Podcasts about Sonoran Desert

North American desert

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Sonoran Desert

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Best podcasts about Sonoran Desert

Latest podcast episodes about Sonoran Desert

SHAPE Shorts Podcast
Motointhewild.com: Wildlife Biology and the Humanities with Heatherlee Leary

SHAPE Shorts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 28:45


Stew interviews Heatherlee Leary. Heatherlee is our director and one of the co-founders of SHAPE Shifters. She is a wildlife biologist and graduate student. As a wildlife biologist, she works on the management side of wildlife conservation, and as a student, she works on the research side. She is currently studying urban trees and the diversity of birds, bats, and butterflies in a Sonoran Desert city. She has also recently founded Moto in the Wild, which is a YouTube channel that combines her background as a wildlife biologist with her interest in travel and motorcycling to share a view of wildlife conservation that most folks never see or experience.   Learn more about Heatherlee's channel here: www.motointhewild.com   Find us online at www.shapeshiftedu.com and don't forget to leave a 5-star rating and written review on the show!

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
Joe Wagner - Owner of Copper Cane Wines & Provisions

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 40:31


In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Joe Wagner. A fifth-generation Napa Valley winemaker, Joseph Wagner has been immersed in every aspect of the wine industry his entire life. Learning the ropes from his father Chuck, who co-founded Caymus Vineyards with his parents in 1972, Joseph garnered a love for cultivating the land, tending grapevines, the art of winemaking, the strengths of a good work ethic, and leading by example. Planting his first Pinot Noir vineyard at age fifteen sparked a love for the then lesser-known variety. After working in the Sonoran Desert of Northern Mexico farming table grapes, Joseph returned to California where he joined the family business working under his father in vineyards and the winery.   Establishing Belle Glos with his father with the inaugural vintage of 2001 focusing on vineyard-designated Pinot Noirs, Joseph took a different approach to vineyard decisions and winemaking than the traditional Burgundian philosophy. Taking the risk of separating from tradition would prove a wise choice for Joseph and the brand and shape a philosophy he carries to this day of “Go With Your Palate”; a simple way of empowering people to drink what they enjoy, and not be swayed by the sommeliers and critics of the world. In 2006, Joseph began crafting Meiomi, an industry-shaking Pinot Noir with bold and robust flavors uncommon in Pinot Noirs at the time. The brand gained so much recognition that it soon became the focal point of the largest non-asset wine sale in history, a deal Wagner made to fund his dreams and aspirations for his blossoming company, Copper Cane Wines & Provisions.    Next up for Joseph was Elouan, a collection of Oregon wines made in his signature style. Since starting Copper Cane in 2014, Joseph has launched numerous new wines, each with a distinct slant towards his personal style. Taking a hands-on approach to cultivation, winemaking and marketing with each of the brands, his Copper Cane portfolio includes Belle Glos, Elouan, Napa Valley Quilt, Böen, and others. Always an entrepreneur, Joseph opened AVOW Restaurant and more recently Quilt & Co. Tasting Room & Lounge, both located in the heart of downtown Napa. He also owns premium cigar line Avrae. Joseph lives in Napa Valley and enjoys mountain biking and camping with his six children and teaching them the ropes of the business with the hopes that someday, they too will be in the wine industry.    Learn more and connect with Joe Wagner by visiting him on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/coppercanewines/ Website: https://www.coppercane.com/     Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* ****************************************************************************

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Javier Zamora: You Can't Simply Make Art From Your Trauma to Heal Yourself

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 44:59


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan is joined by Javier Zamora to discuss his memoir, Solito, out now from Hogarth Press. Javier Zamora was born in El Salvador in 1990. His father fled the country when he was one, and his mother when he was about to turn five. Both parents' migrations were caused by the U.S.-funded Salvadoran Civil War. When he was nine Javier migrated through Guatemala, Mexico, and the Sonoran Desert. His debut poetry collection, Unaccompanied, explores the impact of the war and immigration on his family. Zamora has been a Stegner Fellow at Stanford and a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard and holds fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Keen On Democracy
Solito: Javier Zamora's Memoir of His Unaccompanied Migration From El Salvador to California at the Age of Nine

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 35:02


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Javier Zamora, author of Solito. Javier Zamora was born in El Salvador in 1990. His father fled the country when he was one, and his mother when he was about to turn five. Both parents' migrations were caused by the U.S.-funded Salvadoran Civil War. When he was nine Javier migrated through Guatemala, Mexico, and the Sonoran Desert. His debut poetry collection, Unaccompanied, explores the impact of the war and immigration on his family. Zamora has been a Stegner Fellow at Stanford and a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard and holds fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Earth Wise
Tepary Beans | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 2:00


Tepary beans are an ancient crop native to the northern part of Mexico and the southwestern part of the U.S..  They have been grown in those places by native peoples since pre-Columbian times.  They are still grown in Native American reservations in Arizona's Sonoran Desert.  One can purchase them from some small farms in that […]

Wild And Exposed Podcast
The Nature Photographer by NANPA - There Are Stories to Be Told with Colleen Miniuk

Wild And Exposed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 88:21


Colleen Miniuk didn't follow a traditional path to photography (if there really is one). As a child, she developed a fear of water when she couldn't see the bottom or her feet and she didn't sleep outside in a tent until her early twenties. In college, she was a scholarship volleyball player, focused on academics and athletics. After graduation, she worked as a software engineer for Intel. So, how did she become a renown nature photographer with a passion for water who, ironically, lives in the Sonoran Desert outside Phoenix, Arizona?Website: https://www.colleenminiuk.com/You Can Sleep When You're Dead Blog: http://youcansleepwhenyouredead.com/Dear Bubbles Advice Column: http://dearbubbles.com/

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee
My Experience with 5-MEO-DMT (Bufo Alvarius) Part 3 - Lessons from Integration

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 37:57


Episode Highlight: In this episode, I'm taking you through Part 3 of my journey with The Psychedelic Toad of the Sonoran Desert, Bufo Alvarius.  I'll be sharing what transpired after my ceremony experience and take you through all the lessons and blessings that came into my life since then.  As I've said before, about 10% of the earth & plant medicine work is done in ceremony, the other 90% (and what really can heal and transform us and our lives) is what happens in Integration.  After my death/rebirth process, what culminated and has carried forward with me in integration has been the most PROFOUND part of this journey for me, and I'm so excited to share it with you today!  So, if you're interested in plant and earth medicines, are curious to know more about a 5-MEO-DMT experience, the healing and transformation that can happen using this medicine, and how an integration of this medicine could look/feel, then this episode is for you!Grab Your FREE Self-Care Guide >>> 50+ Self-Care Practices for Unshakeable Self Love!Schedule Your Complimentary Spiritual Awakening Clarity Call >>> Book Now!Want to be notified of new episodes? Sign Up HereFollow me on Instagram: @iamsusynreneeA Special Thanks To:Podcast Editor: Roberto D.Podcast Cover Artist:  @lenovatoPodcast Music: @lesfm

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee
My 5-MEO-DMT (Bufo Alvarius) Experience Part 2 - Rebirth

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 34:24


Episode Highlight: In this episode, I'm taking you through Part 2 of my journey with The Psychedelic Toad of the Sonoran Desert, Bufo Alvarius.  As you learned in the previous episode, the medicine from Bufo Alvarius is due to its venom containing the psychedelic medicine 5-MEO-DMT, which caused me to experience a “death” of sorts, and it also caused me to experience a REBIRTH.  Today, I'll be taking you through my rebirth that happened in my ceremony and how the rest of my ceremony experience unfolded. I'll also tell you about the after effects of the medicine and the profound experiences I had with the reactivations of the medicine!  So, if you're interested in plant and earth medicines, are curious to know more about a 5-MEO-DMT experience, and what a death/rebirth cycle feels like with this medicine and the healing and transformation that can happen using this medicine, then this episode is for you!Grab Your FREE Self-Care Guide >>> 50+ Self-Care Practices for Unshakeable Self Love!Schedule Your Complimentary Spiritual Awakening Clarity Call >>> Book Now!Want to be notified of new episodes? Sign Up HereFollow me on Instagram: @iamsusynreneeA Special Thanks To:Podcast Editor: Roberto D.Podcast Cover Artist:  @lenovatoPodcast Music: @lesfm

KJZZ's Stories You Don't Want to Miss
Stories You Don't Want to Miss for the week of Aug. 1, 2022

KJZZ's Stories You Don't Want to Miss

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 37:56


Thursday night, two days after polls closed in Arizona, The Associated Press called the Republican primary for governor for former local news anchor Kari Lake.  The Broadway Curve Improvement project addresses one of the most famous and busiest traffic interchanges in the state. A growing number of people in the Sonoran capital Hermosillo are starting to consider how the city and its residents can deal with the impacts of climate change in the already hot, dry Sonoran Desert. Plus the latest metro Phoenix, education, tribal resources and science news.

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee
My 5-MEO-DMT (Bufo Alvarius) Experience Part 1- Death

A More Beautiful World with Susyn Renee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 30:17


Episode Highlight: In this episode, I'm taking you through Part 1 of my journey with The Psychedelic Toad of the Sonoran Desert, Bufo Alvarius, which was absolutely a “death” experience.  This toad medicine is psychedelic because it contains a powerful hallucinogenic substance in its venom known as 5-MEO-DMT.  I'll get into a bit more of how this medicine works in this podcast, but know that this medicine is POWERFUL! I'm so eager to share with you the healing and transformation I experienced in taking this beautiful Earth Medicine, which included what I can only assimilate to a very safe, Near Death Experience, which really made this the most profound experience of my life!  So, if you're interested in plant and earth medicines, are curious to know more about a 5-MEO-DMT experience, the healing and transformation that can happen using this medicine, or you simply like a good story, then this episode is for you!Grab Your FREE Self-Care Guide >>> 50+ Self-Care Practices for Unshakeable Self Love!Schedule Your Complimentary Spiritual Awakening Clarity Call >>> Book Now!Want to be notified of new episodes? Sign Up HereFollow me on Instagram: @iamsusynreneeA Special Thanks To:Podcast Editor: Roberto D.Podcast Cover Artist:  @lenovatoPodcast Music: @lesfm

Growing Native
Sonoran Desert Millipede

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 4:02


This is the time of year when you see desert millipedes out and about on muggy overcast days. Sometimes even crossing the two lane blacktop roads near my home. When that occurs I invariably will see several millipedes crossing the road in the same area, causing me to wonder why we don't have millipede crossing signs along the highway. At least seasonally like the “ice on bridge” of “watch for water” signs. And I think we could agree that a “Millipede Crossing” sign with the silhouette of a millipede would be an excellent sign. But yes, I know it’s not likely that a millipede crossing sign will ever happen. Honestly if I had my way there would be crossing signs for every wild creature found in the borderlands. The poem was originally my contribution to  a poetic inventory of the Saguaro National Monument East done in 2012. The photos are mine.

Talking Books
Desert Friends: Travels With The Pack by Linda Harkey

Talking Books

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:54


This is the second book in Linda Harkey's latest series of ‘Travels With The Pack' aimed at 4–8-year-olds. The story is set in the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and tells the adventurous tales of the day in the life of four enchanting and irrestible characters. Rodney is a brown-and-black speckled roadrunner who along with his […] The post Desert Friends: Travels With The Pack by Linda Harkey appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

Psychedelic Therapy Frontiers
DMT, 5-MeO, and psychedelic entity encounters

Psychedelic Therapy Frontiers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 56:42


In this episode of the Psychedelic Therapy Frontiers podcast, Dr. Steve Thayer and Dr. Reid Robison discuss the psychedelic Dimethyltryptamine (DMT).  DMT and similar psychedelics have been used by indigenous peoples for healing, development, and spiritual purposes for thousands of years. Western science is now exploring how this molecule might be used to treat modern mental health conditions. (1:24) Terence McKenna (3:35) What is DMT?(5:41) Ayahuasca (6:36) Similarities between the DMT and psilocybin experience(7:45) Hamilton Morris and Dr. Mark Plotkin on The Tim Ferriss Show(8:18) 5-MeO-DMT and the Sonoran Desert toad(14:15) Studies on the mystical experience and improved life satisfaction (18:03) Potential relationship between duration of psychedelic experience and the potential for a "bad trip"(21:28) Is the psychedelic experience necessary for the therapeutic effect?(21:58) DMT "entities"(23:18) Steve's DMT experience  (27:41) Reid's ayahuasca experience(31:48) The exercise of surrender (36:15) Risks of DMT use(47:55) Spirit Pharmacist (51:28) DMT clinical trials and therapeutic potential compared to other psychedelics  Email us questions and feedback at psychfrontiers@novamind.ca Learn more about our podcast at https://www.psychedelictherapyfrontiers.com/Learn more about Novamind at https://www.novamind.ca/Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drstevethayer/https://www.instagram.com/innerspacedoctor/https://www.instagram.com/novamind_inc/Disclaimer: The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice or mental health treatment. Consult with a medical/mental health professional if you believe you are in need of mental health treatment.

StarShipSofa
StarShipSofa No 690 Jeffrey Ford

StarShipSofa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 43:32


Main Fiction: "Not Without Mercy" by Jeffrey FordThis story originally appeared in Conjunctions #67, Fall 2016Jeffrey Ford is the author of the novels The Physiognomy, Memoranda, The Beyond, The Girl in the Glass, The Cosmology of the Wider World, The Shadow Year, The Twilight Pariah, Ahab's Return, and Out of Body. His short story collections are The Fantasy Writer's Assistant, The Empire of Ice Cream, The Drowned Life, Crackpot Palace, A Natural History of Hell, The Best of Jeffrey Ford, and Big Dark Hole. Ford's fiction has appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies from Tor.com to Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction to The Oxford Book of American Short Stories and been widely translated. It has garnered World Fantasy, Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, Nebula awards and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He lives in Ohio's farm country in a 120-year-old house and teaches part-time at Ohio Wesleyan University.Narrated by: Bob HoleBob Hole is a bon-vivant (hermit), author, podcaster, blogger, and social media addict. He loves science fiction, fantasy, mysteries, stamp collecting, cactus, and most of the sciences (geek AND nerd). He lives in the Sonoran Desert with his partner.Fact: Looking Back At Genre History by Amy H Sturgis Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/starshipsofa. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ShelfLogic
Meet the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center

ShelfLogic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 34:28


Join librarian Shelley as she speaks with two of the staff for the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center, located in Scottsdale Arizona. The SWCC is a unique animal rehabilitation facility that partners with state and federal programs to house displaced wildlife. We'll meet Don Coyote (the center's first resident) as well as Heavenly (a bear with a sweet tooth), Tocho the mountain lion, and more. We'll also discuss the issues facing the wildlife of the Sonoran desert as more of their habitat is absorbed into human environments. And tune in to discover more great books about the confluence of humans and nature, such as The Glitter in the Green: In Search for Hummingbirds by Jon Dunn, The Puma Years: A Memoir by Laura Coleman; The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate―Discoveries from A Secret World by Peter Wohlleben, and Zooburbia by Tai Moses

Blue Collar Bourbon
Stoked for a Lil Bit of Madness!

Blue Collar Bourbon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 26:55


Today's episode is sure to be a smooth sipper, because we're blind tasting two offerings under 100 proof. We'll also be returning to the Sonoran Desert to try a new offering for our ‘Choose Your Cheers' segment!Want to get in on exclusive Blue Collar perks? Visit: https://www.patreon.com/bluecollarbourbonLearn More:Blue Collar Bourbon: https://linktr.ee/bluecollarbourbonLasting Media: https://linktr.ee/lastingmediaSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Tomb With A View
Episode 124: Dying to Be American: The Fate of Unknown, Undocumented Border Crossers in the United States

Tomb With A View

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 53:00


America is a country of immigrants; however, since 1994 death of those seeking to cross the southern border of the United States have skyrocketed. What happens to these individuals, stuck, in death, somewhere between the countries they left behind and America?Email: tombwithaviewpodcast@gmail.comFacebookInstagram

Blue Collar Bourbon
Whiskey Review: Whiskey Del Bac

Blue Collar Bourbon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:28


Hailing from the Sonoran Desert in Tucson, AZ, craft distiller Whiskey Del Bac has been distilling and producing their own unique spin on American Single Malts. Whether you're a bourbon purist or like your pours a bit more adventurous, their unique portfolio of ‘desert aged' drams are sure to have something for everyone. In this episode we review Whiskey Del Bac's Classic American Single Malt, Winter 2021 and Spring 2022 releases.Want to get in on exclusive Blue Collar perks? Visit: https://www.patreon.com/bluecollarbourbonLearn More:Whiskey Del Bac: https://www.whiskeydelbac.comBlue Collar Bourbon: https://linktr.ee/bluecollarbourbonLasting Media: https://linktr.ee/lastingmediaSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Tuesday June 21, 2022

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 8:58


Uvalde developments continue: The Texas Tribune has published a minute-by-minute account of the mass shooting event, based upon all currently-available information - including new information that shows police on the site with sufficient firepower and shielding to have engaged the shooter much earlier than they did. Parents of the Uvalde school district are calling for the firing of district school police chief Pete Arredondo, and Democrats in the Texas Senate have renewed calls to Governor Greg Abbott to convene a special session of the Texas Legislature to consider gun safety. Record heat continues On Monday, as the "heat dome" affecting the area shifts eastward. One day prior to today's official first day of summer - the Texas power grid set a new all-time record for power demand, for the second time in just over a week. Monday's peak of 76,600 megawatts tops the prior, eight-day-old record by over 1,500 megawatts. Meanwhile, development in new energy sources is being outpaced by growth in demand. Austin-area U.S. Representative Lloyd Doggett has unveiled a new federal research project dedicated to the impact of climate change on water supplies. Doggett predicts that rising heat will see "Texas become much more like the Sonoran Desert". Meanwhile, concern mounts about toxic algae contamination and zebra mussels in Austin's waterways. The Austin housing market shows signs of cooling, as inventory grows and the rate of sales slows - prices, however, have not yet begun to drop. With all of that in mind, Austonia breaks down the question: Is Austin still cool? In the wake of an ignominious loss to Texas A&M, marking Texas Baseball's departure from this year's College World Series, head coach David Pierce has dismissed longtime assistant and pitching coach Sean Allen. The athletic director at OU says that following the Sooners' departure from the Big 12 alongside UT, that the schools will continue to play football against each other each season, outside of the partial-conference rotation that will mark that large conference's members schedules.

Growing Native
When the Wolfberries Bloom on "A" Mountain

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 5:01


I wrote this song about Lycium fremontii when I was managing the native plant nursery of Desert Survivors on West Starr Pass in Tucson. The nursery is located right beside the Santa Cruz River at the base of A Mountain (Sentinel Peak). I used to perform the song whenever I did slide show talks and a version of it ended up on The Best of Growing Native Volume III. This is yet another version. I love the chorus and have always envisioned the song being part of a musical about Tucson or the Sonoran Desert that surrounds it. I'm looking for investors…I'm kidding. I have so many 35 mm slides of this shrub and its flowers and fruit, but no digital photos, so the photo used here is by Tom Van Devender. He is a botanist, ecologist, biologist and a wonderful fellow. I thank him.

Growing Native
When the Wolfberries Bloom on "A" Mountain

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 5:01


I wrote this song about Lycium fremontii when I was managing the native plant nursery of Desert Survivors on West Starr Pass in Tucson. The nursery is located right beside the Santa Cruz River at the base of A Mountain (Sentinel Peak). I used to perform the song whenever I did slide show talks and a version of it ended up on The Best of Growing Native Volume III. This is yet another version. I love the chorus and have always envisioned the song being part of a musical about Tucson or the Sonoran Desert that surrounds it. I'm looking for investors…I'm kidding. I have so many 35 mm slides of this shrub and its flowers and fruit, but no digital photos, so the photo used here is by Tom Van Devender. He is a botanist, ecologist, biologist and a wonderful fellow. I thank him.

Mexico Unexplained
Cerro de Trincheras, Lost City of the Sonoran Desert

Mexico Unexplained

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022


A magnificent city of 1,500 people flourished in the middle of the Sonoran Desert, then was abandoned.

Draw Knives : A Top Chef Recap Podcast
Top Chef: Season 19 Episode 13 Recap

Draw Knives : A Top Chef Recap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 23:43


The penultimate episode of Top Chef Season 19 has our hosts talking about the origin of the chimichanga, carne seca, and the Sonoran Desert. As the final four chefs get whittled down to three, Nadia and Bernard weigh in on who they think will win as the cheftestants quickly approach the finale.

Live Greatly
Jaana Roth | A Wellness Retreat to Rejuvenate Your Mind, Body & Spirit | Conversation with the Senior Spa Director of the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North

Live Greatly

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 22:37


Global Wellness Day is June 11th 2022 and Kristel Bauer sat down with Janna Roth, the Senior Spa Director of the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North to talk about some rejuvenating and invigorating rituals and services to support your overall well-being.  Kristel and Jaana talk about Desert bathing experiences, massages that incorporate real cactus paddles, a seasonal Soul and Sound series and much more!  This episode is sponsored by the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North.  Kristel and her husband recieved a sponsored stay at the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North which included some incredible food, an amazing Nopal massage, some beautiful hiking and an overall amazing experience and she is excited for you to learn about this resort and some of their amazing offerings!    Key Takeaways from This Episode Insights into the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North services for Global Wellness Day on 6/11/2022 A look into the Desert Bathing Experience Insights into the Soul & Sound Series which includes yoga and sound healing The importance of getting out in nature How to feel your best while traveling A look into the Nopal Massage which uses real cactus paddles Visit the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale Troon North's website here  To participate in the spa activities at Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale Troon North's call 480-513-5145 Disclaimer: All information and views shared on the Live Greatly podcast are purely the opinions of the authors, and are not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. The contents of this podcast are intended for informational and educational purposes only. Always seek the guidance of your physician or other qualified health professionals when you have any questions regarding your specific health, changes to diet and exercise, or any medical conditions. About Jaana Roth: Jaana Roth, Senior Spa Director at Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North, is a spa and wellness visionary who has spent nearly two decades exploring new frontiers in health and wellness, while studying ancient practices and traditions from the Middle East to Polynesia. “It's essential to have a deep understanding of the past to truly understand one's direction in the future," she says. Jaana, a native of Estonia on the Baltic Sea, earned her Bachelors Degree from the University of Tartu. After moving to the United States in 1996, she attended the Conrad Hilton College of Hotel Management at the University of Houston where she earned a Masters Degree in Hospitality Management. In 1998, Jaana joined Four Seasons at Four Seasons Resort and Club Dallas at Las Colinas. Jaana quickly rose in the ranks to the position of Front Desk Manager where she worked until she discovered her passion for spa in 2001.  Since then, Jaana has guided spa teams across the company's vast portfolio including Four Seasons Resort Great Exuma at Emerald Bay (formerly a Four Seasons hotel), Four Seasons Resort Oahu at Ko Olina, and most recently, Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara. Jaana joined Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale in 2021, bringing a clear vision for the Sonoran Desert retreat: overall renewal that is lasting and meaningful. Website: s:/https://https://www.fourseasons.com/scottsdale/?seo=google_local_sco1_amer  Instagram: hthttps://www.instagram.com/fsscottsdale/?hl=en Facebook: @whttps://www.facebook.com/DominiqueSachshttps://www.facebook.com/FourSeasonsResortScottsdale/ Twitter: @wahttps://twitter.com/kprc2dominique?lang=https://twitter.com/FSScottsdale?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor About the Host of the Live Greatly podcast, Kristel Bauer: Kristel, the Founder of Live Greatly, is on a mission to help people thrive personally and professionally. Kristel is a corporate wellness expert, Integrative Medicine Fellow, Top Keynote Speaker, TEDx speaker & contributing writer for Entrepreneur.  Kristel brings her expertise & extensive experience in Corporate Wellness, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, Mindset, Resilience, Self-Care, and Stress Management to in-person and virtual events as Professional Keynote Speaker.  If you are looking for a female motivational speaker to inspire and empower your audience to reclaim their well-being, inner motivation and happiness, Kristel's message will leave a lasting impression. Kristel would be happy to discuss partnering with you to make your next event one to remember! Speaking Topics can be tailored to fit the needs of your group. To Book Kristel as a speaker for your next event, click here. Follow Kristel Bauer on: Instagram: @livegreatly_co LinkedIn: Kristel Bauer Twitter: @livegreatly_co Facebook: @livegreatly.co Youtube: Live Greatly, Kristel Bauer To Watch Kristel Bauer's TEDx talk of Redefining Work/Life Balance in a COVID-19 World click here.

Talk Stupid 2 Me
132 - Extreme Nature

Talk Stupid 2 Me

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 44:17


Life seems to thrive on this planet in the least suspecting of places, including caves, volcanoes, and acidic pools.  This episode of TS2M is about crazy things and places in nature, as well as some of the creatures that somehow live there.Support the show

BirdNote
Phainopeplas Glisten

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 1:46 Very Popular


A slim, sleek bird with a spiky crest, Phainopepla comes from the Greek for “shining cloak.” The name refers to the male's glistening, inky black feathers, which are set off by piercing red eyes. And if the Greek name isn't helping you picture it, a common nickname might: the goth cardinal. From February to April, they nest in pairs in the arid Sonoran Desert. From May to July, they form nesting colonies in leafy oak and sycamore canyons to escape the summer heat. Learn more at BirdNote.org.

New Books Network
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Politics
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in American Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Politics
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books in Native American Studies
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Environmental Studies
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Critical Theory
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Geography
Alicia Puglionesi, "In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession, and the Landscapes of American Empire" (Scribner, 2022)

New Books in Geography

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 64:04


The important new book by Alicia Puglionesi, In Whose Ruins: Power, Possession and the Landscapes of American Empire (Scribner, 2022), is a fat sampler of episodes that show how origin stories get made, what happens when white-supremacist origin stories are mistaken for empirical fact, and how the political impacts persist. The book is decidedly anti-capitalist; resoundingly anti-colonial. It is an invitation not to jettison story-work, but to imagine, collectively, origin stories of the present that might bring into being a more just future. In Whose Ruins could easily be categorized as Environmental History or Native Studies. But Puglionesi forges a book that is more than either field could accomplish alone. The “power” of the book's subtitle has a double meeting: political power and the energy sources of a capitalist economy (oil, hydropower, and nuclear energy). The book is organized into four sections, or “sites,” that visit four evocative land features: a hulking, conical earth mound in present-day West Virginia adjacent to a decommissioned state prison; wells dug into the ground in smalltown Pennsylvania; rocks that tell stories (they're etched with petroglyphs) along the Susquehanna River with kin fragmented elsewhere; the Sonoran Desert rich with pottery, uranium, and physicists, both white and Native. In each of these sites, people with different political projects—some announced, some implicit—have generated multiple accounts of the landscapes and ideas of value. Within a context of shifting political power, white-settler stories about each site displaced empirical knowledge of Native labor, skill, presence, and endurance with harmful fables of white origins and of Native communities' need for white “rescue.” Into the present day, the effect has been to justify white theft of Native land and deadly violence against tribal communities for the purposes of resource extraction. In the end, even the false white origin stories became a resource to commodify. Puglionesi is a writer of poetry, fiction, academic scholarship, and, now, In Whose Ruins, a mass-market trade publication. She holds a PhD in History of Medicine and is a lecturer in Medicine, Science and Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. On the page, Puglionesi has a friendly, funny, quiet presence—an affable Where's Waldo that centers the relationships of historical actors (including spirits) and the work of scholars such as Kim TallBear, Zoe Todd, and Eve Tuck. This conversation explores ways of living in good relation via writing; the status of truth; the relevance of singer-songwriter Prince for labor studies; and many other themes. It discusses the important book by Chadwick Allen, Earthworks Rising (Minnesota, 2022). In an unrecorded snippet, we also swap names of our favorite local indie bookstores. So check out Red Emma's the next time you're in Baltimore, MD (or on Bookshop.org) and Symposium, Riff Raff, and Paper Nautilus when your compass points to Providence, RI. Laura Stark is Associate Professor at Vanderbilt University's Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/geography

Florida Trail Runners Podcast
#26: Stories from the Cocodona 250

Florida Trail Runners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 76:23


This year was the second Cocodona 250 put on Aravaipa Running in Arizona. When it comes to Florida, our state had four runners taking on the challenge of 250 miles across the Sonoran Desert with soaring temps both hot and cold, bloody noses, heat rash, gnarly trails and more... For this part-one episode we have Michelle Taylor and Dave Krupski! The second part will be with the barefoot runner C Sawyer. Michelle took on the course head on however, she unfortunately took a DNF this year. Covering the distance she was able to is still no joke! It is such an accomplishment and an amazing journey. Krupski came back for a second time after succumbing to a DNF last year. This year, he got it done! This was a blast!

Artistories
Alex! Jimenez - Public Artist, Illustrator, Printmaker and Mother

Artistories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 33:11


In this episode, we hear from Alex! Jimenez, Public Artist, Illustrator, Printmaker, and Mother. Alex begins by sharing a story about the exciting project that started through an initiative of the US Water Alliance and Tucson Water. As the selected artist for the Tucson Water team, Alex shares the goals of the project and how she decided to mitigate the “bad history” in South Tucson in relationship to water and the path to building trust. Sharing the historical context in which the project took place, Alex then gets into how her process led to collaborations with the community and Tucson artists to develop a library of monsoon storm sounds. She then shares her motivation for working in the intersections of art and science. Alex takes us back to when she was pursuing a career as a veterinarian, and we learn how her career trajectory shifted to visual arts and the excitement of being awarded an artist grant as she completed a BFA degree in Illustration from the University of Arizona. Alex provides advice for emerging artists and emphasizes the importance of seeking grant funding to develop projects and the value of collaboration in her practice. Finally, she shares what is moving her in this moment and the big plans in store for the coming years as a public artist working in her home community of South Tucson. Lear More about Alex’s residency here! Additional audio provided by Alex Jimenez featuring collaborations with Logan Phillips, Cazo, Karima Walker, and Kevin Larkin. To hear all this more, listen to the full-length podcast by clicking the link above! To listen to the mini, click below! https://kxci.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Alex-Jimenez-Mini_mixdown.mp3 Alex Jimenez. Image courtesy of the artist. The Talking Mural, 2017.  This mural has QR codes that you can scan to listen to short stories told by the business owners whose signs are featured on this mural. Image courtesy of the artist. Our Pond, Our Planet, 2021. An editioned screenprint that plays with the idea of our shared water both on the micro level of an ecosystem but on the global level of our planet. The animals along the perimeter of the pond are natives of the Sonoran Desert. Image courtesy of

Journal of the Southwest Radio Hour
Brian Powell: Protecting the Sonoran Desert

Journal of the Southwest Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 66:04


Brian Powell, currently a Parks Superintendent with Pima County's Natural Resource, Parks and Recreation department, has spent the past two decades working to understand and protect biodiversity in the Sonoran Desert of Southern Arizona. In 2007, he was tapped by Maeveen Behan to develop a biological monitoring program for Pima County. In this interview, Powell describes efforts leading to the county's innovative approach to preserving open space, starting in the late 1990s – the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. This was a time of fast-paced housing development, particularly on Tucson's northwest side, and environmentalists were pushing for stronger controls on growth. This interview is the first in a two-part series focusing on conservation in Southern Arizona.

DF Connection
Brown's Ranch, AZ - Why it's a special place to ride!

DF Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 11:56


Sonoran Desert cycling means taking in saguaros and beautiful exposed geology. A great place to see and ride through the desert in Arizona is Brown's Ranch. Brown's Ranch is located within the McDowell Sonoran Preserve, an incredible area conserved in Scottsdale, Arizona. On today's episode, we talk with Stu Alt, a trail steward and local who walks us through the geology, plant-life, history, and riding at Brown's Ranch. More Information: Brown's Ranch ------------------------------- This podcast is produced by Dirty Freehub, a nonprofit organization that publishes hand-curated (and great!) gravel cycling route guides. Our mission is to connect gravel cyclists to where they ride through stories about culture, history, people, places, and lands with the hope that they will become involved as advocates, volunteers, or donors with organizations that protect and preserve recreation spaces. Our Podcast Channel / The Connection Our Route Guides / Dirty Freehub Our Ask / Donate

Growing Native
Occupied, Not Vacant

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 4:34


There are 2 species of walnuts here in the borderlands of southern Arizona; the Arizona walnut (Juglans major) that I talked about and a species called little walnut (Juglans microcarpa) which is uncommon, but I found it growing in a canyon on the east side of the Catalina Mountain above Redington along the San Pedro River. Travel eastward to the Trans Pecos of Texas and it’s quite common in that region. In the eastern U.S. it is the land of the black walnut (Juglans nigra), not to mention other trees in the walnut family (Juglandaceae) like the butternut and a few hickory and pecan species (Carya). I think when I first saw a walnut tree in southern Arizona in the 1960s, I had a “Whoa, that's a walnut tree!” moment. Hmm, I still have that reaction and Arizona walnut trees (Juglans major) are magnificent! I have so many memories of hikes or journeys in southern Arizona that include walnut trees…sometimes up high in the mountains or as I mentioned in this episode, in a riparian canyon cutting into the Sonoran Desert. They're part of the flora and fauna that make the borderlands so diverse and beautiful and occupied, not vacant. The photos are taken from SEINet and are either by Max Licher or Leslie Landrum…I mixed them up, but I thank them.

Growing Native
Occupied, Not Vacant

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 4:34


There are 2 species of walnuts here in the borderlands of southern Arizona; the Arizona walnut (Juglans major) that I talked about and a species called little walnut (Juglans microcarpa) which is uncommon, but I found it growing in a canyon on the east side of the Catalina Mountain above Redington along the San Pedro River. Travel eastward to the Trans Pecos of Texas and it’s quite common in that region. In the eastern U.S. it is the land of the black walnut (Juglans nigra), not to mention other trees in the walnut family (Juglandaceae) like the butternut and a few hickory and pecan species (Carya). I think when I first saw a walnut tree in southern Arizona in the 1960s, I had a “Whoa, that's a walnut tree!” moment. Hmm, I still have that reaction and Arizona walnut trees (Juglans major) are magnificent! I have so many memories of hikes or journeys in southern Arizona that include walnut trees…sometimes up high in the mountains or as I mentioned in this episode, in a riparian canyon cutting into the Sonoran Desert. They're part of the flora and fauna that make the borderlands so diverse and beautiful and occupied, not vacant. The photos are taken from SEINet and are either by Max Licher or Leslie Landrum…I mixed them up, but I thank them.

CannaInsider - Interviews with the Business Leaders of The Legal Cannabis, Marijuana, CBD Industry
Delta-8 THC and 5-MeO-DMT (Two Compounds You Need To Know About)

CannaInsider - Interviews with the Business Leaders of The Legal Cannabis, Marijuana, CBD Industry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 54:20


What are Delta-8 THC and 5-MeO-DMT and what's all the hype about? Here to help us understand is the cannabis whisper himself, Max Montrose of Trichome Institute. Learn more at https://trichomeinstitute.com Key Takeaways: [00:43] An inside look at Trichome Institute, the leading cannabis education company [2:06] Delta-8 THC and how it differs from its better-known cousin delta-9 THC [3:45] Why delta-8 is surging in popularity [13:36] Where Max sees delta-8 THC heading over the next 3-5 years [16:44] Max's partnership with Abstrax, an industry leader in the study and production of cannabis and botanically-derived terpenes [23:39] 5-MeO-DMT, a psychedelic found in a variety of plant species and the glands of the Sonoran Desert toad [27:39] Max's work studying the Sonoran Desert toad and their unique venom glands [41:12] How Max's experiences with 5-MeO-DMT and ayahuasca have changed his philosophies and way of life

Start Today Podcast
Chris' Eye-Opening Experience With “The Toad”

Start Today Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 92:29


5-MeO-DMT, aka “the toad”, is a substance secreted from the venom of the Sonoran Desert toad.  It's the most powerful psychedelic known to man and has earned the nickname, the “God Molecule”.  Most of society associates psychedelics with illegal drugs like heroin and assume the goal is just to get fucked up.  We are here today to show healing is possible through psychedelics like these.   A John Hopkins study tested 362 adults that used 5-MeO-DMT in a ceremonial setting. 80% reported being less anxious, having lessened depression and reported a come up in their overall quality of life.    In episode 76, Chris goes into detail about his recent experience with the hallucinogenic, 5-MeO-DMT.  He opens up about what led him to using “The Toad”, as well as the valuable life altering events and lessons he experienced on his journey.     You will hear a very vulnerable and enlightened version of Chris, as he shares, in detail, about the single most powerful yet terrifying perspective altering experience of his life.  Chris, gives a behind the scenes account of what exactly happens during these spiritual experiences which are designed to heal, awaken and tap into our higher levels of consciousness. You will also hear from Chris about the personal struggle in 2021 that threatened to derail Nutrition Solutions as well as his own routines.   You're not going to want to miss this!

Arizona Spotlight
The drivers of the Women's Formula 1 racing circuit test their speed and skill in the Sonoran Desert

Arizona Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 27:49


This AmeriCorps Life
Share It All In A Cook Book

This AmeriCorps Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 40:01


Are you aware of all the native plants that grow here in the Sonoran Desert? AmeriCorps members Cara serving with Mission Garden and Briana serving with Tucson Clean & Beautiful discuss the importance of learning more on the indigenous culture and environment here in Tucson and the importance of sharing. Whether that's information or recipes, sharing is what helps our community flourish and bloom. Hear what they have to share on this episode! https://www.missiongarden.org/ https://tucsoncleanandbeautiful.org/

Growing Native
Brittle Bush Spring

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 4:34


Encelia farinosa (brittle bush, incienso) loves rocky hillsides and gravelly desert. And though this native shrub has a large range showing up in the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, for me personally the bright yellow flowers atop the silvery foliage shout, “Sonoran Desert!” If you're interested in ethnobotany (and why wouldn't you be?) this is a good plant to add to your journal with its many uses, from chewing gum to incense. And good native plant nurseries grow and sell this wonderful wide ranging native, so plant or 2 or 3 in your personal habitat to remind you that, “the desert is beautiful.” Yeah it is. I couldn't find any digital photos  of brittle bush in my collection  (35 mm slides, yes, of course), but there are numerous photos on line. Well, of all things, I found and really liked these pics at at a web site about the Mojave Desert called BirdandHike.com. I thank them.

Growing Native
Brittle Bush Spring

Growing Native

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 4:34


Encelia farinosa (brittle bush, incienso) loves rocky hillsides and gravelly desert. And though this native shrub has a large range showing up in the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, for me personally the bright yellow flowers atop the silvery foliage shout, “Sonoran Desert!” If you're interested in ethnobotany (and why wouldn't you be?) this is a good plant to add to your journal with its many uses, from chewing gum to incense. And good native plant nurseries grow and sell this wonderful wide ranging native, so plant or 2 or 3 in your personal habitat to remind you that, “the desert is beautiful.” Yeah it is. I couldn't find any digital photos  of brittle bush in my collection  (35 mm slides, yes, of course), but there are numerous photos on line. Well, of all things, I found and really liked these pics at at a web site about the Mojave Desert called BirdandHike.com. I thank them.

Higher Consciousness Talk
Higher Consciousness Season 6 Episode 3 Bufo Alvarius

Higher Consciousness Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 62:47


Next up in our Psychedelic season is Bufo Alvarius, aka the Psychedelic Toad of the Sonoran Desert! Currently this sacred medicine is receiving international attention due to its powerful ability for spiritual evolution. We can find evidence of Bufo Alvarius all the way back to Mayan & Olmec cultures. Traditionally, this was kept secret by the shamans of the indigenous people, but over time it grew in popularity due to the work of consciousness explorer & researcher Ken Nelson. Thanks to Hamilton Morris, the world knows the true story of Al Most aka Ken Nelson. We dive into all of this, plus we share our personal thughts about it, & ask mind-opening questions around protecting the Bufo Alvarius toad. Get ready for another wild ride through the cosmos! Don't forget Mary Jane!

Arizona State Parks and Trails Podcast
Ecotourism with Dr. Aireona Raschke of Central Arizona Conservation Alliance

Arizona State Parks and Trails Podcast

Play Episode Play 28 sec Highlight Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 25:23


Is it possible to support conservation efforts and be a tourist at the same time? Dr. Aireona Raschke of the Central Arizona Conservation Alliance (CAZCA) shares how you can do both! We talked with Aireona about what ecotourism can look like when recreating in beautiful places, from both perspectives of sustainability for the habitat and for community support. Sometimes this looks like helping map invasive plants while you're hiking to assist land managers, choosing wisely with your own landscaping decisions, and volunteering with local groups to do conservation work; other times it looks like donating to an organization or spreading awareness about the work they're doing. Find out more about CAZCA and follow along with the work they're doing to protect and care for natural, open spaces that serve the communities and protect the habitat of the Sonoran Desert in Central Arizona.Check out the principles of responsible recreation.Visit Aireona's blog, Nightborn Travel, where she showcases her own responsible tourism adventures.

The Slowdown
554: Sonoran Desert Poem

The Slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:19


Today's poem is Sonoran Desert Poem by Jake Skeets.

The Slowdown
554: Sonoran Desert Poem

The Slowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 5:19


Today's poem is Sonoran Desert Poem by Jake Skeets.