put a great tagline into the film's ad campaign:                        You have been warned. If something frightening happens to you today, think about it. It may be The Omen.   As Donner recalled in The Omen: Curse or Coincidence, "If we had been making a comedy, you would have recalled all the funny, great, ridiculous, silly moments that happened in that film. if you were doing a love story, you'd remember all the times somebody left their wife, fell in love... You're doing The Omen, anything that happens on that film, you don't tell about the jokes, you don't talk about the love stories, you don't even think about them. You think about things that coincidentally could have been something to do with The Omen. We had lots of them."   Creepy stuff right there my friends.   Next up we have one of my personal all-time favorites, the crow! The Crow began filming in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1993. Cursed Films revealed that before production got underway, a mysterious caller left a voicemail message warning the crew not to shoot the movie because bad things would happen. Eerily, two on-set electricians were involved in an accident in which their truck hit a live wire. One of the men experienced second and third-degree burns and lost both ears.   Disaster also struck the entire production when a hurricane destroyed the movie set. That is when the “curse of The Crow” rumors began circulating in Hollywood. The star of The Crow, Brandon Lee, was the son of martial arts legend, Bruce Lee. The elder Lee died during the production of his final film. Some fans speculated that the Chinese mafia had placed a hit on the actor for betraying martial arts secrets. Others suspected that he had been struck by an insidious death blow at an earlier time.   The most popular theory about The Dragon's death is that he was a victim of the Lee Family Curse. His older brother had died, and Lee's parents believed there was a demon targeting the males in the Lee family.   Like his father, Brandon Lee died before he finished filming The Crow. In a fluke accident, the performer was shot while completing an action sequence, as described in Cursed Films. The crew used what are called ‘dummy rounds,' for the scene, but there was something in the barrel of the gun that acted as a lethal projectile, killing Lee.    To complete the final photography for The Crow, the man who had been working as Lee's stunt double wore a mask in his image.   Crazy stuff!   How about some of our patented quick hitters!    The Conqueror" is a whitewashed 1956 film with John Wayne as Genghis Khan. The film was shot at a location downwind from a nuclear testing site, causing dozens of crew members to eventually die of cancer. so maybe not so much a curse as a poor choice of locations.   Apocalypse Now"   The horror! Francis Ford Coppola was tempting fate when he decided to film "Apocalypse Now" during monsoon season. Big mistake. The monsoon destroyed multiple sets, Martin Sheen suffered a heart attack during filming, and Coppola was so stressed that he suffered a seizure, according to The Independent. "Apocalypse Now" (1979) turned out to be a masterpiece anyway, but the documentary "Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse" about its making is just as engrossing.    "Fitzcarraldo"    Dysentery. Injuries. Fights among the crew. Nothing seemed to go right during the filming of 1982's "Fitzcarraldo." The story concerns hauling a boat over a hill, which the crew literally accomplished, but not without the same nightmarish difficulty as is depicted in the film. And in the end, director Werner Herzog looked as mad and overly driven as its hero. Check out the documentary "Burden of Dreams" for more.   The Superman Curse    Comic book movie fans may know about the "Superman Curse," which is said to afflict multiple actors involved in Superman films. Christopher Reeve was paralyzed following a horse accident. And Margot Kidder, who played Lois opposite Reeve, suffered from bipolar disorder, according to TCM. Also, the original Superman, George Reeves, supposedly committed suicide. His death at age 45 from a gunshot remains a controversial subject; the official finding was suicide, but some believe that he was murdered or the victim of an accidental shooting.   "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers"    Bad luck ran amok in Middle Earth during the filming of 2002's "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers." DVD interviews revealed that multiple actors and stuntmen suffered injuries while shooting the film's elaborate fight sequences. The worst was Viggo Mortensen, who broke his toe and chipped his tooth while filming.   The Exorcism of Emily rose   Dexter star Jennifer Carpenter reported that during the making of The Exorcism of Emily Rose — in which she played a big-screen version of German woman Anneliese Michel, whose poor health and subsequent death was blamed on a failed exorcism — her radio would mysteriously turn on and off. From an interview with Dread Central:   Q: A common question when making a film like this; did anything weird happen during filming?   JC: I thought about that when it happened, and two or three times when I was going to sleep my radio came on by itself. The only time it scared me was once because it was really loud and it was Pearl Jam's “Alive” (laughs). Laura's TV came on a couple of times.   Q: At 3:00 a.m.?   JC: Mine wasn't 3:00 a.m. I was born at 3:00 a.m. but it hasn't happened to me. I did check.   We'll totally do an episode on Analiese one of these days   Psycho Myra Jones (aka Myra Davis) was the uncredited body double/stand-in for Psycho star Janet Leigh during the making of Hitchcock's 1960 film. A handyman named Kenneth Dean Hunt, who was supposedly a Hitchcock “obsessive,” murdered her.   The Conjuring   Real-life ghost hunters Ed and Lorraine Warren, who aided the real-life Amityville Horror case, investigated the haunting of the Perron family home — a farmhouse plagued by generations of death, disaster, and a possessed doll. The case inspired James Wan's supernatural film, which left some audiences in the Philippines with such a fright there were priests available at screenings to bless viewers and provide counseling. On and off-set paranormal incidents — including strange claw marks on star Vera Farmiga's computer, Wan's tormented dog growling at invisible intruders, a strange wind (that apparently put Carolyn Perron in the hospital), and fire — were reported.   The Innkeepers   Filmed at the reportedly haunted hotel the Yankee Pedlar Inn in Torrington, Connecticut, The Innkeepers director Ti West was skeptical about the strange occurrences during the making of his movie. Still, creepy stories from the set became the focus in the press. From an interview with West:   I'm a skeptic so I don't really buy it. But I've definitely seen doors close by themselves; I've seen a TV turn off and on by itself; lights would always burn out in my room. Everyone on the crew has very vivid dreams every night, which is really strange.   The one story that is the most intriguing to me — In the film, the most haunted room is the Honeymoon Suite. That's where the ghost stuff started in the hotel. The only reason I picked the room that I picked to shoot in, was because it was big enough to do a dolly shot. No more thought went into it other than pure technical reasons. So when we're finishing the movie, I find out that the most haunted room in real life is the room I picked to be the haunted room in the movie. It could be a coincidence. It's weird that it happened that way. . . . [Star] Sara Paxton would wake up in the middle of the night thinking someone was in the room with her. Everyone has stories, but I was too busy saying, “Let's shoot this! We have 17 days!   Atuk"    "Atuk" is a movie so cursed that it never got made. The project, based on a 1963 Mordecai Richler novel about an Eskimo in New York, had four different men attached to play the lead while in development hell through the 1970s and '80s: John Belushi, Sam Kinison, John Candy, and Chris Farley. All four died shortly after entering negotiations to be in the film. Holy shit!    Ok how about twilight zone the movie. The 1983 film 'Twilight Zone: The Movie' directed by John Landis and Steven Spielberg gained publicity pre-release because of the deaths of lead actor Vic Morrow and two child extras during the filming of the helicopter crash scene. The children were illegally hired to play the role in this scene, as Landis would go on to reveal in the subsequent trial. It was also prohibited to make children work after a certain hour in the evening. However, Landis insisted that the scene would have to entail a late-night setting to seem more authentic. This was the last scene in the film. It also included explosions as a helicopter flew over the village while Morrow would run across the street to save the Vietnamese children from the explosion. Testing for the scene sparked concerns when the helicopter seemed to vigorously rock at the explosion but despite this, Landis' need to capture the explosion took priority. He reportedly said, "You think that was big? You ain't seen nothing yet." At the controls of this helicopter was a Vietnam War veteran named Dorcey Wingo, who had just joined the movie business. When the cameras began filming, the pyrotechnic fireball that had been fired as part of the explosion hit the helicopter, engulfing it in flames. The helicopter then crashed into the river where the actors were standing — Morrow, 6-year-old Renee Chen, and 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le. Almost a hundred people were present when the tragedy occurred. The helicopter skidded right onto Renee, crushing her to death and when it toppled over, the main blade sliced through Morrow and Myca.   Rosemary's baby is next up on the list. Over the years, the myth surrounding Roman Polanski's 1968 film Rosemary's Baby has only grown in stature. The film is based on the 1967 novel of the same name by American novelist Ira Levin. He came up with the idea for the book in 1965, drawing inspiration from his wife who was pregnant at the time, his New York apartment, and the anxiety of being a parent.   The struggling writer imagined a world where there was no God and the devil was allowed to reign freely. This is evident in the iconic ending where Rosemary finds out that her husband sold her womb to Satan and that her child is the Antichrist. Levin was catapulted into the highest echelons of the literary world due to the success of his novel and a year later, a European auteur who was looking for his own Hollywood break decided to direct the film adaptation of his novel.   However, not everyone was pleased with Levin's attacks on religion. He faced severe backlash from the Catholic Church for his “blasphemy” and his wife left him the year the film was released. He was never the same man again, growing increasingly paranoid over the years. Levin repeatedly had to make public statements denouncing Satanism and told Dick Cavett that he had become “terrified” as he grew older. 30 years after the release of the film, Levin came up with a sequel titled Son of Rosemary but it tanked.   William Castle was the man who first recognized the potential of Levin's work and secured the rights to make a film adaptation. Best known for his work on B-grade horror films, Castle wanted to direct it initially but Paramount Pictures executive Robert Evans agreed to go ahead with the project only if Castle worked as a producer. In April of 1969, Castle was hospitalized because of severe kidney stones. He was already under a lot of stress due to the sheer volume of hate mail he received, a terrible consequence of being attached to Rosemary's Baby. In his autobiography, he claimed that he began to hallucinate scenes from the film during his surgery and even shouted, “Rosemary, for God's sake drop that knife!” Although Castle recovered, he never reached that level of success again.   Producer Robert Evans was not exempt from this alleged curse either. He had risen to the top with major hits like Rosemary's Baby and The Godfather. However, he was convicted of cocaine trafficking in 1980 and got a suspended prison sentence. As a part of his plea bargain, Evans had to make an anti-drug commercial. Three years later, the producer would get caught up in the high-profile murder of Roy Radin which has come to be known as the “Cotton Club murder”. Despite two witnesses testifying that Evans was involved in the case, he was later cleared of the charges. In 1993, he told The New York Times, “I had 10 years of a horrific life, Kafkaesque. There were nights I cried myself to sleep.”   This is arguably the most renowned story that is related to Rosemary's Baby. In autumn of 1968, composer Krzysztof Komeda, who worked on the film, fell off a rocky escarpment while partying and went into a four-month coma. Coincidentally, this affliction is exactly what the witches in Levin's book subject Rosemary's suspicious friend to. Komeda never came out of the coma and died in Poland the following year.   John Lennon was assassinated outside The Dakota in 1980, the famous building where they filmed Rosemary's Baby. Producer Robert Evans claimed that the whole time he was on set at the apartment building he felt a “distinctly eerie feeling”. Lennon was gunned down by alleged “fan” Mark David Chapman who was influenced by Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye and the loneliness of protagonist Holden Caulfield. However, the fleeting association with the film has led fans of the film to link Lennon's assassination with the “curse” of the film. It can be said that the primary reason why the myth of the curse came about was the brutal murder of Polanski's wife, actress Sharon Tate. Polanski even wanted to cast Tate as Rosemary but Evans was adamant about Mia Farrow's involvement. A year after the film's release, Tate and her friends were stabbed to death by followers of cult leader Charles Manson. Tate was eight-and-a-half months pregnant at the time of her demise. The members of the Manson Family delivered around 100 stab wounds to the four victims and wrote “Helter Skelter” on the wall in blood.   After his wife and unborn son were killed, Polanski indulged in substance abuse to cope with things but he ended up exemplifying human depravity. While guest editing the French edition of Vogue in 1977, the director preyed upon a 13-year old girl and persuaded her to participate in multiple photoshoots. During the second shoot at Jack Nicholson's house, he incapacitated the minor with champagne and half a Quaalude before sexually violating her multiple times.   Although he was arrested for the felony and spent 42 days in jail, Polanski became a fugitive and fled to France to avoid facing charges. Since then, he has lived the life of a criminal and has avoided traveling to countries where he can be extradited back to the US.   Ok, let's round things out with the wizard of oz. Despite its commercial success, The Wizard of Oz is seen by some as cursed. There were so many serious accidents onset that those Oscar-nominated special effects almost cost cast members their lives, from the two actors playing winged monkeys crashing to the ground when the wires that hoisted them up in the air broke, to the Wicked Witch of the West's stunt double Betty Danko injuring her left leg when the broomstick exploded.   Buddy Ebsen was originally cast in the role of the Tin Woodman, a.k.a. the Tin Man, but he was essentially poisoned by the makeup, which was made of pure aluminum dust. Nine days after filming started he was hospitalized, sitting under an oxygen tent. When he was not getting better fast enough, the filmmakers hired Jack Haley to be the Tin Man instead. This time, instead of applying the aluminum powder, the makeup artists mixed it into a paste and painted it on him. He did develop an infection in his right eye that needed medical attention, but it ended up being treatable.   Margaret Hamilton — who played the Wicked Witch of the West and was the one tipped who Harmetz off to the turmoil on set more than three decades later for her 1977 book — got burns, and the makeup artists had to rush to remove her copper makeup so that it wouldn't seep through her wounds and become toxic. Unlike Ebsen, she didn't get fired because they could live without her on the set for several more weeks.   An actor playing one of the Wicked Witch of the West's soldiers accidentally jumped on top of Dorothy's Toto, Carl Spitz, the dog trainer on set, told Harmetz. The dog (a female Cairn terrier named Terry) sprained its foot, and Spitz had to get a canine double. Terry did recover and returned to the set a few weeks later.   In a memoir by Judy Garland's third husband, Sid Luft, published posthumously in 2017, he writes that, after bar-hopping in Culver City, the actors who played the munchkins “would make Judy's life miserable by putting their hands under her dress.” Harmetz says it's true that the actors would go drinking near the Culver City hotel where they stayed, but she says their interactions with Garland did not rise to the level of what Luft described. “Nobody on the movie ever saw her or heard of a munchkin assaulting her,” said one worker on the film. Garland did say the drinking was annoying in an interview with talk-show host Jack Paar, but experts on Garland's life say that her rant about being scarred by the rowdy behavior on set may have been a deflection from the real damage she suffered during that time, at the hands of the studio. Garland was only 16 when she made The Wizard of Oz, and her struggles with depression and disordered eating started at an early age and continued for the rest of her life. She claimed that the studio executives gave her uppers and sleeping pills so she could keep up with the demanding pace of show business. She struggled with drug addiction and attempted suicide several times before she died of an accidental overdose on June 22, 1969, at just 47 years old.   The film went through four different producers by the time it was through.   Richard Thorpe, the first director, insisted that Judy Garland wear a blonde wig and thick makeup to depict Dorothy. When Buddy Epsen got sick from his Tin Man makeup and filming shut down for two weeks, the studio fired Thorpe and replaced him with George Cukor of My Fair Lady fame. Cukor encouraged Garland to wear natural makeup and play Dorothy less cartoonish and more natural. Cukor later left the film to work on Gone with the Wind instead and Viktor Fleming took his place. However, Cukor came back a few weeks later after getting fired from Gone With the Wind by Clark Gable (supposedly he was fired when Gable found out he was homosexual).   Director King Vidor was responsible for most of the sepia sequences and also helped Mervyn LeRoy with editing in post-production.   Not only did the public think former kindergarten teacher Margaret Hamilton was really evil following the first airing of The Wizard of Oz — she also suffered physically for the role. Hamilton received second and third-degree burns all over her body when the green copper makeup she was wearing got too hot during the fire scene. Her stunt double spent months in the hospital after a prop broom exploded — they were using a double because Hamilton got injured on an earlier take.   Stage makeup and prosthetics in 1939 were nowhere near what they are today. Ray Bolger's Scarecrow makeup left deeply embedded marks in his skin that didn't disappear for more than a year after the movie wrapped up filming. Luckily, this would never happen today.   How bout that hanging munchkin… Well, sorry folks. That seems to be fake. In a scene where Dorothy, the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger), and the Tin Man (Jack Haley) are skipping down the Yellow Brick Road, singing “we're off to see the wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz,” some think the dark, moving figure hanging from a tree in the background is an actor who hanged himself on set. More likely, it's one of the exotic birds that the filmmakers borrowed from the Los Angeles Zoo to create a wilderness setting. The rumor has been circulating since around 1989, the time of the 50th anniversary of the film's release. Alright, there you have it… Cursed movies!!!  Obscure 90s horror movies you need to see   https://www.ranker.com/list/obscure-1990s-horror-movies/christopher-myers

movies tv dvd new york los angeles chinese hitchcock american german bruce lee halloween god vietnamese philippines new york city world war ii richardson new york times french castle hearts dragon hollywood psycho west injuries illinois poland england european france testing nest superman irish vietnam war iraq dreams wind baby holy peck vogue apocalypse cursed north carolina judy garland wilmington connecticut crow ohio sweden wizard supposedly middle earth oz francis ford coppola thorpe sweeney jack nicholson steven spielberg jesuits alive hong kong luft evans cleveland hamilton viggo mortensen catcher rye fights john wayne ironically reeve beyonce ti west independent werner herzog john landis friedkin charles manson landis william friedkin satan unholy moody omen sharon tate clark gable godfather toto helter skelter poltergeist pearl jam nova scotia janet leigh pugsley paramount pictures george reeves catholic church levin manson family my fair lady fordham university ray bolger exorcism cuckoo sampson west hollywood exorcist coppola chris farley one flew over brandon lee mere gregory peck christopher reeve coincidence john belushi culver city john candy satanism burden cotton club genghis khan salinger innkeepers ira levin roman polanski john richardson georgetown lorraine warren antichrist cairn jason miller martin sheen wan kafkaesque sam kinison tcm tin woodman wicked witch yellow brick road bernhard gable dick cavett morrow emily rose amityville horror ellen burstyn polanski george cukor coptic perryman tin man apocalypse now david seltzer jack haley holden caulfield vera farmiga max von sydow david warner james wan poltergeist ii the other side poltergeist iii perron scarecrows assyrian mia farrow coincidentally margaret hamilton eerily los angeles zoo dominique dunne quaalude spitz anneliese michel vic morrow bermingham bridge too far jennifer carpenter robert evans mcneil ceco myca mundelein eskimos jack paar atuk krzysztof komeda komeda street studios honeymoon suite carol anne fitzcarraldo mark david chapman tina knowles ommen torrington von sydow father karras cukor mordecai richler cursed films
Daily Rosary
Nov 10, 2021, Holy Rosary (Glorious Mysteries) | In Memoriam of Maria Blanca

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:13


Friends of the Rosary: Maria Blanca shared the Passion of Christ and now is in paradise, said to us Fr. German Martinez, a Catholic priest and a Ph.D. educated in the U.S., and former professor at Fordham University [in the picture during Mass last Monday in Madrid]. Fr. Martinez revealed that he dispensed Maria Blanca attending Mass when she was about to enter the hospital. But my wife responded: “I cannot live without the Eucharist.” “You've lost just physically Maria Blanca. We believe in the Communion of Saints, and you'll see Maria Blanca transformed. Our beloved relatives enter the new life.” Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! + Mikel A. | TheRosaryNetwork.org, New York • Watch this Rosary Live. Every day at 7:30 PM ET or at any time on-demand. Please share it! • In Memoriam of Maria Blanca: Testimonials • Free Online Video Course: Everything You Wanted to Know about the Rosary of Mary

The Takeaway
A Look at Tuesday's Elections 2021-11-03

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:24


A Look at Tuesday's Elections  We were joined by political commentator and host of Breaking Points, Krystal Ball and political scientist and Associate Professor of Political Science and American Studies at Fordham University Dr. Christina Greer to break down the biggest election results and what it all means.  Former Gov. Christine Todd Whitman discusses Election 2021 Former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman joins us to discuss election wins and losses, her thoughts on the winner of the New Jersey Governor's race and how she and others are working to better the country across party lines through the Renew America Movement PAC. Mayors Campaign on Public Safety and Policing Last year New York officials shifted roughly $1 billion from the police department, but then added $200 million this year. Eric Adams, the former police officer who will be the city's next mayor, campaigned on fighting crime. The Takeaway took a look at mayoral races across the country from Buffalo to Seattle with Tim Craig, National Correspondent for the Washington Post. Investigation Finds More Than 400 Unarmed Drivers Or Passengers Killed At Traffic Stops In The Last Five Years Meanwhile, only five officers have been convicted of crimes in those killings, according to a review of publicly reported cases. The investigation went on to find that at least $125 million dollars have been spent by local governments across the country to resolve legal claims in about 40 cases, with dozens more ongoing. We discussed the findings of this investigation with David Kirkpatrick, an investigative reporter with the New York Times.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

The Takeaway
A Look at Tuesday's Elections 2021-11-03

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:24


A Look at Tuesday's Elections  We were joined by political commentator and host of Breaking Points, Krystal Ball and political scientist and Associate Professor of Political Science and American Studies at Fordham University Dr. Christina Greer to break down the biggest election results and what it all means.  Former Gov. Christine Todd Whitman discusses Election 2021 Former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman joins us to discuss election wins and losses, her thoughts on the winner of the New Jersey Governor's race and how she and others are working to better the country across party lines through the Renew America Movement PAC. Mayors Campaign on Public Safety and Policing Last year New York officials shifted roughly $1 billion from the police department, but then added $200 million this year. Eric Adams, the former police officer who will be the city's next mayor, campaigned on fighting crime. The Takeaway took a look at mayoral races across the country from Buffalo to Seattle with Tim Craig, National Correspondent for the Washington Post. Investigation Finds More Than 400 Unarmed Drivers Or Passengers Killed At Traffic Stops In The Last Five Years Meanwhile, only five officers have been convicted of crimes in those killings, according to a review of publicly reported cases. The investigation went on to find that at least $125 million dollars have been spent by local governments across the country to resolve legal claims in about 40 cases, with dozens more ongoing. We discussed the findings of this investigation with David Kirkpatrick, an investigative reporter with the New York Times.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2709 - Race And Freedom in France and the U.S. w/ Tyler Edward Stovall

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 66:06


Sam and Emma host Tyler Edward Stovall, Professor of History and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Fordham University, to discuss his recent book White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea. Sam and Emma host Tyler Edward Stovall, Professor of History and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Fordham University, to discuss his recent book, “White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea,” looking at how the construct of liberty, largely from the French and American perspective, was built around a central element of whiteness. Professor Stovall takes on the mythologies of Peter Pan, looking at how Pirates and Indians were treated in white childhood, as these symbols of freedom from responsibility, something that comes to define white adulthood, and how these represent the specificity of white liberty. They also look at the appropriation project around piracy when it comes to shaping Hollywood heroes like Johnny Depp, and how fetishization combined with a de-racialization worked to reinforce this exclusive liberty, before they dive into the French and American roots of liberty, and how the nations were ingrained in promoting the enslavement of nonwhite people internationally. Next, Professor Stovall dives into the slipperiness of whiteness, specifically around the symbol of the statue of liberty, first exploring how this was read as an anti-immigrant symbol, before looking at how the original model for the statue came as a warrior breaking free from chains of enslavement, and how the changing reading of this worked in tandem with a changing perception of whiteness. Tyler Edward Stovall, Emma, and Sam, then dive into the effects of the first and second world wars on the treatment of liberty, with Woodrow Wilson's gift to the world following the Great War as freeing Eastern Europe to democracies while colonized nations remained under control, before the WWII tore open the racialized sores of liberty, centering western concepts of white supremacy and colonialism in the most public genocide to that point, forcing the US to actually take on this issue, resulting in free countries engaged with UN over doubling in the decades following it, while France attempted to double down on their empire, involving themselves in two bloody failures of war. They wrap up the interview with the state of liberty today, looking at the battlegrounds in the US as BLM and defund the police begin to question what our perception of freedom is and what it should be. And in the Fun Half: Nomiki Konst joins Emma and Samas they cover Dave Rubin's backing out of a debate on Big Tech regulation for totally legitimate reasons this time, Devin from St. John talks overuse of antibiotics, Manchin says compromise isn't enough, enough is enough, and enough is exclusively what he says, and they discuss how progressives can take back the narrative from centrists. They admire “the Good Liars” taking on CRT protesters in VA, expand a little on the VA elections, Tom Friedman reminds us that capitalism is what's too big to fail, the earth is fine to fall by the wayside, Donald Trump continues to hit on both antisemitism and anti-antisemitism, and Sarah from NJ talks fascist business boys and the genuine dangers they pose, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: LiquidIV: Cooler weather makes it easier to miss signs of dehydration like overheating or perspiration, which means it's even more important to keep your body properly hydrated. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your Liquid I.V. in bulk nationwide at Costco or you can get 25% off when you go to liquidIV.com and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at liquidIV.com. Harry's: With Harry's, you don't have to choose between a great shave and a fair price. Harry's delivers a close, comfortable shave at a fair price – still as low as two dollars per refill! Harry's is giving their best offer to Majority Report listeners. New Harry's customers can get a starter set that includes a 5-blade razor, a weighted ergonomic handle, foaming shave gel, and a travel blade cover at https://www.Harrys.com/MAJORITY – a $13 value all for just $3. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop

Outside the Walls
Dr. Charles C. Camosy - Medical Ethics and Fundamental Human Dignity

Outside the Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 56:00


Dr. Charles C. Camosy, associate professor of theological and social ethics at Fordham University, joins us to talk about the importance of defending and promoting fundamental human dignity in the realm of Medical Ethics, particularly resisting dehumanizing models of 'care' when serving an aging population.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Vaccine Mandate Deadline Looms for City Workers

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 26:44


Christina Greer, political science professor at Fordham University, host of the podcast FAQNYC, politics editor at The Grio and author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013), and Robert Hennelly, City Hall reporter for The Chief-Leader, former WNYC reporter, and the author of Stuck Nation: Can the United States Change Course on Our History of Choosing Profits Over People? (Democracy at Work, 2021), talk about today's deadline for police, fire and sanitation workers to get vaccinated or face going on unpaid leave.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - ROBERT MORNINGSTAR - Is there a UFO-UN Connection OR Is This More UFO Propaganda

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:17


Robert D. Morningstar is currently Co-Editor of UFO Digest. RDM is a civilian intelligence analyst, and photo analyst living in New York City. He is a graduate of Power Memorial Academy ('67) with a degree in psychology from Fordham University ('74). While at Fordham University, Robert D Morningstar was recruited as a research associate in some of the earliest studies of "Artificial Intelligence" in a program sponsored by ONI & IBM. During the 1970s, Robert D Morningstar became a "China Watcher," specializing in Chinese language studies, as well as, a Yang Family Tai Chi master, acknowledged by the Hong Kong Tai Chi Masters Association and the highest-ranking masters in. RDM has taught Tai Chi for the East Asian Studies Department at Oberlin College (1980-81) and as an Adjunct Lecturer at Hunter College (1994-95), City University of New York. From 1992-1994, he served as a consultant and movement therapist in the Behavioral Sciences Department at The International Center for the Disabled in New York City teaching Movement Therapy, Stress Management and Behavioral Modification Programs. During the 1990s, Robert D Morningstar dedicated himself to investigating the JFK Assassination and exposed the doctoring of the Zapruder Film and the alteration of the medical and forensic evidence in the Warren Commission Report. Robert has been studying UFOs since the mid-1950s and has had several close encounters while airborne and on the ground (most recently in September '07). Morningstar is a civilian pilot, FAA-certified Instrument Ground Instructor and a USG certified Weather Specialist. Robert D Morningstar works regularly with victims of alien abduction around the world (via Internet) and uses Tai Chi, Taoist meditation methods to relieve trauma resulting from PTSS (post traumatic stress syndrome) of ETAP. Morningstar teaches psychic and psychological skills (like Remote Viewing) to combat "intruders" and thwart psychic attacks and alien abductions. *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - ROBERT MORNINGSTAR - Is there a UFO-UN Connection OR Is This More UFO Propaganda

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:17


Robert D. Morningstar is currently Co-Editor of UFO Digest. RDM is a civilian intelligence analyst, and photo analyst living in New York City. He is a graduate of Power Memorial Academy ('67) with a degree in psychology from Fordham University ('74). While at Fordham University, Robert D Morningstar was recruited as a research associate in some of the earliest studies of "Artificial Intelligence" in a program sponsored by ONI & IBM. During the 1970s, Robert D Morningstar became a "China Watcher," specializing in Chinese language studies, as well as, a Yang Family Tai Chi master, acknowledged by the Hong Kong Tai Chi Masters Association and the highest-ranking masters in. RDM has taught Tai Chi for the East Asian Studies Department at Oberlin College (1980-81) and as an Adjunct Lecturer at Hunter College (1994-95), City University of New York. From 1992-1994, he served as a consultant and movement therapist in the Behavioral Sciences Department at The International Center for the Disabled in New York City teaching Movement Therapy, Stress Management and Behavioral Modification Programs. During the 1990s, Robert D Morningstar dedicated himself to investigating the JFK Assassination and exposed the doctoring of the Zapruder Film and the alteration of the medical and forensic evidence in the Warren Commission Report. Robert has been studying UFOs since the mid-1950s and has had several close encounters while airborne and on the ground (most recently in September '07). Morningstar is a civilian pilot, FAA-certified Instrument Ground Instructor and a USG certified Weather Specialist. Robert D Morningstar works regularly with victims of alien abduction around the world (via Internet) and uses Tai Chi, Taoist meditation methods to relieve trauma resulting from PTSS (post traumatic stress syndrome) of ETAP. Morningstar teaches psychic and psychological skills (like Remote Viewing) to combat "intruders" and thwart psychic attacks and alien abductions. *** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
Rob McConnell Interviews - ROBERT MORNINGSTAR - Is there a UFO-UN Connection OR Is This More UFO Propaganda

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 45:17


Robert D. Morningstar is currently Co-Editor of UFO Digest. RDM is a civilian intelligence analyst, and photo analyst living in New York City. He is a graduate of Power Memorial Academy ('67) with a degree in psychology from Fordham University ('74). While at Fordham University, Robert D Morningstar was recruited as a research associate in some of the earliest studies of "Artificial Intelligence" in a program sponsored by ONI & IBM. During the 1970s, Robert D Morningstar became a "China Watcher," specializing in Chinese language studies, as well as, a Yang Family Tai Chi master, acknowledged by the Hong Kong Tai Chi Masters Association and the highest-ranking masters in. RDM has taught Tai Chi for the East Asian Studies Department at Oberlin College (1980-81) and as an Adjunct Lecturer at Hunter College (1994-95), City University of New York. From 1992-1994, he served as a consultant and movement therapist in the Behavioral Sciences Department at The International Center for the Disabled in New York City teaching Movement Therapy, Stress Management and Behavioral Modification Programs. During the 1990s, Robert D Morningstar dedicated himself to investigating the JFK Assassination and exposed the doctoring of the Zapruder Film and the alteration of the medical and forensic evidence in the Warren Commission Report. Robert has been studying UFOs since the mid-1950s and has had several close encounters while airborne and on the ground (most recently in September '07). Morningstar is a civilian pilot, FAA-certified Instrument Ground Instructor and a USG certified Weather Specialist. Robert D Morningstar works regularly with victims of alien abduction around the world (via Internet) and uses Tai Chi, Taoist meditation methods to relieve trauma resulting from PTSS (post traumatic stress syndrome) of ETAP. Morningstar teaches psychic and psychological skills (like Remote Viewing) to combat "intruders" and thwart psychic attacks and alien abductions. *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Buried Secrets Podcast
The Ghost Exorcist (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 56:39


Forgotten human remains, a lingering entity monitored by a ghostly priest, mysteriously vanishing objects, strange sounds, and more abound at Fordham University's most haunted dorm. Here's a deep dive into ghost stories from Queen's Court, looking at both the reported stories as well as the connections between tales of weirdness. Highlights include: • A second, forgotten burial ground on Fordham's Campus • My own paranormal experience • The entity that supposedly is trapped at the end of the hall of a dorm • A ghostly priest who banishes and traps a strange entity • Poltergeist activity Got a Fordham haunting to report? Send it to buriedsecretspodcast@gmail.com. For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Connect - 632 - David Goldberg of Alpaca VC

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 9:49


On this episode of Investor Connect, Hall welcomes David Goldberg, General Partner at Alpaca VC. Headquartered in New York, New York, Alpaca VC is a seed-stage venture capital firm that believes that layering technology over daily life transforms how the real world works so they invest in the people, products, and processes that power commerce in the physical world. Led by a diverse team of company builders, operators, and analytical thinkers, Alpaca develops a repeatable playbook to help its entrepreneurs most efficiently progress from Seed to Series A.Prior investments include Compass, Transfix, Latch, Wheels Up, Imperfect Foods, and Firstbase. After coming off his own entrepreneurial journey as Founder/CEO of FreshNeck, David joined Alpaca in 2014. He relies on empathy and personal experience to form deep bonds with founders and add value where it matters most. David enjoys partnering with startups on high-level strategy and building scalable ‘operating systems' consisting of structured priorities and OKRs. Some of David's past investments on behalf of Alpaca include Latch, Transfix, Imperfect Foods, Minibar, FirstBase, and Monument. Before getting the startup bug, David spent his early career in finance and law at the University of Miami and Fordham University. He spent three years as an Assistant District Attorney, representing the people of New York, and following that, spent three years across Merrill Lynch and Jefferies & Co. David discusses his investment thesis and some of the challenges entrepreneurs and investors face.  You can visit Alpaca VC at , via LinkedIn at , and via Twitter at .  David can be contacted via email at , via LinkedIn at , and via Twitter at .  _____________________________________________________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:    Check out our other podcasts here:   For Investors check out:   For Startups check out:   For eGuides check out:   For upcoming Events, check out    For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group    Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .

Health Your Own Way
Episode 104: The power of self-perception to your overall wellbeing

Health Your Own Way

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 21:18


Welcome! I am delighted to have you join us today! Please allow me to introduce you to Jevon Wooden is an Army Veteran and certified mindset in perception coach and the founder of Live Not Loathe, LLC. He has overcome adversity, depression, and PTSD to earn multiple certifications recognized throughout the coaching community, as well as an MBA from the University of Maryland Robert H. Smith Business School and an M.S. in Cybersecurity from Fordham University. His mission is to empower others to increase their self-confidence, improve their perception of their own worth, and design their lives through a mindset shift from scarcity to abundance. He does this through transformational group and one-on-one coaching sessions, intimate group coaching sessions, on-demand courses and training, seminars, and workshops. He is an avid traveller, voracious reader, and fitness enthusiast. You can find more details about Jevon Wooden on his website at https://livenotloathe.com/ Share with someone that needs to be inspired and empowered. Don't forget to like, comment, and subscribe. Best Health, Mo Akins

Grace To All
The Positivity Tribe in the Locker Room: tackling culture, kindness, overcoming adversity, and the importance of teamwork. (A Life touches a life touches a life…”

Grace To All

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:36


Paul interviews Fred Quartlebaum, Division 1  basketball coach for more than twenty-five years, currently on the coaching staff at the University of Kansas and who has had coaching stops at North Carolina, St. John's, and Notre Dame among others. While at Kansas, Fred has been a part of six Big 12 regular-season championships, two Big 12 Tournament titles, three NCAA Championship Elite Eights and one Final Four in 2018. Fred played college basketball at Fordham University where he was a four-year letter winner from 1985-89. He helped the Rams to an NIT appearance in 1988 and was co-captain his senior season. He graduated with a degree in communications and is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. Fred and his wife Christy have two sons, Trey, who is a guard at St. Francis Brooklyn, and Mayson, a forward at Kennesaw State.    Fred has teamed up with his close friend, inspirational author, coach, trainer, and top podcaster Christopher J Wirth to coauthor book two in The Positivity Tribe series. Their new book, The Positivity Tribe in the Locker Room, tackles culture, kindness, overcoming adversity, and the importance of teamwork.   Catch up with Coach Q on Instagram or contact The Positivity Tribe for more information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Thinking Allowed
Freedom

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:48


Freedom: Laurie Taylor explores an unruly & disputed concept. Annelien de Dijn, Professor of Modern Political History at Utrecht University, asks how it came to be identified with limited government. Does our view of freedom owe more to the enemies of democracy than the liberty lovers of the Age of Revolution? Also, Tyler Stovall, Professor of History at Fordham University, considers the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in the United States, a nation that has claimed liberty as at the heart of their national identity. Producer: Jayne Egerton

Thinking Allowed
Freedom

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:12


Freedom: Laurie Taylor explores an unruly & disputed concept. Annelien de Dijn, Professor of Modern Political History at Utrecht University, asks how it came to be identified with limited government. Does our view of freedom owe more to the enemies of democracy than the liberty lovers of the Age of Revolution? Also, Tyler Stovall, Professor of History at Fordham University, considers the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in the United States, a nation that has claimed liberty as at the heart of their national identity. Producer: Jayne Egerton

Grid Talk
National Grid Takes New York Green

Grid Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 24:40


In this episode of Grid Talk, host Marty Rosenberg talks with Rudy Wynter who is the president of National Grid New York. The discussion focuses on the investments needed to reach the state's climate goals.“We have very ambitions climate goals in New York State, 70% renewable electricity by 2030; 100% decarbonized electricity by 2040. In order to get to those kinds of targets we need to start now,” said Wynter.According to Wynter, that means massive investments in infrastructure and technology.“We're going to need all of it. We're going to need electric vehicles. We're going to need to electrify big portions of the heating sector. We're going to need battery energy storage. We'll need solar, wind. We'll need carbon capture and storage. But we will also need to identify a role that the existing natural gas network can play and I think there is clearly a role it can play.”Wynter also talks about the prospect of using hydrogen in natural gas.“Blending green hydrogen, hydrogen that's produced by renewables, but blending that hydrogen into the gas distribution network to create a lower carbon fuel in that network.”Finally, Wynter reveals what concerns him about our energy future.Rudy Wynter leads National Grid's regulated energy delivery portfolio that provides electricity and natural gas service to 4 million customers across New York. He is responsible for the financial, operational, and customer-focused performance of the New York business and manages the relationships with regulators, government officials and the communities National Grid serves. In his more than 30-year tenure at National Grid and its legacy companies, Mr. Wynter has served in several senior and operational roles, most recently as Chief Operating Officer of the company's Wholesale Networks & Capital Delivery business. He earned a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Pratt Institute and an MBA from Fordham University.

The Long Leash with James Jacobson
James Gorman: New York Times Science Writer & Dog Lover | The Long Leash #34

The Long Leash with James Jacobson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:15


James Gorman dog lover, science writer for The New York Times, author and narrator, is stepping away from the newspaper after almost three decades. He is the author of books on hypochondria, penguins, dinosaurs and the ocean around Antarctica. He writes about animals, viruses, archaeology and the evolution of dogs and he's also taught science writing at New York University, Fordham University and as part of Stanford University's online program. In this conversation he deep dives into many of his articles over the years including his most recent ‘How old is the Maltese really?'. He also lifts the lid on his approach to telling fascinating science stories and shares his thoughts around the science and reporting on the COVID pandemic. About James Gorman  James Gorman is a science writer at large for The New York Times and the author of books on hypochondria, penguins, dinosaurs and the ocean around Antarctica. He writes about animals, viruses, archaeology and the evolution of dogs. He has been at The Times since 1993, as an editor on The New York Times Magazine, deputy science editor, editor of a personal technology section, outdoors columnist, science columnist and editor of Science Times. From 2013 to 2019 he wrote and narrated the video feature “ScienceTake.” Over the course of his career at the Times and elsewhere, James Gorman has written about everything from the invention of flea collars to the nature of consciousness. Most recently he has covered the lives of animals, the evolution of dogs and viral diseases in animals. The New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/by/james-gorman Twitter: https://twitter.com/jimgorman About The Long Leash  Thank you for joining us. If you have enjoyed listening, please SUBSCRIBE so you'll never miss out!   Check out Dog Podcast Network for other dog-adjacent shows.  Follow us in Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. 

Buried Secrets Podcast
NYC's Most Haunted Half-Mile (Haunted Fordham University)

Buried Secrets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 40:39


A look at one of the most concentrated areas of hauntings in all of New York City: Fordham University in the Bronx. Ghostly priests, secret tunnels, a black dog, poltergeist activity, multiple burial grounds, students living in an old morgue, and more, abound at Fordham University. The school's campus in the Bronx is about half a mile wide, but it's packed with weirdness. This series about Fordham University's hauntings begins with a look at Queen's Court, the university's oldest dorm. Queen's Court was built in 1845, was once a seminary, and has a number of ghost stories and urban legends attached to it. Highlights include: • A groundskeeper ghost who still does his rounds • The ghost of a 19th century seminarian • A digression about Stone Tape Theory • A theory about why Fordham's ghost stories weren't really talked about until the 1970s • A conceited archbishop • Edgar Allan Poe For the shownotes and sources, visit buriedsecretspodcast.com.

Pints With Aquinas
Aquinas' MANY Arguments For God's Existence w/ Dr. Joseph Trabbic

Pints With Aquinas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 124:23


Here are the PDFs that Dr. Trabbic and I discussed today: https://www.patreon.com/posts/57265103 Dr Joseph Trabbic earned his PhD in philosophy from Fordham University in New York in 2008. He is currently associate professor of philosophy and chair of the philosophy department at Ave Maria University in Ave Maria Florida, where he has taught since 2006. His interests include St. Thomas Aquinas, Martin Heidegger, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion. He has published in various academic journals, among which Religious Studies, the International Journal of Philosophy and Theology, the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, and the Heythrop Journal. He is a contributor to Thomistica.net and has a regular column with Catholic Word Report entitled “St. Thomas for Today.” He and his wife Rose are the proud parents of five children. Sign up for my free course on St. Augustine's "Confessions"!   SPONSORS Hallow: http://hallow.app/mattfradd STRIVE: https://www.strive21.com/ Ethos Logos: https://www.elinvestments.net/pints   GIVING Patreon or Directly: https://pintswithaquinas.com/support/  This show (and all the plans we have in store) wouldn't be possible without you. I can't thank those of you who support me enough. Seriously! Thanks for essentially being a co-producer co-producer of the show.   LINKS Merch: https://teespring.com/stores/matt-fradd FREE 21 Day Detox From Porn Course: https://www.strive21.com/   SOCIAL Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mattfradd Twitter: https://twitter.com/mattfradd Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mattfradd Gab: https://gab.com/mattfradd Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/pintswithaquinas   MY BOOKS Get my NEW book "How To Be Happy: Saint Thomas' Secret To A Good Life," out now! Does God Exist: https://www.amazon.com/Does-God-Exist-Socratic-Dialogue-ebook/dp/B081ZGYJW3/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=fradd&qid=1586377974&sr=8-9 Marian Consecration With Aquinas: https://www.amazon.com/Marian-Consecration-Aquinas-Growing-Closer-ebook/dp/B083XRQMTF/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=fradd&qid=1586379026&sr=8-4 The Porn Myth: https://www.ignatius.com/The-Porn-Myth-P1985.aspx   CONTACT Book me to speak: https://www.mattfradd.com/speakerrequestform

Women With Vision
9.6 Rewinding Back the Story With Budy Jamilly Whitfield

Women With Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 23:51


Budy (pronounced Beauty) Jamilly Whitfield is a Licensed Latinx Psychotherapist with over 16 years of experience in the mental health and not-for-profit sector. Jamilly holds an MSW from Fordham University. In 2019 she established Beauteous Me, Corp., and Beauteous Mind, PLLC in 2021 with the intention of creating a healing space for professionals to break through Limiting Beliefs and achieving self-confidence. Aside from providing coaching, therapy, and leading a non-for-profit program, she is a speaker, leadership consultant, trainer, advocate of mental health, content creator, podcaster, wife, mom, and creative. Jamilly has been featured on various podcasts. Jamilly motivates you to level up, breakthrough limiting beliefs so that you can achieve self-confidence.

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
God and Basketball with ESPN's Mike Breen

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:39


The National Basketball Association season starts next week. If you flip on a marquee matchup on ESPN or ABC sometime this fall, you'll probably hear the voice of today's guest: play-by-play announcer Mike Breen. Mike is widely regarded as one of the best announcers in the world in any sport. He informs without overexplaining. He shows excitement and love of the game without being cheesy. He perfectly captures the energy in the arena for those of us watching at home. It's no surprise he has announced the NBA finals a record fifteen times and received the top media award from the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2020. Mike is a proud alumnus of Fordham University and a deeply committed Catholic. Host Mike Jordan Laskey asked him about what he loved the most about returning to the arena after announcing dozens of games from his house during the pandemic. They also talked about all the work that goes into the job of announcing games in the hours and days before a big game starts. They also discussed Mike Breen's faith and his time at Fordham. Learn more about Mike Breen: https://espnpressroom.com/us/bios/breen_mike/ AMDG is a production of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. Subscribe to AMDG wherever you get podcasts.

The World of Football
THIS WEEK IN THE WORLD OF FOOTBALL #218 | (OCTOBER 12, 2021)

The World of Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 72:04


On this week's show, Randy and Adam Snow talk about Jon Gruden resigning as the head coach of the Las Vegas Raiders and the Alabama Crimson Tide's 19-game winning streak comes to an end. In this week's HISTORY LESSON, we tell the story of Fordham University's famous linemen known as the Seven Blocks of Granite. Follow us on: Facebook: facebook.com/TWOFKalamazoo Twitter: twitter.com/TWOFKalamazoo YouTube: The World of Football Kalamazoo Contact us: info@theworldoffootball.com Official Web Site: www.theworldoffootball.com

Politics with Amy Walter
Politics: Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long?

Politics with Amy Walter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:48


Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? Join us for this week's political round up with Michael Steele, former Lt. Gov. of Maryland and previous chair of the RNC and Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University, co-host of podcast FAQ NYC, and author of the book “Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration and the Pursuit of the American Dream." Michael and Christina share their thoughts about the debt ceiling extension and reproductive rights as well as the state of voting rights and the Democrat and Republican strategies ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. Why New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas is Fighting for Immigration Reform New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas traveled to D.C. this week and was arrested while participating in that peaceful protest. She joined The Takeaway today to talk about why she's fighting for immigration reform. Jason Rezaian Discuss his new podcast 544 Days Jason Rezaian joins us to discuss his new Spotify Original Podcast 544 Days which chronicles his time in an Iranian prison and what it took to get him out. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

The Takeaway
Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? 2021-10-08

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:48


Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? Join us for this week's political round up with Michael Steele, former Lt. Gov. of Maryland and previous chair of the RNC and Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University, co-host of podcast FAQ NYC, and author of the book “Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration and the Pursuit of the American Dream." Michael and Christina share their thoughts about the debt ceiling extension and reproductive rights as well as the state of voting rights and the Democrat and Republican strategies ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. Why New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas is Fighting for Immigration Reform New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas traveled to D.C. this week and was arrested while participating in that peaceful protest. She joined The Takeaway today to talk about why she's fighting for immigration reform. Jason Rezaian Discuss his new podcast 544 Days Jason Rezaian joins us to discuss his new Spotify Original Podcast 544 Days which chronicles his time in an Iranian prison and what it took to get him out. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

The Takeaway
Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? 2021-10-08

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:48


Debt Ceiling Deal Extended but For How Long? Join us for this week's political round up with Michael Steele, former Lt. Gov. of Maryland and previous chair of the RNC and Christina Greer, Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University, co-host of podcast FAQ NYC, and author of the book “Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration and the Pursuit of the American Dream." Michael and Christina share their thoughts about the debt ceiling extension and reproductive rights as well as the state of voting rights and the Democrat and Republican strategies ahead of the upcoming midterm elections. Why New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas is Fighting for Immigration Reform New York State Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas traveled to D.C. this week and was arrested while participating in that peaceful protest. She joined The Takeaway today to talk about why she's fighting for immigration reform. Jason Rezaian Discuss his new podcast 544 Days Jason Rezaian joins us to discuss his new Spotify Original Podcast 544 Days which chronicles his time in an Iranian prison and what it took to get him out. For transcripts, see individual segment pages.

On Record PR
How Lawyers Can Prepare for the Future of AI in Legal with Bert Kaminski, Director of Legal for Google Cloud

On Record PR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 21:17


Jennifer Simpson Carr goes on record with Bert Kaminski, director of legal for Google Cloud. They discuss artificial intelligence, contract automation, and how counsel can adapt their role in light of increasingly powerful AI-based tools. Learn More Bert Kaminski is a seasoned legal counsel in the technology industry, specializing in advanced and emerging fields such as cloud computing, internet of things, artificial intelligence, data science & machine learning.  Bert is a frequent public speaker on these topics, and has served as a senior advisor to all levels of business and executive management in leading technology companies, such as Google, GE Digital and Oracle. Bert serves as a Board Advisor to SafePorter LLC, a technology company specializing in privacy-centric data analytics and tools for diversity and inclusion tracking. Bert leads the Technology Law committee of the New Jersey chapter of the Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) and previously served on the chapter's board of directors and as its President.  As a Director within Google's legal organization, Bert leads a team that supports commercial enterprise transactions for key industry segments of Google Cloud, including financial services, healthcare and the public sector. Prior to joining Google, Bert was General Counsel and a member of the executive leadership team of ServiceMax Inc., a California based cloud application provider, where he was responsible for all legal affairs of the company including privacy and technology related legal issues. Earlier, Bert was Chief Commercial Counsel at GE Digital LLC, a General Electric company, where he served as GE Digital's privacy leader and specialized in the Industrial Internet of Things, cloud computing, and software licensing. Bert began his in-house legal career at Oracle. Bert established and led Oracle's Cloud Legal team, and as Assistant General Counsel, served as the principal attorney globally for Oracle's cloud computing and information technology managed services businesses.  Bert served as an appointed member of the Privacy Bar Advisory Board of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), and is also an IAPP Certified Information Privacy Professional for European data protection (CIPP/E). A graduate of Fordham University's joint J.D./M.B.A. program, Bert earned a certificate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on the topic of Artificial Intelligence and its implications for business strategy. Bert earned a bachelor's degree with honors at New York University (NYU), in the field of economics.

Trillions
The Tax Idea That's Scaring ETF Investors

Trillions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 48:43


Exchange-traded funds have a special super power: tax efficiency. Investors pay taxes when they sell, but not when others in the fund sell. Yet that super power is suddenly in jeopardy. A recent bill proposed by Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden (D-Ore) would repeal a tiny section in the tax code that allows for ETF's in-kind creations and redemptions to be non-taxable events.  On this episode of Trillions, Eric and Joel invite Professor Jeffrey Colon of Fordham University, a tax expert who's critiqued ETFs before and influenced Wyden's bill, and Dave Nadig, director of research for ETF Trends, to discuss the proposal. Some chaos ensues.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Dear Culture
What's In It For The Culture?

Dear Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 43:47


Ya'll, if it's not one thing it's another! This week on the Dear Culture Podcast, we're calling in for backup! Our host Gerren Keith Gaynor is joined by theGrio Politics Editor and Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University, Dr. Christina Greer to help us make sense of all the big stories making headlines and what they mean for us.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Take Nothing When I Die
S2, E8: Paying Homage to Our Ancestors with Veronica Agard

Take Nothing When I Die

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 62:51


We are in seasons of transitions and changes and "Take Nothing When I Die" is no different. The biggest and greatest change: I have created a whole life form! I will be sharing more about my parenting journey this season so stay tuned. If you haven't gotten a chance to listen to episodes 1 - 7 of Season 2, take a listen and you'll hear a little bit of my pregnancy experience. Thank you for staying on this episode experience with me. I would love to know how YOU want to see TNWID transition: a book, a documentary, a series? Hit me up! Find me on IG (@takenothingwhenidie) or Twitter (@TNWID), leave me a voicemail on Anchor (anchor.fm/tnwid) or email me: sghostonpaul@gmail.com Now, let's get into this episode! I am so excited to pick Season 2 back up with my amazing guest: Veronica Agard. Veronica Agard is a writer and cultural organizer at the intersections of Black identity, wellness, representation, and culture. Of Afro-Caribbean, African-American and Indigenous descent, she experiments with creative healing modalities and puts theories learned into practice. With bylines at Redefining Our Womanhood, Black Girl Magik, Life as Ceremony and Black and Well; Veronica also is the creator behind the Who Heals the Healer experience, contributes to Your Magic, and facilitates the Ancestors in Training educational project. She graduated magna cum laude from CUNY City College in 2014 and is pursuing a master of social work degree from Fordham University. In this episode, we will be discussing: Why Veronica feels aligned with coming out of a winter slumber and why she feels "even" Honoring and paying homage to the phrase "Rest is Resistance" Clarity in finding your inspiration Ways that we hyper consume traditions by people of color How letting go invites in new positive things to happen The importance of Shadow work What Veronica would put in a time capsule Where can you find Veronica: https://ancestorsintraining.org/ http://www.veronicaagard.com/ IG: @ancestorsintraining, @verosgotthejuice Twitter: @veraicon_ Honorable Mentions: Jambalaya by Luisah Teish The Alter of My Soul by Marta Moreno Vega

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Live From UNGA -- Day 2 | Joe Biden's UN Speech | Antonio Guterres' Big Warning to the World | And More!

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 28:47


The United Nations General Assembly is always one of the most important weeks of the diplomatic calendar. Each day this week we are bringing you live coverage featuring the latest news and analysis from of UNGA, in partnership with the UN Foundation.  Today's episode was recorded Tuesday afternoon, September 21. Richard Gowan of the International Crisis Group and Anjali Dayal of Fordham University discuss the key takeaways from speeches by world leaders, including Joe Biden and Antonio Guterres. We also discuss some important stories to follow from the United Nations during the week ahead. 

Excited Utterance
108 Maggie Wittlin

Excited Utterance

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021


Meta-Evidence and Preliminary Injunctions. Maggie Wittlin from Fordham University discusses the applicability of the rules of evidence to preliminary injunction hearings and how the concept of "meta-evidence" might help us think about the kinds of evidence offered at pre-trial hearings more generally.