Podcasts about Consumer price index

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Statistic to indicate the change in typical household expenditure

  • 335PODCASTS
  • 626EPISODES
  • 23mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST
Consumer price index

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Best podcasts about Consumer price index

Latest podcast episodes about Consumer price index

POLITICO Energy
Gas prices have fallen. Will inflation follow?

POLITICO Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 8:11


According to the latest data released from the Consumer Price Index, overall inflation didn't rise in July for the first time in more than two years, due to lower gas prices. POLITICO's Victoria Guida breaks down if falling gas prices will continue to be a trend and how the economy might look heading into the midterms.    Victoria Guida is an economics reporter for POLITICO. Josh Siegel is an energy reporter for POLITICO.  Nirmal Mulaikal is a POLITICO audio host-producer.  Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the executive producer of POLITICO's audio department.

TD Ameritrade Network
Fed Can Afford To Be Aggressive & Control Inflation Now

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 14:08


"The stock market today rallied after the CPI report was released. The core year-over-year CPI is unchanged from last month. This means that there was a change in inflation, but it is not going lower. The Consumer Price Index will not deter the Federal Reserve in its form. The Federal Reserve can afford to be aggressive and control inflation now," says Bob Iaccino.

Real Vision Presents...
Have We Reached Peak Inflation?

Real Vision Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:55


U.S. stocks gapped higher at today's open and held onto big gains through the day, buoyed by signs in July's Consumer Price Index data that we've finally reached an inflection point for inflation. Both headline and core measures came in below consensus forecast, as the question turns to whether the trend has changed. Plunging yields across the U.S. Treasury curve suggest investors believe it has. Weston Nakamura joins Andreas Steno Larsen at the top of today's Daily Briefing to talk about price action across asset classes leading up to and in the aftermath of this morning's report. Andreas welcomes Darius Dale, the founder and CEO of 42 Macro, for an assessment of the July CPI data in the broader context and the “evolving distribution of probable outcomes.” What does this print mean for markets, especially as it comes from a month when the U.S. economy added more than 500,000 jobs? And what does the Federal Reserve do next? “It's critical,” as Darius tweeted today, “to have a data-driven process that's able to recognize it in real-time.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast
Whales FOMO into Ethereum! (Crypto Bulls Stampede)

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 34:50


Today we will be discussing the Consumer Price Index bringing $50 Billion back into the crypto market with a favorable CPI data release. Next, we'll talk about the upcoming Ethereum Merge test for the Ropsten testnet and the new Beacon chain and last, we'll talk about the exchange Hotbit freezing all users accounts and assets indefinitely. Around the Blockchain is your favorite Cryptocurrency show discussing Bitcoin, Ethereum, Cardano, and the top altcoins. Our four crypto experts Altcoin Daily, Tim Warren, Altcoin Daily, & Johnny Hopper. Tune in for their insightful crypto analysis.

Squawk on the Street
Inflation Data Fuels Big Rally for Stocks and Elon Musk Sells More Tesla Shares 8/10/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 44:09


Jim Cramer and David Faber focused on the stocks leading Wednesday's big stock market rally, sparked by cooler-than-expected inflation data. The Consumer Price Index for July easing from a four-decade high, fueling investor hopes that the Fed might take a 75 basis point rate hike off the table in September. The anchors reacted to Elon Musk's decision to sell nearly $7 billion worth of Tesla shares amid his legal battle to exit his $44 billion deal to buy Twitter. Also in focus: What to make of this year's meltdown in media stocks ahead of Disney's after-the-bell earnings, Softbank reducing its stake in Alibaba, and Coinbase's billion-dollar loss.

CNN News Briefing
9 AM ET: US inflation slows, Trump deposition, Musk's cashing out & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 4:30


The latest inflation figures are out and the Consumer Price Index is slightly lower than predicted. It's not been the best week for Trump so far. He's being deposed today as part of a civil investigation - we'll tell you why he might not be able to plead the fifth. Meanwhile people are asking what happens next, after the FBI searched Trump's Florida residence. Europe is dealing with drought after one of the hottest July's on record. Plus, Elon Musk just added a few more billions to his cash pile.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Quick News Update: Inflation Report Surprise

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 2:31


We have a quick news update on today's inflation report. Investors have been waiting anxiously to see if inflation hit a peak in June and is now headed down, prompting the Fed to slow down on rate hikes. Well, we have good news. The report on the Consumer Price Index, or CPI, shows a bigger-than-expected decline in July. It shows that the annual rate of inflation dropped from 9.1% to 8.5%. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had expected a reading of 8.7%.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.The decrease was mostly due to a big drop in gas prices. The report says the gasoline index was down 7.7% which offset a rise in food and housing costs. When you look at the broader category of energy, that was down 4.6% because of a drop in gasoline and natural gas prices, but the index for electricity was higher. (1)The core rate of inflation, which excludes food and fuel, remained the same as it was in June at 5.9%, but that was a better reading than economists had expected. Shelter accounts for about 40% of the core rate and that was up 5.7% on an annual basis.Economists and stock traders had been predicting another .75% rate hike in September to help control inflation. But as CNBC reports, they now believe there's a better chance for just a half point rate hike. (2) Louis Navellier said in his podcast that he believes it could be a 75 basis rate hike still, but that it will most likely be the last one because it's rare to see rate hikes before an election. If that's the case, he's expecting a big stock market rally after September 21st.The Chief Economist at Jeffries, Aneta Markowska, told CNBC: “Things are moving in the right direction. This is the most encouraging report we've had in quite some time.” She also agrees that it will take some pressure off Federal Reserve officials at their next meeting.You'll find a link to the full report in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.Please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm2 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/10/consumer-prices-rose-8point5percent-in-july-less-than-expected-as-inflation-pressures-ease-a-bit.html

CNN News Briefing
5 PM ET: Consumer Price Index, PGA Tour lawsuit, Michael Jordan jersey & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 3:58


In this episode, we break down a new report on consumer prices and what it could mean for inflation. Plus, former President Donald Trump pleaded the fifth in a civil investigation into his real estate finances. The US Justice Department charged a man in an alleged plot to assassinate former national security adviser John Bolton. Three pro golfers who joined the Saudi-backed LIV Series won't be allowed to play in the PGA Tour's first post-season event. Lastly, one of Michael Jordan's NBA Finals jerseys could sell for big bucks at an auction – we have the details.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Arizona's Morning News
When will the price of basics drop?

Arizona's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 3:46


Jim and Jayme discuss the Consumer Price Index report that was released today. Health care, car insurance, food and shelter were all more expensive. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
New CPI numbers released today

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 21:19


Mike dives into the new Consumer Price Index numbers and the increase in cost for every day items. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Vision Presents...
"Listen to What the Market Is Saying"

Real Vision Presents...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 35:48 Very Popular


If last week's events in and around Taiwan illustrate Asia's growing geopolitical importance, today's announcement by SoftBank that it lost $23 billion in the second quarter also make it the home to “the world's largest dumb retail investor,” as Weston Nakamura put it. Weston joins Maggie Lake at the top of today's Daily Briefing to talk about SoftBank and to preview Wednesday's release of the U.S. Consumer Price Index. With the New York Federal Reserve's monthly survey of consumer expectations showing substantial declines in short-, medium-, and long -term inflation expectations, Maggie welcomes Dave Floyd, the president of Aspen Trading Group, for an update on financial markets from a technical analyst's perspective. Where are key levels of support and resistance for the major equity indexes? What are forex markets telling us? And is this merely a bear market rally? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TD Ameritrade Network
CPI & PPI Economic Reports In Focus This Week

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 11:43


"In a data dependent environment for the Federal Reserve, the inflation and jobs numbers are important. The jobs report is encouraging them to continue tightening. Both the Consumer Price Index or CPI and Producer Price Index PPI are in focus this week," says Michael Zarembski. He also weighs in on the crude oil and gasoline prices.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Best Investment Option During Times of Inflation?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 6:38


The latest reports on inflation have given the economy indigestion. The Consumer Price Index hit 9.1%, the Producer Price Index hit 11.3%, and the Fed's preferred gauge, the Personal Consumption Expenditures Price Index or PCE, hit 6.8%. They are all signs that inflation is much too high and the reason the Federal Reserve just hiked short term interest rates another whopping three-quarters of a percent. So what's the best way to invest when inflation is working against you? (1, 2, 3)Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Four Peaks Capital put together a great list of all the options that I received in an email which I will share with you in this episode. The company is mostly focused on large multi-family projects, but this list pertains to everyone.Investing Options1 - First on the list is cash. It's not an investment as much as it is a way to preserve a certain quantity of money. But when there's a high rate of inflation, that same quantity of money will be worth less over time. As Four Peaks explains: Putting $100,000 under your mattress for something you want to buy in a year, won't cover the cost. At today's rate of inflation, you'll need an additional 9.1% or $9,100. So hiding your money under the mattress isn't a great idea if you don't want to lose money. Warren Buffett would agree. He says: “The first rule of an investment is don't lose money. The second rule of an investment is don't forget the first rule.” Let's take a look at your other options.2 - You can invest in stocks. Wall Street is a magnet for investor enthusiasm and money, but people are often invested at the worst possible times. A period of inflation is typically one of those times. As inflation rises and the Federal Reserve raises rates, stocks often fall because it'll cost more money for companies to get the funding they need to do business. We've seen some major stock losses lately because of investor concerns on inflation.3 - Crypto, Blockchain, and NFTs have become a new investment category, and it's gotten a lot of attention, but it's also very volatile. The crypto market had soared to a peak of about $3 trillion dollars, but when the economy got choppy, crypto got chopped. Investors liquidated their gains and the crypto market quickly shrank to just $1 trillion. The high-flying leader of the pack, Bitcoin, had actually hit $69,000 earlier this year but is now down to one third of that value.4 - You can buy Certificates of Deposit, or CDs, as a more traditional and safer way to invest money. NerdWallet has a list of CDs, and its top choice is a CD with a fixed 5-year term at 3.35%. But even that percentage won't make you money because inflation is so high. At 9.1%, inflation wipes out the gain and leaves you with a -5.75% loss.5 - You can put your money into a Money Market Account. But the interest you'll earn is even less than a CD. It's more like 1% right now, although that could increase as the Fed raises rates, but at 1%, you stand to lose -8% of your investment because of inflation.6 - High-Yield Savings Accounts are another option. They are supposed to give you a better interest rate than money market accounts. But the extra bump in interest only reduces the loss you'd get from a CD by a tiny amount.7 - Annuities can provide better gains, but they still don't offset today's rate of inflation. Four Peaks explains it like this: “Some of the best fixed-income annuity rates right now hover in the 4.5% range, but that doesn't take into account administration fees of 1-3% annually, putting real rates at 1.5% to 3.5%. In the best-case scenario, the annual loss of the best annuity is -5.6% when considering inflation.”8 - And then you have Treasuries. The 10-year treasury might give you 2.96%, but when you account for inflation, you end up with a loss of -6.41%. So, we've run through “eight” investing options and none of them make your money grow when inflation is as high as it is. That leaves us with an eighth option that covers a lot of “ground,” no pun intended. As Four Peaks puts it: “Cash flowing tangible assets tied to essential goods… that consumers will always need… like shelter.” Four Peaks says: “That's why certain classes of commercial real estate like affordable housing will thrive in downturns.” 9 - The ninth option is real estate. At RealWealth, we focus on single-family rentals which also provide a tangible asset that's in high demand. The foreclosure crisis produced the first big surge in demand for single-family rentals. And now we're seeing a new surge because people who can't afford to buy a home, still crave the single-family lifestyle.We recently had an investor on my other podcast, The Real Wealth Show, who was not discouraged by today's market. Jimmy Vreeland believes that the housing market slowdown is providing an opportunity for investors to find deals, and there's no better time to buy real estate than the present. He says: “You don't wait to buy real estate. You buy real estate, and wait.” In other words, the value of your real estate will go up in time. Jimmy talks about how you can maximize that potential with the "value add" concept.Plus, when you borrow money, like most people do when acquiring real estate, you are getting another hedge against inflation. It's like the inflation is eating away at your debt.If you are interested in hearing more about how to invest in real estate when prices are high, please check out Jimmy's interview. He's both entertaining and inspiring. You'll find it at newsforinvestors.com. Just click on the Learn tab. You'll find the interview under the Real Wealth Show with the title “Invest Now or Wait?”And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-consumer-price-index-for-june-116577136652 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-wholesale-prices-surge-again-and-signal-inflation-is-still-running-hot-116578024323 - https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-pce-inflation-and-consumer-spending-11659096833

Generation Squeeze's Hard Truths
How mismeasuring inflation fuels the housing crisis: an interview with Kareem Kudus

Generation Squeeze's Hard Truths

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:23


Inflation seems like big news lately, but runaway inflation has been around for decades when it comes to housing prices in Canada. Gen Squeeze volunteer Kareem Kudus joins Umair and Megan to discuss how mismeasuring housing inflation has contributed to soaring home prices. Since 2005, home prices have risen about 300 per cent on average across the country. But the housing component of the Consumer Price Index -- which we use to measure inflation in Canada -- has only gone up 60 per cent. "So it's completely disassociated from reality," Kareem explains. Fixing this faulty monetary policy will help make homes affordable for younger and future Canadians. Kareem Kudus began his career in finance, where his job involved developing investment strategies by studying financial markets and the economy. Through this experience, he began to recognize that our economic system is both less efficient and less fair than it has the potential to be, oftentimes due to well-meaning policies with unintended consequences. Kareem left finance to study artificial intelligence and its applications to the medical field. He is working with Generation Squeeze to try and apply the knowledge he gained in his former career in order to find solutions to Canada's economic issues. Dig deeper: Full episode transcript Kareem's Gen Squeeze blog posts about inflation: Should Canadians concerned about high and rising home prices welcome high gas prices? Budget 2022 doesn't fix the poor job Canada's inflation measure does at representing our biggest source of inflation Statistics Canada proposes sticking with the status quo – no need to change harmful mismeasurement of housing price inflation We have tolerated homes becoming more unaffordable by mismeasuring inflation

Planet Money
Two recession Indicators

Planet Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 20:11 Very Popular


So are we in a recession or not? The jury is still out, but there are some warning signs. GDP is down and inflation is up. But how much do we know about the 'indicators' that tell us how the economy is doing? Today, the stories of two of our most important indicators, the Consumer Price Index and GDP, and what they can and can't tell us about our current economic predicament.| Subscribe to Planet Money+ in Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org/planetmoney.

Community Solutions Podcast
Episode 256- Cuff 'Em And Stuff 'Em

Community Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 75:05


The City of Morris, MN has passed a measure to disband their police department. They shout to the hills that they support their police, and then held closed door meetings to discuss the handling of the situation by the City Manager, Blaine Hill. How transparent of them. What happened? Why the secret meetings? 29 days after their reassurances that the police would not be going away, these police supporters on the council dismantled the city's force. Mayor Sheldon Giese cites a lack of ability to hire enough staff to keep the department, but we doubt that it's that people just refuse to work there. Many police are looking for jobs outside of the Metro. This looks a whole lot more like poor planning. Morris is a college town. It's not a small town. There are things going on. Can the Sheriff's office handle the increased workload? Is this going to be a trend in outstate Minnesota, and is this a back door way to get rid of the police in police-friendly areas? We also discuss the illusion of inflation versus the Consumer Price Index and this "great job market" and what is really causing the overabundance of available jobs. Minnesota touts 1.8% unemployment, but as with all things government, that number is manufactured... just like how inflation is calculated. Newsflash: none of this is going to get better soon. Have you checked out our Spotify playlist? At the beginning of each episode, Jason quotes some song lyrics that have to do with the subject matter of the podcast. Andrew never knows what they are, but now he can… and so can you! We've launched the Spotify playlist: “Community Solutions Music From the Podcast!” You can listen to Roundabout from Yes after listing to Episode 30 on Roundabouts… or kick back and enjoy a rocking playlist just for the thrill of it. We add a new song every week. Subscribe and enjoy! Don't forget that you can also subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play, and Spotify!

Please Explain
Cost of living bites as inflation hits 6.1 per cent

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:44


The Consumer Price Index has risen by 6.1% over the past 12 months, pushing inflation to its highest level in more than 20 years. In news Treasurer Jim Chalmers described as unsurprising, but still confronting, CPI rose by 1.8 per cent in the June quarter. The biggest increases were in the cost of transport, which rose by 13.1 in the 12 months to June, and housing, up 9 per cent in the year to June. The figures show the pressures on household budgets are real: in the June quarter, the cost of vegetables rose by 7.3 per cent, while fuel costs were up by 4.2 per cent. Now all eyes turn to the Reserve Bank, which is due to meet on Tuesday. Today on Please Explain, senior economics correspondent Shane Wright joins Bianca Hall to discuss the latest inflation figures and why inflation is likely to get worse before it gets better.Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS NITV Radio
NITV Radio - News 27/07/2022

SBS NITV Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 12:45


One Nation leader Pauline Hanson walks out of the Senate chamber during acknowledgment of country -The Consumer Price Index jumps to 6.1 per cent for the June quarter, the highest since 1990 - And, the International Monetary Fund lowers its world economic forecast as it predicts a slowdown of the largest global economies...

Please Explain
Cost of living bites as inflation hits 6.1 per cent

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:44


The Consumer Price Index has risen by 6.1% over the past 12 months, pushing inflation to its highest level in more than 20 years. In news Treasurer Jim Chalmers described as unsurprising, but still confronting, CPI rose by 1.8 per cent in the June quarter. The biggest increases were in the cost of transport, which rose by 13.1 in the 12 months to June, and housing, up 9 per cent in the year to June. The figures show the pressures on household budgets are real: in the June quarter, the cost of vegetables rose by 7.3 per cent, while fuel costs were up by 4.2 per cent. Now all eyes turn to the Reserve Bank, which is due to meet on Tuesday. Today on Please Explain, senior economics correspondent Shane Wright joins Bianca Hall to discuss the latest inflation figures and why inflation is likely to get worse before it gets better.Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ
SBS News in Ukrainian - 27/07/2022 - SBS новини українською - 27/07/2022

SBS Ukrainian - SBS УКРАЇНСЬКОЮ МОВОЮ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 17:25


27/07/2022. The latest news from Australia, Ukraine and from res of the world. The Consumer Price Index jumps to 6.1 per cent for the June quarter, the highest since 1990.  The Federal government will bring its climate change bill to the House of Representatives on the first official sitting day of the new parliament. Federal Agriculture Minister Murray Watt says the Defence Force is unlikely to be involved should an outbreak of foot and mouth disease occur in Australia. The war in Ukraine. The female England team have beaten Sweden to qualify for the final of the European football championships. More: SBS Ukrainian - 27/07/2022. Бюлетень SBS новин українською мовою. Парламент Австралії і питання щодо зміни клімату. COVID-19 і напруга щодо ящурного віруса. Президент України отримав нагороду. Сенат і носіння паранджі. Інфляція в Австралії та світі. Жіночий футбол.  Про це і більше - на веб-сторінці SBS Ukrainian...

Free Thoughts
Inflation! (with Norbert Michel)

Free Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 43:02 Very Popular


What can hurricanes teach us about supply side shocks? Norbert Michel, vice president and director of the Cato Institute's Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, joins the show to explain the Consumer Price Index, how the Federal Reserve responds, and how its period of “Great Moderation” was a better time. Plus: why should we have expected the rate of inflation to increase? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Car Prices Hit Record High

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 25:16


Gas prices are sky high right now, but it may not matter if you can't afford to buy a car. Prices for new and used cars have hit record highs. We'll talk about that today on MoneyWise. Just how bad are car prices these days? One way to tell is by the average monthly payments you now have to make to buy a vehicle. A new report by Cox Automotive and Moody's Analytics shows that monthly payments for new cars are now averaging $712 a month and that a median of over 41 weeks of income is now needed for the average new car purchase. The latest data from the Consumer Price Index shows that new car prices jumped 12.6% in the last year. That, and rising interest rates continue to drive monthly payments to record highs. Kelly Blue Book is reporting that the average new car price in May was just over $47,000. Incredibly, price hikes are even worse for used car prices. They've gone up more than 16% since last year. In addition to higher interest rates, another factor driving payments higher is the continued shortage of computer chips required in today's vehicles. Analysts are predicting that the chip shortage probably won't get worse but then again it's not likely to get any better in the months ahead. The bottom line, analysts say, is that the rapid rise in prices for new and used cars is likely to tail off but due to a continued tight inventory they're not expected to decline for the rest of 2022. So, what can you do about it? Well, obviously, if you can afford to wait to buy either a new or used car, do it. In a year, things may look different, but they're not likely to be much worse. But if you need a vehicle, first make sure you have a hefty down payment. Ideally, you want to save enough after paying off a car loan to make an even bigger down payment. If you keep doing that, you'll be able to pay cash and not finance the vehicle at all. You'll save a trunk load of interest costs. Now, if you're buying a new vehicle, there are certain fees that you may be able to negotiate your way out of, so look for these on the window sticker. ADVERTISING FEE: First is an advertising fee. The dealer may insist on charging you for it, but it should be listed on the vehicle in plain view. If they spring it on you when you're signing papers, do your best to have it taken out. PREPARATION CHARGE: Here's another one to look for, something called a dealer preparation charge. Theoretically, it would cover prepping the vehicle for display on the lot and finalizing the sale, but this cost should be included in the retail price of the car not an added fee. FABRIC PROTECTION: Next, you might see a fabric protection fee. Ask to have that one taken off. If you're worried about staining the upholstery, just buy a few cans of Scotchgard and do it yourself. It'll be a lot cheaper. PAINT PROTECTION: Another fee you should try to avoid paying is for paint protection. This is a urethane film put on the car, but you shouldn't need it. Any rust that appears would be covered by the warranty. Instead of this protection, just ask for wax when you go through the car wash. VIN ETCHING: One more fee you shouldn't pay when buying a new car: vehicle identification number etching. It's true that this would make it more difficult for thieves to resell your car if it's stolen, but you can do it yourself or take it to an auto repair shop and have it done much cheaper than the dealer would charge. USED CAR TIPS Now for some tips on buying a used car, assuming you already know the vehicle or vehicles that would work best for you. Go online to Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds.com. You can plug in a vehicle's year, make, model and mileage to get an idea of what you should expect to pay. To find potential used vehicles, you can also go online and check AutoTrader, Craigslist, AutoList and CarMax. Once you find a vehicle you like and you've settled on a price, make that contingent on the car passing inspection. Take it to a trusted, independent mechanic for a thorough going over. But then also check the vehicle history at CarFax and AutoCheck. It may have been involved in an accident. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● How should you manage a land trust? ● When does it make sense to convert traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs? ● When is it wise to invest in real estate vs investing more in the market? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Church Finances and Inflation

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 25:23


As if the pandemic wasn't enough, inflation is now having an impact on church budgets. What should the Body of Christ do about it? We'll talk about what can be done today on MoneyWise. An article by the Gospel Coalition puts into perspective the impact inflation is having not just on church members but also on church staff. Using an example of a person taking a job in 2015 at a salary of $50,000 we can see the effect inflation is having today. That $50,000 salary is now really worth just over $42,000. That's a decline in purchasing power of nearly 16%. To keep pace with inflation, that individual would now need to earn almost $58,000. According to the latest government figures, inflation is running at about 8.5-percent, the highest in 40 years. That's based on Consumer Price Index figures for the cost of around 200 items. But inflation doesn't affect all goods and services equally. Fuel, food, housing, and transportation are all running higher than that 8.5% inflation rate. And all of this is putting the squeeze on church budgets. We can't stress enough how important it is for you to not make giving your last priority. We all need to continue honoring God with our first fruits. And that means we'll probably have to cut back in other areas of the household budget. Now, what can churches do to keep pace with inflation? An article by Church Executive magazine lists a number of ways churches can cope. DON'T PANIC: The first is not to panic, and instead, focus on the things that will have an impact. These include trimming the budget, possibly scaling back projects and keeping more cash on hand. You can't control inflation, so concentrate on what you can control. WANTS VS NEEDS: Next, make a decision on wants versus needs. Remember that God promises only to provide for our needs, not our wants. Philippians 4:19 reads, And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus. Can you delay certain projects until the economic situation improves? BORROWING: The next suggestion is one that we would take with a huge grain of salt. In fact, we'd recommend it only if absolutely necessary, and that's borrowing more money. If funds are running dry for a construction project that's already underway, and the building needs a roof to protect materials already in place, that might be a reason to borrow more. But if it's just to finish a project that could be delayed, we don't recommend it. DON'T OVERPAY: Next, and still related to building projects, don't overpay for materials. It's tempting to shift resources from other areas of the budget to finish a project, or again, even to borrow more. The cost of materials was already starting to moderate some before inflation hit. If you can wait a few months before making a purchase, it could save you some money. COMMUNICATE: The next way for churches to manage inflation is to communicate clearly with members. Whether it's related to the operating budget or a building project, let the members know how inflation is having an impact. If you made a commitment to delay or scrap a project if a fundraising goal isn't met, honor that commitment. TAKE THE LONG VIEW: Next, take the long view of any planned church projects. You may look back someday on a project that was abandoned and realize it wasn't as necessary as you once thought. In fact, a lack of funding may be God's way of telling you to put your priorities somewhere else. And that leads us to the last and most important way to manage inflation in the church and that's to invite God into every decision you make. He will reveal His will and lead you in the right direction. James 1:5 tells us, If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him. And Proverbs 2:6 teaches, For the Lord gives wisdom; from his mouth comes knowledge and understanding. So those are some ways churches can cope with inflation. We hope you find them useful. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● How do you go about paying cash for a vehicle? ● Where can you put savings to earn a small return? ● How does delaying Social Security affect monthly benefits? Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

Thoughts on the Market
Mike Wilson: Preparing for Potential Recession

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 3:27 Very Popular


Some investors think a potential recession is already priced in but given defensive leadership, labor statistics and incoming Fed rate hikes, it may be too early to tell.----- Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Mike Wilson, Chief Investment Officer and Chief U.S. Equity Strategist for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about the latest trends in the financial marketplace. It's Monday, July 18th, at 11 a.m. in New York. So let's get after it.Last week, we highlighted how extreme the 12-month price momentum weightings are for defensive sectors. In fact, it's unprecedented for this type of price momentum to occur outside of an economic recession. One reaction to this development we've heard from many clients is that a recession must already be priced based on this relationship. If true, then defensive leadership is likely to reverse with something else taking the lead, like growth stocks or even cyclicals. We disagree and believe defensive leadership will likely persist until either a recession is officially announced, or the risk of a recession is definitively extinguished.In our view, the first outcome can only be achieved with a series of negative payroll data releases, something that still seems far away given last month's 372,000 new job additions. The second outcome—a soft landing—will also be hard to prove to the market until earnings revisions bottom out and companies stop doing hiring freezes.With respect to the recession outcome, the odds have been steadily increasing now for months. Morgan Stanley's proprietary economic model is currently suggesting a 36% probability of a recession in the next 12 months. Historically speaking, once it reaches 40%, it's usually a definitive reading that recession is oncoming. Furthermore, jobless claims have been rising the past few weeks. Secondarily, the household survey for total employment peaked in March and has fallen by approximately 400,000 jobs so far. While not the gold standard for measuring labor market health, it's worth watching closely as things can change rapidly for hiring and firing, particularly when profits come under significant pressure, as we expect. Finally, the job openings data has started to roll over, albeit from record high levels, while consumer and business confidence readings remain at record lows.In the very near term, equity markets seem to be digesting another hot Consumer Price Index release very well, even as concerns rose that the Fed might raise rates as much as 100 basis points next week. Our view is that 75 basis points is still the base case, and that should be plenty to keep the Fed on track to getting ahead of the curve. Importantly, the bond market seems to agree with the yield curve inverting the most since the 2000 cycle, quickly catching up to the defensive leadership of the stock market. The bullish take which this market seems to want to try and run with one more time, is that the Fed can pivot before a recession arrives.The other positive that has investors excited again is the fact that bank stocks had a strong rally on Friday, even as the earnings results were quite mixed. While this kind of price action is a necessary condition for the bear market to be over, we would caution that second quarter results are likely to be the first of several cuts, not just for banks, but for the market overall.The bottom line is that this earnings season is likely to be the first of several disappointing ones, especially if a recession is the endgame. Therefore, staying defensively oriented in one's equity positioning should remain the best course of action for the next several months.Thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcasts app. It helps more people to find the show.

EconoFact Chats
Dan Sichel on Measuring and Understanding Inflation

EconoFact Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 19:43


Inflation erodes purchasing power, but the reported inflation rate can mask very different experiences across groups of people. For example, the current rapidly rising rents and food and energy prices hit lower-income households harder since they spend a higher proportion of their income on these items. Dan Sichel discusses the measurement of inflation and how the single, headline statistic may not fully reveal the range of effects across income groups or categories of goods and services.   Dan is a professor at Wellesley College. He recently served as Chair of a National Academies panel that wrote the report “Modernizing the Consumer Price Index for the 21st Century”. He also worked at the Federal Reserve Board for over 20 years.

VIEWPOINT THIS SUNDAY
The Inflation Blues, Election Rules & America's Electrical Grid on Viewpoint This Sunday

VIEWPOINT THIS SUNDAY

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 58:56


Viewpoint This Sunday with Malcolm Out Loud – As the Consumer Price Index skyrockets to over 9.1%, inflation is being felt by every single American. Atty Gordana Schifanelli is here on the top stories and her account of election fraud in the Midterms. America's electrical grid is a target that could send America back to the 18th century. A new film highlights this massive problem. Financial Expert and Filmaker David Tice will tell us more...

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
The Inflation Blues, Election Rules & America's Electrical Grid on Viewpoint This Sunday

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 58:56


Viewpoint This Sunday with Malcolm Out Loud – As the Consumer Price Index skyrockets to over 9.1%, inflation is being felt by every single American. Atty Gordana Schifanelli is here on the top stories and her account of election fraud in the Midterms. America's electrical grid is a target that could send America back to the 18th century. A new film highlights this massive problem. Financial Expert and Filmaker David Tice will tell us more...

Degenerate Business School
Inflation is the worst

Degenerate Business School

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 21:31


This week the Consumer Price Index, the inflation measure that now governs the market, came in higher than consensus at 9.1%. And yet the 10 year treasury yield didn't move. And the equity market chopped sideways.What do we make of this? According to the high priests of the bond market, we've priced in an even more hawkish Federal Reserve in the near term. And thereby a higher chance of a recession later on. In this milieu, the long bond ETF TLT might be forming a bottom. But still the game is patience. 

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Fist bumps and failure that would pretty well sum up the last few days and the pathetic mission to grovel at the feet of Saudi Arabia to beg for more oil

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 11:00


Live from the No Panic Zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America—God Bless You and let's do this! This is the Steve Gruber show— I am just an overgrown Zygote in search of humanity and leadership in a nation—that seems desperately in need of both—   Here are three big things you need to know right now—   ONE— A federal judge has for now slammed the door on the Biden Administrations rules for transgender bathrooms and lockerrooms—and that could be a big set back for the Blue Agenda— TWO— In Texas—a stunning report about the failures of law enforcement in the Uvalde school massacre—it is heartbreaking to the families of 19 kids and 2 teachers—many of whom could have survived— THREE— Fist bumps and failure—that would pretty well sum up the last few days and the pathetic mission to grovel at the feet of Saudi Arabia to beg for more oil— Joe Biden—having promised to bankrupt the American energy sector as a candidate for President—is doing his best to follow through on that strange proclamation now that he is in office—  he went to a meet a man he said he would not—Mohammed Bin Salmon—to plead for more output—he fist bumped the man connected to the murder of an American journalist—and honestly made a fool of himself— Biden didn't visit Texas, Alaska or North Dakota to discuss energy—instead he went to a country he promised to label a pariah—to look for answers instead of America—   Why? You have to ask why? Because the Green New Dealers are not following science they are following a religious movement—and no dissent is allowed—ever! And instead of realizing his whole green energy obsession is going to get rejected completely over the next couple of years—leaving the left with nothing to show for their efforts and in fact they may find that they have lost ground on their Green Religion—because they are completely over-playing their hand—Biden and his bunny hugging zealots are plowing blindly ahead— and plowing under America along the way— They are just turning a blind eye to the plight of Middle Class families and the pain being inflicted all across the nation—where food banks and homeless shelters are bracing for an increased demand—they may not be able to handle— The high cost of energy in all its forms is plowing under family budgets and the dreams of millions right now— Plowing under any chance of retirement- or staying retired for many- plowing under the idea of putting in a few less hours and plowing under a lot more- The high cost of energy- as a direct result of the reckless policies attacking American energy—everything costs more—I went to the mall yesterday—not how I normally spend two or three hours—BUT it was an education—looking for Nike's or any kind of basic black tennis shoes for my kids was jaw dropping—you can hardly find a pair under $100—and several were double that— No wonder parents are shell shocked by Bidens disastrous policies—and the damage being done to their wallets— The inflation—delivered by the reckless spending of trillions of dollars—flooding into the economy—is plowing under what at first looked like pretty good gains in wages for American workers—BUT now—those raises—are running far behind the rising cost of everything— With the Consumer Price Index at 9.1% and many of us realizing- its actually much higher- its no wonder people are so worried right now and scared to death they will be the next ones to get plowed under by the Biden plans and the socialist ideas— Gas is up 60% from last year—and double what it was when President Disaster stumbled into the Oval Office—Fuel Oil is up nearly 100% from last year—meat—up over 10%-- milk jumped 16—eggs 33— coffee 16—and cars both new and used are too expensive to even discuss for most families anymore—BUT Joe and the Clowns still think you should just run out and buy an electric car—because—you know—spending 60 grand will save you a couple hundred dollars a month— That is true Democrat math right there— And lets not forget who is really getting plowed right now—farmers—from here to the Netherlands—diesel—fertilizer and the war on agriculture in general is making it nearly impossible for many—in fact farm foreclosures continue at a very dangerous pace— That means that food security in this nation—that has produced more food than any in history—could be facing food shortages and real challenges in the not to distant future— But don't worry China and others are buying up the farm land and they will be sure to use it in your best interest— The idea of homeownership is getting plowed under right now too—the days of 2 and 3 percent mortgages are just a memorty now—and likely will never return—some would say that's a good thing—would you? American pride is also getting plowed under—BUT that will not last—because we will rise above the incompetence of these fools in Washington—we will get rid of the Socialists and communists that wander among us—and we will get a shot at rebuilding this great nation— But you have to make sure you don't get plowed under by all the things you are seeing—and know we can—and we will do better in the days to come—we will get our hands back on the wheel—and President Disaster will get the boot before the point of no return— BUT you must vote against every single person that supports what is currently happening—you must vote for America First candidates—I don't know who will end up running for the White House in 2 years—and right now it doesn't matter—right now we have to correct what we can and go from there—this is a critical time in American history and you have the power to get involved and make a difference

Wealthion
Weekly Market Recap: Strong Dollar At 20-Year High Creating Havoc

Wealthion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 95:00 Very Popular


The US dollar index hit a 20-year high of 109 this week. This is creating increasing pain for other countries, especially those with Eurodollar loans, as servicing those is becoming more expensive — at the same time that import costs are rising. Multinational companies are also feeling the squeeze, as their overseas revenue declines due to weakening demand and increasingly unfavorable exchange rates. Somewhat ironically, this is happening at the same time when US inflation, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, is spiking to a 41-year high of 9.1%. Financial advisor Lance Roberts doesn't see much reason for the dollar strength to abate anytime soon. So what will be the most likely repercussions from this? For everything that mattered to markets this week, watch this week's Market Recap featuring Lance Roberts. https://youtu.be/IqK_D3rRV7o

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA
Henssler Money Talks - July 16, 2022

Money Talks Radio Show - Atlanta, GA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 45:17


Henssler Money Talks – July 16, 2022Season 36, Episode 29This week on “Money Talks,” Chief Investment Officer Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, is joined by Director of Insurance Planning Jim Crone, CFS®, CLU®, and Senior Financial Planner Josh Weidie, CWS®, to cover rising inflation with the Consumer Price and Producer Price indices. In this week's Case Study, pre-retirees are panicking because their portfolio is down, so they are considering an annuity. Jim explains how and where annuities work best and that there is nothing an insurance company can invest in that isn't already available in the marketplace. The experts round out the show answering listeners' questions on the taxable gains from I Bonds held to maturity and if an inverted yield curve is a harbinger of recession or if it causes a recession.Timestamps and Chapters 00:00     Market Roundup: Covering July 11 – July 15, 202222:27     Case Study: In Uncertain Times, Do Annuities Make Sense?34:13     Q&A Time: Gains from I Bonds and Inverted Yield Curves Follow Henssler:  Facebook: http://bit.ly/HensslerFacebook  Twitter: http://bit.ly/HensslerTwitter  LinkedIn: http://bit.ly/HensslerLinkedIn  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hensslerfinancial/YouTube: http://bit.ly/HensslerYouTube   “Money Talks” is brought to you by Henssler Financial. Sign up for the Money Talks Newsletter: https://www.henssler.com/newsletters/ 

5 Things
Pregnant people could face greater risk of domestic violence after abortion bans

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 11:08 Very Popular


Health inequities reporter Nada Hassanein explains. Plus, the House votes on two bills to protect abortion access, money reporter Elisabeth Buchwald breaks down June's Consumer Price Index amid record inflation, President Joe Biden begins a controversial trip to Saudi Arabia and autopsy findings will be released for Jayland Walker.(Audio: Associated Press)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Loving Liberty Radio Network
07-14-2022 Washington Watch Live with Tony Perkins

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 54:10


Chris Mitchell, CBN News Middle East Bureau Chief, offers his analysis of President Biden's Middle East trip. Warren Davidson, U.S. Representative for the 8th District of Ohio, comments on the Consumer Price Index hitting a new record high of 9.1 percent as well as the latest news on the National Defense Authorization Act. Brenda Lebsack, a teacher and former school board member who writes at "Brenda4Kids," shares what she witnessed at the National Education Association's recent convention. Bruce Friedman, father of a student in Florida's Clay County School District, shares what he experienced at his local school board meeting Meg Kilgannon, FRC's Senior Fellow for Education Studies, reacts to a recent American Federation of Teachers-commissioned poll showing voters fed up with woke education. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday July 15, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 24:11


  Landaas & Company newsletter  July edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Art Rothschild Chris Evers (with Max Hoelzl and Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (July 11-15, 2020) Significant economic indicators & reports Monday No major releases Tuesday No major releases Wednesday The broadest measure of inflation rose at a 9.1% annual rate in June, the most since November 1981, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said. The year-to-year increase in the Consumer Price Index reflected broadly rising prices but especially for food, which was up 10% from June 2021 and gasoline, which rose 60%. Excluding volatile energy and food costs, the core index rose 5.9% from June 2021, the third month in a row that the rate of inflation declined. Thursday Wholesale inflation also accelerated in June. The Producer Price Index rose 1.1% from May, following a 0.6% gain the month before. A 10% increase in energy prices led the boost, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Compared to the year before, the index rose 11.3%, the highest wholesale inflation rate since an 11.6% increase in March. Excluding volatile costs for food, energy and trade services, the core PPI was up 6.4% from June 2021, decelerating for the third month in a row. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims failed to fall for the 14th week in a row after reaching an all-time low in April. The average hit 235,750 claims in the latest week, still 36% behind its 55-year average. The Labor Department said 1.4 million Americans claimed unemployment insurance benefits in the latest week, up 5.5% from the week before but down from 13.8 million the year before. Friday The Commerce Department said retail sales resumed their climb in June, up 1% following a 0.1% decline in May. Inflation figured into the sales increases, with gas stations generating nearly 4% more than in May and 49% more than in June 2021. Of 13 retail categories, nine improved sales from May. Sales at bars and restaurants rose 13% from the year before, with a 9% decline for electronics and appliance stores. U.S. industrial output signaled a slowdown, declining 0.2% in June after no change in May and a gain of 0.8% in April. The Federal Reserve reported that factory production was down 0.5% for the second month in a row. The oil and gas industry drove mining sector output up 1.7% from May. Compared to the year before, total industrial production was 4.2% ahead. Meanwhile, annual revisions in Fed data showed the capacity utilization rate for industries above the 50-year average for the fourth month a row, another sign of inflationary pressures. Record-low consumer sentiment in June barely picked up in early July, according to preliminary survey results from the University of Michigan. Respondents' assessments of current economic conditions improved slightly from June, with more citing an ease in supply constraints. But about half of the consumers (49%) blamed inflation for eroding their living standards, matching a record high set during the Great Recession. MARKET CLOSINGS FOR THE WEEK Nasdaq – 11452, down 183 points or 1.6% Standard & Poor's 500 – 3863, down 36 points or 0.9% Dow Jones Industrial – 31286, down 52 points or 0.2% 10-year U.S. Treasury Note – 2.93%, down 0.17 point Send us a question for our next podcast. Not a Landaas & Company client yet? Click here to learn more. More information and insight from Money Talk Money Talk Videos Follow us on Twitter. Landaas newsletter subscribers return to the newsletter via e-mail.

Axios Today
Wages can't keep up with inflation

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 11:19 Very Popular


New June inflation numbers released Wednesday show the Consumer Price Index rose 9.1% since last year - the fastest annual pace since November 1981. To make matters worse, wages are not keeping up. Plus: the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency is running out of money. And: the millennial friendship crisis. Guests: Axios' Neil Irwin, Stef Kight and Erica Pandey Credits: Axios Today is produced by Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Lydia McMullen-Laird, Alex Sugiura, and Ben O'Brien. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go Deeper: America's inflation problem gets worse Scoop: ICE is short $345 million, poised to spend more than ever Axios Finish Line: Making friends Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tractors And Troubadours
Ep. 35: Massey Ferguson turns 175, Jared Bernstein on inflation in rural America, music from Vanessa Bourne, Jake Blocker and Lance Shaw and the 419 Swing Band

Tractors And Troubadours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 41:43


On this Episode, Massey Ferguson's Adam Sills discusses the company's 175 anniversary celebration and looks to the brand's future, driven by innovation. White House Council of Economic Advisers member Jared Bernstein discusses the June Consumer Price Index and inflation's impact on rural America. Jesse Allen and Global Commodity Analytics' Mike Zuzulo talk about inflation's impact on the markets on this week's Market Talk Report, and Ray Bohacz is talking instrument cluster lighting in “Bushels and Cents.” The episode also features music from Vanessa Bourne, Jake Blocker and Lance Shaw and the 419 Swing Band, presented by ND Express. Timestamps Intro and news: 0:00 Goatlifeclothing.com advertisement: 6:57 Adam Sills, Massey Ferguson: 7:16 Concept AgriTek advertisement: 14:10 Jared Berstein, White House Council of Economic Advisers: 14:43 Jesse Allen, Market Talk, 22:29 Ray Bohacz, “Bushels and Cents”: 27:38 Gateway Seed Co. advertisement: 29:12 The NDExpress presents Vanessa Bourne, Jake Blocker and Lance Shaw and the 419 Swing Band: 29:43

FRC - Washington Watch with Tony Perkins
Chris Mitchell, Brenda Lebsack, Bruce Friedman, Meg Kilgannon

FRC - Washington Watch with Tony Perkins

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022


On today's program: Chris Mitchell, CBN News Middle East Bureau Chief, offers his analysis of President Biden's Middle East trip. Warren Davidson, U.S. Representative for the 8th District of Ohio, comments on the Consumer Price Index hitting a new

Latinos In Real Estate Investing Podcast
June 2022 Consumer Price Index Numbers

Latinos In Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 8:47


In this special update of the Latinos in Real Estate Investing Podcast, the numbers are out! And by numbers, I am talking about the Consumer Price Index Numbers. I'll be discussing the recent data with regards to inflation, how these data affect us as real estate investors, and what strategies can we do during these tough times in the market.CHECK OUT MY MERCHANDISE: https://the-elite-strategist.creator-spring.com/To Reach Martin Perdomo "The Elite Strategist": martin@premierridgecapital.comIf you want to learn more on how to invest passively in Multifamily Real Estate visit our website:  https://www.premierridgecapital.comTo get on our newsletter http://eepurl.com/gDkX0PConnect with us on social media:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elitestrategist/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theelitestrategistCheck out our online course and learn How to wholesale Real Estate:https://real-estate-investing15.teachable.com/p/real-estate-beginner-dealsCheck our Real Estate Investors Club meet-up Website:https://stroudsburgrei.comGet our Free Habit Register by texting the word  STRATEGIES to 33222

Liberty Lighthouse
20220714 - Liberty Minute

Liberty Lighthouse

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 1:34


The latest Consumer Price Index lie came out yesterday. I'm Peter Serefine with today's Liberty Minute. Yesterday's report on the Consumer Price Index shows prices up an average of 9.1%. That is the worse report since 1981, and it is actually worse. Forget the average reported by the government who causes the inflation in the first place. Look at the thing you actually buy. The three things everyone needs to live are groceries, gas, and utilities. Those essential items together are up 37% over last year. Make no mistake, this is entirely the fault of our Federal Government. To paraphrase Milton Freeman, only the government causes inflation because only the government can print money. Using the trickle-down theory, it is actually our fault. We The People keep putting the same overspending establishment crooks in office. To help with inflation I have lowered the price of t-shirts at Liberty-Lightouse.com/store Until tomorrow, Si vis Pacem, Para Bellum --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/libertylighthouse/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/libertylighthouse/support

Squawk on the Street
Inflation Hits Fresh Four-Decade High, White House's NEC Director Reacts to CPI, and Twitter Sues Elon Musk 7/13/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 46:05 Very Popular


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David engaged in a wide-ranging discussion about inflation news that sent stocks tumbling: The Consumer Price Index for June up 9.1% from a year ago -- a new four-decade high. National Economic Council Director Brian Deese joined the program with White House reaction to the numbers. The anchors also explored how big an impact inflation could have on earnings season, as big banks get ready to report. Also in focus: Twitter sues Elon Musk as it looks to enforce their $44 billion deal, Delta's earnings miss on higher costs, Google's hiring slowdown, plus M&A: Game development platform Unity Software agrees to buy ironSource in a $4.4 billion all-stock deal.

Marketplace Morning Report
A June boom for inflation: Consumer price index comes in hot at 9.1%

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 7:19 Very Popular


Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors joins us to discuss the markets shortly after the June consumer price index came in higher than expected. Contingencies are making a comeback in the housing market. A study shows that people left big cities in record numbers during the pandemic.

Squawk Pod
The Inflation Heat, A Crypto Chill, & Twitter's $44B Lawsuit 7/13/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 30:58 Very Popular


Inflation jumped 9.1% to a new 40-year high in June. CNBC's Steve Liesman, Rick Santelli, and Mike Santoli unpack what today's Consumer Price Index data means for the Federal Reserve and for consumer wallets. As a crypto winter puts serious pressure on the industry, some crypto lenders are collapsing. BlockFi found a lifeboat in crypto exchange FTX; in a CNBC-exclusive interview, BlockFi CEO Zac Prince explains why he discounted his company 95% to strike a credit and possible acquisition deal with FTX. Plus, Twitter is suing Elon Musk in hopes that he'll keep his $44 billion word to buy the company, and Tulane law professor Ann Lipton lays out the possible legal moves from here–as well as any tricks Musk might have up his sleeve.  In this episode:Zac Prince, @BlockFiZacAnn Lipton, @AnnMLiptonJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @AndrewrsorkinKatie Kramer, @Kramer_Katie

The President's Daily Brief
July 13th, 2022. Chinese COVID Policies Create Opportunity for American Manufacturing. The (Subtle) Battle for the South Pacific.

The President's Daily Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 23:07 Very Popular


It's July 13th. You're listening to the President's Daily Brief. Your morning intel starts now. ------ First up, A major steel hub in China has gone into lockdown this morning over one case of COVID. We're going to discuss the implications of that Zero COVID policy in China and how, if our leaders handle it right, we could use it to launch a new era of American manufacturing.  As always, I'm keeping an eye out for developing stories. Put these two on your radar. First, the Battle for the South Pacific is back in the news. The Biden Administration is trying to regain America's power in that region that's critically important in defending the homeland — especially Hawaii. I've got an update shortly. Finally, some big economic news coming out in the next few hours. We've got numbers from the Consumer Price Index telling us whether inflation is getting better or worse. I've got some projections — and even a bit of good news. All up next on the President's Daily Brief. ------ Please remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode of the President's Daily Brief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace All-in-One
A June boom for inflation: Consumer price index comes in hot at 9.1%

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 7:19


Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors joins us to discuss the markets shortly after the June consumer price index came in higher than expected. Contingencies are making a comeback in the housing market. A study shows that people left big cities in record numbers during the pandemic.

TD Ameritrade Network
CPI June 2022 Data Assures An Upcoming 75 BPS Rate Hike

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 13:14


Consumer Price Index or CPI data came in higher than expected. "The CPI month-over-month number bothers me as it needs to stabilize. This data assures a 75 BPS rate hike for the next meeting. The average equity investor does not realize that stocks look for a reason to go down and when they don't find it, they go up," says Bob Iaccino.

Today's Issues
Consumer Price Index Increase

Today's Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 24:18


Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Contrarian View on Negative GDP & Recession

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 6:44


Economists have been weighing each twist and turn of the economy to determine whether we are going “up” or “down.” Many are predicting a recession at some point, while a few say we're already in a recession because the economy is contracting. But does this economy show the typical signs of a recession? One MarketWatch contributor doesn't think so.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.As you may know, two quarters of negative economic growth are usually interpreted as a recession. We've already seen negative growth in the first quarter. The economy contracted at an annual rate of 1.6%. And now, there are analysts and GDP trackers that are predicting the second quarter will decline as well. The Q2 numbers won't be out until the end of this month, but in the meantime, there are plenty of people looking at historical patterns to determine what might be happening, or not happening.Economy Still Quite HealthyMarketWatch contributor, Jeffrey Bartash, doesn't believe the typical definition of a recession will hold true this time around. He says the report we see on the “gross domestic product” is often reduced to simple headlines that don't tell the whole story, and that, right now, “many parts of the U.S. economy still seem quite healthy.” (1)For one, consumer spending and business investment both rose in the first quarter. Consumers are well employed with plenty of savings from the pandemic, while businesses are creating hundreds of thousands of jobs that they can't fill because of a labor shortage. The unemployment rate is 3.6% which is close to a 54-year low. That makes layoffs less likely, even if the economy sputters in the months ahead.Blame the International Trade DeficitBut the economy did decline in Q1. Bartash says it's not because the economy is in bad shape. He says it's because of a surge in the international trade deficit, and that happened because of supply chain issues. Many companies placed bigger orders for foreign goods to “stock up.” But the surge in goods coming into the country also made it look like our economy was slowing down. There's a group of eight economists at the National Bureau of Economic Research who study all the details of a potential recession. Bartash says they pay special attention to hiring, unemployment, manufacturing, consumer income, and consumer spending, adjusted for inflation. And he says none of those data points support the idea of a U.S. recession, right now.NBER's Definition of “Recession”The NBER's definition of a recession is a little different than two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth. It says a recession happens when there's “a significant decline in economic activity that is spread across the economy and that lasts more than a few months.” It also says that a downturn has to be “deep, broad, and long-lasting” before it's considered a recession. We still have about three weeks before the official report comes out on the second quarter GDP. As Bartash points out, a lot can change between now and then, and between now and next year. This is why some economists are predicting a potential downturn or recession in 2023. But most agree, an economic slowdown has already begun.As Senior Wells Fargo Economist, Sam Bullard, told CNBC: “There are certainly a lot of challenges ahead. The latest incoming data clearly signals there has been a loss of momentum.”Economic Challenges AheadA few weeks ago, the Federal Reserve lowered its full-year GDP estimate to just 1.7% from 2.8%. Both those numbers are substantially lower than last year when the GDP was 5.7%. (2)The central bank lowered its outlook after it announced the biggest rate hike in 28 years to help curb inflation. It raised the Federal Funds rate 75 basis points, and is now planning to do the same at its July meeting. Fed Chief Jerome Powell has emphasized the need to fight inflation. The Consumer Price Index hit 8.6% in May.Higher interest rates will help slow the economy by making money more expensive. It'll cost more for things like credit cards, car loans, business loans and adjustable rate mortgages. Fixed-rate mortgages are also impacted indirectly, and they've been shooting higher as well. The cost of a 30-year fixed rate mortgage has doubled since last fall from around 3% to around 6%.Why Consumers Are Doing So WellEconomists feel that most consumers are doing well so far because unemployment is low and many are flush with savings. They didn't spend as much on things like clothes, gas, travel, and entertainment during the pandemic.. MarketWatch says that consumers have more than $2 trillion in “excess” savings. Many employees are also getting bigger paychecks because of the labor shortage and pay raises meant to keep them from leaving. All that helps offset higher prices. According to the MarketWatch assessment, a lot depends on how much the Fed has to raise rates before we see inflation ease up. Some say we need to see improvement by the end of this year, and with short-term rates that don't go any higher than 4%. Other variables, of course, involve the war in Ukraine and the price of oil and grain that come from that region. And the supply chain squeeze that began during the pandemic and hasn't resolved.Avoiding Recession with a Bit of Good Luck!Higher interest rates that slow the economy could help producers catch up. But when it comes down to what makes or breaks the economy, it could be that we need a little bit of luck for things that are not in our control outside the U.S. Economist Oren Klachkin of Oxford Economics told MarketWatch: “The window for avoiding a recession is narrower today, but a downturn isn't unavoidable.”If you'd like to hear more about how the economy is impacting real estate and the housing market, I go into more detail on that topic in a recent webinar. It's my Housing Market Update for Q2. You can listen to the replay for free at newsforinvestors.com. You'll find it under the “Learn” tab.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-u-s-wont-officially-be-in-recession-if-gdp-shrinks-again-and-heres-why-11657047088 2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-odds-of-recession-are-rising-but-the-u-s-economy-is-not-doomed-to-a-downturn-11655479959

The Takeaway
What's Going On With the Economy and High Inflation?

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 12:10


Prices are high and they're going higher. In June, the Labor Department reported that a key inflation measure, the Consumer Price Index, had increased by 8.6 percent year-over-year – the largest 12-month increase in 40 years. New numbers will be out this week – and they are expected to stay high. In response to this inflation, and in order to stabilize it, the Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate by three quarters of a percentage point in mid-June – the biggest hike since 1994. And the Fed has indicated that additional rate hikes are expected in the coming months.  While these higher rates are supposed to “cool” the economy down, some economists worry that this could hurt the job market, cause higher unemployment, and potentially trigger a recession. To hear more about what's going on with the economy we spoke with Damon Jones, economist and professor at University of Chicago.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Slows, GDP Results for Q1, Year-Over-Year Rent Growth

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 6:46


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending July 2nd, 2022... why inflation appears to be slowing, what the GDP says about a potential recession, and the latest reports on rent growth.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week. The rate of inflation appears to have slowed a bit. The Personal Consumption Index, or PCI, was up .6% in May with a yearly rate that was unchanged at 6.3%, but the core rate was down slightly. The core rate doesn't include prices for food or fuel, and the yearly rate for that dropped from 4.9% in April to 4.7% in May. The Federal Reserve feels the PCI is more accurate than the Consumer Price Index or CPI, because the PCI factors in more variables, such as changes in consumer behavior. (1)It's now official. The economy shrank 1.6% in the first quarter, and the Atlanta Federal Reserve is forecasting a negative reading for the second quarter as well. The Atlanta Fed GDPNow tracker indicates that the economy shrank 1% in Q2. Two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth is interpreted as a recession. But MarketWatch reports that some economists are forecasting growth in the second quarter. We won't have the official reading until the end of this month. (2)(3)As concerns mount about a long-lasting recession, there are now predictions that the Fed will be cutting rates next year, not raising them. CNBC reports that most analysts expect the Fed to continue hiking rates until the end of “next” year, but global chief economist at UniCredit, Erik Nielsen, told CNBC: “Can you really hike interest rates into a recession even if inflation is high? That would be unusual.” Michael Yoshikama of Destination Wealth Management also feels that the Fed will reverse its course and cut rates by the end of “this” year. The predictions are all over the map however. The president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Loretta Mester, expects growth to slow but doesn't expect to see a recession. Ark Invest CEO, Cathie Wood, told CNBC that the U.S. is already in a recession. (4)Initial jobless claims were down by about 2,000 last week, to a total of 231,000, but the four-week average is slightly higher. Continuing claims have continued to fall and are now back down to pre-pandemic levels. MarketWatch economists feel that layoffs may remain low because companies have already had a tough time filling positions, and won't want to let anyone go. (5)Pending home sales have rebounded somewhat. The National Association of Realtors says they were up .7% in May after six months of declines. But there are still challenges ahead for the housing market. NAR's chief economist Lawrence Yun says: “Despite a small gain in pending sales from the prior month, the housing market is clearly undergoing a transition.” He says: “Contract signings are down sizably from a year ago because of much higher mortgage rates.” Year-over-year, they are down 13.6%. (6)Meantime, home prices are up again. The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city index shows a 21.2% year-over-year increase in April. That's up from 21.1% in March. The Federal Housing Finance Agency reports a slightly slower rate of growth. It says that home price growth is up 18.8% year-over-year. (7) Construction spending was down slightly in May, but remained the same for new single-family and multi-family homes. (8) And consumer confidence hit a 16-month low in June, due to concerns about the economy, high prices, and the possibility of a recession. (9)Mortgage RatesThe rise in mortgage rates took a break last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell 11 basis points to 5.7%. The 15-year dropped 9 points to 4.83%. (10)In other news making headlines…Homebuyers Lose Purchasing PowerA new study shows that a typical homebuyer has lost more than $100,000 in purchasing power because of high interest rates. Redfin says that a homebuyer that can afford $2,500 a month in mortgage payments can only buy a home worth about $400,000 right now, or $120,000 less than they could at the end of last year. For someone who can afford $3,500 a month, the budget cut is more like $165,000. (11)Redfin's chief economist Daryl Fairweather says: “Many house hunters now need to consider smaller homes – perhaps farther from their ideal neighborhood – or stick to renting if they're priced out of the market altogether.”Rent Growth Hot, but SlowingRents continue to rise across the country, but the pace is slowing down. The latest report from CoreLogic shows that single-family rents continue to move higher. The year-over-year rate in April was 14%. That's more than double what it was in April of last year. (12)And CoreLogic economist, Molly Boesel, doesn't see it slowing down anytime soon. She says: “We expect single-family rent growth to continue to increase at a rapid pace throughout 2022.”A new report from “Apartment List” shows similar rent growth for apartments. The year-over-year increase for July is 14.1% but the report says that apartment rent growth is slowing down. It was 17.8% year-over-year at the beginning of the year. (13)That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. You can also find out more about how changes in the economy are impacting the real estate market by listening to one of my recent webinars. It's called “The Changing Tides of 2022: How to Prepare as a Real Estate investor.” You'll find the webinar under the “Learn” tab on our website at newsforinvestors.com.Thanks for listening! And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-pce-inflation-and-consumer-spending-11656591128?mod=economic-report2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/its-a-wrap-u-s-first-quarter-gdp-shrank-1-6-the-second-quarter-isnt-looking-much-better-11656506598?mod=federal-reserve3 -https://www.fastcompany.com/90766283/recession-fed-gdp-tracker-atlanta4 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/01/fed-could-cut-interest-rates-in-2023-analysts-say-after-rate-hikes-this-year.html5 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-inch-lower-in-latest-week-11656592825?mod=economic-report6 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-pending-home-sales-rebound-in-may-reversing-a-six-month-decline-11656338457?mod=economic-report7 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/home-price-growth-continues-slows-in-april-case-shiller-says-11656422745?mod=bnbh_mwarticle8 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-construction-spending-fell-marginally-in-may-271656686288?mod=search_headline9 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/consumer-confidence-falls-to-16-month-low-on-worries-about-inflation-and-economy-11656425418?mod=economic-report10 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms11 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/28/rising-interest-rates-cost-typical-homebuyers-16-percent-of-purchasing-power.html12 -https://www.corelogic.com/intelligence/april-jump-in-us-rent-price-growth-puts-pressure-on-inflation-corelogic-reports/13 -https://www.apartmentlist.com/research/national-rent-data