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The study of the past through material culture

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Latest podcast episodes about Archaeology

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Southeast Asian Archaeology with Dr. Noel Hidalgo Tan - RockArt 59

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 56:01


Dr. Noel Hidalgo Tan is a southeast Asian archaeologist, and apparently, there aren't that many. He's almost single-handedly telling the world about SE archaeology through his publications, Instagram, and his website. Tune in and learn about rock art and southeast Asia. Links California Rock Art Foundation Southeast Asian Archaeology Rock Art on Southeast Asian Archaeology Ancient Southeast Asia Coloring Book Dr. Tan's Instagram Contact Dr. Alan Garfinkel avram1952@yahoo.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #220: More Egypt, with Seriah

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


We're joined by Seriah from Where did the Road Go podcast for a swapcast discussion about our Egypt trip. Seriah always asks great questions, so we have an excellent discussion about our evolving thoughts on the things we learned, and the things we unlearned, during our two weeks in Egypt.Brothers of the Serpent Episode 220If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element Executive Producers:Mark Rendina

It Was A Dark and Stormy Book Club
True Crime Round up 2021

It Was A Dark and Stormy Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:07


Mafia Hitman Lib/E: Carmine Dibiase, the Wiseguy Who Really Killed Joey Galloby Michael Benson, Frank DiMatteo, Eric Jason MartinPublished September 28th 2021 by Citadel PressWho really killed Crazy Joe Gallo? It wasn't Frank The Irishman Sheeran as he claimed. Sober, he was nothing, but drunk he would blow your head off. That's how Pete the Greek described Carmine Sonny DiBiase, the Colombo crime family hitman who'd been terrorizing Manhattan's Little Italy since he was a kid. After beating and robbing a local tailor and doing time in reformatory, Sonny set up operations at the Mayfair Boys Civic and Social Club, an illegal poolroom where he shot and killed his best friend on Christmas day . . . A prime suspect of this and other crimes, Sonny went on the lam and off the grid for seven years. He then surrendered himself to police, was tried for murderm and sentenced to death. But after a second trial, he walked away a free man--free to kill again. Joey Crazy Joe Gallo and his President Street mob waged a deadly Mafia civil war with the Colombo crime family, and in particular, Carmine the Snake Persico. And on that fateful night of April 7, 1972, in a Little Italy restaurant, Gallo was assassinated . . . by Carmine Sonny DiBiasi . . . This is the true story of who really whacked Crazy Joey Gallo on that fateful night of April 7, 1972.We Keep the Dead Close: A Murder at Harvard and a Half Century of Silenceby Becky CooperPublished November 10th 2020 by Grand Central Publishing1969: the height of counterculture and the year universities would seek to curb the unruly spectacle of student protest; the winter that Harvard University would begin the tumultuous process of merging with Radcliffe, its all-female sister school; and the year that Jane Britton, an ambitious twenty-three-year-old graduate student in Harvard's Anthropology Department and daughter of Radcliffe Vice President J. Boyd Britton, would be found bludgeoned to death in her Cambridge, Massachusetts apartment. Forty years later, Becky Cooper a curious undergrad, will hear the first whispers of the story. In the first telling the body was nameless. The story was this: a Harvard student had had an affair with her professor, and the professor had murdered her in the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology because she'd threatened to talk about the affair. Though the rumor proves false, the story that unfolds, one that Cooper will follow for ten years, is even more complex: a tale of gender inequality in academia, a 'cowboy culture' among empowered male elites, the silencing effect of institutions, and our compulsion to rewrite the stories of female victims. We Keep the Dead Close is a memoir of mirrors, misogyny, and murder. It is at once a rumination on the violence and oppression that rules our revered institutions, a ghost story reflecting one young woman's past onto another's present, and a love story for a girl who was lost to history. Notes on a Killing: Love, Lies, and Murder in a Small New Hampshire Townby Kevin Flynn, Rebecca LavoiePublished April 2nd 2013 by BerkleyWeaver and fiber artist Edith “Pen” Meyer knew her friend Sandy Merritt's relationship with a married man was wrong. She had even urged Sandy to take out a restraining order against Kenneth Carpenter. Which was why her call to Sandy on February 23, 2005, seemed to come from out of the blue. During it, she told Sandy to drop the restraining order and get back together with Ken.Pen was never seen again.One man stood to gain from Pen's disappearance: Ken Carpenter. But evidence was bleak: no blood, no DNA, no body. Until detectives found notes hidden beneath a leather chair that turned out to be a playbook for murder…

Curiosity Daily
A New Stonehenge Discovery and Why Females Feel Colder

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 14:42


Learn about a mysterious new archaeological discovery around Stonehenge; and why females feel colder in many species. More from world-renowned Stonehenge archeologist Susan Greaney: STONEHENGE: LAND OF THE DEAD' Premieres Sunday, November 28 at 8 PM ET/PT on Science Channel: https://press.discovery.com/us/sci/programs/stonehenge-land-dead/  Start your free trial of discovery+ at https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity  Follow @SueGreaney on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SueGreaney  Academic page: https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/people/research-students/view/122326-susan-greaney  Females feel colder in many species -- scientists say it was an adaptation to keep the sexes separate by Grant Currin  A new study reveals the evolutionary reason why women feel colder than men. (2021, October 5). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/930578  ‌Magory Cohen, T., Kiat, Y., Sharon, H., Levin, E., & Algar, A. (2021). An alternative hypothesis for the evolution of sexual segregation in endotherms. Global Ecology and Biogeography. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13393  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.60. History of the Mongols: Golden Horde #1

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:10


Having taken you, our dear listeners, through the Yuan, Chagatayid and Ilkhanates, we now turn our attention to the northwestern corner of the Mongol Empire: the Jochid ulus, the Golden Horde. Ruled by the line of Chinggis' eldest son Jochi, this single division of the Mongol Empire was larger than the maximum extent of most empires, dominating from the borders of Hungary and the Balkans, briefly taking the submission of Serbia, stretching ever eastwards over what is now Ukraine, Russia, through Kazakhstan before terminating at the Irtysh River. Under its hegemony were many distinct populations; the cities of the Rus' principalities, the fur trading centres of the Volga Bulghars along the Samara Bend, the mercantile outposts of the Crimean peninsula which gave the Jochid Khans access to the Mediterranean Sea, to the Khwarezm delta, giving them a position in the heart of the Central Asian trade. These distant frontiers, hundreds upon hundreds of kilometres apart, were connected by the western half of the great Eurasian steppe, the Qipchaq Desert as it was known to Islamic writers. Thus was the Golden Horde, and over the next few episodes we'll take you through its history, from its establishment under Batu, to the height of its glory under Özbeg, to its lengthy disintegration from the end of the fourteenth century onwards. This first episode will serve as an introduction to the history of the Golden Horde, beginning first with its very name and important historiographical matters, then taking you through its origins, up to the death of Berke and ascension of Möngke-Temür, the first ruler of the Golden Horde as an independent state.  I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       As good a place to start as any is terminology, and the Golden Horde is known by a host of names. Firstly and most famously, we can note that the Golden Horde is a later appellation, given to the state centuries later in Rus' chronicles. In Russian this is Zolotaya Orda (Золотой Орды),  which in Mongolian and Turkish would be Altan Orda. The English word “horde” comes directly from Mongolian ordu, though also used in Turkic languages, and signifies, depending on the case, a command headquarters, the army, tent or palace- quite different from the image of uncontrolled rabble that usually comes to mind with the term. While commonly said that the Rus' chronicles took the term from the golden colour of the Khan's tents, we actually do see the term Golden Horde used among the Mongols before the emergence of the Golden Horde state. For the Mongols and Turks, all the cardinal directions have colour associated with them. Gold is the colour associated with the center; while the divisions of the army would be known by their direction and colour, the overall command or imperial government could be known as the center, the qol, or by its colour, altan. This is further augmented by the association of the colour gold with the Chinggisids themselves, as descent from Chinggis Khan was the altan urugh, the Golden Lineage; and the name of a well-known Mongolian folk band. For example, in 1246 when the Franciscan Friar John de Plano Carpini travelled to Mongolia as an envoy from the Pope, he visited a number of camps of the new Khan, Güyük. Each camp was named, and one of these was, as Carpini notes, called the Golden Horde. In this case, Carpini also describes Güyük's tent as being literally covered in gold, with even the nails holding the wooden beams being gold.       So Altan orda, or Golden Horde, may well have been in use within the Golden Horde khanate. However, the term is never used to refer to it in the thirteenth or fourteenth centuries. What we see instead is a collection of other terms. In the Ilkhanate, it was common to refer to the rulers as the Khans of Qipchap, and the state as the Desht-i-Qipchaq, the Qipchaq steppe or desert. Hence in modern writing you will sometimes see it as the Qipchap Khanate. But this seems unlikely to have been a term in use by the Jochid Khans, given that the Qipchaps were the Khan's subjects and seen as Mongol slaves; a rather strange thing for the Mongols to name themselves after them. Given that it was the pre-Mongol term for the region, and the Ilkhanid writers liked to denigrate the Jochid Khans whenever possible, it makes rather good sense that they would continue using it.       Many modern historians, and our series researcher, like to refer to it as the Jochid ulus, the patrimony of the house of Jochi, particularly before the actual independence of the Golden Horde following 1260. This term appears closer to what we see in Yuan and Mamluk sources, where the Golden Horde was usually called the ulus of Batu or Berke, or ulus of whoever was currently the reigning Khan. Either designating themselves by the current ruler, or by the more general ulug ulus, meaning “great state or patrimony,” with perhaps just the encampment of the Khan known as the altan ordu, the Golden Horde, among the Jochids themselves. Over the following episodes the term Jochid ulus will be used to refer to the state in general, and Golden Horde will be used specifically for the independent khanate which emerged after the Berke-Hülegü war in the 1260s.       There is another matter with terminology worth pointing out before we go further. The Jochid domains were split into two halves; west of the Ural river, ruled by the line of Batu, Jochi's second son. And east of the Ural River, ruled by the line of Orda, Jochi's first son. Now, Batu may have been the general head of the Jochids, or a first amongst equals, or Orda and Batu may have been given totally distinct domains. Perhaps the ulus of Orda simply became more autonomous over the thirteenth century. Opinions differ greatly, and unfortunately little information survives on the exact relationship, but the ulus of Orda was, by 1300, effectively independent and the Batuid Khans Toqta and Özbeg would, through military intervention, bring it under their influence. So essentially, there were two wings of the Jochids with a murky relationship, which is further obfuscated by inconsistent naming of them in the historical sources. Rus' and Timurid sources also refer to the White Horde and the Blue Horde. The Rus' sources follow Turko-Mongolian colour directions and have the White Horde, the lands ruled by the line of Batu, the more westerly, and Orda's ulus being the Blue Horde to the east.  Except in Timurid sources, this is reversed, with Batu's line ruling the Blue Horde, and Orda the White.        There has been no shortage of scholarly debate over this, and you will see the terms used differently among modern writers. This is not even getting into the matter if the Golden Horde was then itself another division within this, referring to territory belonging directly to the Khan within the Batuid Horde. For the sake of clarity, this podcast will work on the following assumptions, with recognition that other scholars interpretations may differ greatly: that following Jochi's death around 1227, the Jochid lines and lands were divided among Batu and Orda, with Batu acting as the head of the lineage. The western half of this division, under Batu, we will call the White Horde, and Orda's eastern division will be the Blue Horde. Together, these were the Jochid ulus, with the rest of their brothers given allotments within the larger domains. While Batu was the senior in the hierarchy, Orda was largely autonomous, which following the Berke-Hülegü war turned into the Blue Horde becoming effectively independent until the start of the fourteenth century, as apparently suggested by Rashid al-Din and Marco Polo,        One final note is that we have effectively no internal sources surviving from the Golden Horde. In the opinion of scholars like Charles Halperin, the Golden Horde simply had no chronicle tradition. Any records they maintained were likely lost in the upheavals of the late fourteenth century that culminated in the great invasion under Tamerlane in the 1390s, where effectively every major city in the steppe region of the Horde was destroyed.  The closest we come to Golden Horde point-of-view chronicles appear in the sixteenth century onwards, long after the dissolution of the Horde. The first and most notable was the mid-sixteenth century Qara Tawarikh of Ötemish Hajji, based in Khiva in the service of descendants of Jochi's son, Shiban. Sent to the lower Volga by his masters, there he collected oral folk tales which he compiled into his history. While often bearing intriguing and amusing tales, they reveal little in the way of the internal machinations of the Golden Horde. Luckily we are serviced from more contemporary sources, most notably Ilkhanid and Mamluk sources- once again our friend the Ilkhanid vizier Rashid al-Din is of utmost importance, who provides us an important outline of the Golden Horde's politics up to 1300. The Mamluks and Ilkhanid sources largely collected information from Jochid diplomats or refugees. Most of our understanding of Golden Horde political events, and the details of the following episodes, comes from these sources.   Post-Ilkhanid Timurid and Jalayirid authors help somewhat for the later fourteenth century, while the Rus' sources provide information on the Golden Horde almost exclusively in the context of its interactions with the principalities, similar to other European and Byzantine sources. A few details can be gleaned too from travellers like Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta, and even distant Yuan sources from China. Archaeology has provided some interesting details, particularly relating to trade and the extensive coinage circulation of the Jochids. Despite this, the Golden Horde remains, regardless of its fame, arguably one of the poorer understood of the Mongol Khanates.       So, with that bit of paperwork out of the way, let's get on with it! The kernel of the immense Golden Horde can be found in the first decades of the thirteenth century. In the first ten years of the Mongol Empire Jochi, Chinggis Khan's first son, was tasked with leading campaigns around Lake Baikal, as well as the first expeditions that brought their armies far to the west of Mongolia. While around Baikal he had been sent to subdue the local peoples, in 1216 Jochi and Sübe'edei pursued fleeing Merkits across Kazakhstan, to the region between the Aral Sea and the Caspian. Here, the Merkits had allied with Qangli-Qipchaps, beginning the long running Mongol animosity to the various Qipchap peoples. While Jochi was the victor here, he was forced into battle with the Khwarezm-Shah Muhammad on his return, as we have previously detailed. But the result seems to have been an association of these western steppes as Jochi's lands, in the eyes of the Mongol leadership.       Such an association was strengthened following the campaign against the Khwarezmian Empire. The Mongols saw conquering a region as making it part of the patrimony of a given prince, and such a belief fueled into the interactions between Jochi and his brothers, especially Chagatai. This was most apparent at the siege of the Khwarezmian capital of Gurganj, where Jochi sought to minimize destruction to the city- not out of humanity, but as it would be a jewel in his domains as one of the preeminent trade cities in Central Asia. Chagatai, in a long running competition with his brother, was not nearly so compassionate. The end result was Gurganj being almost totally annihilated, and Jochi and Chagatai's antagonism reaching the frustrated ears of their father. As you may recall, Jochi's mother Börte had been captured by Merkits before he was born, leaving an air of doubt around the true identity of his father. Chinggis, to his credit, always treated Jochi as fully legitimate, and indeed up until 1221, in the opinion of some scholars, appears to have been grooming him as his primary heir. However, the falling out between Jochi and Chagatai over the siege of Gurganj, and Chagatai's apparent refusal to accept Jochi as anything but a “Merkit bastard,” as attributed to him in the Secret History of the Mongols, left Chinggis with  the realization that should Jochi become Khan, it would only lead to war between the brothers. And hence, the decision to make Ögedai the designated heir.       It has often been speculated that Jochi's massive patrimony was essentially a means to keep him and Chagatai as far apart as possible,and appeasing Jochi once he was excluded from the throne.  Following the conquest of Khwarezm, Jochi seems to have taken well to the western steppe being his territory, the grasslands between the Ural and Irtysh Rivers. Juzjani, writing around 1260, writes of Jochi falling in love with these lands, believing them to be the finest in the world. Some later, pro-Toluid sources portray Jochi then spending the last years of his life doing nothing but hunting and drinking in these lands, but this seems to have been aimed at discrediting his fitness. Rather he likely spent this time consolidating and gradually pushing west his new realm, past the Aral Sea towards the Ural River, while his primary camp was along the Irtysh. Though effectively nothing is known of Jochi's administration, we can regard this period as the true founding of what became the Jochid ulus, and eventually the Golden Horde. Though he died between 1225 and 1227, either of illness, a hunting accident or poisoned by his father, Chinggis immediately confirmed upon Jochi's many offspring -at least 14 sons- their rights to their father's lands. And Chinggis, or perhaps Ögedai, made Jochi's second son Batu the head of the lineage. It was then that the division of the Jochid lands into two wings under Orda and Batu may have been first implemented.        By the start of Ögedai's reign, the western border of the Mongol Empire  extended past the Ural River, and Mongol armies were attacking the Volga Bulghars.  While we do not have much information on it, we may presume a level of involvement on the part of Batu and his brothers. Of course, in the second half of the 1230s Ögedai ordered the great invasion that overran the western steppe. Starting from the Ural River, within 5 years the Mongol Empire was extended some 3,000 kilometres westwards to the borders of Hungary. Whereas previously the urban area of the Jochid lands was restricted to the Khwarezm Delta and the scattered steppe settlements, now it included the cities of the Rus' principalities, Volga Bulghars, other Volga communities, and the Crimean peninsula. All in addition to the western half of the great Eurasian steppe, and the now subdued Cuman-Qipchaq peoples. By 1242, Batu was arguably the single most powerful individual in the Mongol Empire. Enjoying the rich grasslands along the Volga between the Black and Caspian Seas, Batu created a permanent capital, Sarai. Much like the imperial capital of Qaraqorum, Sarai served as a base to collect tribute, receive embassies, and house the administration and records, while Batu and the other Jochid princes continued to nomadize. The newly conquered territories were quickly incorporated in the Mongol tax system, and the Rus' principalities began to see Mongol basqaqs and darughachi come to collect the Khan's due.       But Batu was an ambitious man. There was clearly an understanding that the Jochids were granted the west of Asia as theirs, and he took this quite literally. As the Mongol Empire incorporated Iran, the Caucasus and Anatolia over the 1230s through 40s, Batu ensured that Jochid land rights were not just respected, but expanded. The administration in these regions was picked either from Batu's men, or from his consultation, such as Baiju Noyan, the commander of the Caucasian tamma forces and who brought the Rumi Seljuqs under Mongol rule.    In the turmoil following Ögedai's death, Batu extended his hold over western Asia. Naturally, this put him on a collision course with the Central Government. When Ögedai's widow, Törögene tried to hunt down her political rivals, such as the head of the Central Asia Secretariat Mas'ud Beg, Batu gave shelter to him. When her son Güyük took the throne, Batu did not attend his quriltai in person, putting off any meeting due to, Batu claimed, the severe gout he suffered from preventing his travel. Batu and Güyük had been rivals ever since the great western campaign, where Güyük had insulted Batu's leadership. Güyük hoped to put a cap on the decentralization of power which had occurred during the last years of his father's reign and during his mother's regency, and showed a willingness to execute imperial princes, such as the last of Chinggis Khan's surviving brothers, Temüge. When rumour came to Batu that Güyük was planning a massive new campaign to subdue the west, Batu must have suspected that Güyük planned on bringing him to heel too; either limiting his political freedom, or outright replacing him with Batu's older brother, Orda, with whom Güyük was on good terms with.    The news of Güyük's advance came from Sorqaqtani Beki, the widow of Tolui and sister of one of Jochi's most important wives. Sources like William of Rubruck have Batu preemptively poison Güyük in spring 1248, thus avoiding civil war. Batu and Sorqaqtani then promptly had many of Güyük's favourites executed and, in a quriltai in Batu's territory, had her son Möngke declared Khan of Khans in 1250, before an official ceremony in Mongolia the next year. The relationship was an effective one. In being key supporters for Möngke's otherwise illegal election, Jochid land rights were confirmed across the empire. Transoxania was cleared of Chagatayids and handed over the Jochids, Georgia confirmed for Batu's younger brother Berke, and travellers who passed through the empire in these years like William of Rubruck basically have the empire divided between Batu and Möngke. Most of western Asia, both north and south of the Caucasus, was overseen by Batu and his men. When Batu died around 1255, the Jochids enjoyed a preeminence second only to the Great Khan himself. The special place of the Jochid leader was recognized by numerous contemporary sources, and it is notable that while the rest of the empire was divided into the great branch secretariats, that the Jochid lands were not placed into one until late in Möngke's reign, and there is little indication it was ever properly established before Jochid independence.    However, despite even Möngke recognizing Batu's power, as a part of his wider centralizing efforts he reminded Batu of the leash on him. Batu's interactions with William of Rubruck indicate that Batu saw his power to conduct foreign diplomacy was limited; the Jochid lands were not exempted from Möngke's empire-wide censuses, and when Möngke demanded Batu provide troops for Hülegü's campaigns against the Nizari Ismailis and Baghdad, Batu duly complied. During Batu's lifetime it was the name of the Great Khan who continued to be minted on coinage in the Jochid lands, and Rus' princes still had to receive yarliqs, or confirmation, not from Batu but from Qaraqorum. And in 1257, Möngke ordered the Jochid lands to be incorporated into a new Secretariat, and thus bring them better under the control of the Central Government. There is no indication from the sources that Batu or his successors resisted Möngke in any capacity in these efforts   Following Batu's death, Möngke promptly ratified Batu's son Sartaq as his successor, but as Sartaq returned from Qaraqorum, he died under mysterious circumstances; in a few sources, the blame falls onto his uncles, Berke and Berkechir. Sartaq's son or brother Ilagchi was made Khan under the regency of Batu's widow Boraqchin Khatun, but soon both were dead. Though Ilagchi's cause of death is unmentioned, for Boraqchin the Mamluk sources note that Berke had her tried and executed for treason. Still, for Sartaq and Ilagchi the tendency for Mongol princes to die at inopportune times can't be forgotten, and Berke may have simply reacted to a favourable circumstance.  The fact that he stood with the most to gain from their deaths made him the likely scapegoat even to contemporary writers, even if he happened to actually be innocent of the matter. Much like how Batu may or may not have poisoned Güyük, the deaths are a little too convenient for the relevant Jochid princes to be easily dismissed.   Between 1257 and 1259, possibly waiting for Möngke to begin his Song campaign and be unable to interfere, Berke became the head of the Jochid ulus. As the aqa of the Jochids, that is, the senior member of the line of Jochi, he did this with the approval of his fellow Jochid princes and military leaders. But there is no indication that Berke ever received support from Qaraqorum for his enthronement. Given that Chinggis Khan had confirmed upon Batu the right to rule, the shift from brother-to-brother, though common in steppe successions, was still an extreme matter.   Part of the success of Berke's ascension may have been achieved through an agreement with Batu's family. According to the fourteenth century Mamluk author al-Mufaddal, the childless Berke designated Batu's grandson Möngke-Temür as his heir. Some historians like Roman Pochekaev have suggested that Berke's enthronement may have been leveraged as part of an agreement; that Berke, as the most senior member of the Jochids, could take the throne following the death of Ilagchi Khan. But, the prestige of Batu made his line the designated leaders of the White Horde. Without his own children, on Berke's death the throne would fall back to the line of Batu, under his grandson Möngke-Temür.  And so it would remain among Batu's descendants until the 1360s, almost 100 years after Berke's death.    As you likely know, Berke was the first Mongol prince known to convert to Islam. The exact time of his conversion varies in the sources, but a convincing argument has been put forward by professor István Vásáry. Essentially, that Berke, likely through a Muslim mid-wife that raised him (and not a Khwarezmian Princess, as sometimes suggested) was either in his youth a convert to Islam, or at least extremely influenced by it. By the time of the 1251 quriltai in Mongolia which confirmed Möngke as Great Khan, Berke is attested in independent sources writing at the same time to have sought to Islamize the event; getting the meat to be slaughtered for the feast to be halal, according to Juvaini, and trying to get Möngke to swear on the Quran, according to Juzjani. On his return from Mongolia, he was contacted by a Sufi shaykh in Bukhara, Sayf ad-Din Bakharzi, who is mentioned in a number of sources in connection with Berke's conversion. Having heard of a prominent Mongol prince's interest in Islam, the Shaykh invited Berke to Bukhara, and there gave him a formal education in the religion, leading to Berke to make a more official declaration of his faith likely around 1252. Berke's conversion was accompanied by the conversion of his wives, a number of other princes, members of his family and his generals, though all evidence suggests there was only limited spread of the faith among the rank and file Mongols at the time.    As Khan, Berke sought to ensure Jochid hegemony on frontier regions. His troops crushed a newly independent Ruthenian Kingdom in Galicia, and in 1259 his armies under Burundai Noyan led a devastating raid into Poland. Possibly in this time Bulgaria began paying tribute to the Jochids as well. Berke demanded the submission of the Hungarian King, Béla IV, and offered a marriage alliance between their families. As Hungary was spared any damage in Burundai's 1259 campaign, it has been suggested that Béla undertook a nominal submission to Berke, sending tribute and gifts in order to spare Hungary from another assault.    In Khwarezm and the Caucasus Berke continued to exercise influence. But tensions were fraying with his cousin Hülegü, who in 1258 sacked Baghdad and killed the ‘Abbasid Caliph. Obviously, as a Muslim Berke was not keen to learn of the Caliph's death. According to the contemporary author Juzjani, writing from distant Delhi, Berke had been in contact with the Caliph in the years preceding the siege. Much of Berke's anger though, as gleaned from his letters to the Mamluks and the writing of Rashid al-Din, was at Hülegü's failure to consult with Berke as the senior member of the family, and as the master of western Asia. Though Jochid troops partook in the siege, and we have no indication from the sources that Berke tried to prevent them taking part, it seems Hülegü did not reach out to Berke regarding the fate of Baghdad, or in the dispensation of loot.   Berke was greatly angered at this, and relations only worsened over the following years, once Hülegü killed the Jochid princes in his retinue on charges of sorcery; it just so happened that these same prince had previously annoyed Hülegü through attempting to enforce Jochid land rights over Iran and Iraq. The final straw came in early 1260 once Hülegü learned of Möngke's death. Hülegü by then had already set up in the pastures of Azerbaijan, land Berke considered his. As he learned of the fighting between his brothers Khubilai and Ariq Böke which broke out later that year, Hülegü decided to use the interregnum to seize the pastures of the Caucasus, as well as all of the land between the Amu Darya and Syria, for himself. Berke's officials in these lands were driven out or killed. With no Great Khan to intercede, Berke felt forced to resort to violence to avenge his fallen kinsmen and retake his lands; in 1262 he went to war with Hülegü, and so did the Mongol Empire in the west split asunder.   We've covered the Berke-Hülegü war in detail in a previous episode, so we don't need to repeat ourselves here. The end result was both Berke and Hülegü dead by 1266, and the frontier between them set along the Kura River, where Hülegü's son and successor Abaqa built a wall to keep out the Jochids- though the jury is out on whether he made them pay for it. The conflict set the border between the newly emerged Ilkhanate and the Jochid state for the next century, and the Jochids would not forget the sting of losing this territory to the Ilkhanids for that time either.    On Berke's death his coffin was carried back to Sarai.  Berke's reign, though much shorter than Batu's, had been a decisive one. For not only did it determine many aspects of the Golden Horde's diplomacy and character, notably antagonism to the Ilkhans, a predatory view to the Chagatayids who in the 1260s retook control of Transoxiana and killed Berke's officials, and a cool, distant view to Khubilai Khaan's legitimacy. He helped begin the alliance with the Mamluk Sultans, which never materialized into any actual military cooperation but uneased the Ilkhans and allowed the Mamluks to continue to purchase Qipchaq slaves from the steppe. This alliance too would survive essentially until the dissolution of the Golden Horde at the start of the fifteenth century.    But it also seeded the kernel for eventual islamization of the Khanate, a slow process which would only be fulfilled some sixty years later under Özbeg Khan. While their father was the true founder of the Jochid ulus in the 1200s, both Batu and Berke could argue for this title. Batu posthumously became the Sain Khan, the Good Khan, while to the Mamluks the Golden Horde rulers ascended to the throne of Berke. With his death, it seems at Sarai a quriltai was held to confirm the enthronement of his grand-nephew, Möngke-Temür, the first true independent ruler of what we can call the Golden Horde, and subject of our new episode, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals Podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, consider supporting us on patreon a www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals, or giving us a like, comment and review on the podcast catcher of your choice, and share with your friends, it helps immensely. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.   

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve
34) Who Mourns for Adonais?

Enterprise Incidents with Scott & Steve

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 133:19


While exploring the planet Pollux IV, the Enterprise is held captive by an alien super-being who claims to be the Greek god Apollo. His demands are that the crew abandon ship, settle on his planet and worship him like their human ancestors did 5,000 years before. Since they are no match for Apollo's mythological powers, Captain Kirk's only hope lies in reasoning with Lt. Carolyn Palamas, the ship's Archaeology and Anthropology officer, who becomes smitten with Apollo after he chooses her to be his mate. In what is perhaps one of "Star Trek'" deepest and most thought-provoking episodes, "Who Mourns for Adonais?" takes the "ancient astronaut" theory and runs with it. The writing and direction are both superb, and the production design, wardrobe and original score are all fantastic. But the key to the success of this episode lies with the magnificent, fiercely-committed and heartbreaking performance of Michael Forest, who portrays Apollo as a charismatic and empathetic, yet ultimately tragic, figure. You can follow Enterprise Incidents at: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EnterpriseIncidents Twitter @enterincidents Instagram @enterpriseincidents Follow Scott Mantz @moviemantz on Twitter and Instagram Follow Steve Morris @srmorris on Twitter and srmorris1 on Instagram --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/enterpriseincidents/support

Women In Archaeology
The History and Archaeology of Thanksgiving

Women In Archaeology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


On this episode, Chelsi, Kirsten, and Emily chat about the history and archaeology of the Thanksgiving holiday. What was the original harvest celebration all about? Were the Pilgrims an absolute bummer? What are our misconceptions about this holiday? What can archaeology tell us about the relationship between the Pilgrims and indigenous communities? The hosts also... Continue Reading → The post The History and Archaeology of Thanksgiving appeared first on Women In Archaeology.

Jacobin Radio
A World to Win: A History of Everything w/ David Wengrow

Jacobin Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 46:14


This week, Grace speaks to David Wengrow, Professor of Comparative Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and the author of a brilliant new book with the late David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity.In this episode, David and Grace talk about literally everything—human history, human nature, and how to change the world. You can support our work on the show by becoming a Patron. Thanks to our producer Conor Gillies and to the Lipman-Miliband Trust for making this episode possible.A World to Win is a podcast from Grace Blakeley and Tribune bringing you a weekly dose of socialist news, theory and action with guests from around the world.

Chasing History Radio
Chasing History Radio: Is Every Artifact ever made Still out there?

Chasing History Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 13:17


In this episode, we will look at the reality of human history objects - like all of the buttons that were on continental army uniforms during the American Revolution to every bullet made out of lead that was fired during the Civil War. Are all those things that were made in the past is it still out there somewhere? The answer is... Yes, most of them are. We talk about the details of the tangible artifacts that are still out there waiting to be discovered.  Please help us out by taking 20 seconds and giving us a rate and review or tell us how we can make a better show. We Appreciate Youz Guyz!   Please help us out by leaving a comment and sharing our show with others!    Don't forget to Subscribe, Comment & leave us a rating and review. We also have a YouTube Channel "Chasing History" where we take you into the field with the men & women who discover history!

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Sheffield Troublemakers: Rebels and Radicals in Sheffield History with David Price - Arch and Ale 42

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 36:00


Archaeology & Ale is a monthly series of talks presented by Archaeology in the City, part of the University of Sheffield Archaeology Department's outreach programme. This month we are proud to host David Price from the University of Sheffield speaking on "Sheffield Troublemakers: Rebels and Radicals in Sheffield History ". This talk took place on Thursday, October 28th, 2021, online via Google Meets. David Price David Price studied history at Cambridge. He then went into the civil service. He was private secretary to Willie Whitelaw who later became Deputy Prime Minister. For some years, he worked on the transformation of old employment exchanges into modern Job Centres. In 1980, he moved with the Manpower Services Commission from London to Sheffield. On his retirement he took up history again. His first book was called Office of Hope and was the history of the Job Centres in the UK - originally founded by Winston Churchill and William Beveridge in 1910. Recently, he has been interested in helping asylum seekers in the city which has led him to write a book about migration to Sheffield called 'Welcome to Sheffield: A Migration History'. However, his best known book is about the radical tradition in Sheffield and is called 'Sheffield Troublemakers'. This is the subject of today's talk. In his talk, David will trace Sheffield's long history of radicalism and the important role that Sheffield has played on the national stage. This is a story of dissenting middle classes, independent minded artisans, champions of the weak and an unwillingness to be pushed around. Links David Price's Book: Sheffield Troublemakers: Rebels and Radicals in Sheffield History Save Sheffield Archaeology Please sign our Petition! For more information about Archaeology in the City's events and opportunities to get involved, please email archaeologyinthecity@sheffield.ac.uk or visit our website at archinthecity.wordpress.com. You can also find us on Twitter (@archinthecity), Instagram (@archaeointhecity), or Facebook (@archinthecity) ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

A World to Win with Grace Blakeley
A HISTORY OF EVERYTHING: An interview with David Wengrow

A World to Win with Grace Blakeley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 46:14


This week, Grace speaks to David Wengrow, Professor of Comparative Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, and the author of a brilliant new book, with the brilliant late David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything. In this episode, David and Grace talk about literally everything—human history, human nature, and how to change the world.You can support our work on the show by subscribing to our Patreon, where you'll get access to full-length versions of the interviews. Thanks to producer Conor Gillies and to the Lipman-Miliband Trust for making this episode possible.

New Books in the American West
Carolyn L. White, "The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City" (U New Mexico Press, 2020)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:37


How do you do archaeological research on a place that exists for only one week per year, in the middle of the Nevada desert, and is based on the ethos of "leave no trace?" In The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City (U New Mexico Press, 2020), Dr. Carolyn White, a professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, sets out to tackle just this question. Using the methods of contemporary archaeology, White spent a decade attending the annual Burning Man event in the desert of northwestern Nevada, chronicling the construction, the day to day life, and the dismantling of Black Rock City, which is among the largest cities in the state for the short time exists every August and September. White examines the various ways that people live in Black Rock, the semi-invisible infrastructure and bureaucracy which keep it running and keep its 75,000 residents safe, and the day to day life in the city itself. White shows a side of Burning Man not often seen by outsiders, and one that runs counter to the chaotic, Instagram-ified, narrative often presented in mainstream media. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west

New Books in Archaeology
Carolyn L. White, "The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City" (U New Mexico Press, 2020)

New Books in Archaeology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:37


How do you do archaeological research on a place that exists for only one week per year, in the middle of the Nevada desert, and is based on the ethos of "leave no trace?" In The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City (U New Mexico Press, 2020), Dr. Carolyn White, a professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, sets out to tackle just this question. Using the methods of contemporary archaeology, White spent a decade attending the annual Burning Man event in the desert of northwestern Nevada, chronicling the construction, the day to day life, and the dismantling of Black Rock City, which is among the largest cities in the state for the short time exists every August and September. White examines the various ways that people live in Black Rock, the semi-invisible infrastructure and bureaucracy which keep it running and keep its 75,000 residents safe, and the day to day life in the city itself. White shows a side of Burning Man not often seen by outsiders, and one that runs counter to the chaotic, Instagram-ified, narrative often presented in mainstream media. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/archaeology

New Books Network
Carolyn L. White, "The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City" (U New Mexico Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:37


How do you do archaeological research on a place that exists for only one week per year, in the middle of the Nevada desert, and is based on the ethos of "leave no trace?" In The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City (U New Mexico Press, 2020), Dr. Carolyn White, a professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, sets out to tackle just this question. Using the methods of contemporary archaeology, White spent a decade attending the annual Burning Man event in the desert of northwestern Nevada, chronicling the construction, the day to day life, and the dismantling of Black Rock City, which is among the largest cities in the state for the short time exists every August and September. White examines the various ways that people live in Black Rock, the semi-invisible infrastructure and bureaucracy which keep it running and keep its 75,000 residents safe, and the day to day life in the city itself. White shows a side of Burning Man not often seen by outsiders, and one that runs counter to the chaotic, Instagram-ified, narrative often presented in mainstream media. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Carolyn L. White, "The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City" (U New Mexico Press, 2020)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 61:37


How do you do archaeological research on a place that exists for only one week per year, in the middle of the Nevada desert, and is based on the ethos of "leave no trace?" In The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City (U New Mexico Press, 2020), Dr. Carolyn White, a professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, sets out to tackle just this question. Using the methods of contemporary archaeology, White spent a decade attending the annual Burning Man event in the desert of northwestern Nevada, chronicling the construction, the day to day life, and the dismantling of Black Rock City, which is among the largest cities in the state for the short time exists every August and September. White examines the various ways that people live in Black Rock, the semi-invisible infrastructure and bureaucracy which keep it running and keep its 75,000 residents safe, and the day to day life in the city itself. White shows a side of Burning Man not often seen by outsiders, and one that runs counter to the chaotic, Instagram-ified, narrative often presented in mainstream media. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

3 minute lesson
The Rosetta Stone | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 3:00


Episode 390. Topic: The Rosetta Stone. Theme: Archaeology. How old are Egyptian hieroglyphs? How were they used as a writing system? How did  hieroglyphic scrimp become indecipherable over time? How are we able to read them today?!Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #219: Straight to Pyramids - Part 2

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


We continue our musings on the Egypt trip this week by responding to many excellent questions and comments from listeners by email and through the Discord server. (To join our Discord, click the connect button on our website here)We learned a lot from that trip, but in the end we have no answers, only better questions.Brothers of the Serpent Episode 219If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element Executive Producers: Chandra ChellMichael BurroughsAssociate Executive Producer:Liam Johnston

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Perishable Artifacts and Tribally Driven Archaeology - HeVo 57

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 68:28


On today's podcast Jessica interviews Dr. Edward Jolie (Oglala Lakota and Hodulgee Muscogee), the new Clara Lee Tanner Associate Curator of Ethnology at the Arizona State Museum and Associate Professor at School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. We talk about perishable materials, such as textiles, baskets, nets, and footwear, and why they are understudied, how they offer unique insights into the past, and what they can teach us about diversity and continuity both within and across regions. Throughout the podcast we continually return to the human element of perishable artifacts and associated research, including the movement to tribally driven archaeology. Links Heritage Voices on the APN Arizona State Museum University of Arizona School of Anthropology Heritage Voices Tejon Episode (Nation-Building After Federal Recognition) Cedar Mesa Perishables Project Dr. Jolie: ejolie@arizona.edu Contact Jessica Jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org @livingheritageA @LivingHeritageResearchCouncil ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Bioarchaeology Across the World with Dr. Alex Garcia-Putnam - Ruins 82

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 58:37


In this episode, we are chatting with Dr. Alex Garcia-Putnam who is the Assistant State Physical Anthropologist for the Department of Archaeology and History Preservation in Washington State. And how did we come across Dr. Garcia-Putnam? Well he is a UW graduate of course! We start out by recapping how we know each other and talk about Alex's awesome experience returning to US from Canada. Alex talks about his experience growing up as a professors kid and how he got hooked on archaeology. We then discuss Alex's change of dissertation topic caused by the COVID19 pandemic and also discuss how bioarcheology can be used to talk about very relevant and interesting topics. We finish off talking about all the places he has worked as a bioarcheologist. Literature Recommendations Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency Website 2012 The Bioarchaeology of Violence edited by Debra L. Martin and Ryan P. Harrod 2014 The Anthropology of Plague: Insights from Bioarchaeological Analyses of Epidemic Cemetaries by Sharon N. DeWitte 2015 The Land of Open Graves by Jason De León 2021 Health, Stress, and Demography at Charity Hospital Cemetery #2 (AD1847-1929) by Garcia-Putnam, A., C. Halling, and R. Seidemann. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Grating the Nutmeg
130. Whatever Happened to Nick Bellantoni?

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 55:22


Recently, Connecticut State Historian Walt Woodward announced he will be retiring next July 1st. To find out what "historical"  retirement is like, Woodward sat down with Nick Bellantoni, who retired as state archaeologist in 2014, and is now Connecticut's state archaeologist emeritus. The resulting conversation was a fascinating discussion of archaeological sites in Connecticut, Nick's successor state archaeologists, and Nick's own career of amazing discoveries. 

3 minute lesson
Tutankhamun's Tomb | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 3:00


Episode 389. Topic: Tutankhamun's Tomb. Theme: Archaeology. Who was Tutankhamun? When was he the pharaoh of Egypt and how long did he rule? Why is he now so famous? What does his tomb and his DNA reveal about his life and health? Who were the other two infant mummies in his tomb? Where is his mummy today?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Stories from Palestine
The history of Tel el Qadi / Tel Dan

Stories from Palestine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 32:40


In the most northern part of historic Palestine is an archaeological site, now within a National Park, that has remains of the Bronze Age city of Laish and of the iron age city of Dan. In Arabic the location is called Tel el Qadi, the hill of the judge.This archaeological site has two very impressive city gates that were excavated. The Bronze Age gate was built by the Canaanites who called their city Laish. They built a mud brick gate with pointed arches, the oldest one found in the region (18th Century BC). The city was conquered by the Israelites who built new walls and new gates. The iron age gate that was excavated is built of local basalt blocks and has four chambers. At the gate they found a platform with stones in which sticks could be placed to hold up a canopy to create shade for the judge (hence the hill of the judge). It is also the site where the Israelite King Jeroboam set up a high altar with a golden calf where the Jewish people could worship their God Yahweh instead of going to Jerusalem in the south. The sacrificial area that the excavators found is thought by some scholars to be that place. The excavations are found in the Tel Dan National Park. Through this National Park the Dan stream flows down towards the Jordan river. The other contributors to the Jordan river are the Hasbani river and the Banias river. If you want to watch a video I made about Tel Dan, then click on this link to go to the YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/A9YBKFi7btAIf you want to support the podcast with a donation, if you want to follow the podcast on social media or sign up for the weekly email go to :https://podspout.app/storiesfrompalestineJoin us on Saturday 27 or Sunday 28 November 2021 for the Christmas Bazar in Singer Cafe in Beit Sahour. The Bazar is from 11.00 until 17.00 and there will be about eight artisans each day promoting their products. Find all the details on the facebook page of Handmade PalestineA route description to Singer Cafe can be found here : http://www.singercafe.com/contact/

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron
Ashdod One Of Five Cities Of The Philistines

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:29


Archaeology, primarily between 1962-69, has greatly proved the Biblical record of Ashdod. God bless you and thank you for listening! Please join us again tomorrow! Please subscribe!

3 minute lesson
The Terracotta Army | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:16


Episode 388. Topic: The Terracotta Army. Theme: Archaeology. How did some farmers uncover an untouched collection of funeral art in China? What is The Terracotta Army and why was it made? How did they go for millennia without discovery or looting? Can you visit them today?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron
Shiloh Place Of The Tabernacle In The Wilderness

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 3:41


The Archaeology of Shiloh is fascinating and ongoing, and greatly confirms the Scriptural account. God bless you and thank you for joining us! Please join us daily!

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Best Practices for Digital Field Archaeology - ArchaeoTech 167

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 61:07


We've got a guest from Wildnote on today to talk about best practices when going in the field with your digital forms. There is some Wildnote feature stuff in here, but, most of this is applicable to anyone using digital recording devices in the field. Links Wildnote Article Email Rachel at Wildnote - rachel@wildnoteapp.com Contact Chris Webster Twitter: @archeowebby Email: chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Paul Zimmerman Twitter: @lugal Email: paul@lugal.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The ArchaeoTech Podcast
Best Practices for Digital Field Archaeology - Ep 167

The ArchaeoTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 61:07


We've got a guest from Wildnote on today to talk about best practices when going in the field with your digital forms. There is some Wildnote feature stuff in here, but, most of this is applicable to anyone using digital recording devices in the field. Links Wildnote Article Email Rachel at Wildnote - rachel@wildnoteapp.com Contact Chris Webster Twitter: @archeowebby Email: chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Paul Zimmerman Twitter: @lugal Email: paul@lugal.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Arts & Ideas
Green Thinking: Climate Justice

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:36


Melting perma-frost in Alaska has led to crooked housing, an eroded air-strip and changes to the hunting and fishing diets of the inhabitants. But are their views and experiences being properly registered in our discussions about climate change? Today's conversation looks at the idea of climate justice. Des Fitzgerald is talking about community based research with: Dr Tahrat Shahid - the Challenge Leader for Food Systems, and cross-portfolio Gender Advisor at the Global Challenges Research Fund, a UK government fund managed primarily by UK Research and Innovation. https://www.newton-gcrf.org/gcrf/challenge-leaders/dr-tahrat-shahid/ and Dr. Rick Knecht - Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at University of Aberdeen where he specialises in working with the Yup'ik communities of Alaska, both past and present https://www.abdn.ac.uk/geosciences/people/profiles/r.knecht Professor Des Fitzgerald is a New Generation Thinker based at the University of Exeter. The podcast series Green Thinking is 26 episodes 26 minutes long looking at issues relating to COP26 made in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. It explores the latest research and ideas around understanding and tackling the climate and nature emergency. The podcasts are all available from the Arts & Ideas podcast feed - and collected on the Free Thinking website under Green Thinking where you can also find programmes on mushrooms, forests, rivers, eco-criticism and soil. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07zg0r2 For more information about the research the AHRC's supports around climate change and the natural world you can visit: Responding to climate change – UKRI or follow @ahrcpress on twitter. To join the discussion about the research covered in this podcast and the series please use the hashtag #GreenThinkingPodcast. Producer: Sofie Vilcins

Israel Bible Podcast
Adventures in Archaeology

Israel Bible Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 26:53


Find out more about Dr. Jodi Magness HEREPeruse her many books HEREDig through the pictures and publications of Huqoq HEREListen to the full Round Table Talk titled Archaeology on Life in the First Century HERESign up to be a student at IBC with access to a huge collection of courses: https://israelbiblecenter.comStay connected with IBC on Facebook @IsraelBibleCenter or Twitter @IsraelStudy

3 minute lesson
Troy | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 3:00


Episode 387. Topic: Troy. Theme: Archaeology. What is the story of the Trojan War? Who wrote it and is it real or fictional? How did a retired businessman rediscover the location of Troy? What went wrong at the excavation of this site? Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Against Everyone with Conner Habib
AEWCH 169: DAVID WENGROW or ARCHAEOLOGY AGAINST THE STATE

Against Everyone with Conner Habib

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 96:26


I talk with archaeologist and co-author (with AEWCH 99 guest, David Graeber) of The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity, David Wengrow!

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast
Episode #218: Straight to Pyramids

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


We're back from our epic two week trip in Egypt with Ben from UnchartedX and Yousef from the Khemit School. We have many things to say about what we saw and experienced, and a mountain of photos and videos to go through.For this episode we are joined in-studio by The Watcher to attempt to give an overview of our thoughts and some highlights of the trip. Expect many more episodes like this to come as we dive deeper into the questions we have about what we saw in Egypt.Thanks so much to all of you who have listened to the show and supported us in various ways, this would not have happened without you!Brothers of the Serpent Episode 218If you cannot see the audio controls, your browser does not support the audio element

Well-Adjusted Mama
Carmen Baker-Clark: Impact of Movement Throughout Pregnancy and Beyond on Baby's Feeding and Development | WAM146

Well-Adjusted Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 50:38


Carmen Baker is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) with a BA from Princeton University in Art and Archaeology. Her sons, born in 1991, 1994, 1996 and 2000, continue to be her inspiration. Through and with them, she has experienced so many of the challenges and joys of breastfeeding and parenting. These have challenged her to thoughtfully explore concepts and ideas that formed her beliefs in the importance of listening to your gut and doing what feels right for you, your child and your family. Her repeated interactions with so many families has led her to see that there constantly is a tremendous need for loving breastfeeding support with up-to-date research and evidence based information as its foundation, for all those individuals caring for young children. Carmen has been helping parents breastfeed their babies since 1998 when she became a La Leche League Leader, continuing on as an IBCLC since 2005 working in private practice doing home visits, and since 2008 adding work in the hospital setting. From 2008-2011, Carmen was one of the IBCLCs that followed and counseled approximately 900 mother/baby couplets as part of a research study at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. From 2011-2012, she worked as Breastfeeding Manager for North Hudson WIC supervision several Breastfeeding Peer Counselors and seeing a few hundred participants. Since then she has been working as manager of the Lactation Program at Hoboken UMC and Christ Hospital seeing over 1200 dyads a year. In all three of these settings, Carmen has encountered many situations of high medical complexity which have provided invaluable perspective into what parents experience with these challenges while trying to establish and succeed in breastfeeding their babies. Carmen is a conference speaker, and over the last 15 years some of the topics have been: The First Three Days, Tongue-Tie and Its Impact on Breastfeeding and Beyond, Economics of Breastfeeding. She helps manage and run a New Moms Support Group in the Hoboken Area, and she is involved in NJ State Groups that help advocate for legislation that protects and promotes access for breastfeeding services to all. Carmen is passionate about the work she does and she truly loves nurturing new families through their breastfeeding journey and tailoring solutions to suit their unique needs. For more information about Carmen, go to http://www.breastfeedingmomma.com/ Please click the like button above and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! Visit http://drlaurabrayton.com/podcasts/ for show notes and available downloads. © 2021 Dr. Laura Brayton

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
Prime Time Episode 55: Album Archaeology #8 Audio: Pet Sounds, The Beach Boys

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 135:14


Prime Time Jukebox Episode 55 features our eighth installment of our Album Archaeology Series. On his episode, we break down The Beach Boys' landmark album Pet Sounds. Much like an archaeologist digs and hunts for gems, on Album Archaeology we dig into the Pet Sounds album. We go deep into each of the tracks of this album looking at the music, lyrics, and stories behind this album. When it comes to Pet Sounds, not only was this a cutting edge album, but it has one of the wildest backstories. We also touch on new music from Duran Duran, ABBA, and Diana Ross. On this show, Dave smokes the Tatuaje T110 Capa Especial and Coop smokes the Tatuaje T110 Reserva. As always you can follow along with our Spotify Playlists: Full Episode 55 Playlist  References Developing Palates Team Cigar Review: Tatuaje T110 Reserva Broadleaf Developing Palates Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Las Calaveras Edición Limitada 2021 LC48 Duran Duran, Future Past  ABBA, Voyage Diana Ross, Thank You God Only Knows, BBC Music Edition Oasis, (What's the Story) Morning

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show
Prime Time Episode 55: Album Archaeology #8: Pet Sounds, The Beach Boys

Cigar Coop Prime Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 135:14


Prime Time Jukebox Episode 55 features our eighth installment of our Album Archaeology Series. On his episode, we break down The Beach Boys' landmark album Pet Sounds. Much like an archaeologist digs and hunts for gems, on Album Archaeology we dig into the Pet Sounds album. We go deep into each of the tracks of this album looking at the music, lyrics, and stories behind this album. When it comes to Pet Sounds, not only was this a cutting edge album, but it has one of the wildest backstories. We also touch on new music from Duran Duran, ABBA, and Diana Ross. On this show, Dave smokes the Tatuaje T110 Capa Especial and Coop smokes the Tatuaje T110 Reserva. As always you can follow along with our Spotify Playlists: Full Episode 55 Playlist  References Developing Palates Team Cigar Review: Tatuaje T110 Reserva Broadleaf Developing Palates Team Cigar Review: Crowned Heads Las Calaveras Edición Limitada 2021 LC48 Duran Duran, Future Past  ABBA, Voyage Diana Ross, Thank You God Only Knows, BBC Music Edition Oasis, (What's the Story) Morning

What It Takes
Zahi Hawass and Kent Weeks: Golden Age of the Pharaohs

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:43


Much of what we've learned over the past half-century about the ancient Egyptians, we've learned from these two archaeologists. They've both made major discoveries and have played a crucial role in protecting the pyramids and burial sites for future generations. Zahi Hawass is a National Geographic explorer, and once oversaw all of antiquities Egyptian government. But beyond that, he has drawn millions of tourists to visit Egypt, with his many books and television documentaries.  He wears a signature hat, and is famous for his outsized personality.  Kent Weeks is a more professorial type.  He is retired now, but for 60 years lived and breathed the life of the Pharaohs.  He created what many consider the most important preservation effort ever undertaken in Egypt: The Theban Mapping Project.  It catalogued every tomb and every shard of pottery unearthed in The Valley of the Kings.  We hear just what motivated each of them to spend their lives unearthing the secrets of a 5,000 year old civilization.

3 minute lesson
Machu Picchu | Archaeology

3 minute lesson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 3:00


Episode 386. Topic: Machu Picchu. Theme: Archaeology.How was Machu Picchu discovered? What do we know about the site and its history in the Inca Empire? What was it used for? Why was it abandoned and forgotten? Did you know there are skeletal remains there?Twitter: @3minutelessonEmail: 3minutelesson@gmail.comInstagram: 3minutelessonFacebook: 3minutelessonNew episode every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday! Find us everywhere podcasts are found.

Book of Mormon History Podcast
An Ishmael Funerary Stela Archaeological Discovery | Neal Rappleye

Book of Mormon History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 70:00


Ishmael died in the Book of Mormon and was buried in Arabia in a place named Nahom. Remarkably, archaeologists have discovered a funerary stela in the region of ancient NHM (Book of Mormon Nahom) with the name Ishmael inscribed on it.  The limestone stela has the name of Ishmael, dates to the correct time period and comes from the region of NHM.  The archaeological place of Nahom has well over 10 artifacts which confirm the name including several dating to Book of Mormon times. Has archaeology provided concrete evidence for Ishmael in the Book of Mormon?Book of Mormon Central researcher, Neal Rappleye, found the ancient inscription in part of a collection of over 400 stela.  He joins the podcast to discuss the incredible archaeological evidence in support of the Book of Mormon as a true history.Can we say for sure this is Ishmael from the Book of Mormon?  Listen to the podcast to find out.Here is Neal's article on the funerary stela and its inscription: https://bit.ly/3bS3JeiHere is a link to his blog post from Book of Mormon Central about making the incredible find: https://bit.ly/3kfqxcEQuoting from Neal's abstract from his article published in the Interpreter Foundation: "...scholars generally agree that “the place called… Nahom,” where Ishmael was buried (1 Nephi 16:34) is identified as the Nihm tribal region in Yemen...a funerary stela with the...south Arabian equivalent of Ishmael — was found near the Nihm region and dated to ca. 6th century bc. Although it cannot be determined with certainty that this is the Ishmael from the Book of Mormon...such is a possibility worth considering."Finding any name in history is astounding. Finding a name in the right location and time period from a traveler to that region with a name not from the region is an archaeological bullseye worth discussing in any conversation regarding the Book of Mormon and its history.Support the show (http://www.BookofMormonHistory.com)

WCPT 820 AM
THINK THEORY RADIO - AWESOME ARCHAEOLOGY - 11.6.21

WCPT 820 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 47:19


On this episode of Think Theory Radio we dig into the latest in archaeological discoveries! Were the Vikings in the Americas hundreds of years before previously thought? Were humans in the Americas thousands of years before? New evidence at Stonehenge of ancient art! Has the first drawn image of a ghost from Babylon been found? Plus ancient human clothing, children's cave art, and much more!

Ipse Dixit
NFT Notes 8: Adam McBride on NFT Archaeology

Ipse Dixit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 57:43


In this episode, Adam McBride, a popular podcaster and self-described "NFT archaeologist," among many other things, discusses his book "NFT Ape," how he became interested in NFTs, and how he sees the market for NFTs. McBride begins by describing his early interest in cryptocurrency and how his interest shifted to NFTs. He explains why early NFT projects are especially desirable, and describes how he discovered some of those projects and helped bring them to market. He reflects on what people find compelling about particular NFT projects and where he expects the NFT market to go in the future. And he discusses his new book, "NFT Ape," which is available on Amazon. McBride podcasts at The Adam McBride Show and is on Twitter at @adamamcbride.This episode was hosted by Brian L. Frye, Spears-Gilbert Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky College of Law. Frye is on Twitter at @brianlfrye. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History Hack
History Hack: Future History: Archaeology 1000 Years From Now

History Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 44:29


Gilad Jaffe joins us to talk about what the history of archaeology can tell us about how people will see the 21st Century hundreds of years from now. 

Two Friends Talk History
Witches in the Classical World

Two Friends Talk History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 49:06


In this episode, Zofia is joined again by Latinist and researcher of ancient magic, Celeste De Blois, a Classics doctoral candidate at the University of Edinburgh.Celeste returns to the pod to discuss witches in Greek mythology, Homeric stories, and Roman elegies.Click here to read the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, discussed in the episode.  Find us on InstagramSupport us through Patreon Buy our merch on RedbubbleExplore more resources and topics about the ancient world on ArchaeoArtistMusic by the wonderfully talented Chris SharplesImage credits: cover illustrations and map by Zofia Guertin. If you'd like to get in touch, email at twofriendstalkhistory@gmail.com. 

That Anthro Podcast
The Archaeology Cowboy with Griffin Fox

That Anthro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 55:26


This week, my lab mate Griffin Fox sits down to chat with me about his experiences thus far in archaeology. Griffin's collegiate journey began at Moorpark Community College (California), where he began to take Native American studies and archaeology classes. He then had the opportunity to work with Dr. Andrew Kinkella (Season 1 Episode 39) on two indigenous American sites, as his first field training. Griffin reflects on his time in community college and offers advice for anyone considering transferring to a 4-year University afterwards. In 2019, Griffin transferred to UC Santa Barbara, where he hit the ground running and started an internship with Kaitilin Brown his first day on campus! We reflect on our time working together for the P.L. Walker Bioarchaeology and Biogeochemistry laboratory, our team's effort in the recovery of Jack Cantin's remains and what it meant for Griffin. We also divulge some of our antics in the field including building a yurt, and protecting lizard eggs. The work Griffin did with Kaitlin Brown has recently submitted for publishing, after a successful virtual presentation at the SCA's this year. Follow @thatanthropodcast on Instagram, and @ThatAnthroPod on Twitter for more behind the scenes content. Brought to you in collaboration with the American Anthropological Association check out their podcast library here https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1629

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

The Archaeology of Hazor show a few proofs of the accuracy of Holy Scripture, including its enormous size, showing it was indeed the head of the cities in Joshua's time. God bless you and thank you for listening!

ArchaeoEd Podcast
S3 E3_The Mogollon

ArchaeoEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 42:37


The Mogollon are a little known ancient civilization of  the American Southwest.  But you probably know them and just don't know you know them, you know?  And if you really don't know them, they're worth knowing.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=41783180)

Go Dig a Hole
GDAH Halloween 2021 Double Header

Go Dig a Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 129:22


Happy Halloween! This year we decided to bring double the fun with TWO NEW EPISODES of the Go Dig a Hole podcast. There are also TWO WAYS TO LISTEN: episodes 81 and 82 are available individually and as an all-in-one double header! The double-header is linked above. EPISODE 81 - Archaeology in Folk Horror and Haunting w/ Travis Corwin Individual show link: First up, Travis Corwin tells a frightening tale of an archaeological site in the murky swamps of Florida where horrifying events happened to the archaeologist who worked there. Travis also discusses the idea of "haunting" as a way to relate traumatic events of the past being temporal anomalies that shatter linear concepts of time and our relationships to the past. PLUS, he had "City of the Dead" (1960) playing on a massive projector behind him so Chris could watch a classic folk horror movie. LINKS: Follow Travis Corwin on Twitter www.twitter.com/leftistdadjokes Eleanor Scott 'Randall's Round' (1929) https://hauntedlibraryblog.blogspot.com/2014/11/randalls-round-eleanor-scott.html Hellebore (folk horror zine) https://helleborezine.bigcartel.com/ Sarah Surface-Evans, Amanda Garrison, and Kisha Supernant 'Blurring Timescapes, Subverting Erasure' (2020) https://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/Surface-EvansBlurring EPISODE 82 - An Ancient Shrine and a Real Ghost Story w/ Annelise Baer Individual show link: https://soundcloud.com/godigahole/ep82 Annelise Baer is an archaeologist and TV documentary producer who works on a fascinating site in Albania on the margins of the Classical archaeology world. She has a high-impact public archaeology presence on Tiktok. And she's seen a ghost. Hear about her eerie experiences with apparitions and ancient shrines. LINKS: Follow Annelise Baer on Twitter www.twitter.com/annelisebaer Follow Annelise Baer on Instagram www.instagram.com/annelisebaer Follow Annelise Baer on Tiktok www.tiktok.com/@annelisethearchaeologist?lang=en

Go Dig a Hole
GDAH Ep81 - Archaeology in Folk Horror and Haunting w/ Travis Corwin

Go Dig a Hole

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 63:16


First up, Travis Corwin tells a frightening tale of an archaeological site in the murky swamps of Florida where horrifying events happened to the archaeologist who worked there. Travis also discusses the idea of "haunting" as a way to relate traumatic events of the past being temporal anomalies that shatter linear concepts of time and our relationships to the past. PLUS, he had "City of the Dead" (1960) playing on a massive projector behind him so Chris could watch a classic folk horror movie. LINKS: Follow Travis Corwin on Twitter www.twitter.com/leftistdadjokes Eleanor Scott 'Randall's Round' (1929) https://hauntedlibraryblog.blogspot.com/2014/11/randalls-round-eleanor-scott.html Hellebore (folk horror zine) https://helleborezine.bigcartel.com/ Sarah Surface-Evans, Amanda Garrison, and Kisha Supernant 'Blurring Timescapes, Subverting Erasure' (2020) https://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/Surface-EvansBlurring

Rattlecast
ep. 116 - Ernest Hilbert

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 137:52


Ernest Hilbert's debut poetry collection Sixty Sonnets (2009) was described by X. J. Kennedy as “maybe the most arresting sequence we have had since John Berryman checked out of America.” His other books include All of You on the Good Earth (2013); Caligulan (2015), which was selected as the winner of the 2017 Poets' Prize; and Last One Out (2019). Hilbert currently keeps a heavily-encrypted dark web poetry site called Cocytus and a more public website to promote emerging poets called E-Verse Radio. Hilbert graduated with a doctorate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University, where he edited the Oxford Quarterly. Hilbert later served as poetry editor of Random House's magazine Bold Type in New York City and editor of Contemporary Poetry Review, published by the American Poetry Fund in Washington DC. He works as an antiquarian book dealer in Philadelphia, where he lives with his wife, Keeper of the Mediterranean Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and their son, Ian. Find the book and more at: https://www.ernesthilbert.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Write a spooky poem for Halloween. Next Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let's do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Why archaeology will be the next harbor for technology - ArchaeoTech 166

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 45:09


Paul and Chris talk about a Heritage Daily article that seems a bit starry-eyed about the role of archaeology in current and future technological innovations and use. The article linked below broadly discusses a number of technologies and we take a few of them and break them down. Links Why archaeology will be the next harbour for technology Drone Archaeology Agent Based Modeling for Archaeology Contact Chris Webster Twitter: @archeowebby Email: chris@archaeologypodcastnetwork.com Paul Zimmerman Twitter: @lugal Email: paul@lugal.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Outside/In
The So-called Mystery of Rapa Nui (Easter Island)

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:46


Who moved the giant monolithic statues of Rapa Nui, a remote island in the South Pacific? And how did they do it? These questions have been at the center of much speculation and debate since Europeans first arrived there on Easter Sunday, 1722, and called it “Easter Island”. The most popular theory was that this remote civilization destroyed itself -- cutting down all the trees to make contraptions for moving statues.But according to the indigenous people of Rapa Nui, their ancestors didn't need to cut down any trees to transport the statues. In fact, their oral history has always been clear about how the moai were transported.This is a story about storytelling: what happens when your community becomes the subject of a global mystery? A parable of human failure and ecological collapse? What's the true story? And who gets to tell it?Featuring: Sergio Rapu Haoa, Carl Lipo, Terry Hunt, Sergio Mata'u Rapu, and Gina PakaratiSUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Subscribe to our newsletter.LINKSA profile of Sergio Rapu Haoa for the 2002 Rotary World Peace Scholars program at BerkeleyEating Up Easter -- a documentary film produced by Sergio Mata'u Rapu, about how the people of Rapa Nui are grappling with environmental and social changes brought on by tourism and economic development.The NOVA-National Geographic DocumentaryA team of 18 volunteers move a 10-foot 5-ton statue for the NOVA-National Geographic documentary, Mystery of Easter IslandA figurine animation demonstrating five different theories of moai-transport through the years.Mystery of Easter Island -- The NOVA-National Geographic Documentary in its entiretyLectures by Terry Hunt and Carl LipoNational Geographic Live Lecture -- Terry Hunt and Carl Lipo: The Statues That WalkedLong Now Foundation Lecture: The Statues Walked -- What Really Happened on Easter Island | Terry Hunt and Carl LipoCREDITSReported and produced by Felix PoonEdited by Taylor QuimbyExecutive Producer: Rebecca LavoieMixed by Felix PoonAdditional Editing: Justine Paradis, Jessica Hunt, Rebecca Lavoie, and Erika JanikSpecial thanks to Effie Kong, and Daniela Allee for her Spanish and Rapanui voiceovers.Theme: Breakmaster CylinderAdditional Music by Blue Dot Sessions