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The study of the past through material culture

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    Latest podcast episodes about Archaeology

    Belly Dance Life
    Ep 202. Dr. Audrey Cottet: Researching Finger Cymbal Playing in the Roman Empire

    Belly Dance Life

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 68:26


    Dr. Audrey Cottet is an academic researcher in the Physics department of the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris. She has over twenty years of expertise in theoretical physics, with a focus on condensed matter physics and quantum physics. Outside the lab, Audrey is a Middle Eastern dance and percussion student.She has learned how to player finger cymbals with Hassan Abdel Khalek and Nicolas Derolin in Paris. This practice motivated her secondary research activity on the history of cymbal playing. She has recently written one article on finger cymbal played in the Roman Empire, in the journal “Early Music” published by the Oxford University Press. She also has a second article published in the Review CLARA (Classical Art and Archaeology) hosted by the University of Oslo.In this episode you will learn about:- Proper terminology: zills, sagats or cymbals- The very first mentions of cymbals and finger cymbals in ancient history- The process of writing a peer reviewed article- The tradition of finger cymbals playing in the Roman Empire- First known mentions of finger cymbals in Egyptian cultureShow Notes to this episode:Follow Dr. Audrey Cottet via Instagram. Two of her articles available here: Playing finger cymbals in the Roman Empire: an iconographic study, and Cymbals playing in a Roman mosaic from Mariamin in SyriaAlso, check her performance at the upcoming show "Hommages" choregraphed by Ciya with her amateur dance troupe the “Ballet Egypt'Ciya”, with invited professional dancers (Yael Zarca, Gennaro Festa, Myrto Kaukias) and with a small finger cymbal solo by Audrey (July 3rd, in Montrouge near Paris).Find information on how you can support Ukraine and Ukrainian belly dancers HERE.Podcast: www.ianadance.com/podcast

    Threads of Enlightenment
    My interview with Dr. William Attaway

    Threads of Enlightenment

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 38:44


    I interviewed Dr. William Attaway. Dr. Attaway is an author, entrepreneur, blogger, and speaker. He is a Leadership and Executive Coach for Catalytic Leadership, LLC, a company he founded to help leaders INTENTIONALLY grow and thrive, and a lead pastor that holds a Ph.D. in Old Testament (with an emphasis in Biblical Backgrounds and Archaeology), and is currently the Lead Pastor of Southview Community Church, a church in Herndon, Virginia (near Washington, D.C.) where he has served since 2004. Dr. Attaway is a John Maxwell Team certified speaker, coach, and trainer. He has taught courses in Old and New Testament Survey and the Pentateuch for Washington University of Virginia and Itawamba Community College. He worked for two seasons on the team of an archaeological dig at Tall el-Hammam in Jordan. In 2014 he published his first book, Lead: Leadership Lessons from the (Not So) Minor Prophets, and in 2022 his newest book, Catalytic Leadership. I encourage everyone to buy his book follow him and be transformed by his insights. Everyone has a story, and this is his story. Below are the sites that house his work. https://catalyticleadership.net/ (https://catalyticleadership.net/) https://www.facebook.com/williamattaway (https://www.facebook.com/williamattaway) https://www.linkedin.com/in/williamattaway/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/williamattaway/) https://www.instagram.com/wattaway/ (https://www.instagram.com/wattaway/) https://twitter.com/WilliamAttaway (https://twitter.com/WilliamAttaway) Visit our Threads of Enlightenment store: https://threads-of-enlightenment.myshopify.com/ (https://threads-of-enlightenment.myshopify.com/) We shop worldwide to find some of the highest-quality and some limited hard-to-find products online for you. We work closely with many suppliers to get the lowest prices. Enjoy our store!!!!!!.

    Midnight Train Podcast
    The Antikythera Mechanism (Nerd Overload)

    Midnight Train Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 114:36


    Sign up for bonus episodes at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com    Well since last week's episode left Logan up at night with nightmares and I still can't get the stains out of my shorts; we have decided to make this week's episode a little more on the lighter side. So we are diving deep into the wonderful world of politics! You got it, today we are going to discuss The Biden Administrations wonderful and brilliant plans and maybe even get an interview with Brandon himself! HA like that would ever happen. Fuck those guys. We are actually talking about the Antikythera Mechanism, and the mysteries surrounding it.   The Antikythera mechanism is a hand-powered orrery( a mechanical model of our solar system) from Ancient Greece that has been dubbed the world's first analog computer since it was used to forecast celestial locations and eclipses decades in advance. The ancient Olympic Games' four-year cycle, which was akin to an Olympiad, could also be followed using this method.   In 1901, wreckage from a shipwreck off the shore of the Greek island of Antikythera included this artifact. Archaeologist Valerios Stais recognized it as bearing a gear on May 17, 1902. The gadget, which was found as a single lump and then fragmented into three primary components that are now divided into 82 individual shards following conservation efforts, was contained in the remnants of a wooden box that measured 34 cm 18 cm 9 cm (13.4 in 7.1 in 3.5 in). While several of these shards have inscriptions, four of them have gears. The biggest gear has 223 teeth and is around 13 centimeters (5.1 in) in diameter.   Using contemporary computer x-ray tomography and high resolution surface scanning, a team at Cardiff University led by Mike Edmunds and Tony Freeth was able to image inside fragments of the crust-encased mechanism in 2008 and decipher the faintest writing that had once been inscribed on the machine's outer casing. This shows that it contained 37 bronze meshing gears that allowed it to mimic the Moon's erratic orbit, where the Moon's velocity is higher in its perigee than in its apogee, follow the motions of the Moon and Sun across the zodiac, and anticipate eclipses. Astronomer Hipparchus of Rhodes researched this motion in the second century BC, and it is possible that he was consulted when building the device. It is believed that a piece of the system, which also determined the locations of the five classical planets, is missing.   The device has been variously dated to between 150 and 100 BC, or to 205 BC, and it is thought to have been devised and built by Greek scientists. In any event, it had to have been built prior to the shipwreck, which has been dated to around 70–60 BC by many lines of evidence. Researchers suggested in 2022 that the machine's initial calibration date, rather than the actual date of manufacture, would have been December 23, 178 BC. Some academics disagree, arguing that the calibration date should be 204 BC. Up to the astronomical clocks of Richard of Wallingford and Giovanni de' Dondi in the fourteenth century, comparable complicated machines had not been seen.   The National Archaeological Museum in Athens currently has all of the Antikythera mechanism's fragments as well as a variety of reproductions and artistic reconstructions that show how it would have appeared and operated.   During the first voyage with the Hellenic Royal Navy, in 1900–1901, Captain Dimitrios Kontos and a crew of sponge divers from Symi island found the Antikythera shipwreck. Off Point Glyphadia on the Greek island of Antikythera, at a depth of 45 meters (148 feet), a Roman cargo ship wreck was discovered. The crew found various huge items, including the mechanism, ceramics, special glassware, jewelry, bronze and marble statues, and more. In 1901, most likely that July, the mechanism was pulled from the rubble. The mechanism's origin remains unknown, however it has been speculated that it was transported from Rhodes to Rome along with other seized goods to assist a triumphant procession that Julius Caesar was staging.   The National Museum of Archaeology in Athens received all the salvaged debris pieces for storage and examination. The museum personnel spent two years assembling more visible artifacts, like the sculptures, but the mechanism, which looked like a mass of tarnished brass and wood, remained unseen. The mechanism underwent deformational modifications as a result of not treating it after removal from saltwater.   Archaeologist Valerios Stais discovered a gear wheel lodged in one of the rocks on May 17, 1902. Although most experts judged the object to be prochronistic and too complicated to have been created during the same era as the other components that had been unearthed, he originally thought it was an astronomical clock. Before British science historian and Yale University professor Derek J. de Solla Price developed an interest in the object in 1951, investigations into the object were abandoned. The 82 pieces were photographed using X-ray and gamma-ray technology in 1971 by Price and Greek nuclear researcher Charalampos Karakalos. In 1974, Price issued a 70-page report summarizing their findings.   In 2012 and 2015, two more searches at the Antikythera wreck site turned up artifacts and another ship that may or may not be related to the treasure ship on which the mechanism was discovered. A bronze disc decorated with a bull's head was also discovered. Some speculated that the disc, which has four "ears" with holes in them, may have served as a "cog wheel" in the Antikythera mechanism. There doesn't seem to be any proof that it was a component of the mechanism; it's more probable that the disc was a bronze ornament on some furniture.   The earliest analog computer is typically referred to as the Antikythera mechanism. The production of the device must have had undiscovered ancestors throughout the Hellenistic era based on its quality and intricacy. It is believed to have been erected either in the late second century BC or the early first century BC, and its construction was based on mathematical and astronomical ideas created by Greek scientists during the second century BC.   Since they recognized the calendar on the Metonic Spiral as originating from Corinth or one of its colonies in northwest Greece or Sicily, further investigation by the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project in 2008 showed that the idea for the mechanism may have originated in the colonies of Corinth. The Antikythera Mechanism Research Initiative contended in 2008 that Syracuse could suggest a relationship with the school of Archimedes because it was a Corinthian colony and the home of Archimedes. In 2017, it was shown that the Metonic Spiral's calendar is of the Corinthian type and cannot be a Syracuse calendar. Another idea postulates that the device's origin may have come from the ancient Greek city of Pergamon, site of the Library of Pergamum, and claims that coins discovered by Jacques Cousteau at the wreck site in the 1970s correspond to the time of the device's creation. It was second in significance to the Library of Alexandria during the Hellenistic era due to its extensive collection of art and scientific scrolls.   A theory that the gadget was built in an academy established by Stoic philosopher Posidonius on that Greek island is supported by the discovery of Rhodian-style vases aboard the ship that carried the object. Hipparchus, an astronomer active from around 140 BC to 120 BC, lived at Rhodes, which was a bustling commercial port and a center for astronomy and mechanical engineering. Hipparchus' hypothesis of the motion of the Moon is used by the mechanism, raising the likelihood that he may have developed it or at the very least worked on it. The island of Rhodes is situated between the latitudes of 35.85 and 36.50 degrees north; it has lately been proposed that the astronomical events on the Parapegma of the Antikythera mechanism operate best for latitudes in the range of 33.3-37.0 degrees north.   According to a research published in 2014 by Carman and Evans, the Saros Dial's start-up date corresponds to the astronomical lunar month that started soon after the new moon on April 28, 205 BC. This suggests a revised dating of about 200 BC. Carman and Evans claim that the Babylonian arithmetic style of prediction suits the device's predictive models considerably better than the conventional Greek trigonometric approach does. According to a 2017 study by Paul Iversen, the device's prototype originated in Rhodes, but this particular model was modified for a customer from Epirus in northwest Greece. Iversen contends that the device was likely built no earlier than a generation before the shipwreck, a date that is also supported by Jones.   In an effort to learn more about the mechanism, further dives were made in 2014 and 2015. A five-year investigative program that started in 2014 and finished in October 2019 was followed by a second five-year session that began in May 2020.   The original mechanism probably came in one encrusted piece from the Mediterranean. It broke into three main parts shortly after that. In the meanwhile, more little fragments have come loose from handling and cleaning, and the Cousteau expedition discovered other fragments on the ocean floor. Fragment F was found in this fashion in 2005, suggesting that other fragments may still remain in storage, undetected since their first retrieval. The majority of the mechanism and inscriptions are found on seven of the 82 known fragments, which are also mechanically noteworthy. Additionally, 16 smaller components include inscriptions that are illegible and fragmentary.    The twelve zodiacal signs are divided into equal 30-degree sectors on a fixed ring dial that represents the ecliptic on the mechanism's front face. Even though the borders of the constellations were arbitrary, this was consistent with the Babylonian practice of allocating an equal portion of the ecliptic to each zodiac sign. The Sothic Egyptian calendar, which has twelve months of 30 days plus five intercalary days, is marked off with a rotating ring that is located outside that dial. The Greek alphabetized versions of the Egyptian names for the months are used to identify them. To align the Egyptian calendar ring with the current zodiac points, the first procedure is to spin it. Due to the Egyptian calendar's disregard for leap days, a whole zodiac sign would cycle through every 120 years.   Now we cannot show you pictures because well you couldn't see them. So we will try to describe them as best we can and we can also post them online.    The mechanism was turned by a now-lost little hand crank that was connected to the biggest gear, the four-spoked gear shown on the front of fragment A, gear b1, via a crown gear. As a result, the date indicator on the front dial was shifted to the appropriate day of the Egyptian calendar. Since the year cannot be changed, it is necessary to know the year that is currently in use. Alternatively, since most calendar cycles are not synchronized with the year, the cycles indicated by the various calendar cycle indicators on the back can be found in the Babylonian ephemeris tables for the day of the year that is currently in use. If the mechanism were in good operating order, the crank would easily be able to strike a certain day on the dial because it moves the date marker around 78 days each full rotation. The mechanism's interlocking gears would all revolve as the hand crank was turned, allowing for the simultaneous determination of the Sun's and Moon's positions, the moon's phase, the timing of an eclipse, the calendar cycle, and maybe the positions of planets.   The position of the spiral dial pointers on the two huge dials on the rear had to be observed by the operator as well. As the dials included four and five complete rotations of the pointers, the pointer had a "follower" that followed the spiral incisions in the metal. Before continuing, a pointer's follower had to be manually shifted to the opposite end of the spiral after reaching the terminal month place at either end of the spiral.   Two circular concentric scales may be seen on the front dial. The Greek zodiac signs are denoted on the inner scale, which is divided into degrees. A series of similar holes underneath the movable ring that rests flush with the surface and runs in a channel that makes up the outer scale are marked off with what appear to be days.   This outer ring has been thought to symbolize the 365-day Egyptian calendar ever since the mechanism was discovered, but new study contradicts this assumption and suggests it is really divided into 354 intervals. The Sothic and Callippic cycles had previously pointed to a 365 14-day solar year, as evidenced in Ptolemy III's proposed calendar reform of 238 BC. If one accepts the 365-day presupposition, it is acknowledged that the mechanism predates the Julian calendar reform. The dials aren't thought to represent his intended leap day, but by rotating the scale back one day every four years, the outer calendar dial may be adjusted against the inner dial to account for the effect of the extra quarter-day in the solar year.   The ring is most likely seen as a manifestation of a 354-day lunar calendar if one accepts the 354-day evidence. It is perhaps the first instance of the Egyptian civil-based lunar calendar postulated by Richard Anthony Parker in 1950, given the age of the mechanism's putative manufacture and the existence of Egyptian month names. The lunar calendar was intended to act as a daily indicator of succeeding lunations and to aid in the understanding of the Metonic(The moon phases return at the same time of year every almost precisely 19 years during the Metonic cycle. Although the recurrence is imperfect, careful examination shows that the Metonic cycle, which is defined as 235 synodic months, is only 2 hours, 4 minutes, and 58 seconds longer than 19 tropical years. In the fifth century BC, Meton of Athens determined that the cycle was exactly 6,940 days long. The creation of a lunisolar calendar is made easier by using these full integers.) and Saros(The saros, which may be used to forecast solar and lunar eclipses, is a period of exactly 223 synodic months, or around 6585.3211 days, or 18 years, 10, 11, or 12 days (depending on how many leap years there are). In what is known as an eclipse cycle, the Sun, Earth, and Moon return to about the same relative geometry, a nearly straight line, one saros time after an eclipse, and a nearly similar eclipse will take place. A sar is a saros's lower half.) dials as well as the Lunar phase pointer. Unknown gearing is assumed to move a pointer across this scale in synchrony with the rest of the mechanism's Metonic gearing. A one-in-76-year Callippic cycle correction and practical lunisolar intercalation were made possible by the movement and registration of the ring with respect to the underlying holes.   The dial also shows the Sun's location on the ecliptic in relation to the current year's date. The ecliptic serves as a useful reference for determining the locations of the Moon, the five planets known to the Greeks, and other celestial bodies whose orbits are similarly near to it.   The locations of bodies on the ecliptic were marked by at least two points. The position of the Moon was displayed by a lunar pointer, while the location of the mean Sun and the current date were also provided. The Moon position was the oldest known application of epicyclic gearing(Two gears positioned so that one gear's center spins around the other's center make up an epicyclic gear train, sometimes referred to as a planetary gearset.), and it mimicked the acceleration and deceleration of the Moon's elliptical orbit rather than being a simple mean Moon indicator that would signal movement uniformly across a circular orbit.   The system followed the Metonic calendar, anticipated solar eclipses, and computed the time of various panhellenic athletic competitions, including the Ancient Olympic Games, according to recent research published in the journal Nature in July 2008. The names of the months on the instrument closely resemble those found on calendars from Epirus in northwest Greece and with Corfu, which was formerly known as Corcyra.   Five dials are located on the rear of the mechanism: the Metonic, Saros, and two smaller ones, the so-called Olympiad Dial (recently renamed the Games dial since it did not track Olympiad years; the four-year cycle it closely matches is the Halieiad), the Callippic(a certain approximate common multiple of the synodic month and the tropical year that was put out by Callippus around 330 BC. It is a 76-year span that is an improvement over the Metonic cycle's 19 years.), and the Exeligmos(a time frame of 54 years, 33 days over which further eclipses with the same characteristics and position may be predicted.)   Both the front and rear doors of the wooden casing that houses the mechanism have inscriptions on them. The "instruction manual" looks to be behind the rear door. "76 years, 19 years" is inscribed on one of its parts, denoting the Callippic and Metonic cycles. "223" for the Saros cycle is also written. Another piece of it has the phrase "on the spiral subdivisions 235," which alludes to the Metonic dial.   The mechanism is exceptional due to the degree of miniaturization and the intricacy of its components, which is equivalent to that of astronomical clocks from the fourteenth century. Although mechanism specialist Michael Wright has argued that the Greeks of this era were capable of designing a system with many more gears, it includes at least 30 gears. Whether the device contained signs for each of the five planets known to the ancient Greeks is a subject of significant controversy. With the exception of one 63-toothed gear that is otherwise unaccounted for, no gearing for such a planetary display is still in existence.   It is quite likely that the mechanism featured additional gearing that was either removed before being placed onboard the ship or lost in or after the shipwreck due to the enormous gap between the mean Sun gear and the front of the box as well as the size and mechanical characteristics on the mean Sun gear. Numerous attempts to mimic what the Greeks of the time would have done have been made as a result of the absence of evidence and the nature of the front section of the mechanism, and of course various solutions have been proposed as a result of the lack of evidence.   Michael Wright was the first to create a model that included a simulation of a future planetarium system in addition to the existing mechanism. He said that corrections for the deeper, more fundamental solar anomaly would have been undertaken in addition to the lunar anomaly (known as the "first anomaly"). Along with the well-known "mean sun" (present time) and lunar pointers, he also provided pointers for this "real sun," Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.   A solution that differs significantly from Wright's was published by Evans, Carman, and Thorndike. Their suggestion focused on the uneven spacing of the letters on the front clock face, which seemed to them to imply an off-center sun indication arrangement. By eliminating the requirement to imitate the solar anomaly, this would simplify the mechanism. Additionally, they proposed that simple dials for each individual planet would display data such as significant planetary cycle events, initial and final appearances in the night sky, and apparent direction changes rather than accurate planetary indication, which is rendered impossible by the offset inscriptions. Compared to Wright's concept, this system would result in a far more straightforward gear system with significantly lower forces and complexity.   After much investigation and labor, Freeth and Jones released their idea in 2012. They developed a concise and workable answer to the planetary indicator puzzle. They also suggest that the date pointer, which displays the mean position of the Sun and the date on the month dial, be separated to display the solar anomaly (i.e., the sun's apparent location in the zodiac dial). If the two dials are properly synced, Wright's front panel display may be shown on the other dials as well. However, unlike Wright's model, this one is simply a 3-D computer simulation and has not been physically constructed.   Similar devices A first-century BC philosophical debate by Cicero, De re publica (54-51 BC), discusses two devices that some contemporary authors believe to be some sort of planetarium or orrery, forecasting the motions of the Sun, Moon, and the five planets known at the time. After Archimedes' demise at the siege of Syracuse in 212 BC, the Roman commander Marcus Claudius Marcellus took both of them to Rome. One of these devices was the sole thing Marcellus preserved during the siege because of his admiration for Archimedes (the second was placed in the Temple of Virtue). The instrument was kept as a family heirloom, and according to Philus, who was present during a conversation Cicero imagined had taken place in Scipio Aemilianus's villa in the year 129 BC, Gaius Sulpicius Gallus, who served as consul with Marcellus's nephew in 166 BC and is credited by Pliny the Elder with being the first Roman to have written a book explaining solar and lunar eclipses, gave both a "learned explanation" and working demonstrations of the device.   According to Pappus of Alexandria (290–c. 350 AD), Archimedes had penned a now-lost treatise titled On Sphere-Making that described how to build these contraptions. Many of his innovations are described in the ancient documents that have survived, some of which even have crude illustrations. His odometer is one such instrument; the Romans later used a similar device to set their mile marks (described by Vitruvius, Heron of Alexandria and in the time of Emperor Commodus). Although the pictures in the literature looked to be practical, attempts to build them as shown had been unsuccessful. The system worked properly when the square-toothed gears in the illustration were swapped out for the angled gears found in the Antikythera mechanism.   This technique existed as early as the third century BC, if Cicero's story is accurate. Later Roman authors including Lactantius (Divinarum Institutionum Libri VII), Claudian (In sphaeram Archimedes), and Proclus (Commentary on the First Book of Euclid's Elements of Geometry) in the fourth and fifth century also make reference to Archimedes' invention.   Cicero also said that another such device was built "recently" by his friend Posidonius, "... each one of the revolutions of which brings about the same movement in the Sun and Moon and five wandering stars [planets] as is brought about each day and night in the heavens"   Given that the third device was almost certainly in Posidonius's possession by that time and that both the Archimedes-made and Cicero-mentioned machines were found in Rome at least 30 years after the shipwreck's estimated date, it is unlikely that any one of these machines was the Antikythera mechanism discovered in the wreck. The researchers who rebuilt the Antikythera mechanism concur that it was too complex to have been a singular invention.   This proof that the Antikythera mechanism was not unique strengthens the argument that there was a tradition of complex mechanical technology in ancient Greece that was later, at least in part, transmitted to the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. During the Middle Ages, complex mechanical devices that were still simpler than the Antikythera mechanism were built in these cultures.A fifth- or sixth-century Byzantine Empire geared calendar fragment that was mounted to a sundial and maybe used to help tell time has been discovered. The Caliph of Baghdad commissioned Bani Ms's Kitab al-Hiyal, also known as the Book of Ingenious Devices, in the early ninth century AD. Over a hundred mechanical devices were detailed in this document, some of which may have been found in monastic manuscripts from antiquity. Around 1000, the scholar al-Biruni described a geared calendar that was comparable to the Byzantine mechanism, and a 13th-century astrolabe also had a clockwork system that is similar to it. It's probable that this medieval technology was brought to Europe and had a part in the region's development of mechanical clocks.   Su Song, a Chinese polymath, built a mechanical clock tower in the 11th century that, among other things, measured the positions of several stars and planets that were shown on an armillary sphere that spun mechanically.   Conspiracy Corner The Antikythera Mechanism was thought to have been created between 150 and 100 BCE at first, but recent research dates its development to approximately 205 BCE. It's interesting that this technology seems to have just vanished because comparable items didn't start turning up until the 14th century. But why did the ancient Greeks permit such a significant development to be forgotten over time? Posidonius carried on the work of the Greek astronomer Hipparchus by instructing students at an astronomy academy. Posidonius invented a contraption that "in each rotation reproduces the identical motions of the Sun, the Moon and the five planets that take place in the skies every day and night," according to Cicero, one of Posidonius' students. Which remarkably resembles the Antikythera Mechanism. However, when the Mechanism was created in the second century BCE, Posidonius was not yet alive. Hipparchus was, though. Posidonius could have built an instrument based on Hipparchus' Antikythera Mechanism, which he made many years before. What about Posidonius' instrument, though? A time traveler from the future may have developed the Mechanism, or it may genuinely be a futuristic gadget that was taken back to ancient Greece and put there on purpose if it dates to the second century BCE and equivalent technology didn't start emerging until decades later. Some people think the entire thing is a hoax despite overwhelming scientific proof to the contrary. After all, it is challenging to reconcile the Antikythera mechanism's antiquity with its growth in technology. The Turk, a fictional chess-playing robot constructed in the 18th century, has been likened to the mechanism by some. But scientists easily acknowledge that The Turk is a fraud. Why would they fabricate evidence of the mechanism's reliability? What would they be attempting to conceal? Even though it is quite old, the Antikythera mechanism represented an enormous advance in technology. So how did the Greeks of antiquity come up with the concept, much alone construct it? They didn't, according to The Ancient Aliens: “Beings with advanced knowledge of astronomical bodies, mathematics and precision engineering tools created the device or gave the knowledge for its creation to someone during the first century BC. But the knowledge was not recorded or wasn't passed down to anyone else.” Therefore, aliens either provided humanity the ability to make this gadget or the knowledge to do so, but they didn't do anything to assure that we built on it or learnt from it. It seems like the aliens weren't planning ahead very well. This theory, like the extraterrestrial one, is based simply on the observation that the Antikythera mechanism seems to be too technologically sophisticated for its period. The mythical Atlantis was a highly developed metropolis that vanished into the ocean. Many people think the city genuinely exists, despite the fact that Plato only described it in a sequence of allegories. And some of those individuals believe the Antikythera mechanism proves Atlantis existed since it was too sophisticated for any known culture at the time; they believe Atlantis, not Greece, is where the mechanism originated. According to the notion of intelligent design, a higher power purposefully created many things on Earth because they are too sophisticated to have arisen by simple evolution. Because the Antikythera mechanism is so much more sophisticated than any other artifact from that age, some people think it is proof of intelligent design. If this is the case, you have to question what divine, omnipotent creature would spend time creating such a minute object for such a trivial goal. Greece's coast is home to the island of Rhodes. Greek artifacts were placed into the ship transporting the Mechanism, which was sailing for Rome. One explanation for this might be that the Antikythera mechanism was taken together with the spoils from the island of Rhodes. How come Rhodes was pillaged? following a victorious war against the Greeks, as part of Julius Caesar's triumphal procession. Could the loss of one of history's most significant and cutting-edge technical advancements be accidentally attributed to Julius Caesar? The Antikythera mechanism may have predicted the color of eclipses, which is thought to be impossible by scientists, according to new translations of texts on the device. Therefore, were the forecasts the mechanism provided only educated guesses, or did the ancient Greeks have knowledge that we do not? According to legend, an extraterrestrial species called the Annunaki (possible episode?) invaded and inhabited Earth (they were revered as gods in ancient Mesopotamia), leaving behind evidence of their presence. The Antikythera mechanism could be one of these hints. The Mechanism uses what appears to be distinct technology that was, as far as we are aware, extremely different from anything else that was built about 200 BCE. It estimates when lunar eclipses would occur, which advanced space invaders would undoubtedly know something about. An intriguing view on the process is held by Mike Edmunds from Cardiff University. The uniqueness and technological innovation of the item are frequently highlighted in reports about it. However, Edmunds speculates that the mechanism may have been in transit to a client when the ship carrying it went down. If one device was being delivered, might there possibly be others — if not on this ship, then potentially on others from Rhodes? — he asks in his essay. There may have been more of these amazing machines that have been lost to the passage of time or are still out there waiting to be found. MOVIES - films from the future - https://filmsfromthefuture.com/movies/

    Peopling the Past
    Portrait of a Lady: Discovering Seianti with Judith Swaddling

    Peopling the Past

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 30:55


    Countless faces of real people survive in ancient portraiture, but how often do we know their names, or anything about their lives? In this episode, Dr. Judith Swaddling joins Melissa and Chelsea to talk about Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa, an Etruscan woman who lived over 2000 years ago in Italy. Seianti is an incredible person to get to know, since we have a full-sized portrait of her lying atop her sarcophagus, as well as the physical remains of her skeleton. Listen in as Dr. Swaddling reveals the layers of Seianti's past and discusses the limits to how much we can actually know about any one person from the ancient Mediterranean world.

    Marine Conservation Happy Hour
    MCHH 401: Eat sustainably - like a Viking !

    Marine Conservation Happy Hour

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 11:14


    Dr Scarlett Smash and Dr Craken MacCraic talk about some new research that shows that in the viking era people didn't eat much meat but mostly vegetarian and seafood like oysters and muscles. So despite what the movies might lead you to believe, they actually usually had a much more sustainable and environmentally-friendly diet. This episode is supported by an ad from Cetacean Research Technology - providers of affordable, top quality hydrophones to scientists, documentary makers, artists, educators, whale-watchers and all types of ocean enthusiast! https://www.cetaceanresearch.com/index.html If you liked this show please support us so we can keep providing more content,  $1 helps : www.patreon.com/marineconservation  Contact info@absolutelysmashingllc.com for more information about sponsoring MCHH episodes or having advertisments on the show. MCHH Twitter MCHH Fb Live Dr Scarlett Smash YouTube Dr Scarlett Smash Twitter  Dr Scarlett Smash Instagram Dr Scarlett Smash TikTok  Dr Craken MacCraic Twitter Dr Craken MacCraic Instagram MCHH Instagram

    Stuff You Missed in History Class
    Laocoön and His Sons

    Stuff You Missed in History Class

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 37:09


    Laocoön is a figure in Greek legend, and the inspiration for a beautiful sculpture in the Vatican Museums. And that work of art has been on quite a journey through time.  Research: “ANN: Archaeologist and art dealer Ludwig Pollak and his family to be remembered by memorial stones.” Art Market Studies. Jan. 7, 2022. https://www.artmarketstudies.org/ann-archaeologist-and-art-dealer-ludwig-pollak-and-his-family-to-be-remembered-by-memorial-stones-rome-piazza-santi-apostoli-81-22-jan-2022-930am/ Tracy, S. V. “Laocoön's Guilt.” The American Journal of Philology, vol. 108, no. 3, 1987, pp. 451–54. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/294668. Darwin, Charles. “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.” 1872. Accessed online: https://brocku.ca/MeadProject/Darwin/Darwin_1872_07.html The William Blake Archive. “LAOCOÖN (COMPOSED C. 1815, C. 1826-27).” http://www.blakearchive.org/work/Laocoön Richman-Abdou, Kelly. “All About ‘Laocoön and His Sons': A Marble Masterpiece From the Hellenistic Period.” My Modern Met. January 9, 2019. https://mymodernmet.com/Laocoön-and-his-sons-statue/ Virgil. “The Aeneid Book II.” Poetry in Translation. https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/VirgilAeneidII.php#anchor_Toc536009309 Ludwig, Wolfgang. “Der dritte Arm des Laokoon.”   Weiner Zeitung. Nov. 7, 2021. https://www.wienerzeitung.at/nachrichten/kultur/kunst/2111677-Der-dritte-Arm-des-Laokoon.html Rudowski, Victor Anthony. “Lessing Contra Winckelmann.” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, vol. 44, no. 3, 1986, pp. 235–43. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/429733 “Cast of Laocoön and his Sons (Roman version of a lost Greek original), c.100BC-50AD.” https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/art-artists/work-of-art/Laocoön-and-his-sons-roman-version-of-a-lost-greek-original Squire, Michael. “Laocoön among the gods, or: On the theological limits of Lessing's Grenzen', in A. Lifschitz and M. Squire (eds.), Rethinking Lessing's Laocoön: Classical Antiquity, the German Enlightenment, and the ‘Limits' of Painting and Poetry.” Oxford University Press. 2017. Accessed online: https://www.academia.edu/35492441/M_Squire_Laocoön_among_the_gods_or_On_the_theological_limits_of_Lessing_s_Grenzen_in_A_Lifschitz_and_M_Squire_eds_Rethinking_Lessing_s_Laocoön_Classical_Antiquity_the_German_Enlightenment_and_the_Limits_of_Painting_and_Poetry_Oxford_Oxford_University_Press_pp_87_132_2017 “Digital Sculpture Project: Laocoön.” http://www.digitalsculpture.org/Laocoön/index.html Müller, Joachim. "Gotthold Ephraim Lessing". Encyclopedia Britannica, 11 Feb. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Gotthold-Ephraim-Lessing Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Laocoön". Encyclopedia Britannica, 28 Aug. 2019, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Laocoön-Greek-mythology. http://www.digitalsculpture.org/Laocoön/index02.html Shattuck, Kathryn. “Is 'Laocoön' a Michelangelo forgery?” New York Times. April 20, 2005. https://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/20/arts/is-Laocoön-a-michelangelo-forgery.html Catterson, Lynn. “Michelangelo's ‘Laocoön?'” Artibus et Historiae, vol. 26, no. 52, 2005, pp. 29–56. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/20067096/ Montoya, Ruben. “Did Michelangelo fake this iconic ancient statue?” National Geographic. July 16, 2021. https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/history-and-civilisation/2022/03/this-italian-artist-became-the-first-female-superstar-of-the-renaissance Bruschi, Arnaldo. "Donato Bramante". Encyclopedia Britannica, 7 Apr. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Donato-Bramante Webber, Monique. “Who Says Michelangelo Was Right? Conflicting Visions of the Past in Early Modern Prints.” The Public Domain Review. https://publicdomainreview.org/essay/who-says-michelangelo-was-right-conflicting-visions-of-the-past-in-early-modern-prints Grovier, Kelly. “Laocoön and His Sons: The revealing detail in an ancient find.” BBC. July 22, 2021. https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20210721-laocon-and-his-sons-the-ultimate-expression-of-suffering Howard, Seymour. “On the Reconstruction of the Vatican Laocoon Group.” American Journal of Archaeology, vol. 63, no. 4, 1959, pp. 365–69. JSTOR, https://doi.org/10.2307/501788https://www.jstor.org/stable/501788 Price, Nicholas, et al. “Historical and Philosophical Issues in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage.” Getty Publications. Sept. 26, 1966. https://books.google.com/books?id=4wi7Bdd8sBQC&dq=%22this+arm,+entangled+by+the+snake,+must+have+been+folded+over+the+head+of+the+statue,%22yet+it+looks+as+if+the+arm+folded+above+the+head+would+have+in+some+way+made+the+work+wrong%3B%22&source=gbs_navlinks_s Pliny the Elder, et al. “The Natural History.” Taylor and Francis, Red Lion Court, Fleet Street. 1855. Accessed online: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:abo:phi,0978,001:36:4 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Media-eval: A Medieval Pop Culture Podcast

    Media-eval ventures to Valholl as Sarah and returning guest Miti von Weissenberg tackle 2022 film The Northman! Join us as we explore masculinity, gender, slavery, race, and vengeance in the film and in the real Norse past. CW for discussion of sexual assault (which is not graphically depicted in the film but is thematically important) and for discussion of white nationalism (which is relevant to the audience response to the film and to attitudes toward the Vikings in general). 
Want to learn more about the context for the film? 

Check out some classic Icelandic revenge sagas: The Saga of the People of Laxardal and Bolli Bollason's Tale. Transl. Keneva Kunz. London: Penguin Books, 2008  1903 Translation into English: https://sagadb.org/laxdaela_saga.en2    Njal's Saga. Transl. Robert Cook. London, Penguin Books, 2008.   1861 translation into English free and online: https://sagadb.org/brennu-njals_saga.en    Read some excellent scholarship on the Vikings and Scandinavia:   Brink, Stefan, in collaboration with Neil Price. The Viking World. London: Routledge, 2012.   Callmer, Johan, Ingrid Gustin, and Mats Roslund, eds. Identity Formation and Diversity in the Early Medieval Baltic and beyond : Communicators and Communication. The Northern World : North Europe and the Baltic, c. 400-1700 AD. : Peoples, Economics and Cultures: Volume 75. Leiden: Brill, 2017.   Clements, Jonathan. A Brief History of the Vikings (The Last Pagans or the First Modern Europeans?) London: Hachette, 2005.     Duczko, Wladyslaw. Viking Rus : Studies on the Presence of Scandinavians in Eastern Europe. Brill, 2004. Frank, Roberta. “The Invention of the Viking Horned Helmet” in International Scandinavian and Medieval Studies in Memory of Gerd Wolfgang Weber: Ein runder Knäuel, so rollt' es uns leicht aus den Händen, ed. Michael Dallapiazza, Olaf Hansen, Preben Meulengracht-Sørensen, and Yvonne S. Bonnetai, 199-208. Trieste: Edizioni Parnaso, 2000.    Jarman, Cat. River Kings. A New History of the Vikings from Scandinavia to the Silk Roads. London: William Collins, 2021.     Jóhanna Katrín Friðriksdóttir. Valkyrie. The Women of the Viking World. London: Bloomsbury, 2020.     Price, Neil. The Viking Way: Magic and Mind in Late Iron Age Scandinavia. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2019.   Price, Neil, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Torun Zachrisson, Anna Kjellstrom, Jan Stora, Maja Krzewinska, Torsten Guenther, Veronica Sobrado, Mattias Jakobsson, and Anders Gotherstrom. “Viking Warrior Women? Reassessing Birka Chamber Grave Bj.581.” Antiquity 93, no. 367 (February 1, 2019): 181–98. doi:10.15184/aqy.2018.258.  Price, Neil. Children of Ash and Elm: A History of the Vikings. New York, Basic Books, 2020.  Samson, Vincent. Les Berserkir. Les Guerriers-Fauves dans la Scandinavie ancienne, de l'Âge de Vendel aux Vikings (VIe-XIe Siècle). Villeneuve-d'Ascq: Universitaires du Septentrion, 2011.     Weiss, Daniel. “The Viking Great Army.” Archaeology 71, no. 2 (2018): 50–56.   Winroth, Anders. The Age of the Vikings. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014.    Winroth, Anders. The Conversion of Scandinavia: Vikings, Merchants and Missionaries. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012.   Social Media: Twitter @mediaevalpod E-mail: media.evalpod@gmail.com Find Miti at @MvonWeissenberg Rate, review, and subscribe!

    Anthropological Airwaves
    S04E03: Archaeological Identities - Part One

    Anthropological Airwaves

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 28:45


    This episode is the first of a three-part series produced by Eleanor Neil, contributing editor at American Anthropologist and Anthropological Airwaves. From the African American Burial Ground in New York City to the memorialization of violence in Northern Ireland to professional archaeology in the eastern Mediterranean, Eleanor asks archaeologists with different regional and methodological specialties to choose a single object or site, and, in their own words describe how this this site or artefact speaks to the interaction between archaeology and political or social identity across time and place. Here, Dr. Cheryl Janifer LaRoche discusses the African American Burial Ground in lower Manhattan and the influence it has had on public engagement, perceptions of slavery in the northern United States, and the empowerment inherent in recognizing one's own past in the archaeological record. Dr. LaRoche's is Associate Research Professor at the University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation. Her research on 18th and 19th-century free Black communities, institutions, and spaces combines law, history, oral history, archaeology, geography and material culture to define Black cultural landscapes, often navigating the convergences of public, private, political and social interests. Further Reading: LaRoche, Cheryl J. and Michael L. Blakey, ‘Seizing Intellectual Power: The Dialogue at the New York African Burial Ground', Historical Archaeology, Vol. 31, No. 3 (1997), pp. 84-106. Leone, Mark P. and Cheryl J. LaRoche, Jennifer J. Babiarz, ‘Archaeology of Black Americans in Recent Times', Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 35 (2005), pp. 575-598. Transcript: https://www.americananthropologist.org/podcast/season-04-episode-03-archaeological-identities-part-one Close-captioned: https://youtu.be/XVlc4t1ZH8A Credits: Writing, Production & Editing: Eleanor Neil Production Support: Anar Parikh Thumbnail Image: Wally Gobetz, “NYC - Civic Center: African American Burial Ground National Monument” (2008) African American Burial Ground Memorial Featured Music: “Spirit Blossom” by Roman Belov Executive Producer - Anar Parikh Intro/Outro: "Waiting" by Crowander

    ThePrint
    ThePrintPod: Stalin's archaeology push in Tamil Nadu is the stuff of culture wars. Experts have a warning

    ThePrint

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 12:19


    Stalin-led DMK govt's push for archaeological work has reignited conversations around Tamil pride and antiquity. But researchers are concerned. ----more---- https://theprint.in/features/stalins-archaeology-push-in-tamil-nadu-is-the-stuff-of-culture-wars-experts-have-a-warning/1006949/ 

    Peopling the Past
    Nevertheless, She Persisted: Boudicca and Imperial Resistance with Caitlin Gillespie

    Peopling the Past

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 32:02


    What can we say about Boudicca, one of the most famous women from the ancient world? Who was she, and was she even real? Why is she still so important to us today?  Listen in as Dr. Caitlin Gillespie joins Chelsea and Melissa to discuss what we (think we) know about this powerful resistance fighter and how her actions against the imperial Roman army still resonate with modern women in the 21st century.

    Nailed It Ortho
    84: THA Femoral Stem Design Explained w/ Dr. Anna Cohen-Rosenblum

    Nailed It Ortho

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 71:24


    Enjoy this episode on Cementless THA Femoral Stem Design as Dr. Anna Cohen-Rosenblum  gives us a great talk!  Link to YouTube Video: https://youtu.be/gIh0oG7aWjo Link to Post & Show Notes: www.naileditortho.com/THADesign Listen on ConveyMED: https://conveymed.io/ Dr. Cohen- Rosenblum is an Adult Reconstruction specialist currently on staff at LSU Orthopaedics! She completed her residency at University of Chicago Medical Center and completed a fellowship in adult reconstruction at the University of Virginia. Fun fact, she also has a masters of science in bioarchaeology from University College London (UCL) Institute of Archaeology in the UK! In this episode we talk about: Implant surface types Ingrowth vs on growth implants Different types of cementless femoral stem design Outcomes of different stems + more

    SoupCast
    Ukraine in Flames, UK Archaeology Inert? - WB 25th March 2022

    SoupCast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 37:07


    Welcome to Watching Brief. As the name implies, each week Marc (Mr Soup) & Andy Brockman of the Pipeline (Where history is tomorrow's news) cast an eye over news stories, topical media and entertainment and discuss and debate what they find. #archaeologynews #thepipeline #archaeosoup Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/archaeosoup *** 0:00 Introduction 2:08 Recap of ArchUK4Ukraine 9:26 Reactions 11:08 CIfA's Response 14:41 CBA's Response 15:52 Comparison to Other Responses 16:46 Homes for Ukraine Scheme 18:38 FAME's Response (Blocking Us) 21:56 Accidentally Global? Heritage Alliance 24:50 Why is it SO Hard for Them? 31:26 Ways Forward – Closing Thoughts *** Link of the Week: Disasters Emergency Committee: https://www.dec.org.uk/ *** Links: 6 Things UK Archaeology Can do to Support Ukraine NOW! : https://youtu.be/bfQqzuWsUJ8 Call to Action Card, share freely and widely - No copyright claimed by PipeLine, Archaeosoup or Watching Brief: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1U6Ar_gnLj_dYa1jaf6Z3zFMJmV9Uem6S?usp=sharing CIfA's Response: https://twitter.com/InstituteArch/status/1506329326509244417?s=20&t=fR8ddrQHYeuHZjudimJ0hw The Threat to Ukraine's Heritage – An Open Letter: https://www.theheritagealliance.org.uk/blog/the-threat-to-ukraines-heritage-joint-letter/ “DON'T MENTION THE WAR” A Week of Fawlty Comms from CIfA, CBA & FAME: http://thepipeline.info/blog/2022/03/27/dont-mention-the-war-a-week-of-fawlty-comms-from-cifa-cba-fame/

    BBC Inside Science
    Buried Mars Landers, Freezing Species, and Low-Tide Archaeology

    BBC Inside Science

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 28:03


    Since 2018, Nasa's InSight Mars lander has been sitting on the surface listening to the seismic rumbles of the red planet's deep interior. But this week, plans were announced to finally phase down its activity, as martian dust obscures too much of its solar panels to power it through the forthcoming winter. Jon Amos tells Vic Gill of some of its many successes, and quite why it didn't fly with a duster on board. 50 years of observations across Australia's northern tropical forests suggest yet more bad news for the climate. Trees' mortality has, it seems, doubled since the 1980s. As Oxford University's David Bauman tells Vic, it seems to be linked to a drying of the air as temperatures rise, and if the trend is also true across the world's other moist tropical forests, they could rapidly slip from being carbon sinks, to carbon sources. Conservationists say we're losing animal species faster today than at any point in the last 10 million years of Earth's history. And one approach aims to save as many of those lost animals as possible – after they've died. Biobanking – saving frozen tissue from dead animals for future cloning or other reproductive technologies could buy us time to prevent extinction - or even reverse it. Vic visits Nature's Safe, where technology used in pedigree breeding is being deployed to preserve the cells and tissue of endangered species when individuals die or are euthanised, for possible research in the future, or even cloning. Meanwhile, 2.5 miles off the coast of Jersey, archaeologists are holing up in a medieval fortress waiting for the few lowest tides of the year to give them access to the Violet Bank - an area of reef thought once to have been home to Neanderthal populations, but which now is for most of the year submerged by the sea. Marnie Chesterton has been talking to UCL's Matt Pope between the ebbs and flows. Presented by Victoria Gill Reporters: Marnie Chesterton and Jonathan Amos Produced by Alex Mansfield

    Seven Ages Audio Journal
    Mound Builders Series: Pinson Mounds, Tennessee | SAAJ 55

    Seven Ages Audio Journal

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 72:51


    In this episode, the Seven Ages team is joined by Chase Pipes of the Chasing History Youtube channel and podcast, as they travel and record live from the Pinson Mounds site in Eastern Tennessee. Jason Pentrail and Chase Pipes are joined by Tennessee State Park Ranger Dedra Irwin, who explains all the details of this truly unique woodland-era mound complex. Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park covers over 1,200 acres and contains at least 15 Native American mounds. In addition to Sauls Mound, the group includes Oxier Mound, the Twin Mounds, and Mound 31. Archaeological evidence suggests the mounds were both burial and ceremonial in purpose. Pinson Mounds is a national historic landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Follow the Seven Ages Research Associates online:  Twitter Instagram  Facebook  Seven Ages Official Site  Chasing History  Pinson Mounds State Park  Our Sponsor The Smokey Mountain Relic Room

    The CRM Archaeology Podcast
    How to Get Published in Archaeology - Ep 241

    The CRM Archaeology Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 65:17


    MEMBERS! CHECK YOUR MEMBER PAGES FOR A BONUS SEGMENT 4 ON GETTING PUBLISHED IN A JOURNAL!! Have you ever thought about publishing a book or article in archaeology, only to be suddenly overcome with fear and uncertainty? Join us as we tell our own stories fear and uncertainty that led to ultimately getting published. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code CRMARCH. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/crmarchpodcast/241 Links How to write for social sciences Self-publish eBooks and paperbacks for free with Kindle Direct Publishing, and reach millions of readers on Amazon Follow Our Panelists On Twitter Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Andrew @AndrewKinkella, Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet Blogs and Resources: Bill White: Succinct Research Doug Rocks-MacQueen: Doug's Archaeology Stephen Wagner: Process - Opinions on Doing Archaeology Chris Webster: Random Acts of Science Andrew Kinkella Kinkella Teaches Archaeology (Youtube) Blog: Kinkella Teaches Archaeology ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

    The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
    How to Get Published in Archaeology - Ep 241

    The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 65:17


    MEMBERS! CHECK YOUR MEMBER PAGES FOR A BONUS SEGMENT 4 ON GETTING PUBLISHED IN A JOURNAL!! Have you ever thought about publishing a book or article in archaeology, only to be suddenly overcome with fear and uncertainty? Join us as we tell our own stories fear and uncertainty that led to ultimately getting published. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code CRMARCH. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/crmarchpodcast/241 Links How to write for social sciences Self-publish eBooks and paperbacks for free with Kindle Direct Publishing, and reach millions of readers on Amazon Follow Our Panelists On Twitter Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Andrew @AndrewKinkella, Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet Blogs and Resources: Bill White: Succinct Research Doug Rocks-MacQueen: Doug's Archaeology Stephen Wagner: Process - Opinions on Doing Archaeology Chris Webster: Random Acts of Science Andrew Kinkella Kinkella Teaches Archaeology (Youtube) Blog: Kinkella Teaches Archaeology ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

    Peopling the Past
    Sisters are Doing it for Themselves: Mesopotamian Free Women with Stephanie Budin

    Peopling the Past

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 35:59


    What does it mean to be a "free woman" in the ancient Mediterranean world? Listen in as our guest, Dr. Stephanie Budin, joins Chelsea and Melissa to discuss women who lived outside of the traditional confines of the patriarchy and who were not under the direct control of a man. Dr. Budin, a historian and expert in ancient religion and sexuality, tells us about "harimatu" in ancient Mesopotamia and refutes the idea that these free women were prostitutes. This episode has it all: sex, gender-bending legal documents, and the dismantling of patriarchal assumptions about women's freedom and the origins of prostitution.

    Dan Snow's History Hit
    Falklands40: Return to Mount Tumbledown

    Dan Snow's History Hit

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 27:25


    The Battle of Mount Tumbledown was an attack by the British Army and the Royal Marines on the heights overlooking Stanley, the Falkland Islands' capital. One of a number of night battles that took place during the British advance towards Stanley, the battle led to British troops capturing all the heights above the town.Dr. Tony Pollard is a Professor of Conflict History and Archaeology. Tony joins Dan to detail the battlefield of Mount Tumbledown, the events that led to the capture of Stanley, and the surrender of the Argentine forces on the islands. Tony and Dan also discuss the Falklands War Mapping Project (FWMP), which Tony co-founded with Dr. Timothy Clack. The first time that veterans have taken part- the project uses archaeology to try and alleviate the stresses of PTSD.Produced by Mariana Des Forges and Hannah WardMixed and Mastered by Dougal PatmoreIf you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Free Speech Nation with Andrew Doyle: The Podcast
    Series 2, Episode 18: Turned on by the mob | Toby Young on offence archaeology and his Free Speech Union

    Free Speech Nation with Andrew Doyle: The Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 61:55


    On the latest episode of Free Speech Nation: The Podcast, Andrew Doyle is joined by founder of the Free Speech Union, Toby Young.Toby explains why he set up the FSU, details his experience of being turned on by the woke mob, and discusses offence archaeology.You can watch the episode on our YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/SLzKR9yKbZs See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Don't Wreck Yourself
    Busted! True Crime in Ancient Times

    Don't Wreck Yourself

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 50:48


    On today's episode, Ryan's old boss Dr. Brad Hafford fills in for Matt to talk about a couple popular myths associated with the ancient city of Ur. This episode is 100% archaeology. Ryan and Brad talk about a busty Roman hanging out at a thrift shop in Texas, and seek to answer the all important question "what IS a museum" without smoking any OG kush at all. Then they discuss a pair of ancient Mesopotamian businessman (one of whom you may already know). Finally they take on a claim from r/conspiracy that asserts that mysterious artifacts may be the key to powering ancient flood lights.Find us on Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, and Twitter at @wreckyourpodAnd chat with us on the CastJunkie Discord Server: https://discord.gg/z5GMvpmyTZSubscribe to Artifactually Speaking at:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6q8GsRYTYW1zeke1erD-uA

    Keeping Her Keys
    Putting Medusa's Head Back On

    Keeping Her Keys

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 124:48


    Medusa's story, like many myths, contains sexual violence, murder, and great suffering. If you are not in a space to feel safe while we explore these topics, you may want to skip this one. Angela Natividad and I go deep into the story of Medusa, from her ancient origins to the Me, Too movement. Medusa's story is one of victim-blaming, betrayal, isolation, and hidden potential. She lives on whenever we are not believed, blamed, or invalidated when we speak truth to power. Violated by Poseidon, she was transformed into a monster by Athena. Forced into isolation, she bore the brunt of the powerful. When Perseus murdered her, she birthed two spirits: Pegasus, the free-flying winged horse and the much lesser known Chrysaor, a noble warrior-giant. Through her myth and art, we explore how the image of the woman with snakes in her hair has been viewed over time, and then contextualize what this means today. We link this back to our personal experiences and to social psychological theories to expand the meaning of Medusa. Perhaps there is no more important contemporary story than the way Chanel Miller was "medusaed" by some, both in the courtoom and in the public. We end by discussing ways we can reattach Medusa's head as individuals and in the broader sense. MeToo has amazing resources. Find them HERE. Connect with Chanel Miller. Books mentioned: Red Moon by Miranda Gray Maria Tatar's Heroine With 1001 Faces Cassandra Speaks by Elizabeth Lesser Medusa by Jessie Burton Known My Name by Chanel Miller Lost Goddesses of Ancient Greece by Charlene Spretnak Revisioning Medusa from Girl God Books Pindar's Pythian Odes Ovid's Metamorphoses Hesiod's Theogony Essays and Articles mentioned: NY Times: "The Medusa Statue That Become a Symbol of Feminist Rage." Medusa in Ancient Greek Art by Madeleine Glennon, Department of Greek and Roman Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art A. L. Frothingham, Medusa, Apollo, and the Great Mother. American Journal of Archaeology , Jul. - Sep., 1911, Vol. 15, No. 3 Go deeper into Medusa's story, including viewing the art we discuss HERE.

    Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
    Archaeologists digging into Egypt's past

    Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 53:56


    This year marks the 200th anniversary of the Frenchman Jean-François Champollion's decipherment of hieroglyphs and 100 years since the British archaeologist Howard Carter found King Tutankhamen's tomb filled with all those bewitching treasures in the Valley of the Kings. To celebrate, three Ancient Egyptian scholars dust off their boots and down tools to discuss their incredible discoveries and what life is like as a contemporary archaeologist.

    Coaching Call
    S3 Ep #19 William Attaway is leadership coach who helps leaders to INTENTIONALLY grow and thrive.

    Coaching Call

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 57:28


    My guest today is William Attaway, William is a Leadership Coach for Catalytic Leadership, LLC, a company he founded to help leaders to INTENTIONALLY grow and thrive. He has served in local church ministry for over 25 years, and is currently the Lead Pastor of Southview Community Church, a church in Herndon, Virginia (near Washington, D.C.) where he has served since 2004. He holds a Ph.D. in Old Testament (with an emphasis in Biblical Backgrounds and Archaeology), and he loves to read and speak about leadership, organizational change, archaeology, and building up people and teams. His newest book is Catalytic Leadership (January, 2022). Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, William now lives in northern Virginia with his beautiful wife Charlotte and their two daughters. https://www.catalyticleadershipbook.com/ We are currently offering Coaching Call listeners an opportunity to get a free physical copy of William's new book, Catalytic Leadership (released January 2022), and learn more about the leadership coaching I provide for clients. All we ask is for you to cover the shipping (the offer is for U.S. mailing addresses only; for international orders, a digital copy is available). If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a short review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen? It takes less than 60 seconds and it really helps. If you enjoyed this episode buy me a cup of coffee, make it a large: I'm trying to keep this episode free of advertisements and could use your help with the cost of bringing your this fun and entertaining podcast. Anything you can donate to the cause is greatly appreciated. To donate go to: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/sifuRafael Subscribe: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/coaching-call/id1546026323 Please leave a star rating and a review here Follow Coaching Call: Facebook: facebook.com/coachingcall Instagram: instagram.com/coachingcall Email: maxfitness@optonline.net LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/maxfitness Youtube: https://bit.ly/coachingcallYoutube to watch the full interview. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coachingcall/message

    The Micah Hanks Program
    Path of the Skinwalker: Mysteries of the Uintah Basin | MHP 06.08.22.

    The Micah Hanks Program

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 79:49


    The Uintah Basin is one of Utah's most diversely scenic regions. Nestled in the northeastern corner of the state, it is also the location of one of the most infamous alleged hotspots for UFO sightings, cattle mutilations, and other unexplained phenomena in the world: Skinwalker Ranch.  This week on The Micah Hanks Program, we look at the history of the Uintah Basin dating back to prehistoric times, and survey the myth and mystery that support one of the modern hubs for the strange and unsettling. Why do locations like Skinwalker Ranch seem to be an "attractor" for the UFO mystery, and what can be learned from studying them there?  The story doesn't end here... become an X Subscriber and get access to even more weekly content and monthly specials. Enjoy The Micah Hanks Program? Check out Micah's other podcasts here.  Want to advertise/sponsor The Micah Hanks Program? We have partnered with the fine folks at Gumball to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. If you would like to advertise with The Micah Hanks Program, all you have to do is click the link below to get started: Gumball: Advertise with The Micah Hanks Program Show Notes Below are links to stories and other content featured in this episode: NEWS: How a lost 3-year-old boy survived two days alone in rural Montana Gold and silver coins mark Roswell's 75th anniversary Scientists are studying whether Cold War-era photos of the night sky contain clues of alien life  NASA confirms it will join US govt's team to search for UFOs: Report - World News  It is now irresponsible not to talk about UFOs | The Hill  PATH OF THE SKINWALKER: How Skinwalker Ranch Became a Hotbed of Paranormal Activity The Utah UFO Display- Frank B. Salisbury and Junior Hicks  Ranch still studying cattle mutilations, unexplained sightings BFRO 12289: Possible early morning vocalizations in the Uinta mountains.  BFRO Report 10123: Night time road crossing northwest of Vernal, Utah. BECOME AN X SUBSCRIBER AND GET EVEN MORE GREAT PODCASTS AND MONTHLY SPECIALS FROM MICAH HANKS. Sign up today and get access to the entire back catalog of The Micah Hanks Program, as well as “classic” episodes of The Gralien Report Podcast, weekly “additional editions” of the subscriber-only X Podcast, the monthly Enigmas specials, and much more. Like us on Facebook Follow @MicahHanks on Twitter Keep up with Micah and his work at micahhanks.com.

    Conversations@KAFM
    Museum Meetup - Archaeology in the Colo Natl Monument

    Conversations@KAFM

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 18:48


    Host: Libbie Early & Kaia Michaelis Guest: Adam Brinkman Date: 5/19/22

    Peopling the Past
    Call the (Roman) Midwife: Ancient Delivery and Childbirth with Tara Mulder

    Peopling the Past

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 30:26


    In today's episode, our featured guest Dr. Tara Mulder tells us all about the oldest profession in the world: midwifery! Listen in on a discussion between Dr. Mulder and hosts Dr. Chelsea Gardner and Dr. Melissa Funke that covers the sights, sounds, smells, and experiences of childbirth in ancient Rome, from the perspective of professional midwives. We look at a gravestone of a known midwife and talk about training and approaches to the birthing process. Dr. Mulder brings a unique perspective to the conversation, as she herself the daughter of a professional midwife! Don't miss it, this is an episode that definitely delivers!

    The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
    The Past, Present and Future of Chichen Itza with Evan Albright - Ruins 111

    The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 66:36


    On this episode, we talk with Evan Albright about his book "The Man Who Owned a Wonder of the World". This book (published in 2015), tells the story of Edward H. Thompson, an American who once owned the property on which Chichen Itza sits. We go through the history of this property and talk about guides, hotels, trains and what the future looks like for Chichen Itza. If you have left a review of the podcast on iTunes or Spotify, please email us at alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com so we can get shipping information to send you a sticker. If you are listening to this episode on the "Archaeology Podcast Network All Shows Feed," please consider subscribing to the "A Life in Ruins Podcast" channel to support our show. Listening to and downloading our episodes on the A Life in Ruins channel helps our podcast grow. So please, subscribe to the A Life in Ruins Podcast, hosted by the Archaeology Podcast Network, on whichever platform you are using to listen to us on the "All Shows Feed." Support our show by following our channel. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Interested in sponsoring this show or podcast ads for your business? Zencastr makes it really easy! Click this message for more info. Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code RUINS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to https://www.archpodnet.com/ruins/111 Links Evan Albright's Books Literature Recommendations John Lloyd Stephens, Incidents of Travel in Yucatan (NYC: Harper & Bros., 1843) Paul Sullivan, Unfinished Conversations: Mayas and Foreigners Between Two Wars (NYC: Alfred A. Knopf, 1989) Walter W. Taylor, “A Study of Archaeology,” American Anthropologist, July 1948 (vol. 50, No. 3, Part 2) R. Tripp Evans, Romancing the Maya: Mexican Antiquity in the American Imagination, 1820-1915 (Austin, University of Texas Press, 2010) Guest Contact Evan's Twitter: @americanegypt Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular Motion

    The Morbid Curiosity Podcast
    Death in Ancient Egypt pt 1: Religion and Ritual

    The Morbid Curiosity Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 31:50


    We know the ancient Egyptians built tombs and made mummies, but why? In part 1 of this 3 part series, we explore the ideology, religion, and funerary rituals surrounding death in ancient Egypt. In the next episode, we'll dive into the process of making a mummy, and in part three, we'll discuss tombs and pyramids.

    Medieval Grad Podcast
    Old Barrels and Networks of Trade

    Medieval Grad Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 27:16


    How urban and marine archaeology allows us to dive into international commerce. In this episode of the Medieval Grad Podcast, Lucie Laumonier interviews Jeroen Oosterbaan, who is doing a PhD in Archaeology at the University of Leiden. Jeroen studies casks and barrels found in shipwrecks and in urban settings to investigate the networks of trade in the premodern Low Countries. More specifically, Jeroen looks at the residues inside of the barrels to identify their content and at the barrels themselves to know where they came from. Our guest walks us through the science behind his research and tells us about his preliminary findings. Who would have known that old casks had so many secrets?!

    Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron
    Overview Archaeology In Israel

    Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 10:43


    So many sites from 1,000's of years. It's estimated there are 30,000 archaeological sites in this extremely small Country. Thank you for listening! Please leave a 5 star review!

    The Smart 7 Ireland Edition
    The Sunday 7 – Looking back at 70 years of Science and Technology during the reign of Queen Elizabeth II

    The Smart 7 Ireland Edition

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 19:30


    The Smart 7 Ireland Edition is the daily news podcast that gives you everything you need to know in 7 minutes, at 7am, 7 days a week…Consistently appearing in Ireland's Daily News charts, we're a trusted source for people every day.If you're enjoying it, please follow, share or even post a review, it all helps…Today's episode includes references to the following guests:Alex Haslam - Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology at the University of QueenslandGregor Larson - Professor of Biological Anthropology at the University of OxfordDr Laurent Frantz - Research Associate in the School of Archaeology at the University of OxfordFrank Field - British politician and former Labour MPAndy Byford - Transport for London commissionerMark Wild - Crossrail Chief Executive OfficerContact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.comPresented by Ciara Revins, written by Liam Thompson and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Smart 7
    The Sunday 7 – Celebrating the Platinum Jubilee with a look back at 70 years of science and technology during the reign of Queen Elizabeth II

    The Smart 7

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 19:21


    The Smart 7 is a daily podcast that gives you everything you need to know in 7 minutes, at 7 am, 7 days a week...With over 9 million downloads and consistently charting, including as No. 1 News Podcast on Spotify, we're a trusted source for people every day.If you're enjoying it, please follow, share, or even post a review, it all helps...Today's episode includes the following guests:Alex Haslam - Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology at the University of QueenslandGregor Larson - Professor of Biological Anthropology at the University of OxfordDr Laurent Frantz - Research Associate in the School of Archaeology at the University of OxfordFrank Field - British politician and former Labour MPAndy Byford - Transport for London commissionerMark Wild - Crossrail Chief Executive OfficerIn Ireland? Why not try our Ireland Edition?Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.comPresented by Jamie East, written by Olivia Davies and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Today In Space
    Jane Davies | MSc Digital Anthropology, 3D printing, and humanity in Space | People of Science

    Today In Space

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 61:37


    On this segment of People of Science we welcome Jane Davies to the podcast! Jane is a Masters of Science student researching the Digital Anthropology of 3D printing in Space. Luckily, this podcast is all about that cross-section of humanity and Jane reached out to us! It's been great to have participated in Jane's research and it's awesome to have made a friend through the internet! Jane shares her research, creative process, and insights as a Digital Anthropologist and we discuss humanity and the science around it.  From NASA 3D printing the first wrench in space, to tracking down early Space Artifacts of Earth, the Moon and Mars, we discuss this incredible cross-section of additive manufacturing and human space travel. Jane shared her STEM origin story on how she started in Digital Anthropology at University College London, as well as her interest for a future career in the Space Industry. All this and more on this episode of the podcast! Follow us on social: - @todayinspacepod on instragram & twitter - @todayinspace on TikTok - /TodayInSpacePodcast on Facebook How to Support the podcast: Buy a 3D printed gift from our shop ag3dprinting.etsy.com Donate at todayinspace.net Share the podcast with friends & family! 00:00 - Intro to Jane Davies, Digital Anthropology, and the Anthropology of Space 02:09 - STEM Origin Story for Jane and Digital Anthropology 05:04 - we'll put it up on the screen here "are copenhagen and denmark the same thing?" - answer 04:00 - Academics, Advice for future college students 11:00 - Anthropology, Digital-Age Humans, and the study of humanity 14:50 - Anthropology of 3D Printing in space, COSS, Early Space Artifacts (16:05) 17:00 - Terraforming Lunar and Martian Soil, Anthropology of the first space seeds 18:30 - Moon Seeds for Anthropology (19:30 - The 6th Planet, Navajo), NASA's Veggie Lab, 3D Printing in Space (21min) 22:00 - Jane's Research on the first 3D printed objects in Space 23:15 - The 1st 3D printed wrench in Space (where is it?), What are 3D models? 24:30 - Research & Anthropology of Humans (26:20 Tom Bolstorf 2nd Life) 28:05 - Jane's Writing Process, Finding your Creative Method, & the torture of editing 30:10 - Alex's method of mindmapping, Jungian Personality Science (https://www.truity.com/blog/myers-briggs-vs-disc-mental-models-detailed-comparison) 33:04 - The Anthropology of the Metaverse, NFTs, and VR 37:10 - The 3D model of the space wrench Barry Whilmore 38:30 - The potential Environmental & societal impacts of Cryptocurrency 40:00 - What are Anthropologists like? Malinowski 41:40 - Archaeology vs Anthropology 42:30 - Social Skills in Science: Being Curious 44:30 - Takeaways from Jane's research on the first 3D printed part in space 54:00 - 3D printing opens up the individual to ALL the possibilities to make 57:10 - What's next for Jane? Opportunities for Human Science in Space, Tech

    Chasing History Radio
    Chasing History Radio: Moundville Prehistoric Native Complex

    Chasing History Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 31:12


    In this episode, we discuss the history of one of America's most impressive Archaeological Parks: Moundville. Moundville is a Prehistoric Native American Mississippian era ceremonial complex located in central Alabama. As a joint trip with the Seven Ages Audio Journal podcast, we visited the site and filmed a documentary for our YouTube channel Chasing History. In this episode, we cover the history of the site and why you need to get down to see it!  Please help us out by taking 20 seconds and giving us a rate and review or tell us how we can make a better show. We Appreciate Youz Guyz!   Please help us out by leaving a comment and sharing our show with others!    Don't forget to Subscribe, Comment & leave us a rating and review. We also have a YouTube Channel "Chasing History" where we take you into the field with the men & women who discover history!