Podcasts about Blume

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Latest podcast episodes about Blume

Night Dreams Talk Radio
Alcohol Can Be A Gas! With David Blume

Night Dreams Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 67:54


David Blume: C.E.O - Blume Industries, Farmer-in-Chief - Whiskey HillFarms https://www.alcoholcanbeagas.com/whiskey-hill-farms-clean-fuel-revolution/Blume is a Commercial Farmer, a globally renowned consultant on RegenerativeAg Tech and food waste optimization solutions, a Biofuels pioneer and author ofthe Amazon.com critically acclaimed best-selling book, Alcohol Can Be A Gas!Blume appears regularly on National Public Radio radio including NPR's ScienceFriday and he is a regular commentator on energy, fuel and farming guest onFarming and talk radio programs including Coast-to-Coast radio.Blume received the American Corn Growers Association (ACGA) "Truth inAgricultural Journalism" award and has keynoted Farming and RenewableEnergy conferences around the world for the ACGA, the National Farmers Union,the National Grange, OLADE (the Renewable Energy Organization forCaribbean, Central and South American nations and Mexico) and has been aplenary speaker at the World BIO Ag conference.

Female Founder World
How This Bootstrapping Baddie Built Her Superfood Biz to $7.5 Million in Sales

Female Founder World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 27:42


Karen Danudjaja, the bootstrapping baddie that built Blume to $7.5 million in sales and 2000 stockists (including Wholefoods!) is on Female Founder World today! The idea for a better-for-you latte line came to Karen in 2017 while working in corporate real estate, having multiple coffee meetings each day and then getting the caffeine jitters.  She started off working a full time nine-to-five and also running Blume at night. By the time Blume hit around $200,000 in sales, Karen went all in and quit her day job to grow the company.  “I felt like there was enough proof of concept, like returning customer feedback from retailers, that I was ready to go all in.” At the beginning cafes were her biggest customer, with healthy spots adding Blume's superfood lattes to the menu. But when lockdowns hit, 85% of Blume's business was food service—and it all shut down over night. Karen quickly brushed up on digital marketing and pivoted the company to ecommerce. “I took a digital marketing course March-April 2020 and then launched our first themed bundle for our ecommerce store in mid-April.”  After that, the business shifted to ecommerce-first during the height of the pandemic, before settling into a true omnichannel strategy that's split 50% wholesale and 50% ecommerce and includes distribution across 2000 cafes, grocery, lifestyle stores, as well as the itsblume.com website. When Karen needed to find a cost-effective way to scale sales without hiring a team, she came up with a smart solution: build a separate, password-gated Shopify store with minimum order sizes for cafes and independent retailers to place bulk orders. “We duplicated our regular Shopify store, adjusted pricing and added a login. We have flows set up for them the same way we do for our DTC customers, targeting abandoned carts and returning customer, but set up specific for the needs of a retailer.” When bigger retailers like Wholefoods and Nordstrom wanted to stock Blume, Karen then built out her sales team. During all of this growth, Karen continued to bootstrap, which meant carefully managing cash flow was key. Her tip to other bootstrapped brands is to push back on retailers' standard 90-day payment terms to make sure invoices are paid more quickly.  “We were really firm from the beginning with retailers that we couldn't do net 90 [to get paid for orders]. Because we were bootstrapped and we didn't have access [to cash], I just literally had to say no.” This year, after ending 2021 with $7.5 million in sales, Blume raised its first round of money from investors, closing $2.5 million in five weeks.  Feeling inspired? We have the exact pitch deck Karen used to raise $2.5 million in five weeks available for you to download in the Female Founder World community home. We've shared this resource as a first look at something exciting ✨new and shiny✨ Female Founder World is launching for our besties later this year. Enjoyed the conversation? Take a screenshot and tag us on your Instagram stories @femalefounderworld and @jasminegarnsworthy. (Thank you :)) -- Female Founder World is the place to meet your business besties online and IRL. Join our online community and get alerts about upcoming events in your city: www.femalefounderworld.norby.live -- Links and resources Explore Blume: itsblume.com  Streak email CRM: www.streak.com 'Meet 100 People' by Pat Hedley Asana: Asana.com Rebuy Typeform Klaviyo  

The Come Up
Zach Blume — President of Portal A on 2006 Web Videos, the Wheelhouse Investment, and Building with Your Best Friends

The Come Up

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 65:18


This interview features Zach Blume, Co-Founder and President of Portal A.  We discuss how he built a 360 monetization strategy for an early Internet video series, launching one of the first branded content studios with his childhood friends, creating one of the most well-known and longest-running digital formats in YouTube Rewind, how Portal A ended up selling a minority stake to Brett Montgomery's Wheelhouse, why feeling like outsiders is central to their identity, and what's up next for the Portal A team.Subscribe to our newsletter. We explore the intersection of media, technology, and commerce: sign-up linkLearn more about our market research and executive advisory: RockWater websiteFollow us on LinkedIn: RockWater LinkedInEmail us: tcupod@wearerockwater.comInterview TranscriptThe interview was lightly edited for clarity.Chris Erwin:Hi, I'm Chris Erwin. Welcome to the Come Up, a podcast that interviews entrepreneurs and leaders.Zach Blume:We built a business model around it that included merchandise, ad revenue share, ticketed events, and sponsorships. And so we actually ran that show at a profit, even though it was early internet video web series. And the idea was to build an entertainment property on the web that could become multi-season, could eventually travel to TV, which it did. It later became a TV series called White Collar Brawlers. It was super experimental, and I would say, looking back on a fairly innovative for three guys who had really no idea what we were doing and had no training in any of this, we built an entertainment property on the internet that was profitable.Chris Erwin:This week's episode featured Zach Blume, Co-Founder and President of Portal A. So Zach grew up in Berkeley and had a self-described normal suburban life of sports and friends. Zach then went to University of Oregon to study political science and pursued an early career running local political campaigns in California. But an opportune moment reunited Zach, with his two childhood friends to create one of the internet's earliest digital series White Collar Brawlers.After some unexpected success, the friend trio then became the founding team for Portal A, an award-winning digital and branded content company. Some highlights of our chat include his 360 monetization strategy for one of the earliest internet video brands, what it takes to co-found a successful company with your friends, how they landed a strategic investment from Wheelhouse, why feeling like an outsider is central to their identity, and how they're building towards the next massive creator opportunity. All right, let's get to it. Zach, thanks for being on the Come Up podcast.Zach Blume:It's a pleasure to be here.Chris Erwin:From our conversation yesterday, amazingly, I believe this is your first podcast interview ever. Is that right?Zach Blume:It's true. A lot of interviews over the years. Some predating the podcast era, some during the podcast era, but I'm honored to be invited onto yours. I've listened to a bunch of episodes, and we'll see how it goes.Chris Erwin:Awesome. All right, so as is typical, let's rewind a bit before we get into the whole Portal A story, although it actually starts pretty early on. So why don't you tell us about where you grew up and what your childhood was like?Zach Blume:Yeah, I grew up in Berkeley, California, the son of two die-hard New Yorkers who had moved out to California. My dad was born in the Bronx. My mom was from Manhattan. They were part of the New York exodus to California, and I was the first kid in my family who grew up in California and, of all places, Berkeley, childhood filled with lots of sports and playing in the street and all that good stuff. And the really interesting tie to the Portal A story, obviously, is that I met my two co-founders when we were somewhere between four and five years old. The stories differ, but we met in kindergarten, and we're close friends basically since we were little kids and played a lot of basketball together growing up. And the court that we played basketball in was called Portal A, which eventually became the name of our company 25 years later. The founder story of Portal A is very tied up in the childhood story of all for all three of us. I live in Oakland now, so I didn't stray too far from home.Chris Erwin:Got it. I remember in doing a little bit of research for this episode, I was trying to look up Portal A parks around the US, and I kept finding some in Orange County, so I thought you were an NorC kid, but No, you're a NorCal kid.Zach Blume:I mean, I think if there's an opposite of Orange County, it would probably be Berkeley.Chris Erwin:That's probably right.Zach Blume:But the court was actually an El Cerrito, which is an adjacent town to Berkeley, and it still exists. It's still around, and we should probably go play some hoops over there, but we haven't for years.Chris Erwin:Yeah, that'd be fun. So I have to ask, what did your parents do?Zach Blume:My dad has a business background. He runs and, up until actually six months ago, ran an investment advisory firm helping individuals manage their investments. It was a small company, five to six employees, just a great business, really community based, all about relationships and helping people manage their life and their money. And yeah, it's taught me a lot about business growing up, for sure.My mom was a therapist. She's retired now. She was a private practice in Berkeley. They've known each other since they were 20. They actually both went to the Wright Institute, which was a psychology graduate school in Berkeley. My dad was a psychologist briefly for about six months before he went back into business. And my mom was a therapist for 25 years. It was an interesting mix of business and psychology growing up, for sure.Chris Erwin:Got it. And were there any siblings?Zach Blume:No siblings? I'm the only one and-Chris Erwin:Oh, only child. Okay.Zach Blume:Yeah, interestingly, five of my closest friends, all groomsmen at my wedding, were from that same kindergarten class where I met Nate and Kai, my two co-founders. So there's definitely been a brotherly nature of those relationships. And at this point, I kind of consider Nate and Kai almost like brothers. We've known each other for 35 years, and we've been in business together for over 12 years, so it's pretty deep. Those relationships run pretty deep.Chris Erwin:Was there a part of you early on where you thought you might go into business and finance or become an investment manager like your father?Zach Blume:So there was also a lot of political kind of conversation and learning in my house. I remember from a very early age, my dad, when I was like eight, he would try to sit me down and read the Sunday Weekend Review in the New York Times. And it was like torture for me. But I think it got in there somewhere.In college, I actually studied political science and, for years, worked in the political world after I graduated from school. And I really thought that was my path, and it was for many years. I worked on campaigns. I started managing campaigns. I worked for political communication shop in San Francisco for years. I kind of burned out on the world of politics. I've since been re-engaged in a lot of different ways. But when I burned out on politics, that's when I thought I was going to go into business.I left the political world, was studying to go to business school, doing all the GMAT prep, and that's when Nate and Kai came to me and said, "We should make a web series together." Because I had a three-month gap, and it sounded so fun. We had made some stuff together just for fun earlier on. And so, while I was studying for the GMAT, I joined Nate and Kai to make this web series in the early days of internet video. And that's kind of the origin story of where we are today is that that web series, it was called White Collar Brawler. It was totally weird and crazy and awesome, and it started us on our journey to where we are today.Chris Erwin:Got it. So going back even a bit further, I'm just curious because you met your co-founders, Nate and Kai, back when you were in kindergarten, as you said, four to five years old, when you were in middle school, or when you in high school, were you guys part of the theater club? Were you creating any types of videos for your classes? There's something about meeting people early in your childhood, particularly in digital media, that I think blossoms into different relationships. So was there any kind of through line early on where you were interested in media entertainment before getting into PoliSci, which as part of your early career?Zach Blume:Yeah, I think there definitely was for Nate and Kai. There was less so for me. So Nate and Kai started making, maybe not in high school, but in their college years, they both went to school on the East Coast. This is like 2003, 2004, 2005. They started making internet, video, and web series when they were in college. And Kai was a film major, so he had some training, and they started just playing a lot of comedic stuff earliest day pre-YouTube, so quick time player-type stuff.So yeah, high school, I'm not so sure college for sure for them, at least it started building. And then, right after college, the three of us, plus another friend, grabbed a flight to Hanoi, bought motorcycles in Vietnam, and traveled across the country, and we made a web series called Huge In Asia.So it was like a 30-episode comedy travel web series, kind of just chronicling our journey across Vietnam. And then, they went on, I had to come back to the States for some work, but they went on to Mongolia, China, Laos, all sorts of different countries across Asia. That's where it really started for us the idea that you could not be in the formal, either entertainment industry or advertising industry. You could buy a pretty shitty camera, have an idea, start producing content and build an audience. And that was 2006. So the interest in internet video as a medium really started there.Then we all went our separate ways, and all did kind of normal early career professional stuff, but that Huge in Asia as an idea and an adventure was really the starting point for us. So yeah, so I would say the interest in video and film and just the distribution of it online started college years, and then the year after, we went to Asia.Chris Erwin:Got it. So just to add some context here, because I think YouTube was founded around 2004, and then it was bought by Google around '05, '06 pretty shortly after founding. So when you're coming out of college, I think this is around a 2006 timeframe, as you noted, when you guys decided to go to Asia and to do this motorcycle tour, was there a goal of, "Hey, there's an explosion in internet video, we have a chance to build an audience and make money off of this?" Or was it just, "Hey, this seems like a really fun thing to do. We're just coming out of college, we're kind of this in this exploratory phase, we like spending time with one another, let's go do this and see what happens." When you were thinking from the beginning, what was the end goal of that project?Zach Blume:Much more the latter. I mean, it was purely experimental. It was all about the adventure. I think there was a sense that we were at the dawn of something new, and I think that YouTube, Vimeo, I mean all the other platforms in the investment of history at this point, but there was an explosion of internet video technology that was enabling people like us to start making stuff. So I think there was like a sense that something was happening. It definitely was not a money-making endeavor. In fact, it was the opposite. And it was really just to experiment and play and see where it took us.Looking back on it, 15 years later, 18 years later, whatever it is, I think it's 100% served its purpose. We got our feet wet. We started experimenting. We started learning what worked, what didn't work, what audiences responded to, what made us happy. It kind of gelled our relationship as young adults versus as kids. And we never would've known at the time, but it did 100% lead to Portal A, and that's to where we are now.Chris Erwin:Okay, yeah, I hear you. I think, looking back in retrospect, it was definitely a catalyst to the forming of Portal A and where you got to where you are today, but it wasn't because when you came back from that trip, it wasn't like, "Oh, let's found Portal A and let's get going." You actually entered into the political realm for two to three years before founding Portal A, right?Zach Blume:Yep. That was always my plan, and that was the career I was going to pursue for sure.Chris Erwin:So, but the seed had been planted, but yeah, in '06, for the next two years, you become a political campaign manager. What campaigns were you working on?Zach Blume:First campaign was a Congressional campaign in Southern California. That was actually my first job out of college. We got trounced by 22 points in a very heavily Republican district by Mary Bono, who was Sonny Bono's widow. We had a candidate that we really liked, and it was the 2006 election, so it was kind of the midway point or the later stages of, I guess, Bush's first term. And there was a ground swell of just whenever there's a presidential election, two years later, the other party is the one that's like kind of getting their grassroots organizing on.So it was definitely an exciting time. It was an exciting election year. I happened to work on a campaign that was in a... It was Palm Springs. It was like that area, heavily Republican area, but I learned so much, and I was running a third of the district, and I loved it. I loved organizing. I felt like I was on the right side of history and doing the right thing.That then led to this fellowship that I did called The Coro Fellowship. I met one of my best friends on the campaign who had done the Coro Fellowship, and it was a year-long fellowship in political and public affairs. Everybody listening to this podcast will never have heard of Coro, but in the political and policy world, it's well-known and well-regarded, and that was a great experience. I got exposure across a bunch of different sectors, including government, labor unions, business, nonprofits, et cetera.Out of that, I started managing a campaign for the California State Assembly in Richmond, California, with a candidate, Tony Thurmond, who is now the Superintendent of Public Education in California. So he's gone on to do pretty big things. He's an amazing guy.And that led me to work at Storefront Political Media, which was a political media and communication shop in San Francisco that, at the time, ran all of Gavin Newsom's campaigns. He was then the mayor of San Francisco, obviously, is now the governor of California.I ran the mayor's race in Houston, of all places, elected Annise Parker, who was the first lesbian mayor of a major American city. And she was a fantastic executive out in Houston and then had a bunch of different clients, including firefighters unions, individual candidates. Ultimately, I was working for a client that was leading initiatives that didn't necessarily align with my own political values. And that was part of what led me to say I was ready to move on from the world of politics. So it was a fantastic experience, I learned so much, but that's what kind of prompted me to want to go to business school, which is what I was going to do until Nate and Kai came along and said, "Let's make a web series."Chris Erwin:Yeah. When you were working on these political campaigns and also working with Storefront Political Media, which is a national communication media and PR firm, were you bringing some of your grassroots internet video tactics to help build community, to help build influence and sway some of these elections? Was that part of kind of some of the unique flavor that you brought to these teams?Zach Blume:For sure, I was definitely the internet guy at that shop. I mean, there were a couple of us, there was a couple of coworkers who were of my generation. This was just when kind of Facebook was becoming a powerful tool for communications pre-Instagram, pre all those other platforms we're familiar with now. I definitely brought my expertise in video and the distribution of content online to that work. It was an interesting time politically. It was just at the advent of the internet as a powerful communications tool for campaigns.Chris Erwin:So then you're considering going to business school, you take the GMAT.Zach Blume:I got halfway through the class, and White Collar Brawler, that series, came calling. It was all-consuming. It was so fun. And we produced the hell out of that show, and it got a lot of notoriety. We got a big write-up in the New York Times, like big-Chris Erwin:Give us the context for White Collar Brawler again. What exactly was that project, and what were you supporting?Zach Blume:The log line was basically what happens when you take office workers whose muscles have become dilapidated by sitting in front of a computer all day long and train them to become amateur boxers. It just so happened that the two White Collar workers that were the stars of the show were Nate and Kai. So it was very, kind of like meta, we were the creators, and Nate and Kai were also the stars.The experimental part of it was shooting and producing the series in real-time. So there was an experiential element to the show, meaning as Nate and Kai were training to become boxers, fans of the show could actually come out and train with them, run on the beach in San Francisco or go to a training session with a boxing coach. We had events happening throughout the course of the show. It eventually culminated in an actual fight, a licensed fight in Berkeley between Nate and Kai for the Crown. And we had, I think, 1500 people showed up to that site and paid tickets-Chris Erwin:Was it boxing, mixed martial arts? What was the actual thoughts?Zach Blume:No, just old-school boxing.Chris Erwin:Okay.Zach Blume:It was the real deal. And-Chris Erwin:I may have missed this in the beginning. Who funded this? What was the purpose of it?Zach Blume:It was partially self-funded. It was partially funded by a friend of ours who had sold, in the early internet days, had sold his tech company to Google in one of the early Google acquisitions. So he just privately financed, I mean, we're not talking about big dollars here, and we built a business model around it that included merchandise, ad revenue share, events, ticketed events, and sponsorships, which I was in charge of in addition to other things.And so we actually ran that show at a profit, even though it was just an early internet video web series. It was actually a profitable property, and the idea was to build an entertainment property on the web that could become multi-season, could eventually travel to TV, which it did. It later became a TV series called White Collar Brawlers. And so it was actually super experimental, and I would say, looking back on it, fairly innovative in terms of for three guys who had really no idea what we were doing and had no training in any of this, we built an entertainment property on the internet that was profitable.Back to the question, I mean, that's what distracted me from going to business school because I felt like, first of all, I was learning so much, I was having so much fun creating content with two friends, and you just had a feeling that we were onto something and we didn't know what that thing was. We thought we were going to be an original entertainment company that would just make shows like White Collar Brawler, but we knew there was something. We knew there was a lot of activity and interest in this space. And so that took up all my attention and then took up my attention for the next 12 years.Chris Erwin:I will say from personal experience it saved you a couple of hundred thousand dollars and a lot of agony of actually taking that test.Zach Blume:Right, exactly.Chris Erwin:And being two years out of the workforce, speaking from personal experience.Zach Blume:Right. I know, I know.Chris Erwin:So, okay. And look, this is interesting to think about how you guys, as a founding team, were gelling and coming together. When you guys started talking, "Let's do this White Collar Brawler show as a team," what was your specific role, Zach? What was it like? What are you going to focus on?Zach Blume:Yeah, I mean, it actually reflects the role that I now play and ended up playing when we turned White Collar Brawler into a business. So Nate and Kai are more on the creative side, the creative and production side, both had experience. They had both actually before me had left their kind of "normal jobs," moved to LA, and started making internet video with a vision for again, "We don't know what it is, but there's something going on here, and we want to be a part of it."They had background as almost as creators themselves and also some training, actually with the physical act of production. So Nate and Kai were always much more on the creative side and the production side. And then my role was kind of capital B business. I was responsible for sponsorships. I was responsible for the operations of the show. I was responsible for where we were going to have office space, all that type of stuff. Basically the business side of creativity, and that's the same today. I mean, it's kind of like, it was just a foreshadow of the roles that we ended up playing as we were growing Portal A. And we've always had a super clear and complementary division of labor.I would say when looking for business partners, I think that might be, I mean, your rapport and your ability to communicate is lots of things are really important, but making sure that each person, each principal has a clear role and that they actually like that role and can succeed in that role is I think one of the keys to business success. So we've always had very clear roles. We've always liked our roles and felt like we belonged where we were. That's how it started with White Collar Brawler.Chris Erwin:That's awesome. Yeah, I have to give you some real kudos because you take very early on in your career, and in the digital entertainment ecosystem, you take an IP concept, and you create a diversified, sustainable business model around it where you have revenue coming in from advertising, sponsorships, merch, ticket sales, that's what many different IP properties want to figure out today. And many struggle to do that.Zach Blume:The only we could've described it back then as well as you described it now, but yes, that's basically what it was.Chris Erwin:Yeah, you look around at one another, you have this culmination in a ticketed event where there's over 1500 people pay to see the fight between Nate and Kai. And so you guys look around at one another and say, "Hey, we got something here." Is the next step? Let's found a business, call it Portal A and start doing this at scale. Or did it kind of just naturally happen, saying, "All right, let's find the next project and see where it goes from there."Zach Blume:It was much more, again, the latter. I mean, we did know that there was something brewing; I gave ourselves, at the very least credit for that. Did not have a business model. We did not have a plan. We had a kind of a concept and an idea and a good partnership. And I think that was really important too, is just how well we worked together.When we came out of White Collar Brawler, we had this idea credit to Kai. I believe we really wanted to do a show about whiskey, that that was going to be our next piece of IP that we wanted to develop and the concept behind the show, again because we didn't want, we were just going to be doing original series built for internet video was basically a distillery tour type show, but with a twist where there would be a membership model involved. And for anybody who was in a... 99% of viewers would just watch the show for the entertainment value, any type of good travel show that built that type of audience. But 1% of viewers would subscribe to the show and get a drum of whiskey. For each distillery that we were visiting as part of the show, they would actually get samples in the mail, and it would be kind of a whiskey of the month model married to an entertainment property.And we were coming out of White Collar Brawlers, we were visiting distilleries, getting drunk, trying to figure out this model. And we were super hyped on it. We thought it was a really interesting way to monetize internet video through subscriptions. And we even got into the logistics of shipping, and we were really going down that path, and in the meantime, we were broke, we were like 25 years old and-Chris Erwin:That was my next question. How are you funding all of this?Zach Blume:Well, we paid ourselves an extremely nominal salary. I would call it a stipend when we were making White Collar Brawler enough to survive. And then, coming out of that, we were trying to do our whiskey show, but that stipend went away. So we were without income, really. I mean, I remember going to Bank of America at some point, and there was so little... This is one of our funny stories that we tell each other. I remember this parking lot moment where the three of us had gone to Bank of America, where we had this White Collar Brawler account, or maybe it's a Portal A account. I'm not sure. And there was, I think, less than $1000 in there, and it was one of those like, oh, shit-type moments, and I remember going out to the parking lot and being like to Nate and Kai because I was always kind of the rah-rah guy of the three of us. And just, I remember basically having to give a motivational speech about that we were going to be okay, that this is going to be okay, despite the fact that we had absolutely zero money in the bank.That was where we were at that point. We were trying to figure out this whiskey idea, and then all of a sudden, because of the popularity of White Collar Brawler and some big YouTube videos we had made to promote the series, we started getting some inbound interest from brands. And that was never in the plan. We would think about sponsorships on our original series from brands, but never creative service worked directly to brands, and our first phone call was-Chris Erwin:Explain that difference for the listeners. I think that's a good nuance.Zach Blume:Yeah, I mean, if there was a business model, the business model we were considering was building properties like White Collar Brawler that could be sponsored by, in the best-case scenario, Nike or by Everlast, the boxing company, or by Gatorade or that's who we were pursuing for what-Chris Erwin:So think of title cards and brought to you by et cetera.Zach Blume:Exactly. Or like sponsoring events or merchandise or all that type of stuff. And we had some success, not from the big brands, but we had some success on White Collar Brawler with sponsorships from more regional brands, or like there were some beer companies and some smaller merchandising startups that were part of the sponsorship mix.I will say that we sent out about 500 to 1000 sponsorship emails and got about five sponsors. So we worked hard at it. And so that was the model we were going to pursue even for something like the whiskey show. We were going to look for sponsors and brand sponsors in that way. We never thought we were going to build a creative services company, meaning brands, an advertising company effectively, like brands hiring us as a service provider to create content. That was never, ever something we thought about.We started getting these phone calls. I remember being in a car one time, and I got this random call from a number I did not know, and it turned out to be a marketing manager at the Gap. Her name was Sue Kwon. Shout out, Sue Kwon, if you're out there. She was our first real client after White Collar Brawler. And we started making videos for the Gap, as kind of like a little agency production company.Then we got some more calls. There was a Tequila company that wanted us to make a web series called Tres Agaves Tequila. They wanted us to make a web series shot in Mexico about the origins of Tequila. Then we got a call from Jawbone, which was a hot Bluetooth speaker company at the time-based in the Bay Area. They wanted us to make a music video featuring a bunch of early YouTube influencers or creators.So we started getting these, we called them gigs at the time because literally all we were trying to do is pay our rent and so we could make the whiskey shows. We were just trying to get a little bit of income coming in so we could actually go out and make our dream whiskey show. And there were fun projects, and we weren't making advertising. We were making content, and that was a big difference for us. We weren't making pre-roll ads or 30-second ads. We were making web series for brands and music videos for brands and all that type of stuff. And without knowing it, we kind of stumbled across an area that was in high demand, which was brands trying to figure out what to do on platforms like YouTube and social media with video. We had established ourselves as understanding that world.So that's the origin of our branded content business which became the core of our business for many, many years was just one-off phone calls, unexpected phone calls, taking projects as gigs to pay the bills, and just kind of doing our best and seeing where it led.Chris Erwin:Hey listeners, this is Chris Erwin, your host of the Come Up. I have a quick ask for you if you dig what we're putting down. If you like the show, if you like our guests, it would really mean a lot if you can give us a rating wherever you listen to our show, it helps other people discover our work, and it also really supports what we do here. All right, that's it, everybody. Let's get back to the interview.What was the moment where you felt it evolved from, "Hey, it's the three of us rotating between gigs, hiring freelancers as need be, to what became a business, which is called a systematized and efficient way to deliver consistent quality around a good or service."Zach Blume:I think the first year was the gig model. It was just a patchwork of projects in order to generate some form of income. The second year it started to feel real. There started to be a fairly steady flow of inbound interests, and then a kind of something we be started to become known for a type of content. It was kind of humorous, entertaining, felt like it was native to the internet and to YouTube.I think in that second year was when it started to feel like a business, and then some light clicked for me that we actually needed to do some business planning and thinking, and I had no idea what I was doing. I mean zero, negative. Negative idea what I was doing. But I had grown up where my dad was a small business owner, so I had some exposure, but I just remember being it was just like a vast sea of unknown principles and requirements that I had to navigate.Chris Erwin:How did you figure that out? Did you put together an advisory board? Did you call your dad? Were you calling some other friends in business?Zach Blume:One of our earliest advisors was not a business advisor. He was our sensei in some forms in the earliest days. And this is another shout-out to Steve Wolf, who you may know, who was on the executive team of Blip, which was one of those many early internet video platforms. He really helped us understand the space.We did not have a formal advisory board. We did not have a board. And it was truly trial and error. That's the best way I can describe it. It was just using our brains and figuring things out through mistakes and successes. It is a total blur looking back on it, but I think we were a good partnership. We had our heads screwed on straight, and we kind of learned how to operate.Chris Erwin:Another important part, too, is, like you said, when you all looked at your bank account, and everyone's face went white, but you were the rah-rah guy, which is like, "Hey, guys, we're going to figure this out. Where there's a will, there's a way." And I think that's a very important role. Shout to Steve Wolf. He was one of the execs that oversaw the AwesomenessTV network when I was there in 2014, 2015 timeframe. Super sharp guy, OG in the digital space. So not surprised to hear that he was a valuable advisor to you.All right, so then I think there's another pretty big moment where your business takes an even bigger step up. And I think this has to do with becoming the official partner for the YouTube Rewind project. The moment where you felt, "Okay, we're really onto something here."Zach Blume:Yeah, it was coincidental. We were introduced to somebody at YouTube in 2011 as a three-person team that was making internet video content and mostly on YouTube. And Rewind was just a twinkle of an idea. I mean, it was like there was a minor budget. It was basically a countdown of the top videos of the year. The budget was, I think, $20,000 in the first year to make Rewind. And we shot it in a small studio location. It was one of our earliest projects, and it was before Rewind became Rewind, the big thing that many of us are familiar with. It was a major validator for us to start working with YouTube directly as a client. And Rewind eventually became a project that defined our growth for many, many years to come. But it started very, very small.Chris Erwin:From that project. You've been around for now for 12 years, being founded around 2010. What did the growth in scaling part of your business looks like? With YouTube Rewind and other marquee projects, you're starting to get a sense of what are we actually building towards. Was there a point of view there or like, "Hey, we have inbound interests, we're working with brands and advertisers," all of a sudden we're working with publishers, and were you just kind of being more reactive or was it a mix of being reactive and proactive?Zach Blume:The best analogy I can draw is to kind of riding a wave. This may resonate with you, but I don't think we knew what was around the next corner or what the next thing was going to look like. We were just building momentum in those early years and taking each project as it came. We knew we had something. We knew we had a good partnership. We knew we were starting to bring some really interesting, smart people to the team, clients that were really willing to push some boundaries. And I was learning as I went along how to run a business, and Kai was learning, and Nate was learning how to create amazing content, and there was not a lot of foresight. It was mostly about riding a wave and seeing where the wave took us. Then doing a really good job. That was really important because every project, the success or not success for the project kind of dictated what the next chapter was going to look like.So we just focused on trying to build some good fundamentals for the business, trying to make sure we were profitable because we had to be and just making work that we were proud of. That's the extent of our planning, I think, was just what did the next three months look like and how do we keep riding this wave?Chris Erwin:Yeah, and that's something I think worth emphasizing for the listeners where it's, so often people will say you have to be super strategic in planning every single move and where is their white space and how are you going to beat out your competitors to get it? But I think when you are building a small business, and this is something that I reeducate myself on consistently with RockWater, it's really about the basics, which is know your core service offering and nail it and delight clients, from there, that's really the core foundation from where you grow and where other things can emerge. And I think that's a testament to really what you guys have done for well over a decade is you know your lane, and you operate so effectively within it that is now, over the past few years, created some other really exciting opportunities for you, your success in your lane led to the investment by Wheelhouse a couple of years back. So how did that come to be? Because I think that's a pretty big moment for the company.Zach Blume:That fast-forward a bit over years of misery and happiness and everything in between. We threw ourselves entirely into growing Portal A for the bulk of our 20s. It was all-encompassing, tons of sacrifices that were made to other parts of our lives, which I'm okay with looking back. I do think that 20s are a good time to throw yourself and just be completely focused and passionate about something like this. And we built that branded business. We diversified the type of clients we were working with. Projects got bigger and bigger, Rewind got bigger, and all the rest of our projects got bigger.Starting around 2016, we wanted very badly to return to the original thesis of Portal A, which was creating an original entertainment properties for the web. That's where it all started. And we had spent so many years working with brands, and it was fantastic, and it was a good business, and we got to make really cool stuff. But we had this hunger to return to the kind of to our entertainment roots in some ways. And we're not talking at that point about TV shows on broadcast, but about entertainment that was built for internet consumption.So we started taking steps back in that direction. As we were continuing to grow the branded business and expand in that area, we were committing ourselves to the original entertainment dream and started making shows horribly oversimplified what it took to actually start doing that again. But we started making shows again. We kept the branded business running and growing. And-Chris Erwin:When you started making shows, were you deficit-financing these yourself? So you were developing them internally and then taking them out as a slate to pitch and sell? Or were these being funded by other digital and streaming platforms that were going to put this content on their channels?Zach Blume:We were developing them internally, as a kind of a traditional development arm, and then taking them out to streaming and digital buyers. We were not doing the White Collar Brawler model, where we were building properties completely independently. So we did kind of slot in a little bit more into back into the entertainment ecosystem versus building our own properties, which that could be a whole separate conversation about the drawbacks and the benefits of that.So we were finding our way to making original series, again, we hired ahead of originals a guy named Evan Bregman, who's now at Rooster Teeth who's a good friend. And we started kind of trying to build that business again, and eventually, we started to feel like the branded business was running really well and growing year over year. We felt in order to take the next step forward on the entertainment side of our business. We needed a partner.So we had been a completely independent entire course of our trajectory. We were running a really good business at the time. It was very profitable, and the growth trajectory was really attractive, I think to outsiders. And so we started taking meetings with potential partners with the idea of strategically aligning ourselves to somebody who could level us up. We weren't looking for a sale. We were looking for truly a strategic partner.Chris Erwin:Were you running a formal process here where there was a mandate of, "We seek a strategic partner, we're going to take meetings over the next two months?" Or was it, "Hey, these relationships that we create in the industry, we got some inbounds, let's take these meetings with perhaps a little bit more intent than we would've a couple of years ago."Zach Blume:It was not a formal process in the sense that we had a banker or some advisor who was guiding us through it. But it was a process in that it was fairly intentional. Remember sitting down with Nate and Kai and listing out the players in the original entertainment world, whether that was individuals or production companies, mostly who we think would be good partners for us, and starting to navigate through our network to see who would be interested in talking. And the thing that I've found, especially in that period, which was 2017, '18 was when we were starting to have those conversations, it was a pretty hot period for digital media. I think there was a lot of consolidation going on. Our experience was once we started having a couple of those conversations, and people started to see our numbers and see the fact that we were running an actually profitable business that was growing year over year.It just like word got out, and it was a little bit of a domino. And so I just remember over the course of 2017, 2018, we took like 15 or 20 strategic meetings with potential strategic partners. Again, not running it through a banker or anything like that, but just kind of word of mouth. And it was a really interesting experience, and learned a lot about ourselves and about the space. And we just really clicked with Brent Montgomery and Ed Simpson, who were, at the time they, had sold their TV production company to ITV and they were working at ITV at the time but starting to think about what their post-ITV move was going to be, which would eventually become Wheelhouse and just to immediate connection with both of them on a personal and kind of business level.To them, we looked like a really smart partner. They felt like a really smart partner to us. And that's how that started. And there were other conversations going on at the time, but Brent and Ed and eventually Wheelhouse always felt like the right fit for us.Chris Erwin:From that first meeting with Wheelhouse, did they indicate in the room, "Hey, we want to do a deal, we're going to make an offer," or did it take a while to get there?Zach Blume:Well, this story I always tell about Ed, who everybody should know, Ed Simpson, he's an amazing guy, is that within five minutes of our first meeting he asked us, "Are you Butellas?" And I was floored. I was like-Chris Erwin:Gets right to the point.Zach Blume:I was like, we just shook hands. We were just getting to know each other, but I think honestly it's a testament to directness, and I think that actually really helped was kind of just getting our cards on the table from early days. And I think from the beginning. It was clear that Ed and Brent were looking for their first partners. Brent is also like no BS. He knows what he wants, he goes out and gets it, and the intent for an investment, a partnership of some sort, was clear from the very beginning. The eventual process took very long.Chris Erwin:How long was that process?Zach Blume:I think the timeframe from offer letter or LOI to signed paperwork was about a year. But I think there was a six-month or eight-month, even maybe even a full-year courtship before that. So the whole process from first meeting with Ed, where he asked us what our EBITDA was after shaking his hand, to signing paperwork and then collapsing on the floor because we were so exhausted was maybe year and a half, two years.Chris Erwin:Yeah. It always takes longer than people expect.Zach Blume:Yeah. It's incredible. And there were multiple points where that deal almost fell completely apart. In fact, I was sure it was done. It was toast. And what I've learned from other founders that I've talked to that have done deals, whether it's a sale or a minority investment or some sort of strategic partnership like this, is every time there's a deal, it almost fails twice or three times or more.It's just in the nature of things when there's two negotiators that there's going to be some moments of staring into the abyss. And I actually haven't heard of a deal that hasn't had that. So I learned that, in retrospect, at the time, they were hugely existential moments because we had put so much time and energy, and money into making this happen and having the deal almost fell apart multiple times was, it was really intense.Chris Erwin:Yeah. After having been a part of many M&A and capital raising processes throughout my career before RockWater when I was a banker, and then also at Big Frame, where I hired my old investment bank to represent us in a sale to Awesomeness backed by DreamWorks. And then at RockWater now, there's so many variables. You have different business models, you have different team cultures, you have leadership, you have investors, and to align on, are we working towards the same mission? Do we want the same thing in the future? Do we want the same thing now when we integrate? Where are we complementary? Will we actually succeed combined, or there alternative ways to do this? And I think it really is a special thing. We read a lot of deal headlines in the trade, so everyone thinks like, "Oh, deals get done all the time, it's easy."For all those headlines of the success, there's many, many more instances where deals have fallen apart that we don't hear about. I think the best thing that you guys had, Zach, was your BATNA, your Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement, but also your leverage. You had a profitable independent business. It was you, Zach, and Kai as the founders. You were growing, and you were profitable, and you could sustain with a partner or without a partner. And essentially, that led to a great deal for you guys. So it's awesome to say.Zach Blume:Yeah, it's true. I mean, we were not trying to parachute at our business in any stretch. We weren't trying to sell to then do an arm out to then leave. We were trying to level up, and I agree it was our ability to walk was good leverage for us, but we really wanted to do it because we really had committed ourselves to making this type of strategic move. I think it's very different when you're trying to capitalize on a moment in exit versus when you're trying to make an actual partnership to take the next step up in a business. And we just weren't ready to, and we still aren't ready to sunset Portal A.This is becoming our life's work. We are committed. We are always kind of doubling down on our commitment. Sometimes I can't believe I've been doing this for 12 years. It's unbelievable. And I hope that we do it for many, many, many, many, many more years.Chris Erwin:You found your magnum opus in the first company that you founded pretty rare and pretty incredible, right?Zach Blume:Yeah. I mean it's amazing, but it also puts a lot of pressure on that to fulfill a lot of parts of your being and or your professional desires. When you're focused on one thing for so long, as opposed to a lot of entrepreneurs who kind of jump or leapfrog from one thing to the next. We've had to come to grips with the fact that this is our baby, and it's continuing to be our baby. And it's a long play. It's a long run.Chris Erwin:This is actually a good segue to think about how this business is fulfilling to you, kind of over the past couple of years, some key changes that you've made of, how you're rewarding some of your most prominent team members, elevating them to partner and then thinking about what you want to grow into. So let's get into that. I look at your business. In your 20s, it was kind of the freshman segment of Portal A really starting to become into a real business. Then in your 30s, it's kind of like the sophomore years where you're starting to scale up and start to realize some pretty incredible success. And now you've got this incredible foundation.So not to aid you in front of everyone, but I think you and the founding team are entering your 40s over the next year or two years or so, entering the junior and senior years of your business. And for you guys to continue to be excited and fulfilled, tell us about some of the recent moves that you've made at the company and then where you want to go. What does that look like?Zach Blume:It's a great question. I wonder what happens after the junior and senior year sets. We're definitely at a different life stage, just on a personal level, then we were when we were on the treadmill moving 100 miles per hour in our 20s and in the kind of like the first half of Portal A and the deal with Wheelhouse was definitely like a marker, or maybe it was the dividing line between the freshman and sophomore era as you put it.First of all, I mean the last couple of years have been crazy, the pandemic, the election in 2020, there's been a lot of volatility in the world over the last few years, but what we're trying to do in the face of that volatility and kind of coming out of the Wheelhouse partnership, which again marked a new chapter for us is, create A on the business side sustainability and kind of consistency. And we've been able to do that. I mean, we've been profitable, consistent from a numbers perspective for many years, but it definitely felt for many years, we were running on a treadmill trying to keep up.And over the last several years, we've been trying to do as we enter into new periods of our lives personally, as we bring other people into the business as partners is create a business that doesn't feel like you're about to gasp for air and collapse at the end of every year, but actually create something that's sustainable and supports other parts of our lives that are really important to us. Family, having kids, all that type of stuff.I think on the business side, it's like, and I think we've done this over the last several years, but how do we move from sprinting to running at a good pace and building something that feels sustainable over the course of the next chapter of our lives as our lives change. And that's been really important, and you mentioned this, but bringing, we brought four new partners into the business. Our head of production, our head of business operations, our managing director, and our head of talent partnerships all had been with us for five to seven years each. And we made them partners a couple of years ago.We've invested in our team in a way that we always try to take care of people, but we truly doubled down on that over the last several years so that people feel like they're working at a place that they can work at for many years and feel very taken care of and part of a community, et cetera.Chris Erwin:Quick question on partnership front. So when you elevate these individuals to partners, does that mean there's a compensation bump but is also a bigger voice at the table for bigger strategic decisions for the company? What is the value exchange for that?Zach Blume:They went from kind of executives to partners. I mean, they're always executives, and I think what a partnership means is they participate in the profitability of the company. They participate in an exit. If there is a future, another deal on the horizon, they would have a stake in that. And then they have visibility into all aspects of the business and a seat at the table for really important business decisions around the type of work we take on, the type of things we invest in, the vision that we lay out for the company, the priorities for the year or for the next few years, et cetera.So it's been incredible, and I think it was a big moment. It was always Nate, Kai, and I sitting in a room, staring at each other's faces and trying to figure things out. And to bring in Robyn, Emma, Elyse, and Brittani, they're all so incredibly smart and powerful in their own ways, and it's just made our decision-making much more thoughtful, multifaceted, strategic, and I think intelligent, that group of three became a group of seven. That's been a major milestone and moment for us.So that was a big part of things. And investing in our team and doubling down on the team's wellness and creating a pace of work that was sustainable, not working over Thanksgiving, all that type, taking long breaks, giving days, all sorts of steps we've taken over the last several years to make Portal A sustainable business entity over many years.So that's number one in terms of what this chapter looks like. And I think number two is we just want to make good shit. At the end of the day, when we put ourselves in the future and try to look back on what will feel most valuable about this whole experience, what we make because we are a creative company is at the top of the list. So investing in the quality of the work that we do, investing in projects that may not be the most profitable or they may even not be profitable at all, but that are important to us creatively experimenting in new content formats, longer form, feature-length type stuff, short film, all sorts of getting back to kind of our roots in some ways as experimental content producers and investing in the quality of the work that we're making either on the original side of the business or on the brand side of the business that has become kind of central to our whole vision and identity is just this relentless commitment to quality.Chris Erwin:I want to touch on that because when we were preparing for this interview, something that we spoke about was, yeah, your commitment to creative quality and craft. Sometimes that is undervalued, sometimes that feels like it's going against the grain, and like you said, Zach, maybe there's a near-term impact where these new IP concepts, they're not profitable immediately, but there's actually long-term value to it where adherence to that mission keeps the leadership and founding team galvanized and fulfilled. It also keeps your business exciting for new team members that you want to recruit, building towards future opportunity where there can be much more meaningful revenues to generate in the future.So that's hard to do when you face kind of the near-term headwinds of those decisions, but you got to be steadfast in that it's clearly worked for you guys for over 12 years, and I think that that's just an important reminder that this is a founding value of our company and that's what's going to continue to drive long term success for the next 10, 20 plus years.Zach Blume:Everything you just said, I would like you to come speak to our company, and we can all talk about it together. I mean, that's exactly where we are at. What we'll define the next five, 10, however many years of this adventure will be the quality of the work that we're making. I don't want to speak too soon, and I'm going to knock on wood, but I feel like we've cracked the code on how to run this business well and how to find good people, take care of our people, take care of ourselves, find our lane and operate really well in our lane. And what's going to define the next chapter is how good is the stuff we're making. Is it something we're proud of? And that's both from a kind of, almost like, a spiritual or existential level, but it does layer back to business because we believe what will differentiate us is the quality of the work that we're creating. And so it will lead to new opportunity and new horizons when we're making really good stuff.Chris Erwin:Last one or two questions before we get into rapid fire and we close out here is, are there any current projects that you're working on or things that you're thinking about that maybe are good signals to the listeners of the type of things that you're going to be doing more of going forward?Zach Blume:One really interesting one is completely different from a lot of the work that people may know us for, but my partner Nate is developing a feature documentary. We've done one feature-length documentary, we did it with YouTube original called State of Pride, all about the origins and the genesis of Pride festivals across the country. And it's a beautiful film called State of Pride. It's on YouTube. Nate did a really cool, together with Portal A, did a really cool 30-minute documentary in 2020 about the response from the Trump administration to the first year of COVID.So we've definitely played with longer-form documentary projects. This project is called Fault Lines, and it is a longer-formed feature documentary about housing in America and about the shortage of housing in America, which is driving up housing costs for everybody. Kind of like the deep backstory on where that all comes from.No brands associated with that project. It's going to be financed by foundations and private funders, but we're really excited about it, and it's that kind of getting back to telling interesting stories, experimenting with new formats. It's not going to be the core of our business for the next several years, but we are going to be investing in those types of projects where we can kind of make a name for ourselves in new spaces.And then, of course, we're doing all sorts of cool stuff with our brand partners like big, splashy campaigns that are coming out later this year that I shouldn't talk about yet, but doing a lot of work with Target and Google and we have long-standing partners at Lenovo, the computer maker and all sorts of cool branded stuff. We have original shows in the pipeline.So I think the business mix for us is branded content. Again, nothing that we make should ever feel like a commercial, and if it does, we've failed ourselves and our partners. So content that is made in partnership with brands feels like something you'd actually want to watch. That's one pillar. The second pillar is original series. We just released Level Up, which is a show on Snapchat starting Stephen Curry mentoring a new generation of athletes. So there's all sorts of series like that that we're working on.Then this new area, which is short films, documentary feature films that we're investing in as a loss leader, like truly a loss leader, but as a way to diversify the type of content we're making and invest in quality like I was just talking about.Chris Erwin:That's great. You guys are doing a lot. Last quick question before rapid fire, how would you succinctly describe how your leadership philosophy has evolved now, being, call it 12 years into the Portal A business?Zach Blume:When you're building something, especially for us, we started from zero. We didn't come from the space. We didn't have any relationships. It was completely homegrown and organic. When you're building something, it's like you're captaining a tiny little ship in very rocky waters, and it is survival in some ways. I mean, it's both like I'm just picturing someone on the deck of a little dinghy in the middle of the ocean, just like yelling and surviving and getting thrown all over the place, and you're just trying to survive and make it through the first few years. And I think that was in many ways what leadership, just getting through the choppy waters and trying to grow and survive, was what it looked like for many years in the early days of growing our company.I think now that we've made it through those choppy waters and kind of established ourselves and built something that has a foundation underneath it. I really focus on sustainability and vision. And so that means creating an environment where people can be fulfilled creatively in terms of the people that they work with in terms of the pace of the work, both for the team that works with us and also for us, for ourselves. So creating that kind of a rhythm that feels not like you're like a tiny boat in a gigantic ocean and just trying to survive, but that feels steady and sustainable and solid. So creating that kind of consistency and strength, and that's one side of it. And then, for many years, it was just eat what you killed. And that was so many years of growing the company.Now it's like, "Okay, who do we want to be and who are we and who do we want to be?" And I think I spend so much time thinking about that and then communicating that back to the team and then repeating it over and over and over and over again and giving people something that they can understand and hold onto and feel like they're working toward a common cause has become so much more important now than it was when we were just basically in survival mode. So I think, yeah, sustainability and vision have become the most important pieces.Chris Erwin:I love that. Very well said, Zach. All right, so last segment from me giving you a bit of kudos at the end of this interview. Look, a lot of the people that I interview on the show, I've known for years, if not decades or more. I've actually interviewed people that I've known for over 30 years on this show. I've really only gotten to know you over the past. I think like two to three months through a handful of conversations. But I will say some of the kudos is it feels like I've known you a lot longer than that. I think we have a really shared sensibility, and I think that that's a testament to in this space.What I really like about being at the intersection of digital and entertainment is that there's just some really good people in it. And I think that's not the same from a lot of other industries that I've worked in. And I think you really embody that spirit. I think you really care about your people. I think you really care about your clients and your team and your partners, and that's really valuable. And I can even sense that in what the audience isn't hearing in between these segments is I really just love that note, how you are like the rah-rah spirit for your team. You've even been that for me, talking me up about me as a podcast host and supporting our content work where I'm going through a bit of my own existential crisis with RockWater on, I can feel that very positive energy from you, and I think that makes you a very, very, very compelling leader.Lastly, just to reiterate one of the points I made earlier, you have this extreme focus on your core service and product and on your team and doing right by your client partners. And I think that is actually shows incredible strategic focus and vision versus some really complex framework for how Portal A is going to take over the entire digital entertainment ecosystem with 10 different business models. You guys have nailed your core, and it's given you so much opportunity for what I define as the very exciting junior and senior years that are going to come for you. So massive kudos to you and the team for what you've built exemplary, and I look forward to many more conversations in the future.Zach Blume:Thank you. It feels like you understand us, and I really appreciate that. So thank you for that.Chris Erwin:For sure. Easy to do. All right, so to the rapid-fire, I'm going to ask six questions and the rules or as follows, you'll provide short answers. Maybe just one sentence, maybe just one to two words. Do you understand the rules, Zach?Zach Blume:Yes, I do.Chris Erwin:Okay, cool. All right, first one, proudest life moment.Zach Blume:Birth of my daughter.Chris Erwin:What do you want to do less of in 2022?Zach Blume:Worrying about the state of our union?Chris Erwin:Okay, what do you want to do more of?Zach Blume:Making work that we are proud of and stands the test of time.Chris Erwin:One to two things drive your success?Zach Blume:Focus and commitment, and loyalty.Chris Erwin:Okay, last three here. Advice for media execs going into the second half of this year and 2023.Zach Blume:Brace yourselves. I mean, I don't want to fear monger or create an atmosphere of angst or anxiety, but I definitely can see that there are headwinds ahead and many of us have been through these periods before, and we can make it through, but it's definitely a time to focus on fundamentals and be aware of your costs and brace yourselves for what could be a choppy period.Chris Erwin:Yeah, well said. Any future startup ambitions?Zach Blume:Not beyond what we're doing. I mean, if there's ever sunset to Portal A, I would love to get involved again in the political world. And we've done a lot of political work over the years through Portal A but at the moment, continuing to double down on what we're building.Chris Erwin:Got it. The easy final one for you. How can people get in contact with you?Zach Blume:I don't know, old school email, I mean, really old school, I guess, would be a landline, but email Zach, Z-A-C-H@portal-a.com, or you can find me on LinkedIn, but that sounds really lame, so just send me an email.Chris Erwin:Okay. I think LinkedIn is great.Zach Blume:No, I love Linkedin, but I just don't want to be the guy hawking his LinkedIn profile.Chris Erwin:Got it. All right, Zach, that's it. Thanks for being on the Come Up podcast.Zach Blume:It's been a pleasure, Chris. It's a great service to the digital media, community and world and really appreciated being here.Chris Erwin:All right, quick heads up that our company has a new service offering. We just introduced RockWater Plus, which is for companies who want an ongoing consulting partner at a low monthly retainer, yet also need a partner who can flex up for bigger projects when they arise. So who is this for? Well, three main stakeholders. One, operators who seek growth and better run operations. Two, investors who need help with custom industry research and diligence. And three, leadership who wants a bolt-on strategy team and thought partner.So what is included with RockWater Plus? We do weekly calls to review KPIs or any ad hoc operational needs. We create KPI dashboards to do monthly performanc

covid-19 america tv music american relationships new york family university california founders money community president donald trump thanksgiving business google china interview internet starting leadership strategy media sports vision entrepreneur college pr growth comedy state mexico advice new york times san francisco video digital friend project career opportunities co founders brothers government creator pride management sales brand partner development wellness creative oregon startups finance influencers congress basketball clients bank original political sacrifice humor executives partnership web target republicans vietnam states series bs investment commitment southern california documentary childhood manhattan videos negative crown scale adult experiments commerce bush snapchat pl apple podcast sustainable advertising therapists roi logo projects oakland funding bay area boxing richmond east coast ip bronx berkeley leverage portal creators merch advisor produce firm level up gap orange county congressional tequila palm springs freelancers brotherhood best friends bluetooth superintendents gavin newsom kpis vimeo new yorkers influencer marketing kpi mongolia itv come up adulthood merchandise gatorade dreamworks laos rewind stephen curry gigs branded thesis lenovo monetization public education awesomeness hanoi loi blume norcal ebitda coro blip upstart white collar rooster teeth fault lines jawbone branded content wheelhouse california state assembly everlast sonate sonny bono gmat digital video poli sci norc batna el cerrito wright institute awesomenesstv steve wolf annise parker tony thurmond mary bono daniel tureck
What's in a Song
Hit songwriter Jason Blume on Writing unforgettable melodies, techniques from the hits and creating your own luck

What's in a Song

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 112:17


My guest today is hit songwriter Jason Blume.  He was Brittany Spears first co-writer and has gone on to have more than 50 million album sales with singles on Billboard's pop , country and R&B charts with songs recorded by Britney Spears, the backstreet boys, the oak ridge boys, K-pop and J-pop artists and many more.  His songs have appeared on Emmy winning shows and you can hear Jason's songs all over film and television.  Jason is a writer with the heart of a teacher and I can't wait for you to hear him talk about writing unforgettable melodies and the techniques fond in hit songs.  Jason shares his story on his road to becoming a successful writer and how to create your own luck, cowriter splits, copyrighting your song and writing for a large audience,  how he has only had two hit songs that weren't rewritten and so much more!Show take aways:The most important tool in writing a melody is repetition.Write singable, memorable melodies The rhythm of your melody is a power toolCreating a surprisePay your duesMake your own luckBe flexibleRewrite!!!!!!!!http://www.jasonblume.comhttps://www.scarletkeys.comhttps://www.instagram.com/scarletkeysofficial/https://www.amazon.com/Craft-Songwriting-Music-Meaning-Emotion/dp/0876391927/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2PP55NU6E9ST6&keywords=the+craft+of+songwriting&qid=1659573139&sprefix=the+craft+of+songwritin%2Caps%2C153&sr=8-1Engineer: Peter Sykes https://www.petersykesmusic.comThe show's theme song "What's in a Song" was co-written with Otto GrossRecorded and performed by Otto Gross: @OttoGrossProduction (instagram)@OttoGrossMusic (Youtube, facebook, TikTok)https://biglink.to/ottogrossmusic 

Practicing Catholic Show
What's New from the Office of Vocations? (with Fr. David Blume)

Practicing Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 13:08


We are truly blessed in our Archdiocese to witness the fruits of many men responding to the call to the priesthood. Maybe you or another Catholic you know is starting to really consider the call. What do you do next? Providentially, our Archdiocesan Office of Vocations has some tantalizing events coming up that are just the ticket! Fr. David Blume, Director of the Office of Vocations, is joining us today to fill us in on what's been happening this fall, and how you can get involved moving forward. https://www.10000vocations.org/

CODE OF CREATIVITY
#75 Lea Oberhofer - Hoteliere des Hotels Sensoria Dolomites

CODE OF CREATIVITY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 53:37


Aus dem Ritterhof wird das Sensoria Dolomiten Hotel, Lea hat das Hotel Ihrer Eltern in 8 Monaten umgewandelt: ein Mammutprojekt. Doch mit Ihrer Leichtigkeit des Seins schafft sie es nicht nur, für sich Mikromomente zu schaffen, in denen Sie auftankt, sondern hat auch den Anspruch, das Gleiche für Ihre Gäste zu kreieren, um alle Sinne anzusprechen. Die Seele muss berührt werden! So ist eine Südtiroler Oase entstanden. „Liebe Lea, was bin ich berührt von Deiner, Eurer Familiengeschichte. Ihr habt etwas Großartiges geschaffen. Mit so viel positivem Mut und Durchhaltevermögen - dafür hast Du meinen ganzen Respekt. Ich bewundere Dich und wünsche Dir von Herzen, dass das Hotel Sensoria wunderschön aufgeht wie eine Blume, die ewig blüht. Hab‘ Dank für dieses Gespräch.“

Noget Ved Musikken
Afsnit 36: Blaue Blume, Joakim Berg, Coolio, Kurt Vile, Kleo & FR Airplay Top 20 - 5/10-96

Noget Ved Musikken

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:22


I denne uges afsnit af Noget Ved Musikken ser vi på hvorfor mange store musikere er begyndt at sælge rettighederne til deres eget materiale. Vi anbefaler musik fra Kents tidligere forsanger Joakim Berg, amerikanske Kurt Vile og spritnye tracks fra danske Blaue Blume og Kleo. Og så tager vi et kig på en fransk airplayhitliste fra oktober 1996. Derudover kommer vi med en lille hyldest af rapperen Coolio som desværre er gået bort i en alder af 59 år, vi diskuterer om det stadig er cool at sidde omvendt på en stol, vi mindes åbningskoncerten af Michael Jacksons HIStory World Tour i Prag, vi snakker gamle reklamer for marmelade og så prøver vi at finde ud af, hvad en tyrolerkrop er og hvad pokker det har med Elvis Presley at gøre.

Handelsblatt Today
Opec-Deal könnte Benzin und Heizöl teurer machen – und Inflation befeuern / US-Konzerne vergrößern Abstand auf Europa

Handelsblatt Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 41:59


Das Öl-Kartell drosselt ab November die Förderung. Damit verhärten sich die Fronten zwischen dem Westen und den Ölexporteuren. Leidtragende sind Verbraucher und Unternehmen. Die Öl-Allianz Opec Plus will ab November bis zu zwei Millionen Barrel pro Tag weniger fördern. Die Entscheidung fiel am Mittwoch bei einem Treffen in Wien – bei dem auch der russische Energieminister Alexander Nowak anwesend war. Er gilt als treibende Kraft hinter der Produktionskürzung. Die Ölexporteure gehen angesichts der Abkühlung der Weltwirtschaft von einer geringeren Nachfrage in Rezessionszeiten aus und wollen mit den Förderkürzungen proaktiv den Ölpreis stabilisieren. Allerdings könnte der Schritt die Energiepreiskrise vor allem in Europa verschärfen, die Inflation anheizen und womöglich die Notenbanken dazu veranlassen, länger an einer straffen Geldpolitik festzuhalten, was wiederum eine drohende Rezession verstärken und verlängern würde. Handelsblatt-Rohstoffexperte Jakob Blume glaubt, dass der Deal dem Opec-Plus-Mitglied Russland höchstwahrscheinlich dabei hilft, die Auswirkungen der Preisobergrenze für russisches Öl abzumildern. Diese hatten die G7-Industrieländer ebenfalls am Mittwoch auf den Weg gebracht. „Die Opec Plus ist den geplanten Sanktionen des Westens zuvorgekommen und Russland ist derzeit einer der größten Profiteure des Deals“, sagt Blume in der neuen Folge von Handelsblatt Today. Die Entscheidung des Öl-Kartells steht den westlichen Interessen entgegen: Die Gespräche von US-Präsident Joe Biden, Frankreichs Präsident Emmanuel Macron oder Bundeskanzler Olaf Scholz, die mit Saudi-Arabien über eine Ausweitung der Ölproduktion verhandelt hatten, blieben ohne Ergebnis. Für Biden kommt der Opec-Entscheid zu einem schwierigen Zeitpunkt. Vor den wichtigen Zwischenwahlen im November hatte Biden eigentlich auf sinkende Spritpreise gehofft. Dass sich Saudi-Arabien nun auf die Seite Russlands stellt, dürfte das Verhältnis zusätzlich belasten. Zuletzt hatten die USA mehrfach die strategischen Ölreserven des Landes angezapft, um den Preisanstieg auf dem Weltmarkt zu bremsen. „Die Effekte waren jedoch nur von kurzer Dauer“, sagt Blume im Gespräch mit Host Anis Mičijević. „Investoren lassen sich nicht veräppeln, irgendwann muss die strategische Ölreserve auch wieder aufgefüllt werden“, erklärt Blume. Mehr dazu lesen Sie hier: https://www.handelsblatt.com/finanzen/maerkte/devisen-rohstoffe/opec-plus-kartell-drosselt-oel-foerderung-mitten-in-der-energiekrise/28724702.html Außerdem spricht Handelsblatt-Börsenexperte Ulf Sommer in dieser Folge darüber, warum die großen US-Konzerne ihren Abstand auf die europäischen Unternehmen immer weiter vergrößern. Mehr dazu lesen Sie hier: https://www.handelsblatt.com/unternehmen/umsaetze-usa-versus-europa-us-konzerne-haengen-europas-unternehmen-in-immer-mehr-branchen-ab/28652822.html *** Exklusives Angebot für Handelsblatt Today-Hörer: Testen Sie Handelsblatt Premium 4 Wochen für 1 € und bleiben Sie immer informiert, was die Finanzmärkte bewegt. Mehr Informationen: www.handelsblatt.com/mehrfinanzen Wenn Sie Anmerkungen, Fragen, Kritik oder Lob zu dieser Folge haben, schreiben Sie uns gern per E-Mail: today@handelsblattgroup.com Ab sofort sind wir bei WhatsApp, Signal und Telegram über folgende Nummer erreichbar: 01523 – 80 99 427

Sustainability Now! on KSQD.org
Open Farm Tours is Back!

Sustainability Now! on KSQD.org

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 51:41


Open Farm Tours is back and happening October 8th and 9th! Fifteen south county farms are participating and all are family owned, organic and sustainable. Join host Ronnie Lipschutz and his guests, Penny Ellis, Paul Towers and David Blume. They will talk about the current state of farming in Santa Cruz County and Open Farm Tours. Ellis is the founder and coordinator of Open Farms Tour and organizes tours of Santa Cruz County farms and artisanal food purveyors. Towers is Executive Director of the Community Alliance with Family Farmers which advocates for state and national policies that create more resilient family farms, communities and ecosystems. Blume is CEO of Whiskey Hill Farms. You can find out more about Open Farms Tour at https://www.openfarmtours.com/. Sustainability Now! is underwritten by the Sustainable Systems Research Foundation. and Environmental Innovations.

Handelsblatt Morning Briefing
Falscher Prophet: Elon Musk mit Friedensvorschlag / Richtiger Boom: Oliver Blume hat Börsenfantasien

Handelsblatt Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 10:07


Der Tesla-Chef empfindet sich womöglich als Mischung aus Gott, Dag Hammarskjöld und Gary Cooper. Auf Twitter lässt er über Friedenspläne in der Ukraine abstimmen. *** Hier gehts zu unserem Abo-Angebot für unsere Morning Briefing Leser: https://www.handelsblatt.com/mehrerfahren

Vivace - Selbstliebe durch Heilung in der Tiefe
#110 Wenn das Leben dir einen A*tritt gibt

Vivace - Selbstliebe durch Heilung in der Tiefe

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 9:45


Das Leben ist voller Überraschungen und manchmal kriegen wir richtig einen auf den Deckel. Das können wir nicht ändern. Was wir aber ändern können, ist, wie wir damit umgehen und was wir daraus machen. In dieser Podcastfolge erfährst du: • Wie du es schaffst, dich von Rückschlägen nicht zurückwerfen zu lassen • Wie du in Krisen die Chance erkennen und nutzen kannst, dich weiterzuentwickeln • Warum du immer die Wahl hast, dich für die schönste Blume zu entscheiden • Wie du trainieren kannst, deine Perspektive ins Positive zu shiften • Wie du alte Dinge loslassen kannst, um neue Energie daraus zu schöpfen - Viel Freude beim Zuhören! - Interesse am Abendworkshop „Selbstliebe und das innere Kind“? Melde dich hier an: https://lilianvonwernsdorff.com/workshop-inneres-kind/ - Interesse am Sonnenfrauen-Mentoring? Trage dich hier auf die Warteliste ein: https://forms.gle/5J4rh8DtKeoQjvnRA - Reserviere dir jetzt deinen kostenlosen Wellenlängen-Check: https://calendly.com/lilian-von-wernsdorff/wellenlangen-check - Du findest mich auch hier: Website: www.lilianvonwernsdorff.com | Email: mail@lilianvonwernsdorff.com | Instagram: @lilianvonwernsdorff.coaching | Facebook: www.facebook.com/lilianvonwersdorff | WhatsApp: 0177 8400900

Founded Beauty
BLUME - Pushing The Boundaries For Self Care And Destigmatizing Women's Health ft. Taran Ghatrora

Founded Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 61:12


Taran Ghatrora is the co-founder and CEO of personal care brand, Blume, on a mission to shift the narrative away from perfect skin to healthy skin. After starting as a bootstrapped company and finding success on Dragons' Den, Blume has become more than just a beauty brand. With education and gender equality at its core, Taran truly has created a safe space within one of the most vulnerable aspects of wellness. If you enjoyed this episode, please make sure you like, subscribe and share with anyone you know who will love it too!Founded Beauty is available on all podcast platforms and we release new episodes every Monday and Thursday so be sure to follow the podcast to be notified. We really appreciate every single listen, share, and review. It goes such a long way and helps us reach new listeners. Follow Akash and Taran:Akash Mehta: @mehta_aFable & Mane: @fableandmanewww.fableandmane.comTaran Ghatrora: @taran_smilesBLUME: @blumewww.blume.comFor more information about Founded Beauty, please visit www.foundedbeauty.com#foundedbeauty Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Entwicklungssprünge Der Podcast für alle Eltern, Pädagogen, Erzieher und Lehrer | Mit Gunda Frey

Bob Blume ist wohl einer der bekanntesten Lehrer Deutschlands. Als Bildungsaktivist, Bildungsblogger und Buchautor hat sich Bob Blume, der hauptberuflich als Lehrer arbeitet, in den sozialen Medien einen Namen gemacht. Als gefragter Schulexperte findet man auf seinen Seiten z.B Reels in denen er sich humorvoll für eine Veränderung im Schulsystem einsetzt. So finden ZuschauerInnen auf seiner Instagram Seite alle Themen rund um Schule. In der Schule engagiert sich Bob sehr für ReferendarInnen, ist Oberstudienrat, verantwortlich für die Öffentlichkeitsarbeit der Schule und Leiter von zwei AGs. Die WELT stellte ihn 2020 als einen der besten digitalen Lehrer in Deutschland vor und 2022 folgte die Auszeichnung mit dem Goldenen Blogger Award. Klar wird also, Bob hat etwas zu sagen, was unbedingt gehört werden sollte. Gunda und Bob sprechen in diesem Podcast unter anderem über Bobs Buch „10 Dinge, die ich an der Schule hasse und wie wir sie ändern können“ und dass es in der Schule auch darum gehen muss, SchülerInnen ernstzunehmen, wahrzunehmen und den Themen, die sie beschäftigen einen Raum zu geben. Bob beschreibt sehr eindrücklich warum es gesellschaftlich so wichtig ist, dass SchülerInnen in der Schule eine Stimme bekommen und welche Wichtigkeit das für das Fortbestehen unserer Demokratie hat. Ein inspirierender Podcast mit einem Lehrer, der es schafft trotz ungünstiger Rahmenbedingungen anders zu unterrichten und zur Veränderung einlädt.

Meet The Elite Podcast
4532 Staci Blume-09 22 22-Health and Wellness-Sam

Meet The Elite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 4:34


(Don't) Quit Your Day Job
Episode 142 with Mark Tremalgia (Little Caesar) & Alec (AJ) Blume: All Guitar Players are Judging In Our Heads

(Don't) Quit Your Day Job

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 37:32


For this episode, in addition to our friend Mark Tremalgia, we also have a special co-host in Alec (AJ) Blume. Mark talks about learning and understanding music theory, understanding how to be a good guitar teacher, developing a playing style, and the importance of live performance and the rush of a crowd. Plus, Little Caesar on tour in Europe, touring back in the day versus now, tour rider requirements, and a trivia quiz about the Allman Brothers and ZZ Top. Mark is a working musician in LA, playing in Little Caesar and The Cruzados. He also teaches either in person or via skype. You can contact him here https://www.facebook.com/mark.tremalgia https://www.instagram.com/marktremalgia/ https://www.facebook.com/LittleCaesarOfficial Paul works a day job and puts out vinyl and puts on shows via Katzulhu Productions https://www.facebook.com/paul.neil.12 https://www.facebook.com/katzulhu https://www.facebook.com/Dont-Quit-Your-Day-Job-podcast-107924851339602

International
Was der Irak mit dem Exodus seiner Juden verlor

International

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 30:51


2500 Jahre lang lebten Jüdinnen und Juden im Irak. In Bagdad war einst gar ein Viertel der Bevölkerung jüdisch. Dann: Der Holocaust, der Zweite Weltkrieg und die Staatsgründung Israels. Heute gibt es kaum mehr Juden im Irak, und auch immer weniger Christen. Das macht auch vielen Muslimen Angst. Der Schriftsteller Eli Amir, 85, lebt in Jerusalem. Bis heute sehnt er sich nach seiner Geburtsstadt Bagdad, obwohl seine jüdische Familie dort auch schreckliche Erfahrungen gemacht hat. Sie überlebte den «Farhud» von 1941, den zweitägigen Pogrom in Bagdad. Danach begann der grosse – zum Teil auch erzwungene – Exodus der jüdischen Bevölkerung aus dem Irak. In Bagdad erinnern sich viele mit Nostalgie an ihre jüdischen Nachbarn von einst. Musliminnen und Muslime schwelgen auf dem ehemaligen jüdischen Hanun-Markt in den Erinnerungen an alte Zeiten, erzählen, wie Religion im Alltag kaum eine Rolle gespielt habe, und wie eng die nachbarlichen Beziehungen einst waren. Auch sie sehnen sich nach dem Bagdad, an das Eli Amir noch jeden Tag denkt, und an einen Irak, den man einst «Vater der Religionen» nannte, weil so viele religiöse Minderheiten dort lebten. «Der Irak ist wie ein Blumenstrauss: entfernt man eine Blume nach der anderen, dann ist es nicht mehr der Irak», sagt Lara Yussif Zara, die christliche Bürgermeisterin von Alqosh. Sie weiss, wovon sie spricht: Der Irak hat nicht nur seine Juden, sondern auch achtzig Prozent seiner Christinnen und Christen verloren. Der Verlust der religiösen Minderheiten wurde mit dem US-Einmarsch in den Irak 2003 beschleunigt. Auch, weil der schiitische Mullah-Staat Iran das Chaos nach den Kriegen, die auf den Sturz Saddam Husseins folgten, nutzte, um den Irak zu kontrollieren. Den alten Irak, nach dem sich heute viele Menschen sehnen, gibt es noch im Kleinen: zum Beispiel in einer versteckten Synagoge in Bagdad.

The Inspiration Place
215: What Is Art?

The Inspiration Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 27:37 Very Popular


Writing Lessons from Nora Ephron  Nora Ephron was one of the most popular and accomplished writers in American literature and film. She did it all. Movies, books, essays, magazine articles and more.   Today I'm sharing her strategies that you can use to improve your own writing.   For more helpful writing tips check out podcast episode 171: Words that Sell: 5 Top Copywriters Share their Best Advice with Laura Belgray, Lacy Boggs, Tarzan Kay, Kimberly Houston, and Danielle Weil  The New York Art Scene Circa 1962  There's an exhibit called New York 1962-1964 covering that 3-year period of art in the city. It was a time of epic changes, and the exhibit explores the way artists documented the era.   Looking at art through the lens of the events during that time frame reminds me that what's happening in our world impacts how we see and experience events which affects our expression and the art we create.   Does the Supreme Court get to decide: What is Art?  This fall the supreme court is going to hear a case about Andy Warhol's paintings of the artist known as Prince. Specifically, the legal concern is if the images violate the copywrite law with a portrait of the musician.   Essentially, they are deciding “what is art?” Why is this coming up now? The Andy Warhol foundation has licensed work that was originally based on a single-use license.   It's complicated and I have lots of questions. Let me know what you think on Instagram.   Want to know how to make sure you're protected? Check out podcast 44: Protect Your Art from Copycats and Freeloaders with Legal Expert Katie Lane  Take Yourself Seriously as an Artist  Did you read any books written by July Blume? Her book Are you There God, It's me Margaret was instructional for me as a young 4th grader. A movie based on the book will be released in 2023.   This was the first of 29 books written by Blume but when this was published everyone, including her husband (at the time) laughed at the idea that she was a writer.   Not Judy. She knew she was a writer.   It's time to re-write your story. Start taking yourself seriously. I want you to choose to believe in yourself as the artists, the writer, the creator that you are.   Your Friends Shape Your Mindset   A new study from Harvard found that poor children found that kids who had friends from across class lines has better outcomes that those who didn't.   I became friends with a group of girls, and we decided that we were gifted. We talked about becoming poets and artists and though I am not in touch with them now, I found out that is exactly what happened for at least 2 of them. The seeds of who we were and who we became were planted during those 6th grade friendships.   Our friendships shape what we see as normal. It helped us all believe what was possible for us.   Listen to Master the Emotional Side of Goal Setting with Miriam Schulman schulmanart.com/175  If you are looking to surround yourself with other artists and creators, check out the Artists Incubator.  Pre-order the book Artpreneur: Schulmanart.com/BOOK Come tell me what you think @schulmanArt

SWR1 Leute Baden-Württemberg
Bob Blume | Lehrer und Bildungsinfluencer | So muss sich unser Bildungssystem ändern | SWR1 Leute

SWR1 Leute Baden-Württemberg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 34:06


Allein gelassen in der Pandemie, schlecht ausgestattet mit digitalen Medien und digitaler Kompetenz - Lehrer Bob Blume kritisiert, was im deutschen Schulsystem schief läuft.

Radio Giga
VW-Chef stellt klar: An E-Autos führt kein Weg vorbei

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


Oliver Blume hat bei VW die Zügel von Herbert Diess übernommen, gleichzeitig bleibt der Manager Chef von Porsche. Kurz vor seinem Start als Nummer 1 von VW hatte Blume sich noch für E-Fuels ausgesprochen. Jetzt macht er klar: Der Volkswagen-Konzern wird weiter auf E-Autos setzen, eher noch stärker als bisher.

Founder Storiez
Grish Redekar CEO & Cofounder Sprinto HQ | Building a venture funded startup | Changing your mindsets

Founder Storiez

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 47:51


Conversation with Redekar CEO & Cofounder Sprinto HQ. Hey everyone welcome back to another episode on founder storiez. I am very excited about this conversation. This was such an amazing honest conversation with Grish, co-Founder & CEO of Sprinto_HQ - If I had to bet on a company that I think is going to become HUGE this one is top 5. The founder's mindset and how they approach building and problems is the caliber of top founders. Sprinto has raised $ 12 million from our good friends at Blume, ACCEL, and elevation Capital. This is Grish's second startup, which he's building together with his cofounder Raghu. His first startup RecruiterBox they bootstrapped it & sold. In this conversation with speak about the difference between building a bootstrapped vs venture-funded company. How he handles setbacks, and how he needed to change his mindset. Have a great listen, and if you do benefit please suggest it to a friend who can benefit from it too.

Elements of Stiles
Episode 90 - Gary Blume: Get to the Point

Elements of Stiles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 52:04


Mark welcomes back past guest and long-time friend Gary Blume to hear more of his thoughts on self-reflection, living with intention, and his personal journey for enlightenment. Affiliate Links: Unleashing the Power of Respect: The I-M Approach by Joseph Shrand, MD This episode is brought to you by SecuriTitle. SecuriTitle offers title exam, closing preparation, and title clearing services for real estate closing firms, providing the capacity and expertise to help firms manage costs and increase efficiency. Learn more at securititle.com.

FAZ Digitec
So viele Volkswagen-Fragen

FAZ Digitec

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 41:36


Volkswagen hat mit Oliver Blume einen neuen Vorstandsvorsitzenden. Was muss er besser machen als sein Vorgänger Herbert Diess? Wir versuchen eine Bestandsaufnahme. Welche Stärken und Schwächen hat die Produktpalette und die -Pipeline. Wie geht es den einzelnen Konzernmarken von Porsche bis Seat? Wird es Blume schaffen, Porsche und Volkwagen zugleich zu führen, warum will er das überhaupt? Wann kommt der Börsengang des Sportwagenherstellers. Wird Blume in Wolfsburg von Freunden empfangen, oder hat er auch schon erste Erlebnisse mit seinen Feinden gemacht. Und zuletzt: Gibt es so etwas wie den bisher besten Golf? Und wann wurde der verkauft?

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3397 - GM Fires Up Ohio Battery Plant; Honda Civic Type R Gets 315 HP; VW's Blume Goes Full Speed on BEVs

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 10:21 Very Popular


- VW's Blume Goes Full Speed on BEVs - Car Sales Strong in China - GM Fires Up Ohio Battery Plant - Tesla to Make Batteries in Fremont - Use VW's App, Get Cheaper Charging - Honda Civic Type R Gets 315 HP - Ariel Reveals 1,180 HP Electric Car - BMW Takes Fuel Cells In-House - Toyota Tech Predicts Heart Attacks

Radio Giga
Neuer VW-Chef stellt klar: An E-Autos führt kein Weg vorbei

Radio Giga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022


Bei VW ist ab sofort ein neuer Mann am Steuer: Oliver Blume hat die Zügel von Herbert Diess übernommen, gleichzeitig bleibt der Manager Chef von Porsche. Kurz vor seinem Start als Nummer 1 von VW hatte Blume sich noch für E-Fuels ausgesprochen. Jetzt stellt er klar: Der Volkswagen-Konzern wird weiter auf E-Autos setzen, eher noch stärker als bisher.

Autoline Daily
AD #3397 - GM Fires Up Ohio Battery Plant; Honda Civic Type R Gets 315 HP; VW's Blume Goes Full Speed on BEVs

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 10:21


- VW's Blume Goes Full Speed on BEVs- Car Sales Strong in China- GM Fires Up Ohio Battery Plant- Tesla to Make Batteries in Fremont- Use VW's App, Get Cheaper Charging- Honda Civic Type R Gets 315 HP- Ariel Reveals 1,180 HP Electric Car- BMW Takes Fuel Cells In-House- Toyota Tech Predicts Heart Attacks

Handelsblatt Morning Briefing
Love, Peace and Harmony in Meseberg / VW-Konzernchef Blume startet mit der Kreissäge

Handelsblatt Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 8:30


Olaf Scholz, Robert Habeck und Christian Lindner verkündeten auf der Pressekonferenz zur Regierungsklausur schönste Eintracht. Gasumlage und Co. scheinen vergessen.

TomsTalkTime - DER Erfolgspodcast
Gemeinsam gegen Krebs - die co-cancer community - Karel Kasilag-Otto #753

TomsTalkTime - DER Erfolgspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 44:36


Co-Cancer community - Bewegung als Motor aus dem Tief Karel Kasilag-Otto ist Physiotherapeutin, Groupfitness Instruktorin, Mentorin, Podcasterin und Autorin. Sie ist auf den Philippinen geboren und aufgewachsen. Mit fünf Jahren verunglückte ihr Vater tödlich in Saudi-Arabien, woraufhin sie im zarten Alter von zehn Jahren zu ihren Adoptiveltern in Deutschland nach Bochum zog. Der Ruhrpott mit seinem unnachahmlich groben Feingefühl brachte ihr nicht nur die deutsche Sprache bei, sondern auch, was im Leben wirklich wichtig ist. Bei der Pflege ihrer an Krebs erkrankten Adoptivmutter, wurde ihr bewusst, dass sie diese Stadt bisher nicht zu schätzen wusste, sondern ihr Sprungbrett zur Welt im Gegenteil nur verschmähte. Nach dem Tod ihrer Adoptivmutter entdeckte sie ihre Passion für das Schreiben und veröffentlichte ihr erstes Buch: "Mein verschmähtes Bochum - wie die Blume im Revier mich aus der Grube holte." Erschienen im Selfpublishing Verlag BoD. Das Buch beschreibt das bescheidene Leben ihrer Adoptivmutter und wie die beiden Frauen durch die Krankheit wieder zueinander gefunden haben. Kurzweilig werden erlebnisreiche Episoden in und mit der Stadt Bochum geschildert und man ahnt gleich wie prägend diese Stadt für die Autorin gewesen sein muss. Das Buch ist kein Ratgeber, sondern will einen möglichen Weg durch die Krise des Todes ebnen, eine Leitlinie in der dunklen Situation sein und Menschen Hoffnung vermitteln. Zurzeit lebt sie in der Schweiz, im schönen Kanton Glarus. Dort führt sie ein Online Business, nebst einer eigenen Physiotherapie Praxis. Als Grenzgänger verschiedener Welten bezeichnet sie sich selbst als Kosmopolit, der überall dort zu Hause ist, wo Hund und Herz verweilen dürfen. Gemeinsam gegen Krebs - die co-cancer community Karel gründete die "move on together- co cancer community" als der dritte geliebte Mensch in ihrem Leben den Kampf gegen den Krebs verlor. Sie glaubte jedem dieser Verluste gewachsen zu sein, doch Wunsch und Wirklichkeit liegen nicht immer dicht beieinander. Emotional sehr bewegt, fand sie als Physiotherapeutin und Groupfitness Instruktorin schnell heraus, dass körperliche Bewegung sie weiterbringen würde, als es der Stillstand hätte tun können. Im Gefühl der Ohnmacht, setzte dies kraftvolle Tun bei ihr neue und tröstende Akzente. Konsequenterweise entwickelte sie mit dieser neugewonnen Lebensfülle ein online Mentoring Programm das mit Bewegungsformen wie Pilates, Power Yoga, Kick Power den Weg aus dem eigenen Schneckenhaus heraus findet, aber auch mit Reflexionstechniken und Meditationen wieder neu auf die eigene Mitte zu zentrieren weiss. Auf der körperlichen, mentalen, seelischen und auch spirituellen Ebene arbeitet sie daran den Menschen aus Schock und Trauer heraus zu bringen, um den Hebel wieder Richtung Lebenskraft, Energie und Hoffnung zu bewegen. Zusätzlich bietet sie für diejenigen, die über die körperlich- mentale Komponente hinaus etwas erreichen wollen eine «Seelenbegegnungs- Session» an. Dabei können Angehörige und Hinterbliebene erfahren, was die Krankheit mit ihrem eigenen Leben zu tun hat und inwiefern es eine seelische Verbindung geben könnte. Ihr Ziel ist es Menschen die Annahme ihrer Situation zu erleichtern, so wie Karel es selbst als dreifache Hinterbliebene für sich entdeckt hat. Erfahrt in dieser Episode, wie sie das Thema Krebs angenommen, neue Lebensfreude gefunden und das Licht am Ende des Tunnels entdeckt hat. Begrüßt mit mir die in der Schweiz lebende Ruhrpott Philippina.

Total Information AM
Wife of KMOX's Brett Blume talks about his legacy

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 10:08


Kathleen Blume sits down with Carol Daniel to talk about former KMOX Reporter Brett Blume, who lost his battle against cancer in October 2019 as we prepare for another blood drive in his honor.

Total Information AM
Hoping to have over 400 appointment for Brett Blume Blood Drive

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 2:07


Joe Zydlo of American Red Cross joins KMOX to talk about the Brett Blume blood drive.

DTC Podcast
Ep 230: Blume Banks on Community -- Taran Ghatrora on Community Building Through In-Person and Digital Events [C-Suite Mentor Preview]

DTC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 25:54


Subscribe to DTC Newsletter - https://dtcnews.link/signup Welcome to DTC Podcast. Today we're revisiting one of our favorite brands, Blume, this time chatting with Taran Ghatrora (Bunny's Sister) and catching up on their incredible growth. Catch Taran at C-Suite Mastermind in Victoria BC, Sept 21-23 https://directtoconsumer.co/c-suite-mastermind Subscribe to DTC Newsletter - https://dtcnews.link/signup Advertise on DTC - https://dtcnews.link/advertise Work with Pilothouse - https://dtcnews.link/pilothouse Follow us on Instagram & Twitter - @dtcnewsletter Watch this interview on YouTube - https://dtcnews.link/video

The Blume Saloon: A Judy Blume Book Podcast
Odds and Ends #24: Froffles

The Blume Saloon: A Judy Blume Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 44:49


It's the END of “It's Not the End of the World.” Jody and Alison wrap up this 1972 Judy Blume novel with special guest “Have a Banana” Sally! We've got some divorce trivia, an Eggo Special Report, a celebrity quiz, and some classic Letters to Judy. Thank you to British Blume Head Louise for her A+ letter. Be sure to follow us to learn what our next book is!

Total Information AM
The KMOX Brett Blume Blood Drives

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 9:44


KMOX is honoring the memory of colleague Brett Blume.  Joe Zydlo, Regional Communications Manager for the American Red Cross Missouri/Arkansas talks about the current need for blood donations and how you can sign up to donate blood on August 31st.

Dan Barreiro
Twins Talk, Paul Blume Fox 9 - Bumper to Bumper 8/15/22 Hour Two

Dan Barreiro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 40:50


Dan examines where it's going wrong with the Twins right now before Paul Blume Fox 9 joins to review a busy stretch of court cases in Hennepin County.

Music Secrets Exposed Podcast
MSE Special: Building Leaders Using Musical Education with Janet Anthony from BLUME Haiti.

Music Secrets Exposed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 29:49


In today's episode, meet cellist Janet Anthony, from the inspirational BLUME Haiti Foundation. BLUME Haiti's mission is to work with Haitian and international partners to develop leadership skills, awaken individual potential, and create opportunities for civic collaboration and economic development through the shared pursuit of musical excellence. To view their website, https://www.blumehaiti.org/ * * * View this episode on Youtube here: https://youtu.be/uH7M4lNHwNI * * * Intro Music in this episode was kindly provided by Paul Lloyd Warner & is Copyright (C) CDBaby, on behalf of Paul Lloyd Warner. You can find the related Album here: https://paullloydwarner.com/an-american-symphony/ * * * Visit https://musicsecretsexposedpodcast.com for Episode Directories. To sign up for the #MSE Mastermind go to https://musicsecretsexposedmastermind.com Become a member of the #MSE community - opt-in for the #MSE Newsletter at https://musicsecretsexposed.com Sign up to be part of the Music Theory Tribe here: https://gradedmusictheory.com * * * Sylvia would love a cup of coffee to keep her going, and as it has been said 'every little helps!' ;) : ko-fi.com/sylviamoran * * * Join the journey on your favorite social media here: Facebook #Music Secrets Exposed Discussion Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/233281881815328 Like our Facebook page here https://www.facebook.com/MSE2021 Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmVGpYNR37DqOfVDs6A1qtw Twitter https://twitter.com/musicsecrecy Instagram https://www.instagram.com/musicsecrecy Pinterest https://www.pinterest.ie/MusicSecretsExposed Linked-in https://www.linkedin.com/in/music-secrets-exposed/ * * * Health Hack: https://faig.pruvitnow.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musicsecretsexposed/message

Female Startup Club
6 quick questions with Karen Danudjaja, Founder of Blume (part 2)

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 15:05


Today we're learning from Karen Danudjaja, the founder of Blume. Blume is what happens when you pair the benefits of the wellness aisle and the experience of a cafe. They've bootstrapped the company to 10M in sales making your favourite cafe lattes with the magic of superfoods from Vancouver Canada. We're talking through that first year of business and how she approached getting her first 1000 customers, bootstrapping the brand until now and her learnings from her first raise of $2m. And just a quick shout out to all the amazing humans listening into these episodes. I've been so happy and grateful recently about what we've been able to achieve together, all because you are tuning into these episodes and supporting the show. We've got a few exciting things in the works that I can't wait to share with you soon. Let's get into this episode, this is Karen for Female Startup Club. LINKS WE MENTION: Karen's Instagram Blume's Instagram Female Startup Club's Instagram Doone's Instagram Doone's TikTok To redeem 1 month free of Norby's Basic Plan use code "FSC" here: https://join.nor.by/ Learn more about Athletic Greens and get your FREE gift at Athleticgreens.com/STARTUP Learn more about Dymo at Dymo.com In partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for eCommerce businesses Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook Group Say hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.com Female Startup Club + Clearco: Clear.co/partner/female-star

Female Startup Club
How to bootstrap a brand to $10M in sales, with Blume's founder Karen Danudjaja (part 1)

Female Startup Club

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 36:40


Today we're learning from Karen Danudjaja, the founder of Blume. Blume is what happens when you pair the benefits of the wellness aisle and the experience of a cafe. They've bootstrapped the company to 10M in sales making your favourite cafe lattes with the magic of superfoods from Vancouver Canada. We're talking through that first year of business and how she approached getting her first 1000 customers, bootstrapping the brand until now and her learnings from her first raise of $2m. And just a quick shout out to all the amazing humans listening into these episodes. I've been so happy and grateful recently about what we've been able to achieve together, all because you are tuning into these episodes and supporting the show. We've got a few exciting things in the works that I can't wait to share with you soon. Let's get into this episode, this is Karen for Female Startup Club. LINKS WE MENTION: Karen's Instagram Blume's Instagram Female Startup Club's Instagram Doone's Instagram Doone's TikTok To redeem 1 month free of Norby's Basic Plan use code "FSC" here: https://join.nor.by/ Learn more about Athletic Greens and get your FREE gift at Athleticgreens.com/STARTUP Learn more about Dymo at Dymo.com In partnership with Klaviyo, the best email marketing tool for eCommerce businesses Female Startup Club's YouTubeFemale Startup Club's Private Facebook Group Say hello to Doone: hello@femalestartupclub.com Female Startup Club + Clearco: Clear.co/partner/female-star

The Blume Saloon: A Judy Blume Book Podcast

“It's Not the End of the World,” chapters 30-31. The FINAL CHAPTERS! Karen reaches the Hope Phase, Mom flies by the seat of her pants, and Amy makes her famous cold cut joke. Jody and Alison talk about non-bad divorce books, 1972 New Jersey separation laws, and the 1994 rom-com about a sex worker with a heart of gold, Milk Money. Tune in for a brand new “Isn't That Random” about boredom and a wonderful letter from Blume Head Michelle! It's a Judy Blume book club. Join us every week!