Podcasts about Sanjay

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Best podcasts about Sanjay

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Latest podcast episodes about Sanjay

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose
Episode 32: Meet Chris Living w Mets, Dealing w Progression

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 25:49


In this episode, Chris Stark joins Heather to tell her story and talk about dealing with progression as well as her mantra Get Bust Living. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #metavivor

IoT For All Podcast
Building End-to-End Supply Chain Visibility | Roambee's Sanjay Sharma | Internet of Things Podcast

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 26:53


Sanjay begins by introducing himself and his company along with use cases they are working on. He then discusses the role IoT plays on the supply chain and how new technology developments have furthered that. Sanjay then focuses on the food supply chain and the advances that have been made. The conversation then moves more high level with a discussion around compliance regulations, challenges in the industry, and advice for companies starting their IoT journey.Sanjay Sharma is a strategic thought leader with an impressive 17+ years of entrepreneurial experience building technology startups from the ground up. As CEO of Roambee, he is responsible for leading the company's vision, driving its worldwide business growth, and increasing its value. Sanjay has co-founded and led two successful Silicon Valley technology startups - KeyTone Technologies, which was acquired by Global Asset Tracking Ltd, and Plexus Technologies, which became an ICICI Ventures portfolio company. He has also been a part of the engineering teams at EMC, Schlumberger, and NASA. Sanjay has a bachelor's degree in Electronics Engineering from the University of Bombay and a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from South Dakota State University.Roambee offers better supply chain visibility on demand for on-time, in-full, in-condition delivery of shipments and assets anywhere in the world. 300+ enterprises are improving customer experience, service levels, product quality, cash cycles, business efficiencies, sustainability, and automating logistics with Roambee's real-time insights & foresight. Over 50 are among the top 100 global companies in the Pharma, Food, Electronics, Chemicals, Automotive, Packaging & Containers, and Logistics sectors. Roambee's innovative AI-powered platform, and end-to-end monitoring solutions, deliver curated and highly accurate supply chain signals built on item-level, firsthand IoT sensor data and non-sensor inputs. The outcome is better multimodal ETAs, OTIF deliveries, 80%+ cold chain compliance and more, including 4X+ ROI on supply chain assets by optimizing utilization and inventory levels. 

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this Monday Momentum Heather and Larry talk about how getting a different result comes from doing something different. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #metavivor

Srijan Foundation Talks
Natural Farming and Its Direct Relation To Human Health | Sanjay Bhalla | A2 Milk | Sangam Talks SrijanTalks

Srijan Foundation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 73:00


Natural Farming and Its Direct Relation To Human Health | Sanjay Bhalla | A2 Milk | Sangam Talks SrijanTalks

Shunya One
Create Stunning Images with AI Tech ft. Sanjay Kumar

Shunya One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 28:13


This week on Shunya One, Shiladitya is joined by Sanjay Kumar, Co-Founder and CEO, of Spyne. Taking professional images for an online catalog can be quite a daunting task. In order to resolve this issue, the co-founders of Spyne.ai came up with an AI technology that not only helps one create a stunning image but also cut down cataloging costs and time by half.In this episode, Sanjay touches upon how small-scale industries struggle with cataloging as taking professional photographs of products can be an expensive affair. He also discusses creating immersive 3D models and Metaverse-based products in the future.Check out the YouTube video: https://youtu.be/VqXXx9wr7pwTune in to the episode to know more!You can follow Sanjay Kumar on:LinkedIn: ( https://in.linkedin.com/in/sanjaykv )Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/sanjay_varnwal ) You can get in touch with our host: Shiladitya MukhopadhyayaLinkedIn: ( https://in.linkedin.com/in/shiladityamukhopadhyaya )Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/shiladitya )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app. You can check out our website at https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/featuredDo follow IVM Podcasts on social media.We are @IVMPodcasts on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram.Follow the show across platforms:Spotify, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, JioSaavn, Gaana

Adrian's Playlist of Conversations
Music Episode - Black is the new Black Pt. 3

Adrian's Playlist of Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 11:26


The music companion to “Everybody's Black is Different”, this episode proves that point. Listen as Lillian, Sanjay, and Adrian share songs they added to the “Black is the new Black” playlist. There are some surprises and a bit of an overlap. Did you catch it? This playlist is turning out to be a personal favorite.  Playlist Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0JxBH4pWN6v6MolZN2EjMn?si=208dc9ced1764a6b Tidal: https://tidal.com/browse/playlist/e5e6c2c1-4c56-408e-89ab-f298a46ad51c Apple: https://music.apple.com/us/playlist/black-is-the-new-black/pl.u-PDb408gsLe9o4Z Follow Us On Social Media Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adriansplaylistpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Adriansplaylist

3D InCites Podcast
A Conversation With SEMI'S Market Intelligence Team About the World Fab Forecast

3D InCites Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 31:53


This SEMI Market intelligence Report podcast features Sanjay Malhotra, Vice President of SEMI's Corporate Marketing and the Market Intelligence Team (MIT), and Christian Dieseldorff, Senior Principal Analyst. The conversation focuses on the World Fab Forecast, its history, how data is gathered, and how semiconductor manufacturers and suppliers use it to guide their business decisions. Sanjay starts things off by recapping the Market Symposium at SEMICON West, and the midyear forecast presented there. He also shares how he used the World Fab Forecast during his years in the industry. Christian talks about the outlook for new fabs and fab expansions, and how much this activity represents future capacity increases from both an actual and historical standpoint. Most importantly, he and Sanjay put fab expansion numbers and capacity into context. Lastly, Christian talks about the impact of the US CHIPS and Science Act, and other global incentives around the world. He and Sanjay provide some valuable insights to consider when reviewing the World Fab Forecast to help listeners make the most of this useful tool. You can learn more about SEMI Market Reports here.  For specific questions, email the Market Intelligence team at mktstats@semi.org. Find our Guests on LinkedIn: Sanjay Malhotra, VP of Corporate Marketing and the MITChristian Dieseldorff, Senior Principal Analyst, MITSEMI A global association, SEMI represents the entire electronics manufacturing and design supply chain.

Adrian's Playlist of Conversations
Everybody's Black is Different

Adrian's Playlist of Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 62:02


In this third episode in his Race series where Adrian is exploring what Black in 2022 means, he is joined by his longtime friends Sanjay and Lillian. Both friends from various spots of the African Diaspora dealing with cultural and national alignment. Take a listen while they discuss intra-cultural dynamics and the consequences of divide and conquer, along with a few laughs throughout.  Follow Us On Social Media Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adriansplaylistpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Adriansplaylist

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Heather and Larry talk about food and the role it can play in cancer treatment and beyond. They also discuss the mindset needed to use food to your advantage. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #metavivor

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this Monday Momentum Larry and Heather talk about looking for joy. If you look, you will find it, that's how our brains work. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #metavivor

Produce Like A Pro
BEST Gear For Home Music Production With Sanjay C

Produce Like A Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 25:04


Sanjay C is a YouTuber specializing in reviewing all types of studio gear for music production no matter what the budget may be. Not only has he been on YouTube for 5 years, but he also has sample packs available on his website for sale. In this podcast, we got Sanjay's definitive gear list of must-have tools for music production. We talked about headphones, plugins, interfaces, and more! Check out Sanjay C's YouTube and website: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzcG9DB-raM&t=0s https://sanjayc.com   Subscribe to the email list and get yourself some free goodies: https://producelikeapro.com  Want to create radio ready mixes from the comfort of your home? Go check out https://promixacademy.com/courses/ Check out all other services here:  https://linktr.ee/producelikeapro    

Produce Like A Pro
BEST Gear For Home Music Production With Sanjay C

Produce Like A Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 25:04


Sanjay C is a YouTuber specializing in reviewing all types of studio gear for music production no matter what the budget may be. Not only has he been on YouTube for 5 years, but he also has sample packs available on his website for sale. In this podcast, we got Sanjay's definitive gear list of must-have tools for music production. We talked about headphones, plugins, interfaces, and more! Check out Sanjay C's YouTube and website: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzcG9DB-raM&t=0s https://sanjayc.com   Subscribe to the email list and get yourself some free goodies: https://producelikeapro.com  Want to create radio ready mixes from the comfort of your home? Go check out https://promixacademy.com/courses/ Check out all other services here:  https://linktr.ee/producelikeapro    

KNBR Podcast
9-16 Sanjay Lal joins Papa and Lund to discuss the Seahawks wide receiver room and passing attack before the 49ers Week 2 matchup against Seattle

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 10:12


Seattle Seahawks wide receivers coach and passing game coordinator, Sanjay Lal, joins Papa and Lund to discuss the Seahawks wide receiver room and passing attack before the 49ers Week 2 matchup against Seattle.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Papa & Lund Podcast Podcast
9-16 Sanjay Lal joins Papa and Lund to discuss the Seahawks wide receiver room and passing attack before the 49ers Week 2 matchup against Seattle

Papa & Lund Podcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 10:12


Seattle Seahawks wide receivers coach and passing game coordinator, Sanjay Lal, joins Papa and Lund to discuss the Seahawks wide receiver room and passing attack before the 49ers Week 2 matchup against Seattle.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Untold Stories
Homes onChain with Geoffrey Thompson and Sanjay Raghavan

Untold Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 46:56


Today's guests are Geoffrey Thompson, Roofstock's Chief Blockchain Officer, and Sanjay Raghavan, Head of Web3 Initiatives at Roofstock. Roofstock is an online marketplace for investing in leased single-family rental homes in a transparent and low-friction way. The company provides its clients with research, analytics, and insights to evaluate and purchase independently certified properties at set prices. Roofstock onChain is building an Ethereum-based web3 platform to simplify how single-family residential properties are bought and sold radically. Geoff has nearly 15 years of experience in corporate and finance law; Geoff advises Roofstock on partnerships, product innovation, fundraising, deal structuring, real estate matters, securities law, international expansion, and all other legal and compliance matters. Sanjay currently works as Head of web3 Initiatives at Roofstock. He was a part of Wharton School's Cypher Blockchain Accelerator Genesis Block cohort. We discuss various topics, including Roofstock, Real Estate Investing, tokenizing Real Estate, navigating regulation, the future of Real Estate, and much more. We began our discussion by focusing on the regulatory hurdles crypto companies need to overcome and why having legal counsel is very important to help navigate the legal and regulatory landscape. We discuss the backstory of Roofstock and why it went down the crypto and web3 rabbit hole. Our next conversation topic focused on how Rootstock creates a permissioned system on top of a permissionless infrastructure to comply with the regulation. We discuss how new users are onboarded to their Web3 real-estate platform using soul-bound NFTs. We discuss Roofstock's mission to democratize access to real estate investing by removing the preexisting sources of prejudices that inhibit people from investing in real estate. We discuss how Roofstock ensures everything is legally compliant, from KYC'ing the buyers and sellers to providing the property accurately represented. We discuss the platform's various features that users can use to screen and filter to find the homes they would like to invest in. We discuss Roofstock's commitment to transparency and equal access to information. A fascinating topic we discussed was the second-order consequences of putting Real-Estate onChain, like what happens to title insurance and property insurance. Our conversation discusses the impact of increased liquidity on the Real-Estate Market. We discuss how home loans can be reimagined onChain and the positive consequences this can bring to society. We discuss the unique properties of the tokens that allow for more consumer protection than standard crypto tokens. We discuss the possibilities of collaboration and partnership opportunities that being a web3 native brings. Our final discussion topic centered around how Roofstock is committed to staying true to the Web3 principles and why they believe so strongly in the web3 ethos. -- SafePal is a Singapore-based Binance labs backed company that provides secure and easy-to-use wallet solutions for the crypto masses. With the mission to make crypto secure and simple for everyone, SafePal has built comprehensive crypto asset management solutions, including hardware wallet, mobile wallet, extension wallet, cross-chain swap, trading service, and more. SafePal has supports 48 blockchains and 15 languages, and serves more than 6 million users global-wide. Use code charlie for 10% off SafePal's S1 wallet at https://store.safepal.io/safepal-s1-h... Download the SafePal App and SafePal extension wallet at https://untoldstories.link/safepal -- This podcast is powered by Blockworks. For exclusive content and events that provide insights into the crypto and blockchain space, visit them at https://blockworks.co

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Buy real estate on the blockchain with Roofstock OnChain

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 33:36


Raising finance for new real estate projects is difficult. Property development firms face interest rates as high as 29% when working with banking institutions as single source loan providers. They also face challenges with multiple loan sources as crowd financing can be difficult to administer. Blockchain simplifies access to alternative financing models by facilitating investor management for developers and ensuring investment transparency and continuous ROI tracking for investors. In today's episode Goeffrey Thompson, Chief Blockchain Officer of Roofstock, and Sanjay Raghavan, Head of Structured Securities and Co-head of Digital Securities Initiative, walk us through what blockchain technology is and how they are tokenizing properties in a revolutionary way to buy and sell property.   Episode Links: https://onchain.roofstock.com/ https://twitter.com/rsonchain --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everyone? Welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by Geoffrey Thompson, who's the chief blockchain Officer here at Roofstock and Sanjay Raghavan, who's the head of web three initiatives here at Roofstock and we're gonna be talking today about what blockchain is, and how it applies to us as real estate investors. So let's get into it.   Goeff, and Sanjay, thank you so much for hanging out with me today. I am super excited to chat with you both.   Sanjay: Likewise.   Goeff: Thank you for having us, thank you.   Michael: No, absolutely, absolutely. So I know a little bit, obviously, who you guys are because we work together. But for anyone who isn't familiar with you. Give us a quick and dirty description who you are, and what is it that you're doing at Roofstock? Goeff, I'll kick it over to you first.   Goeff: Sure. So I'm Goeffrey Thompson. I currently have the title of Chief blockchain Officer at Roofstock. Previously, I was General Counsel and I've been a lawyer for by training for a long time and now heading up the blockchain initiative at rootstock together with Sanjay.   Michael: Awesome, great.   Sanjay: I'm Sanjay, head of web three initiatives. Previously, I was leading securities initiatives at roof stock coming up on actually three years this week. So super exciting tomorrow, I think.   Michael: Right on, so really quick follow up questions for you both. Jeff. Were you just like a crypto guy in your everyday life? I mean, how does a real out as a lawyer turn into a blockchain official at a company at the C suite level? I mean, that's incredible.   Goeff: Yeah, I kind of backed into it. That wasn't a plan but I had been advising friends. Since 2017, during the ICO boom, the initial coin offering boom, and I started hearing people in my network, talk about it and say things like, oh, well, it's not a security because it's a coin. So you don't have to follow the securities laws, you know, and I thought, I don't get a lot of the technical stuff that talking about, but I know I can help them with the legal stuff. So then I just I was acting as legal advisor for a couple of years and, and then Gary, our CEO knew that and last year, maybe 12 months ago or a little bit more, our board came to our CEO and said, you guys, Roofstock, you need to get smart on blockchain. We're not saying you have to do it. But you know, we want you to have an idea of whether there's something there and so he asked me and Sanjay, because he knew I had some crypto background and there's a lot of legal and obviously, the financial structure is critical as well, so we kind of got into it together.   Michael: Awesome and Sanjay, at the risk of sounding like a total rookie, what the hell is web three man, I hear so much about it. Break it down for us.   Sanjay: All right. So I know it's so web low. So let's take a step back, right. So web one, which was kind of the first incarnation of the internet, right? There were sites that had static information, you could like type a URL, URL and go and, like, consume that information. But that's all you could do is just a read only type of a platform and then a few years later, the internet evolved to kind of web two, which widely is known as the read write version of the internet. So not only could you consume information, but you could go and, you know, provide information and content to the internet as well as a consumer and what happened with web two was it you know, that ability to read and write created all kinds of new interactions, and that allowed a lot of kind of the internet economy to bloom around it, where the Googles and the apples and eBays and other large companies were able to curate a lot of the content and manage a lot of the traffic. But you know, with social media and stuff, you are providing content as well, and you are consuming content, there was ecommerce, so a lot of these things came about, but the power resided with a very few large corporations that kind of controlled all of these transactions and the when, when web one started, the kind of original vision behind it was a more collaborative environment, where the consumers and the creators and consumers could actually work with each other and use a token economy and share you know, revenue and monetization. So that idea of you know, read, write and then adding on to it at the end. So it's a read write own type of economy that's decentralized. permissionless trustless has its own native payment rails, where the content creators and con Then consumers are all working together and you know, there's no power resting with large corporations, but it's, you know, giving power back to the people. So that's how that's how I would sort of succinctly describe, three and it's so it's a sort of a new way of thinking about things and it's super exciting.   Michael: Yeah it does sound super exciting and so give us all like a background again, treat me like a third grader, because that's probably my IQ level when it comes to the crypto and blockchain world. Give us all an idea of like, what is blockchain and what is cryptocurrency and then we'll get in maybe on how to be thinking about it. With regard to the real estate space and why it even belongs here you don't think this…   Goeff: Yep, sure, so the core concept for blockchain is that it's a network that can be validated the data that's recorded onto the network, which is the chain can be validated by an a limitless number of third parties who aren't organized or connected in any other way. So these are called validators I could have when you could have when they just computers that read the information that's coming in from the blockchain, they perform some mathematical calculations, and then they verify that the data that's been submitted is, is what it says it is and then at that point, it's formalized and recorded to the block and then, so these blocks are really just pieces of data, data that had been put together and then as you form one block after another, that becomes the chain. So it's really just a chain of data that's been validated by third parties that are completely decentralized. So why is that important because it means that there's no third party, a corporation or government, whoever it might be, that can intervene in the functioning of the blockchain, once it's up and running, and you have enough people who are validating and writing to the to the system, it goes infinitely, and it can't be shut down and so the first use case that really grabbed a lot of attention was payments, right? That's what Sanjay was alluding to, in the early you know, the current web two universe, you don't have an easy way to send value to another person without going through a bank or a financial services company, Blockchain, Bitcoin allows you to do that, it's just simply on the on the chain, if you have value in the in the form of Bitcoin, you can send it to any other address anywhere in the world, instantaneously and no one can stop you from doing that. So this really arose from kind of an idealistic perception, like, we have to be able to have to guarantee our own freedom, you know, the government can't intervene and prevent me from sending money to you and that's where, you know, it came from, like the sophisticated cryptographers mathematicians who had an idealistic view, and that's where Bitcoin came from and then since then, it's expanded to a lot more utility, where you can do much, many more things other than just send payments. You can, you know, NFT, you can have lending platforms, you can have social media companies that are effectively on a blockchain and can't be shut down or controlled by third party. So that's, you know, that's the overview of kind of where it came from and why it's important today. Sanjay, anything to add?   Sanjay: Yeah, no, taking a step from there right and that's exactly right, Geoffrey, the original idea was, you know, this all came about during the great financial crisis of 2008 2000, you know, 10 or so, where people thought that these, you know, financial intermediaries are, you know, in control of our lives and so Bitcoin kind of, you know, that was the reason why it came about as a peer to peer system where you can exchange value without involving these intermediaries. But then over the years, we've kind of seen that world expand rapidly and there's other cryptocurrencies now and one of the notable ones is Ethereum and on the Ethereum network, there's actually the ability to create what's known as a smart contract and a smart contract is essentially a piece of computer code that will execute based on a certain event occurring and why that is important is if you think about it from a disintermediation perspective, you know, in a transaction where two parties are involved, and party A needs to provide a good or service and party B needs to make a payment for that. You need a way to make sure that both parties are adhering to their portion of the agreement, or contract, right and so oftentimes, what happens in the financial services world is, in order to make sure that both parties are compliant with their aspects of the contract. You create an intermediary in the middle that takes that position of collecting information or payment from both parties and sending it across and a very common example of this in real estate. Michael, you as a, an owner of, you know, dozens of properties, you've gone through this process many, many times. But you there's an escrow agent involved exactly what I was thinking sure that, you know, right, the property title moves over to, you know, the buyer and the money goes to the seller, right. But imagine you had a piece of computer software that executed on a sale, and it made sure that the two parties were both appropriately receiving what they were expected to receive and there was no intermediary involved in this process. So this, this all executed, basically on the click of a button, right? Like that would be game changing in the real estate world and that's what we're trying to do now with through stock on chain.   Michael: Holy crap. For anybody who's not watching this video, I just didn't pick up my jaw up off the floor, because that was totally a game. So I have so many questions, I want to take just a step back and so Goeff, you were talking about this, these validations that can be done by any number of people. So I'm thinking about like a real world example. So if I go to the store, and I buy something with my credit card, I put down my credit card, they give me the goods and then in this case, would the validator be like the credit card company that says, look, this is the charge that like how do I think about that from like a traditional example.   Goeff: That's exactly right, the validator or usually there are multiple, but they'll they play the function of the credit card company. But instead of sending your data and the transaction data to the credit card company, where the credit, you know, the data goes to the credit card company, the credit card company says okay, this person has credit and the transaction is now going to be posted on their account, and then they send the okay back to the merchant. Instead, the merchant would send the data to a blockchain, the blockchain validators would pick up that transaction, they would validate that, you know, all of the details are the same. Usually, it's a small number of validators that have to agree on the transaction details to make sure that there aren't, you know, nothing's been missed and then once they've reached that consensus, whether that's five or 10, validators, or whatever it may be at that point, then it goes back to the merchant and as it says, The Merton now the blockchain has been updated to show that this transaction occurred, Goeff, or you or whoever was spending the money now no longer has that money. So I had that money in Bitcoin. I gave it to the merchant, the merchant side of the blockchain and said, hey, guys, can you verify that you're debiting Goeff's account and you're adding it to my account? Everyone said, okay, verified, validated, coming back. Now, I can't spend that money, I don't have it anymore and it's in your account. So that's, you know, a high level how that would work.   Michael: Okay   Sanjay: And a couple of more things there, right. Like, if you, you know, credit card transactions for small dollar values is one example. But if you look at larger dollar values, and there's ACH transactions that take three or four days to get validated through the banking system, a wire transaction, if you're trying to buy a house, and you need to make a wire payment, you're rushing to the nearest retail brand, scheduling an appointment to go into the wire, right?   Michael: It's such a pain.     Sanjay: It is all such a pain and like, imagine you had a way 24/7, right, like, you're looking at, you're browsing a site today, you find a property you really like, you want to buy that property, it's Sunday night at 10pm. You just click the button, and you know, your wallet says you have enough money and the smart contract validates that you have the money transfer property over to you, right, like imagine a world that's like that, where you don't have to worry about waiting three or four days for an ACH or running to your bank and getting an appointment waiting in line to get a wire done and it's all literally you're doing all this from your computer, click of a button 24/7 AMS and payments do anywhere in the world.   Goeff: And the cost is in most cases, negligible. You know, the wire fee is whatever 35 $50 It takes a day, you know, some amount of time to process ACH could be clawed back. The claw back concept that exists with ACH that doesn't happen in blockchain that doesn't exist. Like once it's final, it's validated, it's done and you could, you know, a simple payment transaction might cost from a few cents to a few bucks, but it's not going to be anywhere near the cost of a wire transfer.   Sanjay: And the transaction is immutably recorded on the blockchain, nobody can contest it, because you can go and open up that transaction on the blockchain and say, these two parties agreed to this transaction and it's hot, you know, it was hashed on the blockchain and there's this unique hash that represents this transaction, right. So there's no disputing later on. The parties agree that transaction gets done, it's instantaneously recorded and so that that makes this platform as a technology choice. You have innumerable number of possibilities because once you have those types of payment rails, you can build all kinds of applications around it.   Michael: This is insane, you guys. So like, we were talking about the validators and Goeff, you were saying, whatever, four or five or 10 validation points and people are doing it. So is it literally like people on their computer going, like watching their screen for these payments going back and forth or is this happening automatically?   Goeff: No, it can happen. It happens, it's automatic. Yeah, you set up a server that has the right hardware, there are different hardware and software requirements for different blockchains. But it runs silently in the background, or in some cases, it's, it's loud, because there are a lot of fans this morning.   Michael: I heard that, yeah…   Goeff: Yeah, but it's happening 24/7 In the background, and, and in most cases, it's just set or forget, set and forget, you don't have to be online all the time, doing anything manually.   Sanjay: And one other thing I wanted to point out was, you know, obviously, with banks, you can go there on weekends, after hours bank holidays and such, but even a MasterCard or Visa, if they're having a problem with their servers or something, you can have outages where you know, for a couple of hours, you're not able to do any credit card transactions, right? Whereas on the blockchain, that doesn't happen, right because there's blocks can be like, even if my computer was one of the validators, but for whatever reason, it's not working right now there are hundreds of other computers that are doing the same thing that are waiting to pick up the next block and compute it and solve the puzzle and so, you know, as Goeff was saying earlier, once the blockchain is up and running, and there's, you know, enough infrastructure in terms of validators that support that blockchain, you know, it's then it's permanently out there, and it's you can shut it down.   Michael: So that kind of brings to my next question and so you both are talking about this decentralization aspect and I think I've heard so much about the crypto world, it's like getting away from big banks and government and that sort of thing. But if this information is, I mean, it's public at this point, right? When I, Goeff, when I send you money or buy a service from you, it's now public information.   Sanjay: Just to just to clarify on that, right, the part of the information that's public is that this wallet address transacted with this other wallet address. But it's not necessarily public that, you know, Michael transacted with Goeff, right. So what's publicly stored is just the, you know, so, you know, when we talk about privacy, oftentimes, people use the words privacy and anonymity interchangeably, but they're two different things, right? You know, in one example, where there's just two wallets transacting with each other, you both still have full anonymity but the privacy concerning the fact that the transaction occurred between two wallets, that may be public information, but that's the kind of subtle.   Michael: Got it, yeah okay. Okay, that makes total sense, because, well, I was going with the question is, if I send Jeff money for a service, I mean, that could be a taxable event on the traditional world, like, if you were a credit card company, or you were a merchant, I send you that you have sales tax to pay. So I'm imagining government's point to the me sending you money and say, well, now we're going to tax it. But Sanjay, what you're saying is that the actual dollar amount, or what it was for, might not be available to them, all they could see was, someone sent money to someone else, end of story…   Sanjay: We use you the amount of money that went from a to b, but you don't like people don't automatically know who a and who B where the US are going as far as…   Michael: Or what it's for…   Sanjay: Right, in the US people are required, basically to report their own earnings and that's, you know, whether it's on the in the crypto side or non-crypto side, but, you know, you're required to report your earnings and in other countries and jurisdictions, they've passed laws where crypto transactions are not necessarily taxable. So, like, if you bought Bitcoin for, you know, $5,000 and sold it for $20,000, you may not have capital gains taxes in other jurisdictions in the US we do and that's, you know, self-reported, for the most part,   Michael: This is so nuts. Okay, so, taking one more step forward, we're talking about these coins. We talked about Bitcoin, and we mentioned Ethereum, as well, what gives these things of value? Is it just that we have generally I mean, the same thing can be said for the dollar, it's enough people have accepted or any currency have enough people have bought into this idea that this piece of paper that has an old president's face on it is worth what we've decided it's worth, same thing for Bitcoin and Ethereum.   Goeff: Exactly the same. All right, yeah. Nothing else. There's nothing else to we, you know, we all agree today that Bitcoin is worth 20,000. If it goes up, then you know, that's literally the market price. It's set by the people in the market who are transacting on a you know, every second and so it's a very clear pricing mechanism.   Sanjay: In a way you know, it's pure demand and supply that drive pricing for the these types of alternative currencies or crypto currencies, the dollar, for example, you know, we price $1 bill to be worth $1, right and so you will always be able to redeem $1 for $1. But, you know, inflation and other characteristics might make it less valuable to you, right like if a loaf of bread was 50 cents, and now it's $1, you know, you're paying more money to get it, but you know, you're not paying more bills necessarily, you know, like, the dollar bill is always $1 Bill, right? Whereas, one, one Bitcoin or one Ethereum, its value can go up over time, almost like the stock market, right? If you're looking at a share of Microsoft, it's $100 today, but because we all think Microsoft is very valuable, or Apple is very valuable, and the next iPhone is the most sexiest thing that's come out, and therefore, you know, we think we should, you know, put more value to the Apple stock, right? So the concept is similar with Bitcoin and Ethereum. It's simply people that are there are people who are, you know, buyers, and then there's their long on Bitcoin and then there are people who are short on Bitcoin and if there are more people long than short, then the price is going to go up. If there are more people short at a particular point in time price will come down. There's fewer demand.   Michael: Cool and so we mentioned, I think you both mentioned a couple of different use cases for the blockchain and for crypto. What, like, where do you see this going and for Roofstock, specifically, maybe you could talk about what we're doing as a company with regards to blockchain and where do you see it evolving from here?   Goeff: Sure, so, the, you know, the easiest use case for the blockchain technology is for something that is entirely on chain right payment is a perfect example, right? The you know, I give you send you something of value, call it Bitcoin, you accept that, and that's all on the blockchain and that's pretty easy. What we're doing is, we think taking the next step forward for blockchain and we're not the only ones. But we think that we do have something to add here, which is to bridge blockchain to real world assets and that's where things start to get a little bit tricky because let's say that you have a home, you call it a home on chain, a tokenized, home, whatever it is, and you have a token, a blockchain representation of a home, but it's a real world home and so you know, you say, oh, I go to my blockchain wallet, my crypto wallet, and I see I have this home token. That's great but let's say it's not the home that I live in and in fact, it's a home somewhere else in the country and I haven't been there for a while. How do I even know that there's still a home there, right and if I want to sell it to you, you know, you like the idea of using a smart contract to buy and sell this home? You like the idea of having a one click transaction of having certainty that you're going to get what you know, the home token in exchange for your money. That's all great. But how do you know that you're actually buying a real home and not just something that is called a home on a blockchain, whatever that even means, right.   And so that's where we've spent all of the last nine months and the better part of the last 12 months, diving into the nitty gritty legal details to understand and practical implications to understand how we can put this together in a system that works and the answer is, you have to have some type of validation from the real world as well, obviously, you know, the scenarios that I just mentioned, we can't allow that to happen where someone purchases a home token, and finds out that the home burned down three months ago. So you know, you just got nothing and so the way that I think what Roofstock can bring to this equation is the deep, detailed knowledge about how real estate transactions work, plus the blockchain, the blockchain, structuring the legal implementation and that's the value add that we have. I think there are a lot of others in the space and we encourage everyone to get out there and try, you know, try to build, but we do see others who don't have the real estate experience and even though they have a beautiful blockchain strategy, they don't know how to connect that and that you end up with something that's not useful. So what we're doing is designing a system that ensures that before any home is transacted, it's gone through all of the usual checks and balances that are necessary for real estate transaction and inspection has been done recently. We've done you know, made sure that taxes are paid, made sure that insurance is in place, make sure that the title is you know, unencumbered. We do all of that, because you have to do all of that no one's gonna buy it, if you doubt, but we do that behind the scenes, and so went by the time that you as the buyer come to see our site and you see the home, the home tokens that are listed there, you know that you have a data room that shows all of the documents that I just mentioned and more. So your diligence is already done for you. You don't need an inspection contingency, because you have an inspection report sitting right there, you know, you don't need on the on the on the flip side, you know, you don't need an escrow agent, because the smart contract simply it won't execute, it won't perform its function unless the buyer has the funds that it says it has. So you know, this smart contract at the time that you as the buyer purchase, you click, I want to buy this home, the smart contract checks, do you have money, the right amount of funds in your wallet? You know, they check the other side. Does the seller have a home, which is already been approved by Roofstock to be sold? Yes, yes, the transaction happens, and it's not and if one of those isn't true, then it fails and you know, we have to go back to the drawing board and fix whatever was wrong.   Sanjay: Right and then to add to that, right, the kind of the first version of smart contracts and NF T's and all these things that came about on web three, you know, a lot of those assets themselves had the value in it, right. So you might have heard about projects like board a, or crypto punks, these are well known NFT projects where people are spending Saturday 98 to buy, you know, a JPEG image of you know, this popcorn ape. But in those cases, that image itself has that value embedded in it and when people get that image when they buy that they've already exchanged value, right. But the example Goeff is giving us with a real life, real world asset, the NFT is a representation of that real world asset, but it's that real world asset that has the value in it and so when people are transacting these NF t's on the marketplace, Roofstock has to make sure that you know what they're buying and selling corresponds to that real world asset that has that value and we've gone through the inspection and other diligence process to make sure that is still true, right. So that's the sort of the next leap in the web three world where you go beyond just the you know, cryptocurrencies and crypto Native Assets getting traded and now you start looking at real world applications.   Michael: Goeff, I'm thinking about is like, so if I'm trying to understand this, I'm I buy this token, which the underlying asset kind of backing the token up, if you will, is the home, right? So I then own the home as well. How does that work for like, insurance purposes? If I gotta go get insurance on his home? Am I Michael, like going out to my traditional insurance people and saying, okay, well, I own this home, or like, who's on title of the home? How does that all work, is the token on the title?   Goeff: All the right questions. So the way that we're setting this up, each home is titled in its own LLC. So we have a limited liability company where the home is titled and so that really facilitates the transfer between different parties, because you don't have to record title, every time that home token is sold. The title obviously has to be recorded the traditional way at the county recorder's office, the first time that it's transferred into the LLC and then from that moment on, it doesn't need to be retitled because the only thing that's changing hands is the LLC, the ownership of the LLC, the membership interest, it's called like the share of the LLC. So that's, that's how we unlock that. So that when I sell you my home token, I'm selling you an LLC that owns the home and you as the owner of the LLC, you have full control of the LLC, and thereby full control of the underlying home. So you can do whatever you want with the home. If you want to rent it, you can rent it, if you want it to be a long term rental, a short term rental, you get to decide all of that you get to decide when you put a new roof on or if you want to repair the roof instead of replace it. You make all those decisions. As far as the insurance question that you asked, we do have an agreement with an existing insurance company that's tech forward, and they're interested in working on this project. So we've already set that up. The first time you buy a home from us, it will come with one year of property insurance, it's prepaid. If you want to change that you can you can change it if you want to cancel it and replace it with a different insurer. You can what we found is that a lot of intermediates in the space are not necessarily comfortable and dealing with this type of transaction. So we've spent a fair amount of time diligence seen a lot of, you know, providers in the market and we think the ones that we have are very good, but it's up to you as the owner, if you want to have a specific insurer, or a specific title company, you can do that. But otherwise, it's already in place and it's really as easy as just paying your annual premiums you can, you don't have to think about it, if you don't want to.   Michael: Okay, so the follow up what popped in my mind immediately, and then we're going to get you guys out of here, but we live in California. So Roofstock obviously doesn't have a very big footprint here, because there's not a lot of cash flow potential, or it's much more difficult to make the numbers work as compared to a lot of other parts of the country. So, Sanjay, if you buy a home for a million bucks, tokenize it and now you your property taxes in California are based on your purchase price. So if five years down the road, you sell it to me for 2 million bucks. Traditionally, my new property tax value is going based on that 2 million bucks. But are you saying that because this trent this sale isn't getting recorded, as it would traditionally that my property taxes are still gonna be based on your original sale price of a million bucks.   Sanjay: In many state that's, that would be true. But in California, unfortunately, prop 13 would pick that sale up. That's it's a state by state analysis and in most of the states, you know, the transaction would be fine. You individually report any capital gain on your taxes, of course. But in California, the transfer does get picked up.   Michael: Damn it. They always get you somehow but maybe in some states, it sounds like that might not get picked up, right. There's less of an issue…   Sanjay: That's right, in many cases…Yeah.   Michael: Interesting. Okay, man, I thought I had this huge unlock but clearly you guys have already thought of, of all this. So this is this is super exciting, guys. We definitely need to continue the conversation, got a lot more questions, a lot more information. I would love to disseminate to our listeners. But thank you both so much for joining me. If people want to learn more about web three and blockchain and crypto in general, is there are there good resources out there that we can point people to?   Sanjay: Yeah, I mean, definitely come to our website to learn about real estate tokenization. That's https://onchain.roofstock.com/ and also, you know, follow us on crypto Twitter. It's at @rsonchain and then individually, like Goeff and I do contribute in Twitter and LinkedIn and other areas as well. So, you know, look us up and follow us as well, on those platforms.   Goeff: And don't feel don't hesitate to reach out. Like you know, we're happy to talk we're here. We're you know, we're doing something new. We know a lot of people have a lot of questions, and we're happy to answer the questions and then he conversation. So ping us, we're happy to chat.   Michael: Amazing, amazing. Well, thank you both again, for coming on and super looking forward to doing this again soon.   Sanjay: Thank you. Thanks for having us.   Goeff: Likewise. Thanks.   Michael: Alright, anyway, that was our episode. A huge thank you to Goeff and Sanjay for coming on. We're gonna definitely be having them back on again soon. So if you have additional questions about things you just heard, or blockchain things in general, we'd love for you to see those in the comment section. Wherever it is, you get your podcasts, and we will try to get to them on the next episode with Goeff and Sanjay. As always, if you liked the episode, feel free to leave us just traditional rating or review. We love those as well and we look forward to see you in the next one. Happy investing…

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Buy real estate on the blockchain with Roofstock onChain

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 33:36


Raising finance for new real estate projects is difficult. Property development firms face interest rates as high as 29% when working with banking institutions as single-source loan providers. They also face challenges with multiple loan sources as crowd financing can be difficult to administer. Blockchain simplifies access to alternative financing models by facilitating investor management for developers and ensuring investment transparency and continuous ROI tracking for investors. In today's episode Goeffrey Thompson, Chief Blockchain Officer of Roofstock, and Sanjay Raghavan, Head of Structured Securities and Co-head of Digital Securities Initiative, walk us through what blockchain technology is and how they are tokenizing properties in a revolutionary way to buy and sell property.     Episode Link: https://onchain.roofstock.com/ https://twitter.com/rsonchain --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's going on everyone? Welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by Geoffrey Thompson, who's the chief blockchain Officer here at Roofstock and Sanjay Raghavan, who's the head of web three initiatives here at Roofstock and we're gonna be talking today about what blockchain is, and how it applies to us as real estate investors. So let's get into it.   Goeff, and Sanjay, thank you so much for hanging out with me today. I am super excited to chat with you both.   Sanjay: Likewise.   Goeff: Thank you for having us, thank you.   Michael: No, absolutely, absolutely. So I know a little bit, obviously, who you guys are because we work together. But for anyone who isn't familiar with you. Give us a quick and dirty description who you are, and what is it that you're doing at Roofstock? Goeff, I'll kick it over to you first.   Goeff: Sure. So I'm Goeffrey Thompson. I currently have the title of Chief blockchain Officer at Roofstock. Previously, I was General Counsel and I've been a lawyer for by training for a long time and now heading up the blockchain initiative at rootstock together with Sanjay.   Michael: Awesome, great.   Sanjay: I'm Sanjay, head of web three initiatives. Previously, I was leading securities initiatives at roof stock coming up on actually three years this week. So super exciting tomorrow, I think.   Michael: Right on, so really quick follow up questions for you both. Jeff. Were you just like a crypto guy in your everyday life? I mean, how does a real out as a lawyer turn into a blockchain official at a company at the C suite level? I mean, that's incredible.   Goeff: Yeah, I kind of backed into it. That wasn't a plan but I had been advising friends. Since 2017, during the ICO boom, the initial coin offering boom, and I started hearing people in my network, talk about it and say things like, oh, well, it's not a security because it's a coin. So you don't have to follow the securities laws, you know, and I thought, I don't get a lot of the technical stuff that talking about, but I know I can help them with the legal stuff. So then I just I was acting as legal advisor for a couple of years and, and then Gary, our CEO knew that and last year, maybe 12 months ago or a little bit more, our board came to our CEO and said, you guys, Roofstock, you need to get smart on blockchain. We're not saying you have to do it. But you know, we want you to have an idea of whether there's something there and so he asked me and Sanjay, because he knew I had some crypto background and there's a lot of legal and obviously, the financial structure is critical as well, so we kind of got into it together.   Michael: Awesome and Sanjay, at the risk of sounding like a total rookie, what the hell is web three man, I hear so much about it. Break it down for us.   Sanjay: All right. So I know it's so web low. So let's take a step back, right. So web one, which was kind of the first incarnation of the internet, right? There were sites that had static information, you could like type a URL, URL and go and, like, consume that information. But that's all you could do is just a read only type of a platform and then a few years later, the internet evolved to kind of web two, which widely is known as the read write version of the internet. So not only could you consume information, but you could go and, you know, provide information and content to the internet as well as a consumer and what happened with web two was it you know, that ability to read and write created all kinds of new interactions, and that allowed a lot of kind of the internet economy to bloom around it, where the Googles and the apples and eBays and other large companies were able to curate a lot of the content and manage a lot of the traffic. But you know, with social media and stuff, you are providing content as well, and you are consuming content, there was ecommerce, so a lot of these things came about, but the power resided with a very few large corporations that kind of controlled all of these transactions and the when, when web one started, the kind of original vision behind it was a more collaborative environment, where the consumers and the creators and consumers could actually work with each other and use a token economy and share you know, revenue and monetization. So that idea of you know, read, write and then adding on to it at the end. So it's a read write own type of economy that's decentralized. permissionless trustless has its own native payment rails, where the content creators and con Then consumers are all working together and you know, there's no power resting with large corporations, but it's, you know, giving power back to the people. So that's how that's how I would sort of succinctly describe, three and it's so it's a sort of a new way of thinking about things and it's super exciting.   Michael: Yeah it does sound super exciting and so give us all like a background again, treat me like a third grader, because that's probably my IQ level when it comes to the crypto and blockchain world. Give us all an idea of like, what is blockchain and what is cryptocurrency and then we'll get in maybe on how to be thinking about it. With regard to the real estate space and why it even belongs here you don't think this…   Goeff: Yep, sure, so the core concept for blockchain is that it's a network that can be validated the data that's recorded onto the network, which is the chain can be validated by an a limitless number of third parties who aren't organized or connected in any other way. So these are called validators I could have when you could have when they just computers that read the information that's coming in from the blockchain, they perform some mathematical calculations, and then they verify that the data that's been submitted is, is what it says it is and then at that point, it's formalized and recorded to the block and then, so these blocks are really just pieces of data, data that had been put together and then as you form one block after another, that becomes the chain. So it's really just a chain of data that's been validated by third parties that are completely decentralized. So why is that important because it means that there's no third party, a corporation or government, whoever it might be, that can intervene in the functioning of the blockchain, once it's up and running, and you have enough people who are validating and writing to the to the system, it goes infinitely, and it can't be shut down and so the first use case that really grabbed a lot of attention was payments, right? That's what Sanjay was alluding to, in the early you know, the current web two universe, you don't have an easy way to send value to another person without going through a bank or a financial services company, Blockchain, Bitcoin allows you to do that, it's just simply on the on the chain, if you have value in the in the form of Bitcoin, you can send it to any other address anywhere in the world, instantaneously and no one can stop you from doing that. So this really arose from kind of an idealistic perception, like, we have to be able to have to guarantee our own freedom, you know, the government can't intervene and prevent me from sending money to you and that's where, you know, it came from, like the sophisticated cryptographers mathematicians who had an idealistic view, and that's where Bitcoin came from and then since then, it's expanded to a lot more utility, where you can do much, many more things other than just send payments. You can, you know, NFT, you can have lending platforms, you can have social media companies that are effectively on a blockchain and can't be shut down or controlled by third party. So that's, you know, that's the overview of kind of where it came from and why it's important today. Sanjay, anything to add?   Sanjay: Yeah, no, taking a step from there right and that's exactly right, Geoffrey, the original idea was, you know, this all came about during the great financial crisis of 2008 2000, you know, 10 or so, where people thought that these, you know, financial intermediaries are, you know, in control of our lives and so Bitcoin kind of, you know, that was the reason why it came about as a peer to peer system where you can exchange value without involving these intermediaries. But then over the years, we've kind of seen that world expand rapidly and there's other cryptocurrencies now and one of the notable ones is Ethereum and on the Ethereum network, there's actually the ability to create what's known as a smart contract and a smart contract is essentially a piece of computer code that will execute based on a certain event occurring and why that is important is if you think about it from a disintermediation perspective, you know, in a transaction where two parties are involved, and party A needs to provide a good or service and party B needs to make a payment for that. You need a way to make sure that both parties are adhering to their portion of the agreement, or contract, right and so oftentimes, what happens in the financial services world is, in order to make sure that both parties are compliant with their aspects of the contract. You create an intermediary in the middle that takes that position of collecting information or payment from both parties and sending it across and a very common example of this in real estate. Michael, you as a, an owner of, you know, dozens of properties, you've gone through this process many, many times. But you there's an escrow agent involved exactly what I was thinking sure that, you know, right, the property title moves over to, you know, the buyer and the money goes to the seller, right. But imagine you had a piece of computer software that executed on a sale, and it made sure that the two parties were both appropriately receiving what they were expected to receive and there was no intermediary involved in this process. So this, this all executed, basically on the click of a button, right? Like that would be game changing in the real estate world and that's what we're trying to do now with through stock on chain.   Michael: Holy crap. For anybody who's not watching this video, I just didn't pick up my jaw up off the floor, because that was totally a game. So I have so many questions, I want to take just a step back and so Goeff, you were talking about this, these validations that can be done by any number of people. So I'm thinking about like a real world example. So if I go to the store, and I buy something with my credit card, I put down my credit card, they give me the goods and then in this case, would the validator be like the credit card company that says, look, this is the charge that like how do I think about that from like a traditional example.   Goeff: That's exactly right, the validator or usually there are multiple, but they'll they play the function of the credit card company. But instead of sending your data and the transaction data to the credit card company, where the credit, you know, the data goes to the credit card company, the credit card company says okay, this person has credit and the transaction is now going to be posted on their account, and then they send the okay back to the merchant. Instead, the merchant would send the data to a blockchain, the blockchain validators would pick up that transaction, they would validate that, you know, all of the details are the same. Usually, it's a small number of validators that have to agree on the transaction details to make sure that there aren't, you know, nothing's been missed and then once they've reached that consensus, whether that's five or 10, validators, or whatever it may be at that point, then it goes back to the merchant and as it says, The Merton now the blockchain has been updated to show that this transaction occurred, Goeff, or you or whoever was spending the money now no longer has that money. So I had that money in Bitcoin. I gave it to the merchant, the merchant side of the blockchain and said, hey, guys, can you verify that you're debiting Goeff's account and you're adding it to my account? Everyone said, okay, verified, validated, coming back. Now, I can't spend that money, I don't have it anymore and it's in your account. So that's, you know, a high level how that would work.   Michael: Okay   Sanjay: And a couple of more things there, right. Like, if you, you know, credit card transactions for small dollar values is one example. But if you look at larger dollar values, and there's ACH transactions that take three or four days to get validated through the banking system, a wire transaction, if you're trying to buy a house, and you need to make a wire payment, you're rushing to the nearest retail brand, scheduling an appointment to go into the wire, right?   Michael: It's such a pain.     Sanjay: It is all such a pain and like, imagine you had a way 24/7, right, like, you're looking at, you're browsing a site today, you find a property you really like, you want to buy that property, it's Sunday night at 10pm. You just click the button, and you know, your wallet says you have enough money and the smart contract validates that you have the money transfer property over to you, right, like imagine a world that's like that, where you don't have to worry about waiting three or four days for an ACH or running to your bank and getting an appointment waiting in line to get a wire done and it's all literally you're doing all this from your computer, click of a button 24/7 AMS and payments do anywhere in the world.   Goeff: And the cost is in most cases, negligible. You know, the wire fee is whatever 35 $50 It takes a day, you know, some amount of time to process ACH could be clawed back. The claw back concept that exists with ACH that doesn't happen in blockchain that doesn't exist. Like once it's final, it's validated, it's done and you could, you know, a simple payment transaction might cost from a few cents to a few bucks, but it's not going to be anywhere near the cost of a wire transfer.   Sanjay: And the transaction is immutably recorded on the blockchain, nobody can contest it, because you can go and open up that transaction on the blockchain and say, these two parties agreed to this transaction and it's hot, you know, it was hashed on the blockchain and there's this unique hash that represents this transaction, right. So there's no disputing later on. The parties agree that transaction gets done, it's instantaneously recorded and so that that makes this platform as a technology choice. You have innumerable number of possibilities because once you have those types of payment rails, you can build all kinds of applications around it.   Michael: This is insane, you guys. So like, we were talking about the validators and Goeff, you were saying, whatever, four or five or 10 validation points and people are doing it. So is it literally like people on their computer going, like watching their screen for these payments going back and forth or is this happening automatically?   Goeff: No, it can happen. It happens, it's automatic. Yeah, you set up a server that has the right hardware, there are different hardware and software requirements for different blockchains. But it runs silently in the background, or in some cases, it's, it's loud, because there are a lot of fans this morning.   Michael: I heard that, yeah…   Goeff: Yeah, but it's happening 24/7 In the background, and, and in most cases, it's just set or forget, set and forget, you don't have to be online all the time, doing anything manually.   Sanjay: And one other thing I wanted to point out was, you know, obviously, with banks, you can go there on weekends, after hours bank holidays and such, but even a MasterCard or Visa, if they're having a problem with their servers or something, you can have outages where you know, for a couple of hours, you're not able to do any credit card transactions, right? Whereas on the blockchain, that doesn't happen, right because there's blocks can be like, even if my computer was one of the validators, but for whatever reason, it's not working right now there are hundreds of other computers that are doing the same thing that are waiting to pick up the next block and compute it and solve the puzzle and so, you know, as Goeff was saying earlier, once the blockchain is up and running, and there's, you know, enough infrastructure in terms of validators that support that blockchain, you know, it's then it's permanently out there, and it's you can shut it down.   Michael: So that kind of brings to my next question and so you both are talking about this decentralization aspect and I think I've heard so much about the crypto world, it's like getting away from big banks and government and that sort of thing. But if this information is, I mean, it's public at this point, right? When I, Goeff, when I send you money or buy a service from you, it's now public information.   Sanjay: Just to just to clarify on that, right, the part of the information that's public is that this wallet address transacted with this other wallet address. But it's not necessarily public that, you know, Michael transacted with Goeff, right. So what's publicly stored is just the, you know, so, you know, when we talk about privacy, oftentimes, people use the words privacy and anonymity interchangeably, but they're two different things, right? You know, in one example, where there's just two wallets transacting with each other, you both still have full anonymity but the privacy concerning the fact that the transaction occurred between two wallets, that may be public information, but that's the kind of subtle.   Michael: Got it, yeah okay. Okay, that makes total sense, because, well, I was going with the question is, if I send Jeff money for a service, I mean, that could be a taxable event on the traditional world, like, if you were a credit card company, or you were a merchant, I send you that you have sales tax to pay. So I'm imagining government's point to the me sending you money and say, well, now we're going to tax it. But Sanjay, what you're saying is that the actual dollar amount, or what it was for, might not be available to them, all they could see was, someone sent money to someone else, end of story…   Sanjay: We use you the amount of money that went from a to b, but you don't like people don't automatically know who a and who B where the US are going as far as…   Michael: Or what it's for…   Sanjay: Right, in the US people are required, basically to report their own earnings and that's, you know, whether it's on the in the crypto side or non-crypto side, but, you know, you're required to report your earnings and in other countries and jurisdictions, they've passed laws where crypto transactions are not necessarily taxable. So, like, if you bought Bitcoin for, you know, $5,000 and sold it for $20,000, you may not have capital gains taxes in other jurisdictions in the US we do and that's, you know, self-reported, for the most part,   Michael: This is so nuts. Okay, so, taking one more step forward, we're talking about these coins. We talked about Bitcoin, and we mentioned Ethereum, as well, what gives these things of value? Is it just that we have generally I mean, the same thing can be said for the dollar, it's enough people have accepted or any currency have enough people have bought into this idea that this piece of paper that has an old president's face on it is worth what we've decided it's worth, same thing for Bitcoin and Ethereum.   Goeff: Exactly the same. All right, yeah. Nothing else. There's nothing else to we, you know, we all agree today that Bitcoin is worth 20,000. If it goes up, then you know, that's literally the market price. It's set by the people in the market who are transacting on a you know, every second and so it's a very clear pricing mechanism.   Sanjay: In a way you know, it's pure demand and supply that drive pricing for the these types of alternative currencies or crypto currencies, the dollar, for example, you know, we price $1 bill to be worth $1, right and so you will always be able to redeem $1 for $1. But, you know, inflation and other characteristics might make it less valuable to you, right like if a loaf of bread was 50 cents, and now it's $1, you know, you're paying more money to get it, but you know, you're not paying more bills necessarily, you know, like, the dollar bill is always $1 Bill, right? Whereas, one, one Bitcoin or one Ethereum, its value can go up over time, almost like the stock market, right? If you're looking at a share of Microsoft, it's $100 today, but because we all think Microsoft is very valuable, or Apple is very valuable, and the next iPhone is the most sexiest thing that's come out, and therefore, you know, we think we should, you know, put more value to the Apple stock, right? So the concept is similar with Bitcoin and Ethereum. It's simply people that are there are people who are, you know, buyers, and then there's their long on Bitcoin and then there are people who are short on Bitcoin and if there are more people long than short, then the price is going to go up. If there are more people short at a particular point in time price will come down. There's fewer demand.   Michael: Cool and so we mentioned, I think you both mentioned a couple of different use cases for the blockchain and for crypto. What, like, where do you see this going and for Roofstock, specifically, maybe you could talk about what we're doing as a company with regards to blockchain and where do you see it evolving from here?   Goeff: Sure, so, the, you know, the easiest use case for the blockchain technology is for something that is entirely on chain right payment is a perfect example, right? The you know, I give you send you something of value, call it Bitcoin, you accept that, and that's all on the blockchain and that's pretty easy. What we're doing is, we think taking the next step forward for blockchain and we're not the only ones. But we think that we do have something to add here, which is to bridge blockchain to real world assets and that's where things start to get a little bit tricky because let's say that you have a home, you call it a home on chain, a tokenized, home, whatever it is, and you have a token, a blockchain representation of a home, but it's a real world home and so you know, you say, oh, I go to my blockchain wallet, my crypto wallet, and I see I have this home token. That's great but let's say it's not the home that I live in and in fact, it's a home somewhere else in the country and I haven't been there for a while. How do I even know that there's still a home there, right and if I want to sell it to you, you know, you like the idea of using a smart contract to buy and sell this home? You like the idea of having a one click transaction of having certainty that you're going to get what you know, the home token in exchange for your money. That's all great. But how do you know that you're actually buying a real home and not just something that is called a home on a blockchain, whatever that even means, right.   And so that's where we've spent all of the last nine months and the better part of the last 12 months, diving into the nitty gritty legal details to understand and practical implications to understand how we can put this together in a system that works and the answer is, you have to have some type of validation from the real world as well, obviously, you know, the scenarios that I just mentioned, we can't allow that to happen where someone purchases a home token, and finds out that the home burned down three months ago. So you know, you just got nothing and so the way that I think what Roofstock can bring to this equation is the deep, detailed knowledge about how real estate transactions work, plus the blockchain, the blockchain, structuring the legal implementation and that's the value add that we have. I think there are a lot of others in the space and we encourage everyone to get out there and try, you know, try to build, but we do see others who don't have the real estate experience and even though they have a beautiful blockchain strategy, they don't know how to connect that and that you end up with something that's not useful. So what we're doing is designing a system that ensures that before any home is transacted, it's gone through all of the usual checks and balances that are necessary for real estate transaction and inspection has been done recently. We've done you know, made sure that taxes are paid, made sure that insurance is in place, make sure that the title is you know, unencumbered. We do all of that, because you have to do all of that no one's gonna buy it, if you doubt, but we do that behind the scenes, and so went by the time that you as the buyer come to see our site and you see the home, the home tokens that are listed there, you know that you have a data room that shows all of the documents that I just mentioned and more. So your diligence is already done for you. You don't need an inspection contingency, because you have an inspection report sitting right there, you know, you don't need on the on the on the flip side, you know, you don't need an escrow agent, because the smart contract simply it won't execute, it won't perform its function unless the buyer has the funds that it says it has. So you know, this smart contract at the time that you as the buyer purchase, you click, I want to buy this home, the smart contract checks, do you have money, the right amount of funds in your wallet? You know, they check the other side. Does the seller have a home, which is already been approved by Roofstock to be sold? Yes, yes, the transaction happens, and it's not and if one of those isn't true, then it fails and you know, we have to go back to the drawing board and fix whatever was wrong.   Sanjay: Right and then to add to that, right, the kind of the first version of smart contracts and NF T's and all these things that came about on web three, you know, a lot of those assets themselves had the value in it, right. So you might have heard about projects like board a, or crypto punks, these are well known NFT projects where people are spending Saturday 98 to buy, you know, a JPEG image of you know, this popcorn ape. But in those cases, that image itself has that value embedded in it and when people get that image when they buy that they've already exchanged value, right. But the example Goeff is giving us with a real life, real world asset, the NFT is a representation of that real world asset, but it's that real world asset that has the value in it and so when people are transacting these NF t's on the marketplace, Roofstock has to make sure that you know what they're buying and selling corresponds to that real world asset that has that value and we've gone through the inspection and other diligence process to make sure that is still true, right. So that's the sort of the next leap in the web three world where you go beyond just the you know, cryptocurrencies and crypto Native Assets getting traded and now you start looking at real world applications.   Michael: Goeff, I'm thinking about is like, so if I'm trying to understand this, I'm I buy this token, which the underlying asset kind of backing the token up, if you will, is the home, right? So I then own the home as well. How does that work for like, insurance purposes? If I gotta go get insurance on his home? Am I Michael, like going out to my traditional insurance people and saying, okay, well, I own this home, or like, who's on title of the home? How does that all work, is the token on the title?   Goeff: All the right questions. So the way that we're setting this up, each home is titled in its own LLC. So we have a limited liability company where the home is titled and so that really facilitates the transfer between different parties, because you don't have to record title, every time that home token is sold. The title obviously has to be recorded the traditional way at the county recorder's office, the first time that it's transferred into the LLC and then from that moment on, it doesn't need to be retitled because the only thing that's changing hands is the LLC, the ownership of the LLC, the membership interest, it's called like the share of the LLC. So that's, that's how we unlock that. So that when I sell you my home token, I'm selling you an LLC that owns the home and you as the owner of the LLC, you have full control of the LLC, and thereby full control of the underlying home. So you can do whatever you want with the home. If you want to rent it, you can rent it, if you want it to be a long term rental, a short term rental, you get to decide all of that you get to decide when you put a new roof on or if you want to repair the roof instead of replace it. You make all those decisions. As far as the insurance question that you asked, we do have an agreement with an existing insurance company that's tech forward, and they're interested in working on this project. So we've already set that up. The first time you buy a home from us, it will come with one year of property insurance, it's prepaid. If you want to change that you can you can change it if you want to cancel it and replace it with a different insurer. You can what we found is that a lot of intermediates in the space are not necessarily comfortable and dealing with this type of transaction. So we've spent a fair amount of time diligence seen a lot of, you know, providers in the market and we think the ones that we have are very good, but it's up to you as the owner, if you want to have a specific insurer, or a specific title company, you can do that. But otherwise, it's already in place and it's really as easy as just paying your annual premiums you can, you don't have to think about it, if you don't want to.   Michael: Okay, so the follow up what popped in my mind immediately, and then we're going to get you guys out of here, but we live in California. So Roofstock obviously doesn't have a very big footprint here, because there's not a lot of cash flow potential, or it's much more difficult to make the numbers work as compared to a lot of other parts of the country. So, Sanjay, if you buy a home for a million bucks, tokenize it and now you your property taxes in California are based on your purchase price. So if five years down the road, you sell it to me for 2 million bucks. Traditionally, my new property tax value is going based on that 2 million bucks. But are you saying that because this trent this sale isn't getting recorded, as it would traditionally that my property taxes are still gonna be based on your original sale price of a million bucks.   Sanjay: In many state that's, that would be true. But in California, unfortunately, prop 13 would pick that sale up. That's it's a state by state analysis and in most of the states, you know, the transaction would be fine. You individually report any capital gain on your taxes, of course. But in California, the transfer does get picked up.   Michael: Damn it. They always get you somehow but maybe in some states, it sounds like that might not get picked up, right. There's less of an issue…   Sanjay: That's right, in many cases…Yeah.   Michael: Interesting. Okay, man, I thought I had this huge unlock but clearly you guys have already thought of, of all this. So this is this is super exciting, guys. We definitely need to continue the conversation, got a lot more questions, a lot more information. I would love to disseminate to our listeners. But thank you both so much for joining me. If people want to learn more about web three and blockchain and crypto in general, is there are there good resources out there that we can point people to?   Sanjay: Yeah, I mean, definitely come to our website to learn about real estate tokenization. That's https://onchain.roofstock.com/ and also, you know, follow us on crypto Twitter. It's at @rsonchain and then individually, like Goeff and I do contribute in Twitter and LinkedIn and other areas as well. So, you know, look us up and follow us as well, on those platforms.   Goeff: And don't feel don't hesitate to reach out. Like you know, we're happy to talk we're here. We're you know, we're doing something new. We know a lot of people have a lot of questions, and we're happy to answer the questions and then he conversation. So ping us, we're happy to chat.   Michael: Amazing, amazing. Well, thank you both again, for coming on and super looking forward to doing this again soon.   Sanjay: Thank you. Thanks for having us.   Goeff: Likewise. Thanks.   Michael: Alright, anyway, that was our episode. A huge thank you to Goeff and Sanjay for coming on. We're gonna definitely be having them back on again soon. So if you have additional questions about things you just heard, or blockchain things in general, we'd love for you to see those in the comment section. Wherever it is, you get your podcasts, and we will try to get to them on the next episode with Goeff and Sanjay. As always, if you liked the episode, feel free to leave us just traditional rating or review. We love those as well and we look forward to see you in the next one. Happy investing…

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Heather and Larry discuss the how having cancer haas changed our perspective and dying. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #metavivor

Target: Cancer Podcast
Start looking at what's causing cancer

Target: Cancer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 34:18


Our guest this week is Dr. John Hood. Dr. Hood, together with Dr. Sanjay, talk about gene mutations on cancer growth and all the advances in next-generation sequencing that are transforming the treatment of cancer as we know it. If you have heard of the terms: NGS, genomic sequencing, or molecular profiling, but are unsure what they mean, how they work, and - especially - how you can benefit from them, this is the episode for you.

H-TEN - Hanshin Tigers English News
Episode 156: In Search of a New Manager

H-TEN - Hanshin Tigers English News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 63:56


Hosts T-Ray and Sanjay discuss team news, the last twelve games of Tigers baseball, and look at who the most likely (and preferred) candidates are to take over from current manager Akihiro Yano in 2023 and beyond. In the post-show show, they pay tribute to two 40-something legends of the game who both announced their...

Moody&D
Chaos in the Castle: Part 2 (feat. Dr. Sanjay Merchant)

Moody&D

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 52:20


Chaos in the Castle: Part 2 (feat. Dr. Sanjay Merchant)- Hello All! This week, we return for the second part of our Moody&D Live show from May where we take a look at a new group of adventurers. In this adventure, our party seeks to acquire a stolen blade from Lord Victor Von Darmir and escape without getting caught.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Begin the Begin Podcast by Jeff Hilimire
The unstoppable entrepreneur, Sanjay Parekh, on his latest venture: Occasional Wraps

Begin the Begin Podcast by Jeff Hilimire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 35:50


On this episode, I had a chance to talk to one of my favorite people in the world, Sanjay Parekh. Sanjay and I have known each other for a long, long time, and I consider him both of the smartest and kindest (and I shouldn't forget, one of the most successful) entrepreneurs I know. On this episode, we spent our time talking about his newest company, Occasional Wraps, which produces the first-ever artist-designed, limited edition gift wrapping paper. More about Sanjay: https://www.sanjayparekh.com/ Occasional Wraps: https://www.occasionalwraps.com/ Don't forget to subscribe

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

This week's Monday Momentum discusses being good to yourself and how we can do that consistently. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #pinkwashing #metavivor

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro
Prioritizing safety and revolutionizing video-assisted collaboration with Sanjay Jhawar

B2B Tech Talk with Ingram Micro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 36:39 Transcription Available


The goal of video-assisted gear—such as virtual reality or video conferences—is often immersion. However, in environments where virtual collaboration coincides with high-risk tasks, workers require a new solution.  With the RealWear Navigator headset device, you can have the best of both worlds and reach new heights of productive long-distance collaboration.    Shelby Skrhak speaks with Sanjay Jhawar, co-founder and chief strategy officer for RealWear Inc, about:  - Explaining the RealWear headset design - RealWear use cases across remote work - Partnering with RealWear  To join the discussion, follow us on Twitter @IngramTechSol #B2BTechTalk  Listen to this episode and more like it by subscribing to B2B Tech Talk on Spotify,Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Heather and Larry discuss the machine that is Breast Cancer Awareness, and all the feelings it brings. From pinkwashing to sexualizing breast cancer Heather talks about why she hates October. Don't miss this episode and the chance to share it with someone else. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son! #breastcancer #metastaticbreastcancer #stageIVneedsmore #breastcancerawareness #heatherjose #pinkwashing #metavivor

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast
Building A Truly Connected Enterprise (with Software AG CEO Sanjay Brahmawar)

Bernard Marr's Future of Business & Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 35:12


I am joined by Sanjay Brahmawar, CEO of Software AG, a global software and service company working with over 10,000 enterprise customers in over 70 countries. We discuss the importance of being a truly connected enterprise to bring together and use data, connect to IoT devices, and to offer smarter products and services. We look at examples like DHL and Tractor Supply, and explore some of the road blocks and how to overcome them.

Lung Cancer Considered
Mesothelioma With Melina Marmarelis And Sanjay Popat

Lung Cancer Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 30:44


Treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma has undergone dramatic shifts in the past few years. To discuss these changes and the research behind them, Lung Cancer Considered Host Dr. Stephen Liu welcomes Dr. Sanjay Popat and Dr. Melina Marmarelis. Dr. Popat is a Consultant Thoracic Medical Oncologist at The Royal Marsden and Professor of Thoracic Oncology at the Institute of Cancer Research, in London, England, and Chair of the British Thoracic Oncology Group. He is also on the Board of Directors for the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation. Dr. Marmarelis is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Medical Director of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program.

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
In the Bubble Presents: Chasing Life (with Sanjay Gupta)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 35:33


On this Labor Day, Andy is recommending a stellar CNN podcast: Chasing Life with Dr. Sanjay Gupta. In this episode, Sanjay explores the endless loop of pain we can feel after a loved one dies. What happens when grief doesn't subside with time? He speaks to Wendy Lichtenthal, Director of the Bereavement Clinic at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, about why we grieve, how to navigate the grief process, and a new medical diagnosis: prolonged grief disorder. Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Twitter @drsanjaygupta. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.    Support the show by checking out our sponsors! Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://lemonadamedia.com/sponsors/    Check out these resources from today's episode:  Check out more episodes of CNN's Chasing Life here: https://www.cnn.com/audio/podcasts/chasing-life Find vaccines, masks, testing, treatments, and other resources in your community: https://www.covid.gov/ Order Andy's book, “Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response”: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165  Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com/show/inthebubble.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

This week's edition of Monday Momentum talks about moving forward despite challenges. Join Larry and Heather as they kick off another Monday. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

To Be Human
#082 Sanjay Rawal | The Beauty & Joy Found In Suffering | 3100 Mile Transcendence Run

To Be Human

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 71:35


Hello Beautiful People!CONNECT WITH JENNAH-LOUISEWork With Me | https://www.jennahlouise.com.auInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/jennah_louiseCONNECT WITH SANJAYInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/mrsanjayr Documentary: 3100: Run and Become | https://3100film.com On today's podcast we have Sanjay Rawal. Sanjay spent 15 years working on grassroots peace-building campaigns under the direction of his teacher Sri Chinmoy. He is also the film director of the documentaries ‘Food Chains', ‘Gather' and ‘3100: Run and Become' which features several Indigenous cultures in their quest for peace through long-distance running. What I love about this conversation is the enrichment, full of depth, passion and love. This is genuinely one of my all time favourite conversations from the To Be Human podcast, and it's one personally I will be listening back to more than once. I want you to go on your own journey in this one, so I won't share too much of what is inside. I will share that we do derive a lot of our conversation on the lessons learnt from filming 55 days of the 3100 Self-Transcendence Run; a 3,100 mile run around less than 1km block in Queens, New York. We discuss the beautiful relationships between endurance and growth, the beauty and joy that can be found in suffering, and the mindset of those who finish this phenomenal feat. There is also a special contribution to my dear Australian friend Stephen Redfern at the end; he has just arrived in New York to experience his own path of self-transcendence. Stephen I will preface this now with saying, the beautiful Native American Navajo People believe that, ‘Mother Earth is also under the sidewalk.' I am excited to further share this with you and with all. #jennahlouise #tobehumanpodcast

Skincare Anarchy
E.339: Learning About Thriving Skin ft WETHRIVV founders Amy & Dr Sanjay Batra

Skincare Anarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 43:09


In this episode Ekta sits down to chat with the masterminds behind the innovation driven line, WETHRIVV, Dr Sanjay Batra & Amy Batra. WETHRIVV is a leader in the space of aesthetic skin care and post procedure recovery due to their products such as maskād (Amy's brain child) and other equally brilliant products. The interview explores how Dr Batra and Amy have studied the benefits of aesthetic procedures utilizing components such as platelet rich plasma, and crafted their line to act as an intersection between cutting edge medicine and consumer driven needs when it comes to skin health and care. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/skincareanarchy/message

Comics and Crypto Podcast: a collectors world in the digital age
Let's Talk Marvel Comics #1! History, our Collection, and Future Prediction!

Comics and Crypto Podcast: a collectors world in the digital age

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 35:24


In this episode we will be celebrating the 83rd anniversary of Marvel Comics #1 with special guest, and prestigious VeVe collector, Sanjay! We will be discussing Sanjay's collection, history of Marvel Comics #1, and where we believe the value of this comic will be headed in both physical and digital format. If you enjoyed this video, please make sure to Like and Subscribe! As always, this video is made for entertainment purposes only and is never financial advice. Follow Sanjay Twitter: https://twitter.com/MrMC1_ethLinktree Digital & Physical Comics: https://linktr.ee/comicsandcryptoDownload the Lolli extension to earn Bitcoin back on your online purchases. https://lolli.com/share/TUzemVnZCVDonation AddressesVEVE: @comicsandcryptoGEMS: e6085dd1-cc0e-45c7-b6c7-b02a566979bdETH: comicsandcrypto.ethWAX: comicscryptoYou can also follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @ComicsandCrypto Opening Music is by NineFingerInstagram: NineFinger999

Leaders of B2B - Interviews on B2B Leadership, Tech, SaaS, Revenue, Sales, Marketing and Growth
Enabling Successful Entrepreneurs by Strengthening the Community with Sanjay Puri at Autonebula, Wellisen & ACEL360

Leaders of B2B - Interviews on B2B Leadership, Tech, SaaS, Revenue, Sales, Marketing and Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 41:45


Sanjay Puri, Founder and Investor at Autonebula, Wellisen & ACEL360 shares his diverse experience on today's episode. Sanjay discusses these topics:How passion for entrepreneurship can be developed, with successful founders becoming investors and accelerators. A society that most closely resembles a meritocracy can attract the best talent, rewarding their resilience with success.A balance of confidence and humility enables founders to rally their teams yet remain open to ideas. Having someone you can trust and be candid with to share challenges and insecurities can help your mental health at the same time as finding solutions.How technology will accelerate in the fields of space, mobility, and healthcare. The valuable actions startup founders with great ideas can take to leverage incubators and accelerators to get their product to market faster.Great ways founders can get up from a failed startup and use relationships and advisors to help spin it towards success. Startup founders looking to accelerate their ideas on a foundation of experience will find Sanjay's experience insightful and inspirational. This episode is brought to you by Content Allies.Content Allies helps B2B tech companies launch revenue-generating podcasts. Build relationships that drive revenue through podcast networking. We schedule interviews with your ideal prospects and strategic partners so that you can build relationships & grow your business. You show up and have conversations, we handle everything else. Learn more at ContentAllies.com

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Heather talks with Kara Milliron, a genetic counselor at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

The Jaipur Dialogues
Islam First, Nation Later _ Maulana Sajid Rashidi _ Sanjay Dixi

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 16:58


Islam First, Nation Later _ Maulana Sajid Rashidi _ Sanjay Dixit

The Wire Talks
Ethics are not enough, medical sector also needs regulation Ft. Dr. Sanjay Nagral

The Wire Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 41:20


One of pharmaceutical companies spending 1000 crore to promote its paracetamol, Dolo has currently hit the headline. However, the company claims spending nothing more than 6-10 crore in marketing. However, it is no secret that Pharma companies being aggressive in pushing their products to doctors. From providing incentives, freebies, trips and much more, these pharma companies don't leave any stone unturned to make their product the top selling one. Joining our host Sidharth Bhatia on The Wire Talks this week is Dr. Sanjay Nagral, serving as Consultant Hepatobiliary Surgeon, Dept of Surgical Gastroenterology at Jaslok Hospital, Mumbai. The duo speaks about if these techniques harm or help the patients, massive promotional budgets' effect on the medical segment and the common man and more. Our guest also sheds light on the hospitals emphasizing patients to buy medicines from the hospital itself when a person is undergoing treatment or admitted. In this case how a patient is supposed to vest faith in the doctors?Don't forget to tune into this episode of The Wire Talks.Follow Dr. Sanjay Nagral on Twitter @sanjaynagral Follow Sidharth Bhatia on Twitter and Instagram @bombaywallah and https://instagram.com/bombaywallahYou can listen to this show on The Wire's website, the IVM Podcasts website, app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Dyslexia Explored
#124 Discovering Your Dyslexia in Adulthood. Sanjay Kapoor

Dyslexia Explored

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 77:58


This week, I had an interesting conversation with Sanjay Kapoor, a director for proposals for a huge company in the US. He just recently discovered that he has dyslexia and ADHD by looking at materials from Made by Dyslexia and other dyslexia organizations. He also listened to several podcasts where he found us and reached out to us. Listen to the episode and learn how Sanjay discovered his dyslexia. Sanjay shared his work and how dyslexia has been a major part of it. He was also very open about struggling with his mental health and asking for help and finding ways to counter his weaknesses. Links: Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sanjay-kapoor1/ Dyslexia Quiz: https://bulletmapacademy.com/dyslexia-quiz/ Bulletmap Academy Page: https://bulletmapacademy.com Enroll in BulletMap Academy: https://www.bulletmapacademy.com/prices/ Show notes: https://bulletmapacademy.com/blog/124/ Interested in being a guest? Email us at info@bulletmapacademy.com

H-TEN - Hanshin Tigers English News
Episode 155: We Need to Cut Some Guys…

H-TEN - Hanshin Tigers English News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 56:42


Hosts T-Ray and Sanjay discuss team news, the last month of Tigers baseball, choose a few players of the summer, roast our manager for some really questionable decisions, and then list some guys that should (or that we hope will) be cut at season's end. In the post-show show, they talk about personal encounters that...

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose
Episode 23 Monday Momentum Courage Doesn't Always Roar

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 6:14


In this Monday momentum Heather and Larry talk about what courage actually looks like. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose
Episode 22 Healthcare Providers Impact us as Patients

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 27:40


In this episode Larry and Heather talk about the importance of healthcare provider's actions and words, advocating for yourself as a patient, and the impact it all makes. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode of Monday Momentum Larry and Heather discuss Finding Your Way and reveal the changes happening at the Jose Household. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

Diary of an Apartment Investor
ATE - Ways To Reach Out With Stephen Dall'Orso & Sanjay Hegde

Diary of an Apartment Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 37:15


Sanjay Hegde & Stephen Dall'Orso discuss ways to learn more about investing and ways to go about contacting investors.Join our multifamily investing community for FREE for in-depth courses and live networking with like-minded apartment investors at the Tribe of TitansLink to subscribe to YouTube channel: https://tinyurl.com/SubYouTubeDiaryPodcastApple Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/AppleDiaryPodcast Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/SpotDiaryPodcast Google Podcasts: https://tinyurl.com/GoogleDiaryPodcast Follow us on:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DiaryAptInv/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Diary_Apt_Inv Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/diary_of_an_apartment_investor This episode originally aired on August 22, 2022----Your host, Brian Briscoe, has been a general partner in 655 units worth $50 million and has been lead sponsor, asset manager, capital raiser, and key principal on these properties. He has developed a multifamily education community called the Tribe of Titans that helps aspiring investors learn the game, network with other like-minded professionals, and get their apartment investing business to the next level. He is founder of Streamline Capital Group, which will continue to acquire multifamily assets well into the future. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps in 2021.Connect with him on LinkedIn----Sanjay HegdeSanjay Hegde is a first-generation immigrant from India. He and his wife moved to the US in 2001.  He had an opportunity to become a Production Supervisor, Northeastern Regional Sales Rep, Sales Manager, Director of Sales for Americas and Asia later hired by a competitor as VP of sales and marketing. “It was an interesting journey from on the floor starting at $7.25 to making $250K and traveling the world while managing $200M plus in business. One day when I was on business travel, my son got into an accident which is what made me to think of starting my own business. I was trying to figure what business should I get into. I had started investing actively as well as passively in Single Family and Storage Houses in 2016 and I noticed that I was making money in my passive investments and not so much in my single-family active investment.  In 2021 I started Blue Ring Investors. Even though as GP's we are heavily involved in all aspects of managing the asset at Blue Ring Investors we specialize in raising capital while helping healthcare professionals and busy professionals grow their net worth, passive income and scale up their investment portfolio by helping them invest in investment grade commercial real estate with high returns. We do this by partnering with established network of vetted and successful real estate acquisition teams in whose deals we invest on our investors benefit.” Learn more about him at: https://blueringinvestors.com ----Stephen Dall'Orso Stephen Dall'Orso is Fund Manager for the Orso Fund which is a private investment vehicle that specializes in single and multifamily assets.Learn more about him at: Text at 248 773 9006 or stephen@theorsogroup.com 

Rappin' With ReefBum
Guests: Dr. Sanjay Joshi and Mike Paletta

Rappin' With ReefBum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 89:55


Rappin' With ReefBum is a LIVE talk show with host Keith Berkelhamer and guests from the reef keeping community. In this episode I chat with reef keeping legends Dr. Sanjay Joshi and Mike Paletta. Sanjay has written many articles about reef keeping and has been a speaker at several national marine aquarium society meetings and local clubs. In "real life" Sanjay is a professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Penn State University. Mike has also written a lot of articles for many publications and has published two books: The New Marine Aquarium and Ultimate Marine Aquariums. Mike has also been a speaker at many reef keeping conferences in the US and around the world.

Quarantined Comics
KRISHNA: A JOURNEY WITHIN ...explaining blue gods to Ryan

Quarantined Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 41:16


this week we're reading KRISHNA: A JOURNEY WITHIN - by Abhishek Singh. Singh is Indian graphic novelist acclaimed for his unique interpretations of myths and ancient philosophies - who first made his mark for the acclaimed series Ramayana 3392. AND he was first Indian comics artist published in mainstream American comics. Singh's 2012 comics interpretation of the Lord Krishna was a searing, human portrayal of one of the great Hindi deities. To many in the west he became a popular god in the 60s, but to most folks from the subcontinent, he is but one of many reincarnations of the God Vishnu the creator. In an almost poetic, sweeping series of paintings Singh takes us through key moments of Krishna's life - from a little boy stealing ghee, to defeating his evil uncle, to his courtship with Radha, and to key moments from the epic feudal war that makes up both the Mahabharata and the Bhagavad Gita - two of Hinduisms most sacred texts. Soooo, basically it's a pretty, poetic cliff notes from some of Hinduism's greatest hits. SHOWNOTES * Ramayana: The Divine Loophole (kids book): goodreads.com/en/book/show/7456105-ramayana * Sanjay's Super Team (Pixar Short): youtube.com/watch?v=3PaPtCzKh1U * Amra Chitra Katha (classic indian comics): wikipedia.org/wiki/AmarChitraKatha * Mahabarata (classic TV show): youtube.com/watch?v=bJ2Qik2fkX8

The Nonlinear Library
EA - Rhodri Davies on why he's not an EA by Sanjay

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 4:15


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: Rhodri Davies on why he's not an EA, published by Sanjay on August 18, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Rhodri Davies is a smart, reasonable, and well-respected commentator on philanthropy. Many people who follow charity and philanthropy in the UK (outside of EA) are familiar with his blog. He also has a background in maths and philosophy at Oxford (if I remember correctly) so he's exactly the sort of person that EA might attract, so it should be of interest to the EA movement to know why he didn't want to sign up. The critique that I most liked was the one entitled "Is EA just another in a long line of attempts to “rationalise” philanthropy?" I've copied and pasted it below. Rhodri has spent a lot of time thinking about the history of philanthropy, so his perspective is really valuable. Is EA just another in a long line of attempts to “rationalise” philanthropy? The dose of historical perspective at the end of the last section brings me to another one of my issues with EA: a nagging suspicion that it is in fact just another in a very long line of efforts to make philanthropy more “rational” or “effective” throughout history. The C18th and early C19th, for instance, saw efforts to impose upon charity the principles of political economy (the precursor to modern economics which focused on questions of production, trade and distribution of national wealth – as exemplified in the work of writers such as Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus and David Ricardo). Then in the C19th and early C20th the Charity Organisation Society and Scientific Philanthropy movements waged war on the perceived scourge of emotionally driven “indiscriminate giving”. Charity Organization Society, by Henry Tonks 1862-1937. (Made available by the Tate Gallery under a CC 3.0 license http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T11004) This perhaps bothers me more than most people because I spend so much of my time noodling around in the history of philanthropy. It also isn't a reason to dismiss EA out of hand: the fact that it might have historical precedents doesn't invalidate it, it just means that we should be more critical in assessing claims of novelty and uniqueness. It also suggests to me that there would be value in providing greater historical context for the movement and its ideas. Doing so may well show that EA is genuinely novel in at least some regards (the idea of total cause agnosticism, for instance, is something that one might struggle to find in previous attempts to apply utilitarian thinking to philanthropy). But the other thing the history of philanthropy tends to show is that everyone thinks at the time that their effort to make giving “better” or “more rational” is inherently and objectively right, and it is often only with the benefit of hindsight that it becomes clear quite how ideologically driven and of their time they actually are. For my money, it is still an open question as to whether future historians will look back on EA in the same way that we look back on the Charity Organisation movement today. The other thing that historical perspective brings is the ability to trace longer-term consequences. And this is particularly important here, because efforts to make charity more “rational” have historically had an unfortunate habit of producing unintended consequences. The “scientific philanthropy” movement of the early 20th century, for instance (which counted many of the biggest donors and foundations of the era among its followers) had its roots in the 19th century charity organisation societies, which were primarily concerned with addressing inefficiency and duplication of charitable effort at a local level, and ensuring that individual giving was sufficiently careful to distinguish between ‘deserving' and undeserving' cases (as outlined further in this previous article). Over time, how...

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Larry and Heather talk with their daughter Sydney, discussing the impact of cancer on her. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

The Jaipur Dialogues
Modi Shows The Way Ahead in Reuplic Day Speech Rajesh Kumar Singh, Sanjay Dixit

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 45:31


Prime Minister Narendra Modi's speech on Independence Day 2022 showed glimpses of a partial response to Hindu demands. The tri-shakti and pancha-pran reflect the response to ending mental colonisation (including secularism) and honouring the indigenous heritage. Rajesh Kumar Singh joins Sanjay dixit for a discussion.

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In our second Monday Momentum, Larry and Heather talk about changes in life, and how we feel about them. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

In this episode Heather and Larry are joined by their son Ty, who shares his story and thoughts on cancer and his life. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!

I'm Still Here: Lessons from Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer with Heather Jose

Introducing Monday Momentum, a short podcast to get your week started right. In this episode Larry and Heather discuss taking your daily MEDS. Meditation, Exercise, Diet, Sleep. I'm Still Here is hosted by Heather and Larry Jose. Heather was diagnosed with Stage IV (Metastatic) Breast Cancer in 1998 at age 26. Heather has lived with metastatic breast cancer for over 20 years and is often contacted by women asking for help with their diagnosis and transition to life with mets. Heather and Larry want to share the things that have helped them over the years and talk about issues related to cancer that rarely get talked about. IG: @heatherjose FB: Heather Jose I'm Still Here lyrics written by @Sanjay, our awesome son!