Podcasts about CBT

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  • 1,323PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about CBT

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Latest podcast episodes about CBT

ADHD reWired
404 | Let Pleasure be the Measure with Pasha Marlowe

ADHD reWired

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 52:35


In this episode, Eric is joined by Pasha Marlowe who was diagnosed with ADHD at 49. She is a family therapist, therapeutic comedy coach, ADHD coach, podcast host and author. She artfully blends her unique life experience with her life's work in healing through psychotherapy, embodied emotions, holistic wellness, life-coaching, ADHD coaching, CBT coaching, theatre, and comedy.  Pasha's podcast, “Let Pleasure be the Measure” is a playground of conversations about the importance of incorporating pleasure, play, and humor into your personal work, home, and sex life. Pasha also published a book in 2021 called, “My Next Husband Will be a Lesbian.”  What you'll hear in this episode: What did it feel like to be in a place that felt so helpless and challenging to be able to bring humor into a dark space? What is therapeutic comedy? “...folks with ADHD have the ability to think creatively, potentially think outside the box, gain new perspectives, see things from a different angle - which, in this case is really a beautiful gift… I feel like... creativity is a way to manage our ADHD stress.” - Pasha Marlowe Because there is so much value in using humor, where is the line between when you call someone out for acting like the clown and avoiding versus actually dealing with and recognizing that it is a healthy tool? “Let Pleasure be the Measure” - Where did this podcast idea come from? “Play is the opposite of perfection.” - Pasha Marlowe What is, “My Next Husband Will be a Lesbian” all about? Follow & Connect with Pasha: Instagram: Youtube:   Facebook:   Honorable Mentions:   Check out the Other Podcasts on the ADHD reWired Podcast Network: with Brendan Mahan with Will Curb with MJ Siemens with Moira Maybin coming soon - Wait, What Was the Question? with Will Curb and Coach Roxie Martin! Reach out to Will and Roxie at questions@whatwasthequestionpodcast.com  Don't Forget These, Too: — Support the show by becoming a Patron! — Get your name on the waitlist to join the fall season of ADHD reWired's Coaching and Accountability Groups — Join your ADHD-friendly co-working space! — Join Eric, Brendan, Will, MJ, Moira, Roxie, and Barb for an hour of Live Q&A on Zoom, every 2nd Tuesday of the month at 12:30pm Central (10:30am Pacific / 1:30pm Eastern)

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Existential Dread, and Overcoming an Existential Crisis

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 55:06


It's natural to have moments – even in the course of a generally happy, mostly fulfilling life – where we question our meaning, value, and purpose. This "existential dread" sometimes culminates in an "existential crisis." Today Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson consider how we can confront these basic questions with acceptance and curiosity, and find the meaning and purpose that can help us live good lives.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching to listening? You  can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00 Introduction2:35 Meaning and purpose as the basis for Existentialism5:20 Four basic issues of existence7:00 Practical reasons for exploring Existentialism10:50 Forrest's childhood acceptance of death.12:00 Four approaches to confronting existential frailty13:45 Rick's orientation to existential dread and its three psychological challenges15:45 Rick's personal experience confronting ambivalence and asking the point of living20:25 Confronting an existential crisis as a catapult into a meaningful life22:45 Morbid preoccupation as avoidance and self-ing23:45 The three major whys of living: pleasure, service, and learning26:10 What death can teach us about living a good life31:30 Waves and water - resting in gratitude for life and it's inevitable ending36:15 Humor in the space of emptiness between living things39:10 Natural fear vs. anticipatory dread43:10 Finding your why when familiar structures break down48:35 Recap and front porch meditationSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Find the new CBD+ performance gummies and the whole dosist health line-up today at dosisthealth.com. Use promo code BEINGWELL20 for 20% off your purchase. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month! Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website 

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
How to Be Accessible Beyond the Sliding Scale

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 33:42


How to Be Accessible Beyond the Sliding Scale An interview with Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, about how therapy can be accessible (and not just financially). Curt and Katie chat with Lindsay about capitalism versus money exchange, the social enterprise model, and how therapists can make a good living without feeling like greedy capitalists. We also explore the many different types of accessibility and the importance of setting your fees based on your needs and values rather than as a mechanism to single-handedly fix the broken system or to meet an artificial money goal.     It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. Interview with Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, Mind Money Balance Lindsay Bryan-Podvin (she/her) is a biracial financial therapist, speaker, and author of the book "The Financial Anxiety Solution." In her therapy practice, Mind Money Balance, she uses shame-free financial therapy to help people get their minds and money in balance. She's expanded her services to help private practice therapists with their money mindset, sustainable pricing, and authentic marketing so they can include financial self-care in their work. She lives with her partner and their dog on the traditional land of the Fox, Peoria, Potawatomi, and Anishinabewaki peoples also known as Michigan. In this episode we talk about: How therapy can be more accessible (and not just monetarily) The money “shit” that gets in the way of us thinking about other options for accessibility Decreasing stigma and the notion that therapy is by and for white folks Are we making our practices accessible for all sorts of folks? ADA compliance, supporting neurodivergent and disabled folks Cultural competence, the ability to apply that in sessions with clients who are different than us Being embedded in our communities Taking therapy out of the shadows The challenges in getting out and having a larger voice How accessibility is intertwined with therapist visibility How to become part of your community in effective and impactful ways Financial ways to make your practice more accessible beyond sliding scale Social Enterprise Model: intersection of what you do well, what values you stand for, and what can you get paid well to do Feeling like a greedy capitalist What it means to be paid well How to think about setting your fees Fee-setting based on what you need to survive and thrive (not capitalist principles) The problem with “know your worth” The big cognitive shift required to move from community mental health pricing and work-life balance, fees Tying money to quality of life, not specific monetary goals Getting to “enough” not more and more Capitalism versus money exchange The wealth of knowledge we have as therapists (and how therapists take it for granted and/or devalue it) Sharing your knowledge as a mechanism of accessibility to your whole community To practice self-care, you have to be able to afford it Our Generous Sponsor: Trauma Therapist Network Trauma is highly prevalent in mental health client populations and people are looking for therapists with specialized training and experience in trauma, but they often don't know where to start. If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There are so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan, LCSW-C created Trauma Therapist Network.  Trauma Therapist Network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work and what they specialize in, so potential clients can find them. Trauma Therapist Network therapist profiles include the types of trauma specialized in, populations served and therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them.  The Network is more than a directory, though. It's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consult and network with colleagues around the country. Join our growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code:  MTSG20 at www.traumatherapistnetwork.com.   Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! www.mindmoneybalance.com https://www.instagram.com/mindmoneybalance/ Lindsay's podcast: Mind Money Balance   Relevant Episodes: Lindsay's previous podcast episode: Financial Therapy Katie Read: Therapists Shaming Therapists Negotiating Sliding Scale Making Access More Affordable Asking for Money Reimagining Therapy Reimagined   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey.   Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated)   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is sponsored by trauma therapist network.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Trauma therapist network is a new resource for anyone who wants to learn about trauma and how it shows up in our lives. This new site has articles, resources and podcasts for learning about trauma and its effects, as well as a directory exclusively for trauma therapists to let people know how they work, and what they specialize in so potential clients can find them. Visit traumatherapistnetwork.com to learn more,   Curt Widhalm  00:27 listen at the end of the episode for more about the trauma therapist network.   Announcer  00:31 You're listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide, where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:47 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm, with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about things that we do things that we don't do things that maybe we should do. And both Katie and our guests today are looking at me like, where is this going? And honestly, this is just one of those rambling intros that we have. So rather than making this more awkward, we're joined once again by Lindsey Bryan Podvin. She's been a guest to the show before spoken at therapy reimagined with us, talking to us about money and ways that we could be looking at it for our practice. So thank you for joining us again.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  01:35 Oh, yeah, I'm really happy to be here. This is my favorite thing to chat about, and to be in community with you guys. Again, it's fun.   Katie Vernoy  01:43 Oh, we're so glad to have you back. And we'll definitely link to your previous episode in our show notes. But for folks who haven't heard from you for a while, or for our new listeners, tell us who you are and what you're putting out into the world.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  01:57 Yeah, so as Curt mentioned, my name is Lindsay Bryan-Podvin. I'm a social worker, and financial therapist, and I have kind of two arms of what I'm putting out there into the world, I have my clinical arm, and then I have my consulting arm. So in my clinical world, I'm doing financial therapy, which is helping clients with the emotional and psychological side of money, which spoiler alert is all of it, I think. And then, on the consulting side, I know you all know that therapists have money, shit, and we have a lot of hang ups about it. And so in my consulting arm, I help mostly other therapists, though, over the past year, I'll say that other kind of helping professionals have woven their way in, whether it's dietitians, acupuncturist, Reiki healers, because I think a lot of us get similar messaging about what money is and what it isn't. And so I help them work on their emotional and psychological relationship with money so they can have sustainable and profitable businesses. And I do, like outside of the the hands on work, or the zoom work, I suppose I have a podcast and Instagram, a pretty active blog and an email list that keeps me using my creative side of my brain.   Katie Vernoy  03:13 Nice. I love it.   Curt Widhalm  03:15 One of the big discussions that's been in the social justice aspects of our field, especially for private practitioners, and admittedly also here on our show, is talking about things like accessibility and being able to make our services go beyond just those top paying cash pay clients. Can you walk us through kind of what you hear in these discussions about accessibility for practices, and especially as it relates to some of these monetary issues?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  03:50 Yeah, I think as therapists we get really stuck on accessibility being only a monetary issue. So we think about solving for that problem by sliding our scale or by offering pro bono spaces. But we forget about all the other ways in which we can and should be accessible if that works in alignment with us. So as I think you guys were talking with Katie read about like the the the money talk that comes up on therapists forums and how there's so much guilt and shame and, and judgment about what people do or don't do, whether they do or don't take insurance, whether they do or don't slide their scale, but that's where most of us get stuck. And there are so many things beyond sliding our scale and the fee that we charge that can bring about accessibility for our practices and in our communities.   Katie Vernoy  04:45 What are some of the things that we can think about beyond sliding scale because I think I get stuck there as well with and maybe this is just our focus is that we're so focused on the monetary aspects and our own money shit as you described it, and We aren't thinking about what else isn't making us accessible.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  05:03 Yeah, I think taking a few steps back before a client even finds our website or finds us on a therapist directory, really thinking about how can we make our field more accessible by talking about what is therapy, I think in a lot of communities, we still have these stigmas that therapy is buy in for white people. And it's done on a couch with, you know, a person who's got reinforced elbows and they're smoking a pipe, right? You know, like, we have that imagery. And if we are not talking to our communities about what therapy is and who it is for, and how it can be helpful by not just talking about what it is, but also the stigma reduction, we don't even get people landing on our websites or knocking on our, you know, figurative door, right. So being in our communities and talking about what it is and who it's for, and how it can be helpful. And also talking about just the ins and outs of therapy, that it is confidential. I think in a lot of communities, there's a fear that if I go to a therapist, then you know, my mom's cousins going to find out about it, or that my employer will be told about it, or that my partner will be told about it. So I think there's some education that has to happen on the backend before people even get to our doors. And then in terms of other measures of accessibility outside of this scale. Let's get really granular on on what is accessibility? Do our clients see themselves reflected in the way that we practice therapy? Can clients who have disabilities, either neurodiversity or physical limitations, do they have actual access to our offices? Are they ADA compliant? Do we offer you know, nowadays, so many of us offer basically zoom therapy? Which makes it so much more accessible? Are we operating on bus routes and public transportation? Is there easy parking, like the literal accessibility piece? And then the cultural competency piece? Can they speak my language? If I don't speak English? Do I have somebody sitting across from me in the therapy room? Who gets what I'm talking about? When we talk about cultural competence? Not just thinking about, you know, whether or not you took a class on Southeast Asian Studies. But what does that mean? And how does that show up in our spaces, and being embedded in our community beyond just like, hiding in this little bubble, where we're kind of shrouded in mystery, I think, taking therapy out of the shadows and making it more commonplace in our communities, like we are healers in our communities. And we shouldn't be hiding behind the walls of like mystery what when there are community events, I would love to see more therapists out and they're out and about, as sponsors, as networkers and things like that, like, we also have to take ourselves out of the shadow. So there's, there's a lot of different ways we can talk about accessibility.   Curt Widhalm  07:59 So I love what you're saying, I completely agree with getting out there. There's some some stumbling steps that can happen in putting ourselves out there, because so much of our history is in being shrouded to the, you know, the shadows. And sometimes the responses that I hear from clinicians is, oh, that person went out and was talking about this, but didn't represent themselves. Well, it isn't representing the field. Well, do you have any advice as far as taking some of these steps? You know, look at you, and all of the things that you post in your newsletters and social media and this kind of stuff, money seems to be kind of like a fairly neutral ground as far as being able to talk about relationships with money. For those who are looking to maybe take some other steps as far as making this accessibility happen, that might be around more unique issues to communities. Do you have any suggestions on how people might find the confidence to be able to make those steps?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  09:03 Yeah, I really like this question. Because I think that accessibility and visibility are are intertwined. And visibility isn't just social media. So let's say you do want to be more accessible in your community and you do want to be more visible in your community, but you're talking about something that is more sensitive, like you know, sexual trauma, then yeah, maybe going on in doing an Instagram live about it isn't probably the most appropriate way because you don't know who's on the other side of it, you really can't create a container of people to make sure that it's safer or at least safer. So maybe in that instance, it's going to, you know, a high school and pulling a you know, having a group of 30 kids that you are talking to about this in like a speaking engagement setting or maybe it is going to the healthcare system and sitting down and talking to the medical social workers about what you know, or to the nurse midwives about what you know, right there. Different ways to get out and become a part of the community that don't involve these kind of one way one sided communication methods. Does that make sense?   Katie Vernoy  10:11 It does, I think this idea of making the whole profession more accessible to folks and all folks, and not just the kind of historical white people and the, the, the patches and the pipes. I think that to me is, it's really, really important. And I think it also is only a first step. Because when they get to our door is there still is I think, you know, financial accessibility concerns for a lot of folks. And so are there financial ways to be accessible that don't involve involves sliding your scale?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  10:48 Yeah, of course. So, undoubtedly, money is a real accessibility issue. I'm not just saying like, Oh, you know, just get out there. That's it sounds it? All. Right, exactly. Exactly. An email newsletter is not going to fix accessibility. But as you guys have also talked about on this podcast, it's not the responsibility of an individual therapist, to fix the broken medical system salute here. And at the same time, there are more creative ways to provide services to people in your community that are might be easier on their pocketbooks. So group therapy is also a really great option, because you as the clinician are still generating the revenue that you need to, and the people on the other side are usually paying you less dollars per session. Insurance, I know there's a big again, it's not your job to accept insurance if they don't reimburse you well, but accepting insurance is a measure of accessibility. And even if you aren't accepting insurance, helping your clients out, walking them through what a super bill is, you know, spending a little bit of time in session, making sure that they know what that means and how to actually get it done. That, to me is incredibly helpful. So providing a bit of space in the in the session to talk through how you can do that, particularly if they have anxiety, or they've got some ADHD, you know, they might need a little extra hand holding to get those things done. There are depending on your licensing board, I've seen some people do sponsored therapy spot. So it's a little bit different than a pro bono. It's Think of it like a scholarship for therapy. So the way that I've seen this work is for clients who pay a full fee, you essentially tell them look by you paying a full fee, a portion of your fee goes towards sponsoring somebody who would not be able to afford therapy with me. So you're still getting income, but you're also having the clients who are able to pay your fee, kind of some buy in that they are also kind of helping out other people in the community. So those are some different ways to be accessible, that don't involve sliding your scale doesn't mean you have to do all or any of them. It's just different ways to think about it.   Curt Widhalm  13:04 On of the things that you talked about in your presentation at the therapy reimagined conference, this social enterprise.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  13:12 Yes.   Curt Widhalm  13:14 Can you tell us more about that, what it means for people who maybe didn't attend the conference and what the social enterprise model is and how this might fit in for therapists?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  13:24 Yeah, I think so many therapists struggle with this idea of charging for services because we've internalized so many things about what money is or what it isn't. And the social enterprise model essentially says, look, there are three things to provide something that you can feel good about doing. And also know that you are being compensated fairly for it. And it exists at the intersection of these three things. One, what do you do well, what values do you stand for? And what can you be paid? Well to do, and as therapists I think, if we can think about ourselves at the intersection of that, of existing, and I do this really well, these are in alignment with my values, this type of therapeutic intervention is in alignment with my values, and I can be paid well to do that. You know, that you are contributing to the greater good of the community by making sure that you're not just wringing out your clients for the most dollars you can get right? I think so many of us think that if I charge money, then I'm a greedy capitalist, but it's also about am I being compensated for the skills that I offer and the transformations that I'm able to help facilitate in a meaningful way?   Katie Vernoy  14:41 I know that there are a lot of different perspectives on how you decide how much money to wring out of your client. And, and and you mentioned the episode with Katie Read and we've had other conversations as well, just about the shoulds. And you know, how I should set my fees and those types of things. Yeah, and to me, it feels like there's so much nuance. It's it's a wide open space, there's a lot of shit. So people feel like it's not wide open, but I feel like it really is. What advice do you have on on setting those fees? Because when we're in that space where I can be paid well for it, it's aligned with my values, and I can do it well, like, it can be hard to figure out like, and what does being paid? Well mean, that I can feel good about?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  15:30 Yeah. And I think that's such a good question. Because this idea of what does it mean to be paid? Well, is so skewed in our field, my first job, I was making $32,000, you know, with a master's degree, and I don't think that's an unfamiliar number or salary for people to hear. And so when a lot of people go into private practice, they hold themselves to that standard, oh, well, I was making 40k or 50k. I think that's a reasonable salary. I think that's what I'll try to make. So we haven't thought beyond what do we actually need to survive and thrive. And that's where doing things in alignment with your values can be really beneficial. So when it comes to fi setting, you're not just thinking about what are you charging your clients? You're also thinking about? Does that fee sustain me and allow me to practice financial self care? Which means Can I take care of my financial needs? Yes, but do Am I also able to support my mental, my emotional and my spiritual self. With that? I know, I was, I was loving your episode on burnout. And I love the modeling that the two of you did by saying, Look, we're going to hit pause on the therapy reimagine conference, we also have to build in time off and time for restoration, there is a study that says we need, I think, oh, shoot, I'm going to botch it. Now. I think it's eight or 10 consecutive days off in a row to actually unplug from work. So making sure that you have that built in to your time off. So making sure it covers your time off making sure it covers your health insurance. Unfortunately, we live in a society where your healthcare is tied with your employment. So when you're self employed, you have to make sure that you can cover your health insurance, you have to also make sure that you're thinking about your future self in traditional employment, we often have access to retirement plans or programs. And when we move into entrepreneurship, we are our own 401k or four, three B plan. So we have to make sure that all of those things are taken into account. And we don't want to be overworking ourselves. When we show up exhausted and burnt out and watching the clock, we are not being good clinicians we just aren't. And just taking stock of our own energy, my full pre pandemic was 18, I could comfortably see 18 clients a week that felt like a good fit for me, I wasn't burnt out, I wasn't presenting my clients, I had downtime to get the things done, I needed to do and I charged accordingly. Now, my max is 12. I have found that doing zoom therapy. While there are so many advantages of it, like I genuinely really like it, I find that literally the physicality of sitting still and staring at my screen and just what really watching so much harder for nuances through the screen takes so much more energy out of me and I can no longer comfortably and competently feel like I'm a good practitioner when I'm seeing 18 clients when I've had to scale that back to 12. And then what do I have to do to make up for that income? So that was a long answer of saying it depends. You have to figure out what money you need to be bringing in and you need to make sure that you're not just thinking about comparing it to what you use to earn an agency job because you were likely being underpaid there.   Katie Vernoy  18:47 It's hard not to feel like a greedy capitalist. With that it means you have to charge a premium fee mostly   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  18:56 Yeah, yeah.   Curt Widhalm  18:59 Give me advice for people making that jump to those premium price because I'm sure that there's a lot of our listeners who might be considering leaving an agency job and being like, you know, I know you know my session value in this agency and this aligns maybe with my values but in going out and charging somebody three four or five times that fee in order to meet my money goals seems like it has a lot of opportunity to bring up some that imposter syndrome and really being able to balance that for those individuals you have any guidance on what to really look at hopefully beyond just kind of know your worth.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  19:43 Yeah. Oh my god. Thank you for saying that because also the Know your worth thing. That's a trope I used to find myself repeating. And then a friend of mine who's a behavioral economist, she shared with me Jaquette Timmons and she's goes Lindsay You have to stop saying that because we as humans We don't have a worth. So instead, she invited me to reframe it as charged the value of what your services are worth to give yourself a little bit of psychic distance there between like, I'm worth $300. Now it's like no, the value of my services are worth $300 an hour. So anyway, tangent aside, how can you come into charging fees for your services, I think there is a pendulum swing that I see happen when people try to get out of the mentality of sliding their scale as low as possible to charging premium fees. And so they go from being in spaces where being a good therapist means charging very little into spaces that are like, You need to be a six, seven figure business owner, and you need to be charging premium fees, which can be as we know, a big jump cognitively. And so I always invite people to come back to your values, your lifestyle needs, your unique financial goals. And I'm not about bashing the people who are saying, Oh, you need to make six figures or seven figures. My practice does generate six figures. But I don't think that is a magical goalposts where all your problems are suddenly solved. I think this chase this money charge, the premium fees, you have to work more can backfire. In that it forces us to work more meaning when you have that mentality of I have to work harder, I have to chase this x figure goal or this premium fee number. What happens often is you get into this space where I'll just use myself for an example that that 12 clients Oh, I saw 12 clients a week, I made enough money to hit my goals. I started to cultivate work life balance. But now what if I saw twice as many people, I could make twice as much money? What could I do it twice as much money. And then all of a sudden you forget about why you did it in the first place. So coming back to how much do I need? How much do I desire and is the money that I'm charging, allowing me to do things in alignment with my values, let's say family is like the most important value to me. And I want my 10 consecutive days off in a row with my family. And I want to go somewhere where I don't have to worry about you know, finding activities for us to do or cooking a bunch of food, I want to make sure that I have enough money to pay for that Airbnb to pay for takeout and that Airbnb is conveniently located to a lot of like outdoor activities. That's a goal that I can kind of reverse engineer my way. And to me, it's also modeling for your clients, you don't necessarily have to say to your client, like, Oh, my financial goal was this, this and this, and I was able to achieve it. But you're also modeling for your clients the importance of taking time off of adhering to your boundaries and practicing self care. So again, that's a tangent of an answer. But I guess the long and short of it is as you move towards charging premium fees come back to like, what your WHY IS, and when you feel that anxiety to work more and charge more and go harder, you actually may already have enough.   Katie Vernoy  23:02 I like that I think the piece that resonates for me is this, the letting go of I must get to this number, I must make more money. And I think for me, there's also this big push of like we must leverage we must, we must continue to grow and expand. And I think there's a point at which we have enough I mean, there, there may still be challenges that we need to do. But there's this, this freedom and not having to constantly grow and, and make my business bigger and make my business more successful. Like there's each person has to decide where they land or where they land for a time and you know, different seasons of what I need and what I want and what's most important to me, but it feels like it and this is kind of circling back to the the social enterprise model and kind of this idea of capitalism versus money exchange and, you know, clarifying all of that, but but it seems like when it's completely tied to values, what you're positing is that feels better than just making money for money's sake. And so, so tell us a little bit more about this. Because to me, I feel like I'm just starting to grasp the idea I was I was too caught up in the greedy capitalism, to understand kind of what what we were what we were starting to talk about with a social enterprise model.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  24:24 Yeah. So to bounce off of this idea of what is the difference between capitalism and money exchange? I think it's important to note that capitalism is a is a political economic system that we we know the dangers of right it is propped up by the unpaid and underpaid labor. So the person or people who are in charge, get the greatest amount of profit available. And as such, as we kind of touched on earlier, it's a system where we give all the praise to the people who Make a lot of money because they must have worked hard and simultaneously shamed the people who didn't make a lot of money because they must have not been hard workers. And we've we bought into that idea as a society so much so that you know, at the time that we're recording this, if you're on Twitter right now, you can see people rallying around Elon Musk saying like, yeah, he shouldn't have to pay taxes, he worked really hard. So we've got all these people saying, like, yeah, we save the billionaires instead of let's make sure we have a safety net that people can't fall through for the greater good of our society. So that's capitalism. And there's a lot of problems with it. And even if you disagree with it, unfortunately, we live in that society. Yeah. And money exchange, on the other hand has been around since the dawn of time, whether it was literal dollars or coins, there has always been an exchange of things for other things, or things or other services. And when we think about small business owners, which is most private practice owners, if we can think about ourselves as kind of the community farmstand, it helps to shift that mentality. So for example, if I go down to the farmers market, and I purchased a half a dozen eggs, I'm helping to support sustainable agriculture in my community, I get to know the person who grew my crew, my eggs, I don't think we're growing eggs, but you don't I mean, maybe if you're vegan, actually, you're growing your eggs. So you're growing your eggs substitutes? Got it? So we want to think about as therapists, how can we kind of fit into that model, where what we do in charging for services, and helping people in our community is a win win. Because when we have a healthier person in our community, because we are helping them with their mental health, what is that ripple effect on the community? And how can that be beneficial?   Curt Widhalm  26:57 It sounds like, you know, this is what a lot of practitioners do by going out into the community and sharing even some of the things that you were talking about at the top of the episode of just going and talking about mental health and about their practices and doing some, I guess, pro bono work and in the way of psychoeducation, or community education that helps to make that Win Win happen.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  27:25 Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I think it's so so powerful. I think when we are in our spaces where we're surrounded by other mental health, folks, we forget what the baseline is of mental health knowledge. Oh, yeah, forget, just like what a wealth of information we have, like the other day, I did a presentation for non mental health care providers about what financial anxiety is, and tips to cope with it right. And for anybody in the therapy field, they'd be like, that's like, entry level CBT, maybe if you're lucky. But for this group of people, it wasn't that they don't, it's just we forget how much knowledge we have, and how valuable explaining some basics of how our minds and bodies and thoughts are connected, can be a huge value for other people in our community. So just don't take what your knowledge is for granted. Get out of your academic kind of echo chambers and go talk to people who aren't in the mental health care field. And that is really where you can offer a lot of wisdom and value in your community.   Curt Widhalm  28:33 So once again, echoing stop hanging out with therapists.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  28:41 That might be a theme. Yeah.   Katie Vernoy  28:44 Maybe it's stopped just hanging out with therapists   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  28:47 That's a good reframe  Katie   Katie Vernoy  28:49 I know, I just it's really hard. I know, for me, and we've all spoken for therapists, we've all kind of done that thing. And I'm sure, just from the way you described it, Lindsay, you've got the thing. Like, that was a really nice reminder. And like, it is so dismissive. When a therapist comes up and says that to you, you're like, Yeah, but why did you need that reminder? You know, so I think it's that piece of when you start talking to folks who are not therapists, you recognize this is really important information. And it's not going to be discarded as Oh, I already knew that because it is this new piece that's coming in, that then allows, and this is, I guess, going to do accessibility thing. It allows this information to be disseminated more widely widely. It's something where they then are able to implement it, and maybe some people wouldn't need therapy if this information are readily available and was there first and so I think I'm putting the pieces together, Lindsay, I'm starting to see but it's it's really sharing the knowledge. It's making sure that you're available and that you've set up a fee system that makes sense for the folks that you're Working with but it's, it's this additional piece of you know, maybe you get creative and you do sponsorships or I mean there's people that have whole mechanisms for nonprofits to donate for, for scholarships for therapy. So I, there's, there's so much creativity that doesn't require an individual to slide their scale to an unsustainable fee. But this notion of just be accessible for all with all of these other pieces, I think is is hard to do. If you're not making enough money to survive, and you're seeing 40 clients a week,   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  30:33 Ding ding ding that is exactly it. We cannot care for other people in our community when we don't take care of ourselves. And it's, you know, we hammer on this message as therapists but we forget that in order to practice self care, we need to be able to fucking afford it. Like we just do.   Katie Vernoy  30:48 Yeah, exactly.   Curt Widhalm  30:52 And it's not just kind of the big luxurious, affording things like yeah, you know, that eight to 10 days, go and do a vacation if that's your jam, but it's also being able to afford the consistent little things of and you know, it's going home at a decent time of night. It's being you know, not spending your your off hours catching up on notes, or it's having all of the other systems and everything else that we've talked about on this podcast of being able to have the convenience of being able to afford shutting off at each and every day.   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  31:30 Yeah, absolutely in in those are the things that we know, make. The biggest difference is that consistency and that predictability, that predictability that you can power down the predictability that you can pay your bills that helps to give us that mental space to rest and to be safe.   Katie Vernoy  31:51 Where can people find you?   Lindsay Bryan-Podvin  31:53 My website is called Mind money balance. It's the same name as my practice. My podcast is of the same name. My Instagram handle is of the same name so people can find me on any of those places.   Curt Widhalm  32:08 And we'll include links to Lindsay's stuff in our show notes. You can find those over at MCSG podcast calm and also follow us on our social media and join our Facebook group, the modern therapist group. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy And Lindsey Bryan-Podvin.   Katie Vernoy  32:26 Thanks again to our sponsor, trauma therapist network.   Curt Widhalm  32:30 If you've ever looked for a trauma therapist, you can know it can be hard to discern who knows what and whether or not they're the right fit for you. There's so many types of trauma and so many different ways to heal. That's why Laura Reagan LCSW WC created trauma therapist network. Trauma therapist network therapist profiles include the types of traumas specialized in population served therapy methods used, making it easier for potential clients to find the right therapist who can help them. Network is more than a directory though it's a community. All members are invited to attend community meetings to connect, consults, and network with colleagues around the country.   Katie Vernoy  33:07 Join the growing community of trauma therapists and get 20% off your first month using the promo code MTSG 20 at traumatherapistnetwork.com Once again that's capital MTS G the number 20 at Trauma therapist network.com   Announcer  33:23 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ
'Liệu pháp hành vi nhận thức' hữu dụng thế nào đối với bệnh trầm cảm?

SBS Vietnamese - SBS Việt ngữ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 5:00


Sự ra đi của bác sĩ tâm thần nổi tiếng Aaron Temkin Beck hồi đầu tháng 11 nhắc nhớ mọi người về sự phát triển của Liệu pháp Hành vi Nhận thức (Cognitive behavioral therapy - CBT), hiện đã trở thành liệu pháp thay thế các loại thuốc trị trầm cảm ở nhiều quốc gia.

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Philip Grandia, C.Psych: Working With Clients With An Intellectual Disability

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:59


Clients with both an intellectual disability and mental health diagnosis are among the most vulnerable members of our society; however, these clients often face significant barriers with respect to accessing services for a number of complex reasons.  Dr. Philip Grandia, C. Psych joins us for an in-depth discussion of working with clients with an intellectual disability in a mental health context.  In this episode we cover:  a general overview and description of intellectual disability (ID) including diagnostic criteriaimportant considerations around differential diagnosis in the context of IDmental illness in the context of ID including frequently observed patterns of comorbiditythe very special concern of trauma & exploitation of clients with IDhow anxiety and depression presents in clients with IDthe role and caveats around the use of medication in clients with IDassessing one's own competency to deliver psychotherapy to clients with IDaddressing issues of capacity and consent when initiating treatmentassessing safety effectively in clients with IDclinician perceptions of clients with ID that reflect a barrier to accessing servicesthe types of CBT interventions that can be effective and helpful in clients with IDrewarding aspects of working with this populationDr. Philip Grandia is a Clinical Psychologist at The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre. Following his first career as an infantry officer in the Canadian Armed Forces, Philip underwent his PhD in Clinical Psychology at the University of Ottawa. He completed his residency and supervised practice at The Royal and subsequently joined the hospital as staff. In addition to his clinical work, Philip is actively engaged in program evaluation initiatives and Psychology training. He currently works on The Royal's three dual diagnosis teams in the Community Mental Health Program.Have feedback or comments? Email the show: oicbtpodcast@gmail.comPlease note that while all emails are read, we are not able to reply to all messages that are sent. Emailing Thoughts on Record does not establish a clinician-patient relationship with the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (OICBT).  Moreover, we are not able to provide any comment or advice with respect to either general or specific clinical or personal situations. If you live in Ontario, Canada and wish to seek clinical services from the OICBT please visit www.ottawacbt.ca. If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, please contact your health care provider and/or proceed to the nearest emergency department.  The following resources are also available:  Canada Suicide Prevention Service: 1-833-456-4566 (24/7)National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (United States): 1-800-273-8255For a list of International Crisis Lines please visit: https://www.opencounseling.com/suicide-hotlines

Springs Lighthouse Podcast
Jeff Anderson – Psalms 100:1-100:5

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


Psalm 100 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Jeff Anderson – Psalms 100:1-100:5 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

When East Meets West
S2E35_Perspective Taking

When East Meets West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:15


Have you ever been to a dinner and then you ask all the guests what happened at dinner? If there were 6 guests, you will get 6 different stories. That is the power of perspective taking. Dr. Pete shares knowledge about how perspective impacts mood and behaviors, while Dr. Rubin drops knowledge about its role in western behavioral science. The psychologists discuss developmental aspects of perspective, the idea of no self in easters philosophies, and its role in empathy. Tune in, you don't want to miss how your perspective reading this right now will affect whether you listen or not.

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson
Moving Past Perfectionism and Unhealthy Striving with Dr. Diana Hill

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 66:52


How can we aim high, achieve our goals, and get what we want out of life without falling prey to unhealthy striving and excessive perfectionism? Dr. Diana Hill joins Dr. Rick and Forrest Hanson to explore the costs of perfectionism, productivity anxiety, psychological flexibility, calming the threat system, and how we can go from striving to thriving. About Our Guest: Dr. Diana  Hill specializes in evidence-based and compassion-focused approaches to living well. She has a thriving private practice in Santa Barbara, CA, is the author of the ACT Daily Journal, and is one of the hosts of the Psychologists Off the Clock Podcast.Watch the Episode: Prefer watching to listening? You  can watch this episode on YouTube.Key Topics:0:00 Introduction2:00 Dr. Hill's personal journey4:40 Signs of unhealthy striving6:50 Recognizing striving in the body12:50 Signs of being in a healthier place around striving16:15 What drives perfectionism and how to develop comfort with difficult experiences22:20 Psychological flexibility and how to see your experience more clearly26:35 Social and internalized factors in the search for approval 34:55 Practical ways to develop psychological flexibility38:00 Inner freedom and choice within discomfort45:30 Exposure therapy and cognitive diffusion for releasing control and anxiety55:00 The middle way and climbing the mountains that are important to you.59:50 RecapSupport the Podcast: We're now on Patreon! If you'd like to support the podcast, follow this link.Sponsors:Find the new CBD+ performance gummies and the whole dosist health line-up today at dosisthealth.com. Use promo code BEINGWELL20 for 20% off your purchase. Join over a million people using BetterHelp, the world's largest online counseling platform. Visit betterhelp.com/beingwell for 10% off your first month! Want to sleep better? Try the legendary Calm app! Visit calm.com/beingwell for 40% off a premium subscription.Connect with the show:Subscribe on iTunesFollow Forrest on YouTubeFollow us on InstagramFollow Forrest on InstagramFollow Rick on FacebookFollow Forrest on FacebookVisit Forrest's website 

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Genesis 2:8-17 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Genesis 2:8-2:17 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

MyCBT
The Kitchen Sink

MyCBT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 19:34


In this special episode:- Get tips for advocating for yourself with healthcare- Little-known insights into ovarian cancer- Learn how to find a good therapist- Find out how to get the most out of your therapy sessions- Discover how to cope with the end of a relationship- Learn how CBT can help those suffering with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder- Find out what The Fear Ladder is, and how it can help those suffering with anxietyThis special 'kitchen sink' episodes addresses lots of the questions, comments and concerns you've sent in via email. Click to listen now!

Coffee and Bible Time's Podcast
Season 3 Ep. 37 - Near-Death Experience: From Morgue to Eternity

Coffee and Bible Time's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 89:54


Welcome back to the CBT podcast!  For those that may be listening for the first time, our podcast is an offshoot from our main platform, YouTube.  Our channel is called Coffee and Bible Time where our goal is to help people delight in God's Word.  We also have a website and storefront with Bible studies, prayer journals, and more.I'm Mentor Mama and today we are going to be talking to Ian McCormack about his near-death experience.Coffee and Bible Time - Prayer Journal and Prayer BinderFaithful Counseling (sponsor) - Get 10% off your first monthInstacart (sponsor) - Free delivery for new customers on first order!Patreon - Support us on our Patreon!Ian McCormick's Links Ian McCormack Website Ian's Book:  A Glimpse of Eternity: One man's story of life beyond deathIan's Book:  FIVE FOLD: Apostles, prophets, evangelist, pastors and teachersIan's Book:  WHOLE HEARTED: Who has your heart?Ian's Movie:  The Perfect Wave NASB Bible Translation used by Ian

Bitch Slap  ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!
Interview #46 Amy Tran: It's the little "t" trauma.

Bitch Slap ...The Accelerated Path to Peace!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:53


Amy Tran is wise beyond her years and absolutely CRUSHES this interview!  She covers the "little t" trauma.  Believes in normalizing men asking for help and checking in, …  Helps us sort out our inner core beliefs.  Her steps become aware of what we are thinking, identify the patterns, see our core beliefs…  and change (err... heal!)  "Awareness is the first step towards healing,"Administrative: (See episode transcript below)You can find Amy on Instagram @doodledwellness.Email  Amy here: amy@doodledwellness.comCheck out the Tools For A Good Life Summit here: Virtually and FOR FREE https://bit.ly/ToolsForAGoodLifeSummitStart podcasting!  These are the best mobile mic's for IOS and Android phones.  You can literally take them anywhere on the fly.Get the Shure MV88 mobile mic for IOS,  https://amzn.to/3z2NrIJGet the Shure MV88+ for  mobile mic for Android  https://amzn.to/3ly8SNjGet A Course In Miracles Here! https://amzn.to/3hoE7sAAccess my “Insiders Guide to Finding Peace” here: https://belove.media/peaceSee more resources at https://belove.media/resourcesEmail me: contact@belove.mediaFor social Media:      https://www.instagram.com/mrmischaz/https://www.facebook.com/MischaZvegintzovSubscribe and share to help spread the love for a better world!As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.Transcript:0:00:05.8 Mischa Z: Welcome back, everybody to the Tools For a Good Life Summit, and I would like to welcome Amy Tran, MA... Welcome, Amy.0:00:16.7 Amy Tran: Thank you, thank you for having me. Hello, everyone.0:00:21.2 Mischa Z: Awesome. And quick I'm gonna read your bio and then we'll get down to the fun. Okay?0:00:28.5 Amy Tran: Mm-hmm.0:00:29.9 Mischa Z: Fantastic. So Amy is a doctoral student studying clinical psychology in Ontario, Canada, she has received intensive training to provide therapy as well as diagnose mental health disorders and autism in children and adolescents, she has trained in community mental health centers, hospitals and private practices across Ontario. You are also involved in research that examines how the use of smartphones and tablets by young children and parents may disrupt the healthy development of children. Before committing to become a psychologist, you studied visual and creative arts and your Instagram account @doodledwellness, @doodlewellness is where your passion for mental health and art come together, and I do wanna say that your Instagram account is freaking awesome, I just... Brings a smile to my face. And I love everything about it, and it was one of the ways I tracked you down. But let me continue before we get to that.0:01:42.1 Amy Tran: Thank you.0:01:44.4 Mischa Z: Indeed. You draw doodles on social media and create workbooks to make mental health resources and information more accessible to everyone. You're very successful at that. Amy's goal is to raise awareness about mental illness, combat stigma, share helpful coping skills, invite you to practice mindfulness and brighten your social media feed with a daily pick me up, and you will be completing your residency in Toronto next year. Correct?0:02:17.7 Amy Tran: Yes. Well, next year academic year, but this year, September 2021, I'll be off the internship. Yay! [chuckle] Gotta check my pulse.[laughter]0:02:30.9 Mischa Z: And then once you graduate, you hope to continue working with youth integrating mindfulness into mental health treatment and advocating for more accessible mental health treatment.0:02:44.8 Amy Tran: Mm-hmm.0:02:45.9 Mischa Z: Alright, again, welcome to the Summit. And when I look over here, everybody, I'm just looking at your Instagram feed again, @doodledwellness, and you have managed to compile 154,000 followers. Does that surprise you?[chuckle]0:03:04.7 Amy Tran: It really does. I mean, even just hearing you say that number out loud, it's like, "What? Really? Like my account?" So it is surprising. Yeah.0:03:14.0 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think what's really cool about it too, is there's a humbleness within it, there's a humbleness within your doodledwellness.com, your main web page, so I love that. I think there's so much stuff to talk about there, I like your most recent post, childhood trauma. Again, I'm just looking over here, so I apologize. Yes, childhood trauma can also be dot dot dot... And being in my young 50s and perhaps earlier in my 40s, being an A-type male, like a hard charger and all this, if I heard the word trauma, my brain would think, I don't have trauma or that's only this over here, but that's not true, it turns out. Maybe you could speak to that for a second.0:04:10.8 Amy Tran: Yeah, No, I'd love to... I agree, I think most people, when they think about trauma, they think about what do we call, big T trauma, right? Catastrophic accident, natural disaster, abuse or neglect, and of course, those things are very, very traumatic, but I think also love is something that all humans want and crave and need, and especially as a child, right? When you're in that vulnerable stage, who do you depend on to receive love and to have your needs met? Well, the answer typically would be your parents, your mom and dad. But you can have an amazing relationship with mom and dad, they can provide you with food, shelter, warmth, but when there are certain dynamics that play out where you feel like you can't express how you're feeling, you can't share your thoughts, you have to be a certain way to gain approval, love or validation, then that's traumatizing because you are betraying who you really are. And when we're younger, we don't have the mature brain to be able to say, "Well, maybe mom and dad are just having a bad day, or maybe mom and dad were never modeled how to cope with my emotional needs."0:05:38.2 Amy Tran: Instead, the small infant brain is like, "There's something wrong with me." And that core belief gets internalized and carries on throughout adulthood and that's traumatizing, right? To feel like we don't deserve love or cannot receive love unless we're certain people.0:06:02.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, it is traumatizing. And yeah, so hiding your true self by fear of disapproval and to carry that habit into adulthood, right? Denying your needs to be strong for your family. When you say that, denying your needs to be strong for your family... Tell me that.0:06:23.7 Amy Tran: Yeah. Yeah, so let me give you an example. So let's say you are the only male in the home and something's going on with your siblings, so maybe they have special needs or maybe they developed a drug habit or a serious mental health condition, and everyone starts to work together to help this person through, or maybe someone gets cancer, let's say.0:06:50.8 Mischa Z: Okay.0:06:52.8 Amy Tran: And as the young man, you're like, "Well, my dad is so occupied, he's not able to provide for the family because he's dealing with this or this, so I'm gonna be strong for the family. I'm not gonna talk about how scared I am, how worried I am, what I need." And you suppress that, "Oh, what? I'm fine, I'm totally fine. Let's talk about you, don't worry about me."0:07:14.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah and then perhaps you develop the habit of... I know I did [chuckle] of not learning how to communicate perhaps, or feeling that it was okay to be stressed out, or I guess to communicate that in a healthy manner, right?0:07:33.8 Amy Tran: Right, totally.0:07:36.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, another post that you have that again, I'm looking at over here is it's normalized men, and I love that, and it again, resonated with me being in my 40s, fortunately, I was like, I need to start figuring out how to express my emotions, how to cry, how to check in with another, how to ask for help. That's so hard. So maybe talk to that for a minute, normalized men...0:08:07.6 Amy Tran: Yeah. The post, it says, Normalize men asking for help, checking in on each other, crying, sharing their feelings, practicing self-care and having fears and doubts. So I think that it again, it comes back to just, who are we? We're just human beings, right? So this concept of men having to hide their emotions, be strong, that vulnerability is a weakness, those are all just societal constructs that we've taken on, but they're really harmful because we're social beings and we need each other, and we ask each other for help. Checking in on each other that makes you feel like you're wanted, like you belong. Crying, this one is a really interesting one because crying is an emotional release, and in fact, when we cry, there is research to suggest that it can actually help your body bounce back into a place of equilibrium, but we suppress that, right? Sharing feelings, same thing.0:09:14.8 Amy Tran: So having fears and doubts, like if you don't talk about that, then nobody really can reach out to you to help, maybe it gets to the point where you're suppressing it so much that you don't even realize it yourself, so it's just... I think that as someone who identifies as female, I'm very grateful that I have the space with other females to talk about feelings and to share insecurities. And with men, a lot of times, I don't see that, and I think it can be be very detrimental for your mental health because you have no one to talk to and emotions needs somewhere to go, but they're all suppressed in, or it comes out in other ways, like working too much, drinking, gambling, shopping, performance, right? Or...0:10:12.0 Mischa Z: Yes, yes, yes, yes. Good. [chuckle] Yes, thank you for that.0:10:13.8 Amy Tran: So you're like, "Oh, I can resonate with that." Is that what you're... Yeah.0:10:18.9 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think and my sort of the arc for me was, I've been lucky to, a good portion of my life to be on a growth trajectory, let's say, but I definitely think at some point as a male, I was taking in more emotions than I was letting out, so I was building for that pop, and then at some point I was... It leveled out, so I was taking in as much as I was letting out, but I still had a whole bunch of pent-up emotions for a lifetime of these seemingly non-traumatic things. And so when I hit my 40s, it was like divorce, both my parents died in rapid succession, career upheaval, and then I had another failed relationship and just... It was like the...[vocalization]0:11:18.6 Mischa Z: Right?0:11:18.9 Amy Tran: Right, right. Yeah.0:11:22.3 Mischa Z: And yeah, and so I spent a lot of time, I would say, I just say by the grace of God, finding healthy ways to cry, finding that safe space to... I found a community where it was okay as a male to cry and cry a lot, and so that really saved me and then started asking for help, and I think that can be hard as an A-type male it can be hard to ask for help so...0:11:49.3 Amy Tran: Yeah, totally.0:11:51.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, I don't mean to take this over, but I think that that leads us to a great point, if you've got a guy like me who's in his 40s, let's say, and I go through a divorce and one of my kids is like not acting like I want, which can be stressor and that can feel traumatic. Both my parents died and the financial stress and more failed relationships and it became evident to me that my... Like work my way through it, find more success, earn more money, whatever it was, was no longer gonna work. I needed different tools. I needed new tools. So given that scenario, my question to you is thinking of technology as a tool, 'cause you're clearly in tune with that. There we go. I know there's an app you recommend called Mooditude, right?0:12:48.2 Amy Tran: Yes, yes.0:12:49.1 Mischa Z: And then, I think you're also proficient in some CBT, some cognitive behavioral therapy?0:12:55.5 Amy Tran: That's right, yeah.0:12:56.7 Mischa Z: So, thinking of those sorts of modalities, what are the exact next steps you would offer someone like me? So I knew... Well, I would be headed in the new right direction that I would have positive momentum towards getting my life back on track.0:13:15.8 Amy Tran: Wow, so, such a great question, but also such a loaded question, 'cause I just have so much to say.0:13:23.9 Mischa Z: [chuckle] Good.0:13:24.6 Amy Tran: So I don't even know where to start. [chuckle] Yeah. So how about we talk about, basically, how our inner core beliefs are created? So we kind of touched on this before, where we were talking about how our relationship with the people that we grow up with, like our parents, they form certain core beliefs that we have. So there are many more than this, but there's three main ones that I see and that are taught in the CBT framework. So the first one is that I'm unlovable. The second one is that I'm worthless. And the third one is that I'm helpless. So this is all operating on a subconscious level. So we all have some of these core beliefs. We have one or multiple, and then there's other one, right?0:14:19.9 Amy Tran: So as a human, you develop compensatory strategy, so for example, one of my core beliefs is that I'm worthless. So I grew up around parents who were quite invalidating, they were Asian immigrants, just cold, never really praised me or told me they loved me. So me as a young girl, I'm like, "I'm unlovable and I'm worthless." So what did I do? I achieved so much, I just tried so hard, because that's how I got approval from my parents, not just, "Good morning, Amy. Love you," just like, "Oh okay, you've got a A plus, good job." And I'm like, "Yeah, this is the love I need." So anyway.0:15:04.7 Mischa Z: Okay.0:15:05.1 Amy Tran: Okay. So that gets ingrained and then I developed a compensatory strategy. So for me, it was working really hard, for some people, it may be the opposite, being really hyper-vigilant of cues that you don't belong, for example, reassurance seeking, whatever it is, there are behaviors that you do to protect yourself from coming face-to-face with that core belief.0:15:31.8 Mischa Z: Okay.0:15:32.6 Amy Tran: So then, that can be destructive, right? So I would say one of the most important tools at first is to become aware of what you're thinking. Because when we become aware of what we're thinking, we can identify the patterns, and when we look at the patterns, we can start to piece together what our core beliefs might be, and then that's when the actual work happens, is we have to heal that core belief because we have thousands of thoughts a day, that's the premise of CBT, and...0:16:11.8 Mischa Z: And so quickly, a cognitive behavioral therapy, that CBT stands for?0:16:17.4 Amy Tran: Yeah.0:16:18.3 Mischa Z: Yes. Cool.0:16:19.4 Amy Tran: Yeah. So let me give you actually the audience a brief overview of what CBT is. Do you think that would be helpful?0:16:26.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you.0:16:28.7 Amy Tran: Okay. So cognitive behavioral therapy, so there's thought and there's behaviors, and then there's feeling and they're all connected. So if I told you right now to picture a purple elephant, would you be able to do that?0:16:43.4 Mischa Z: Yes, ma'am. [laughter]0:16:44.8 Amy Tran: Perfect. And if I asked you to clap twice, would you be able to do that?0:16:49.9 Mischa Z: Yes. Oops, one extra.[laughter]0:16:52.7 Amy Tran: Nice. And if I asked you to stop feeling depressed, anxious and doubtful of yourself right now, would you be able to do that?0:17:01.4 Mischa Z: Probably not, no.0:17:02.6 Amy Tran: Right. Yeah. So our feelings are harder to change, but what we can change is how we act and what we think. So if we can change those two things, because everything else is connected, then it can change our feelings. So with cognitive behavioral therapy, the first step is to become aware of the thoughts we have. So when we are, let's say, walking past a group of people and they are laughing, one of the automatic thoughts you might have is "They're laughing at me." But CBT trains you to be like, "Woah, woah, woah. What? Wait, I remember now, thoughts are not always real. How do I actually know they're laughing at me? Am I reading their mind? Am I making an assumption?" And then you re-phrase that thought, "Well, maybe someone just told a funny joke," and that reframed thought leads to more positive feelings.0:17:57.3 Amy Tran: So do you see how they're all connected? So basically, you just do that over and over again. So I would say, one of the most important things is to begin to actually look within yourself and be aware of your thoughts, and if you have trouble doing that... One of the things that I've been taught is when you notice the sudden shift in mood, immediately ask yourself, "What was I just thinking?" Because our thoughts trigger our emotions most of the time. When you're sitting there and then all of a sudden you just feel like, "Oh, I feel a little anxious or sad," just ask yourself, "What was I just thinking?" And that automatic thought is a clue of what your core belief is, and you just do that over and over again, and look...0:18:41.0 Mischa Z: Can you give me a quick example of that, of inaction, or for you or for me, or...0:18:47.7 Amy Tran: What do you mean inaction?0:18:50.4 Mischa Z: Or like, give me a real life example of that. I know you did with... Of like... Perhaps recently, you've felt... You've noticed that shift in feeling and so...0:19:07.4 Amy Tran: Oh, yes.0:19:08.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah.0:19:09.7 Amy Tran: Yes, yes. Okay. So yeah, so me and my partner, we were just hanging out and he was doing his own thing, I was doing my own thing. And then I noticed that the sense of dread, almost, I was like, "What was I just thinking?" And I thought for a second, and my thought was that he is purposely avoiding me because he doesn't love me anymore.0:19:39.0 Mischa Z: Okay.0:19:39.2 Amy Tran: Right?0:19:39.5 Mischa Z: Yes.0:19:39.6 Amy Tran: So then, instead of picking a fight or trying to act out, I just took a step back and I was like, "Okay, let's challenge this thought. What evidence do I have? What evidence am I missing? What's an alternative explanation? Am I reading his mind?" So I didn't act on that thought, it turns out he was just tired from working, and had a bad day. [chuckle] But it's interesting because I had that automatic thought, and where did that thought come from? My core belief of being unlovable, of being worthless. So if your core belief is always firing off these automatic thoughts, they shape the way you view the world. Right? And if we leave the thoughts unchecked, they will take over your life.0:20:27.0 Mischa Z: Okay, cool. So you're strategically or... I don't know if strategically is the right word. You're training yourself to catch the thoughts and then evaluate the trail of that thought, or am I saying that right?0:20:45.7 Amy Tran: Exactly.0:20:46.1 Mischa Z: Yeah.0:20:46.3 Amy Tran: Exactly. So the Mooditude app, whenever you have a triggering thought, you can open the app and you can check... Rate how you're feeling, you can write what you were thinking about and the specific topic, so was it relationship, work, family that was triggering you, and then it tracks it all for you, so then you can look at it over time and look for those patterns. Yeah.0:21:11.5 Mischa Z: Awesome, awesome. So I'm just looking at notes I was taking. So become aware of what you're thinking was sort of step, step one, shall we say. And it sounds like for me, that's even inventory, that write it down, get used to literally like, "Alright. What was I thinking? What are my thoughts?" Yes. Yeah.0:21:35.1 Amy Tran: Yeah. As most of the time we go through life on autopilot, right. Have you ever... [chuckle] You've walked down a flight of stairs, and you're like, "How did I get here? Why am I here?" [chuckle] It's 'cause your brain is just chattering, it's just... You're in there. You were thinking about the past and future, we're very rarely in the present moment. And actually, looking at your feet going down the steps, right? And you end up on a different flight of your house, you're like, "What the heck, how did I get here?"0:22:02.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, cool. Or not cool, but cool that we can change that. So you have your MA, which is your masters?0:22:13.8 Amy Tran: Yes.0:22:14.4 Mischa Z: Okay, awesome. And working on your doctorate and so, you've been pretty deep in this sort of field for, I don't know what, five, 10 years, something like that?0:22:26.6 Amy Tran: In the graduate program, about five years, yeah, maybe four years for undergrad.0:22:33.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. And so, there are studies backing up CBT, I'm assuming, cognitive behavioral therapy, and then a little bit of work can lead to profound shifts? That's my question. Is that... Or that's a statement. Is that true?0:22:52.7 Amy Tran: "A little bit of work can lead to profound shift." I would say that... That's a tricky question. It really depends on the person, right? So for some people, they are more open to exploring the thoughts that they have. But there also are people who are really afraid of their own thoughts, right? Or they are not honest with themselves, which is okay. So for those folks that may be harder to monitor their own thinking and come face-to-face with what they're thinking, that can be hard.0:23:27.9 Mischa Z: Any, any strategies to help with that?0:23:34.6 Amy Tran: I would... To help with being more open to your own thinking, I would say that there would be two, right? So I would say that sometimes people are worried about exploring their own thinking because it's going to trigger an intense emotion. So I think that one helpful thing to think about or prepare is coping tools, right? So find what works for you to bring you from a hot moment to a cooler moment. So if you notice that what you're feeling or what you're thinking is getting you quite upset and you don't wanna do it anymore, I think it's important for people to have a strategy to calm down, that might be like deep breathing or meditation.0:24:24.5 Amy Tran: And then my second thing is to practice self-compassion, right. So yeah, some of the thoughts that we have about ourselves or the world can be upsetting, but our thoughts are not always real, and I think our mindfulness can be really helpful because we can monitor... You can monitor your thinking without really attaching to it, and you can also be compassionate and non-judgmental. So mindfulness is an entire thing that we can probably talk about for like three hours [chuckle] but there's a lot of resources online, and I think that mindfulness will not only help people be more compassionate and non-judgmental, but I think it will also help you notice your thoughts even more because it's the practice of awareness. Yeah.0:25:13.9 Mischa Z: Yeah. And I think the more we confront, and I don't know if confront is the right word, or just bring awareness to our thoughts, the more they hold less weight.0:25:27.4 Amy Tran: Right, totally. Yeah.0:25:29.1 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah, yeah.0:25:31.8 Amy Tran: Our entire identity... I agree totally with multiple identities. Our entire identity is basically just stories and stories are just a string of words and pictures. Right?0:25:42.2 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah.0:25:43.1 Amy Tran: So we can let go of that.0:25:45.4 Mischa Z: Yes.[laughter]0:25:47.4 Mischa Z: I wanted to ask, I've got two things, and I'm thinking, I had an idea for the advanced bonus session that everybody's doing, and I'm thinking... And maybe you can tell me now if you think this is worth talking about. But I think where as parents, one thing that I noticed... Like when both my parents died, I went through a divorce, financial upheaval, like I was having to move houses, lots of chaos. And I had two young boys and at one point it really hit me, I was like, "Oh my God, they went through that with me." And I think in hindsight, I could have... What I want you to maybe address, and I think we should save it for the bonus session, and you can tell me if you think it's worth talking about. And I wrote it down is, "What's an important for a parent to be cognizant of for their kids, or how do you nurture or hold space or help kids deal with?" I know this is a broad topic and loaded, but it's like, I think as parents when we're going through hard times... I'll speak for me. As a parent when I was going through hard times, how do I hold space for my kids? What do you think about that as kind of a...0:27:11.2 Amy Tran: Yeah, I love that topic so much. My training is in youth, like working with youth, so yeah, I would love to talk about that.0:27:19.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, I think that would be awesome, and I think it would be very useful because I think there's a lot of us men in our 40s or what have you who... We're a little self-centered. [laughter]0:27:32.5 Amy Tran: Right. Yeah. Well, not only self...0:27:35.2 Mischa Z: Said with love.0:27:35.5 Amy Tran: So not only self-centered, but also modeling what they think society wants men to be, so.0:27:44.6 Mischa Z: Yes, yes. Awesome, so before we hit stop and get to that though, I'm curious and go ahead, were you gonna write down a note? It looks like...0:27:52.9 Amy Tran: Well, I was just writing down what I'm gonna talk about in the bonus session. [laughter]0:27:57.5 Mischa Z: Yeah, perfect. So I'm curious what you... What do you think it is that draws your Instagram account or your Doodled Wellness clearly is a powerful, a powerful place for people to go, and it's drawing people in, and it's clearly a catalyst for change and goodness and stuff and... What do you think it is? What... Just like briefly, what do you think it is? What do you think is coming through there? Does that question make sense, or...0:28:31.3 Amy Tran: It definitely makes sense, but it's a hard question because sometimes, to be honest, I'm like, "I don't even know, I'm just putting it together because this is just me." But if I can step outside of myself as the creator and look at it, I would say that it's... The colors and the way that it's presented is bright and friendly and non-intimidating, that it almost lowers like a layer of defensiveness down. And I don't know if that's true. I haven't done a study on it or anything like that. But I try to make content that's affirming and positive and that sets the colors scheme. But then sometimes I talk about some stuff that really does invite people to do some self-reflection and what they may find or what that I'm inviting them... Where I'm inviting them to go may be a hard place to go. But then while they are on the feed and looking at it, I still think that it's bright and just warm and inviting, so I just think it's a happy place. And I think it's because I actually do believe in the potential for people to flourish and to unlearn what they have learned, uncondition the conditioning of their brain. I really do feel like that's possible and I want more and more people to realize that.0:30:11.5 Mischa Z: I love that. That's a beautiful answer. Thank you so much for that. And as I... It's fun to click on a post and sort of look at the... Who's interacting with you, and it seems like, which I think is super cool, as a pretty broad spectrum of people. Would you say that that's true?0:30:33.6 Amy Tran: Yeah, definitely.0:30:35.7 Mischa Z: Yeah, that's awesome.0:30:36.8 Amy Tran: Yeah, and I...0:30:36.9 Mischa Z: Oh, go ahead. Sorry.0:30:37.7 Amy Tran: And I... Oh no, that's okay. And I also think that one thing that I have noticed too is that more and more teens are noticing the feed because it is quite, I don't wanna say childish, but maybe playful. And I think that's like, I'm just so grateful and honored for them to be there because at that point in our lives we're just so malleable and there's just so much proactive work to be done.0:31:04.3 Mischa Z: Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Well, fantastic. Amy, we're gonna, we're gonna end. I think that's a beautiful place to end round one. So if this interview with Amy Tran was fantastic, and you want to get even more content from Amy, which is gonna be amazing, I already know the bonus session is gonna be beautiful, upgrade to the All Access Pass for that bonus interview. And Amy, any final thoughts to share that we did not get a chance to cover?0:31:39.2 Amy Tran: No, but I'll leave everyone with a quote, which is, "Awareness is the first step towards healing," well.0:31:47.6 Mischa Z: Yeah, beautiful. Thank you so much, Amy. This has been a ton of fun round one, I'm very excited for round two. And a reminder to everybody, you can find Amy@doodledwellness.com and @doodledwellness on Instagram. And we'll see everybody in the VIP section.0:32:10.2 Amy Tran: Ciao![music]

Threads Podcast: Life Unfiltered
Ep. 155 || Consult with a Therapist: Chris Gazdik returns to talk shop about mental health therapy

Threads Podcast: Life Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 66:08


Ben & Jason are raving fans of mental health therapy. But they had some lingering questions about the therapy process, and what healthy boundaries with a therapist look like.Why do therapists awkwardly stop talking in a session? Why don't therapists just tell you what to do? How "informed" should clients be about the goings-on of their therapist? Can you be friends with your therapist??And what on earth is up with quick fix  modalities like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)? Are all CBT practitioners crocks??Learn more about our amazing guest Chris Gazdik at his website, https://www.throughatherapistseyes.com. Check out his podcast at https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/through-a-therapists-eyes-podcast/id1435009400?mt=2-----You'll hear stories about real people who have dealt with depression, anxiety, addiction, self-doubt, or any other struggle they've faced on their journey through life. It doesn't matter where you are in your own story - there's something for everyone on this show!And if you need someone to talk to when it feels like things just aren't going well - reach out! We want nothing more than for every person who listens to this show to feel less alone in the world. If Threads has become a resource that you rely on, consider saying thanks by taking part in our Buy Me a Coffee supporter platform. You can buy us some coffee to keep the podcast going or monthly support so we never have to worry about running out of fuel! Learn more at www.buymeacoffee.com/threadspodcastThank you so much for listening to us! We appreciate each and every one of you. Can you do us a favor? Tell someone about this podcast if you enjoy it. Also subscribe, rate, and review us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get our podcast from hereYou can find anything you would absolutely need from Threads Podcast here!This podcast was produced by Hey Guys Media Group LLC Are you looking to start a podcast? Need help with editing? Hey Guys can help! Check them out at Hey Guys Media GroupSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/threadspodcast)

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Zechariah 9:1-10 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Zechariah 9:1-10:1 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment
Encore Episode: Happy Thanksgiving From Taproot Therapy!

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:19


Happy Thanksgiving! To celebrate this year, we are sharing our previous episodes on our gratitude challenge. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter : @TaprootTherapyNYC

Psych Mic
So you want to be a child psychologist? | Tips for success with Dr. Regine Galanti

Psych Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 68:51


Regine Galanti, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of individuals with anxiety and OCD; as well as young children with behavior problems, anxiety, and co-occuring disorders. She specializes in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). She is the founder of Long Island Behavioral Psychology, a therapy practice in Nassau County, Long Island, and author of Anxiety Relief for Teens: Essential CBT Skills and Mindfulness Practices to Overcome Anxiety and Stress.  Dr. Galanti received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Hofstra University.  Dr. Galanti works together with parents, schools, and teachers to optimize treatment for a child. She provides concrete, research-proven strategies to help individuals with generalized anxiety, panic disorder, OCD,  social anxiety, school refusal, selective mutism, disruptive behaviors, and ADHD. She is a sought after speaker who has been quoted in The Washington Post, Self Magazine, and Buzzfeed, among others. In this episode, we cover:How did you figure out you wanted to be a child psychologist?How did you decide which graduate programs to apply to, and why was program orientation so important?How should students go about figuring out which theoretical orientations they align with?Choosing between PsyD and PhD: orientation, training, research, and financial considerationsWhy Regine's professors told her to go to conferencesHow did you piece together that you wanted to work with children again after having worked with adults throughout graduate school?Why did you open a private practice?How can we do better at communicating clinical findings to the public?What are important considerations to make when deciding whether you want to work with children or adults?Why Regine thinks it's easier to work with kids, and why she loves itA day in Regine's lifeFavorite and least favorite parts of the jobRegine supervises grad students in clinical psychology. In her experience, what kinds of students do really well with CBT therapy?Misconceptions about CBTWhat do you see a lot of graduate students struggling with?Grad school isn't about just getting it doneSpecialist vs generalist practitioners - how do you choose which conditions you want to treat?What do you think people can/should do to maximize their preparedness for graduate school?What skill, quality, or general factor has served you no matter where you went?  Visit psychmic.com to sign up for the newsletter, where you'll get career tips, grad school resources, and job opportunities straight to your inbox! Follow @psych_mic on Instagram to submit questions for speakers and stay in the loop.Music by: Adam Fine 

Insomnia insight with Daniel Erichsen
Insomnia Insight #420: ”It was a big aha moment for me”

Insomnia insight with Daniel Erichsen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 15:03


Stephanie struggled with insomnia for 10 years until she found this channel and community. Combining what she learned here with her work as a CBT therapist, she developed a method of looking at the advantages and disadvantages of believing that your day is determined by the number of hours you sleep. In this episode, we look at her method and how it may help you on your path to leaving the struggle forever.

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence
Ep. 155: Jennifer Shannon — How to Let Go of Your Impossibly High Standards of Perfectionism

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 44:32


My guest this week is Jennifer Shannon, author of the new book, The Monkey Mind Workout for Perfectionism (affiliate link). Jennifer and I explored what perfectionism is, which may be different from what you think. It includes all the ways we rigidly hold ourselves to unrealistic standards. Jennifer offers many simple and effective ways to let go of perfectionism, which you'll hear about in this episode. When we're able to let go of our perfectionistic impulses, we can experience less stress and anxiety, which is the natural result of treating ourselves more kindly.

Inside Schizophrenia
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Schizophrenia

Inside Schizophrenia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 48:46


Cognitive behavioral therapy is a proven treatment for a wide range of mental health conditions and emotional struggles, but many times is not used for treating schizophrenia. Schizophrenia's symptoms of hallucinations and psychosis are assumed to be too complex for this type of therapy.  Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard, explore the types of CBT that best work for schizophrenia. Rachel breaks down her “Monster Technique” that she uses daily to help her deal with her visual hallucinations. Guest Cornelia Larsson, licensed psychologist and psychotherapist, joins to talk in-depth about CBT techniques for dealing with audio hallucinations like hearing voices. To learn more -- or read the transcript -- please visit the official episode page here. Guest Bio Dr. Cornelia Larsson is a licensed clinical psychologist and psychotherapist who spent most of her career working in Swedish psychiatric clinics. Currently, she's a doctoral student working toward her PhD by researching psychological treatments for psychosis, and is a course coordinator in psychotherapist education at Centre for Psychiatry Research at Karolinska Institutet & Region Stockholm. She's also a director of studies for the psychologists at the South-West Psychiatric Clinic in Region Stockholm and gives lectures mainly on cognitive behavior therapy and psychosis. Although Larsson has worked with individuals living with all sorts of psychiatric diagnoses during her career, her main focus the last 10 years have been on individuals living with psychosis and schizophrenia. Clinically, she has taken a special interest in helping individuals with distressing voices, who engage in frequent self-harm and suicide attempts, to change their relationships to their voices and thereby regain hope and quality of life. Inside Schizophrenia Podcast Host Rachel Star Withers creates videos documenting her schizophrenia, ways to manage and let others like her know they are not alone and can still live an amazing life. She has written Lil Broken Star: Understanding Schizophrenia for Kids and a tool for schizophrenics, To See in the Dark: Hallucination and Delusion Journal. Fun Fact: She has wrestled alligators. To learn more about Rachel, please visit her website, RachelStarLive.com. Inside Schizophrenia Co-Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, "Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations," available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. Gabe makes his home in the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio. He lives with his supportive wife, Kendall, and a Miniature Schnauzer dog that he never wanted, but now can't imagine life without. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.

Witness History
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 9:40


How a particular form of psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, became a common treatment for anxiety and depression. CBT was first developed by Professor Aaron T Beck in the USA. It has been rolled out as an option for people with mental health problems in the UK. Professor David Clark has been speaking to Kirsty Reid about why, and how, it works. Photo credit: Getty Images.

When East Meets West
S2E34_Honoring the Father of Cognitive Therapy, Dr. Aaron T. Beck

When East Meets West

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 16:31


On November 1, 2021 the world lost the father of cognitive therapy, Aaron T. Beck, MD, known as Tim by his loved ones. He noticed issues with interpretations in traditional psychoanalysis and introduced the world of psychology to automatic thoughts, cognitive distortions, the idea that psychological concepts could be scientifically studied, and everything related to what we now know as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). In this episode, Dr. Rubin shares stories and autobiographical detaisl while Dr. Pete tries to hold on and learns a ton. Tune in to learn more about Dr. Beck and the impact he had and the legacy that will live forever.Learn more about Dr. Beck's life and his work:Dr. Beck discussing the similarities between CBT and Buddhism with the Dalai LamaThe Beck Institute, co-founded by Aaron Beck, M.D. and his daughter Judith Beck, Ph.D.New York Times Obituary and the Washington Post Obituary 

Quince Questions?
Ep. 164 Heather Blackwell

Quince Questions?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 72:01


thousandfirstdates.com/episodes Heather Blackwell is a CBT-certified mental health coach and Psychology subject matter expert (SME), dedicated to bringing Psychology insights to the dating population. She has two Masters degrees in the areas of Forensic Psychology and MFT and has 15+ years of experience in behavioral analysis under her skill belt. Her discussion topics include, but are not inclusive to, dating experiences, interpersonal relationships, maladaptive behavioral development, self-identity development, self-help, holistic mind-body health, and nutrition as it applies to mental wellness. Links: https://thousandfirstdates.health.blog --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Inspiration Place
167: Redesign Your Mind with Eric Maisel and Miriam Schulman

The Inspiration Place

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 27:30


Your mind is yours to redesign, redecorate and create! The idea that you are what you think has concerned philosophers from Marcus Aurelius to the Buddha. Today, this age-old message is delivered via cognitive behavioral therapy and CBT techniques. By practicing easy-to-understand visualization exercises, you can redesign your mind and change not only what you think but how you think. In this podcast, you will discover... Why mental stress goes hand in hand with intelligence and creativity. How to use visualization exercises to change how and what you think. How you can redesign your mind to Increase your creativity, reduce your anxiety, or recover from addiction. For full show notes, go to schulmanart.com/167 ++++++++++++++++++++

GraceStory Podcast
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Explained - Dr. Seth Scott

GraceStory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 50:38


Our guest on this episode is Dr. Seth Scott who joins us to help break down the complexities of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Is it eastern medicine? Is it a therapy that is consistent with a Biblical worldview? How can I know if this is something that can help me live a better and more abundant life? Seth masterfully simplifies CBT and answers all of these questions and much more in an episode we hope you will be sharing with your friends and family. You can find out more about Dr. Scott by clicking here. Have feedback? Want to hear more on a certain topic? Have a suggestion for a guest? We are listening. You can email me at nate@gracestoryministries.com.  We would love for you to join the GraceStory Community Group on Facebook. There is great content in this exclusive, closed group that you won't want to miss out on. Consider becoming a supporter of GraceStory Ministries with a donation. Whether it's a one time gift or you want to join others in the GraceStory Community with a reoccurring donation, you can give by texting GRACESTORY to 44321. Follow GraceStory Podcast on Facebook Join GraceStory Community Group Follow GraceStory Podcast on Twitter @GraceStoryPod  GraceStory on Instagram: @my_grace_story  @gracestoryministries  @gracestorypodcast

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh: What is Mental Illness (and How Do We Know)?

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 56:35


Conversations around the conceptualization, development & implementation of diagnostic frameworks around mental illness often generate more questions than answers, but are endlessly fascinating in their ability to pull on a number of diverse & interesting threads of inquiry.  Clinical psychologist, professor & former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive & Behavioural Therapies (CACBT), Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh, C.Psych returns to Thoughts on Record for a discussion of diagnostic frameworks for mental illness.  In this conversation we cover:thoughts on the conceptualization of mental illnessthe functional utility/evolutionary significance of mental health "symptoms" - even when frequent and/or intensecultural expectations around the experience of psychological pain advantages and challenges of current diagnostic symptoms (e.g., DSM 5, ICD-11)mental health consumer expecations around receiving a diagnosispotential benefits and harm that can come with a diagnosisthe emergence of potential dimensional models of diagnosis (e.g., The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP))  transdiagnostic treatment of psychopathology, with a special focus on managing comorbidityconsideration of some common diagnostic conundrums e.g., severe symptoms in high functioning clientsAndrea Ashbaugh is an associate professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa, Director of the Centre for Psychological Services and Research, and is a licensed clinical psychologist in the province of Ontario, Canada. She obtained her master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.She is director of the Cognition and Anxiety Studies Laboratory (CASL) and the Sex and Anxiety Research Group (SAX-RG). Her research interests as part of CASL centre around understanding the causes and developing treatments for anxiety and fear-related problems. She has recently started a program of research to understand the causes and psychological effects of experiencing traumatic and non-traumatic events that transgress one's moral beliefs (Moral Injury) in military personnel and veterans. Her research in the context of the SAX-RG centres around the impact of beliefs about arousal sensations and context on the interpretation of arousal, and its impact on sexual interest and functioning. She has received funding for her research broadly including from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.Dr. Ashbaugh regularly supervises CBT training and teaches courses on psychopathology and clinical psychology at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She has served on the Editorial Boards of Psychological Assessment. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry and editorial board member for Behaviour Research and Therapy. She is a former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies (CACBT) and was seminal in the development of national CBT training guidelines that were released by CACBT in May 2019.

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Genesis 2:1-7 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Genesis 2:1-2:7 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Optimal Relationships Daily
1146: Helpful Tips for Balancing Teen Independence by Dr. Susan Chanderbahn of ChandPsych on Giving Your Teen Space

Optimal Relationships Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 9:37


Dr. Susan Chanderbahn of ChandPsych shares helpful tips for balancing teen independence Episode 1146: Helpful Tips for Balancing Teen Independence by Dr. Susan Chanderbahn of ChandPsych on Giving Your Teen Space Dr. Susan Chanderbhan is a psychologist in Laredo, Texas. She helps individuals and couples who are struggling in different areas of their lives gain the clarity they need to grow and change. Her practice is based largely around using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which the National Mental Health Institute (NIMH) notes to be proven by research as effective treatment for a variety of mental health issues that individuals often face, like anxiety, stress, depression, PTSD, and trauma.  The original post is located here: https://www.chandpsych.com/blog/helpful-tips-for-balancing-teen-independence/  BeachBound is a one stop travel shop that is redefining travel, as customers can book worldwide beach vacations including flights, hotels, transfers and excursions in one place. Visit Beachbound.com to book your next beach vacation Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalRelationshipsDailyMarriageParenting Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Coffee and Bible Time's Podcast
Season 3 Ep. 36 - Q&A with Mentor Mama

Coffee and Bible Time's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:03


Welcome back to the CBT podcast!  For those that may be listening for the first time, our podcast is an offshoot from our main platform, YouTube.  Our channel is called Coffee and Bible Time where our goal is to help people delight in God's Word.  We also have a website and storefront with Bible studies, prayer journals, and more.I'm Mentor Mama and today we are going to be Doing something a little different.  Last week Ashley put out an Instagram request asking for questions from our audience to be answered by me, your Mentor Mama. Coffee and Bible Time - Prayer Journal and Prayer BinderFaithful Counseling (sponsor) - Get 10% off your first monthInstacart (sponsor) - Free delivery for new customers on first order!Patreon - Support us on our Patreon!Links from today's podcast: Village Church of Gurnee Jeremiah 1:4-5 Ephesians 2:10Psalm 139:16 Psalm 139:13-14 Hymn:  Beautiful Savior Give Me Jesus by Fernando Ortega YouVersion Bible App The Message Bible New Living Translation Study Bible Psalms

Wellness While Walking
95. Walk + Talk Therapy in Nature with Jen Udler: A Powerful Trifecta

Wellness While Walking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 38:15


We're doing a deep dive into the intersection of movement, nature and mental well-being with walk and talk therapist, Jen Udler of Positive Strides Therapy! Learn about the power of all aspects of this type of therapy, even the parts we can do ourselves to realize some mindset shifts and enhanced wellness effects on our walks. LET'S TALK THE WALK! Wellness While Walking Facebook page Wellness While Walking on Instagram Wellness While Walking on Twitter Wellness While Walking website for show notes and other information Coach Carolyn on Clubhouse: @stepstowellness wellnesswhilewalking@gmail.com   RESOURCES AND SOURCES (some links may be affiliate links)   WALK AND TALK THERAPY WITH JEN UDLER Positive Strides Therapy website Resources page Positive Strides Therapy Facebook Page Positive Strides Therapy Instagram Account The Walking Cure, www.psychiatrictimes.com 25 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques and Worksheets, positivepsychology.com  HOW TO SHARE WELLNESS WHILE WALKING Wellness While Walking on Apple  Wellness While Walking on Spotify Link for any podcast app: pod.link/walking Wellness While Walking website Or screenshot a favorite episode playing on your phone and share to social media! Thanks for sharing! : )       DISCLAIMER Neither I nor many of my podcast guests are doctors or healthcare professionals of any kind, and nothing on this podcast or associated content should be considered medical advice. The information provided by Wellness While Walking Podcast and associated material, by Whole Life Workshop and by Bermuda Road Wellness LLC is for informational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment, and before undertaking a new health care regimen, including walking.     Thanks for listening to Wellness While Walking, a walking podcast.          

SuperAge: Live Better
HRT, Estrogen and Menopause, New Scientific Findings: Dr. Rebecca Dunsmoor-Su

SuperAge: Live Better

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:20


Much of what is thought about hormone replacement therapy is outdated and untrue. We do a deep dive into what is HRT, what are the benefits, and who should and should not be taking it. What happens during a women's hormone journey from childhood to post-menopausal? How are hormones and a woman's brain connected? What happens in a women's body during menopause? What is hormone replacement therapy? Does HRT increase the risk of breast cancer? What is the relation between hormones and the cardiovascular system? How does menopause impact sleep? Dr. Rebecca Dunsmoor-Su is the Medical Director of Menopause services at the Women's Wellness and Gyn Specialties Clinic at Swedish Medical Center. She is also the Chief Medical Officer at Gennev. Dr. Dunsmoor-Su joins us on the SuperAge podcast for an information-dense episode all about menopause. She explains what happens leading up to and during menopause, some of the symptoms like weight gain, trouble sleeping, brain fog, and how they are addressed, how we can use hormone replacement therapy to improve symptoms and longevity for women post-menopause, and much more. What you will learn in this episode:What a woman's body goes through in terms of hormones from childhood all the way through post-menopause The impact of menopause on the brainEverything we need to know about hormone replacement therapy and some of the myths around itHow menopause impacts sleep and what can help How menopause impacts brain health and the cardiovascular system “Estrogen replacement does not cause breast cancer. And I like to shout that from the rooftops. We have many studies that tell us that estrogen replacement does not cause breast cancer.” “Women who start hormone replacement therapy within 5 years of their last period actually reduce their cardiovascular risk. They also slightly reduce their risk of colon cancer and they reduce their all cause mortality overtime.” “When women are transitioning through menopause, we're talking about 5-10 years of disrupted sleep. That's a lot of impact to the brain.” “Menopause is fine and functional if you're going to live to be 65. You've got 10 years to survive menopause, you're going to be okay. We live to 95, 100, 105! That's a long time, that's almost half your life without the hormones that sort of keep things going. So I think that we need to adjust.” Listen to the SuperAge podcast wherever you get your pods. Connect with Dr. Rebecca Dunsmoor-Su: https://swedishfoundation.org/frontline-Dunsmoor-Su LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-dunsmoor-su-92a4997b/ Check out the app, CBT-i Coach, that Dr. Dunsmoor-Su recommends for at home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/cbt-i-coach/id655918660 

So You Want to Start a Business
E176 Angela Ficken psychotherapist has built a worldwide brand Progress Wellness

So You Want to Start a Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 43:12


Like many business owners Angela Ficken reached a point where she was burning the candle at both ends. She took the plunge to start private practice … and thought she would “hang out her shingle” and that's all she needed to do. It didn't work out that way and in this episode Angela tells us how she overcame the “hustle of being in business which is a constant grind” She says that she learned very fast that: “Your pay check is as much as you hustle” Angela has built her business Progress Welness into a worldwide brand. She offers online products that take her expertise out into the world for a wide range of clients.  She tells us that creating the brand allowed the creativity side of her personality. In this episode Angela walks us through the process she used to build her brand and the entire suit of online products – so helpful for every business person. Angela Ficken, LICSW is a full-time psychotherapist in private practice. She specializes in OCD, eating disorders, and anxiety-related concerns. She started her career at McLean Hospital, which is one of the top-ranking psychiatric hospitals in the country and affiliated with Harvard University. She was the head social worker on an inpatient unit that focuses on anxiety and depression. During her time at McLean, she trained in exposure therapy and became certified in CBT and DBT. Shortly thereafter, she worked at Harvard University as a primary therapist for undergraduate and graduate students. During her time there, she taught students CBT and DBT skills to help them manage a range of challenging emotions that young adults face daily.   Angela has focused her attention on working with young adults and entrepreneurs primarily after noticing that both groups struggled with anxiety disorders and stress-related issues due to life transitions and the uncertainty of what was coming next in their lives. The struggle, as they say, is "real". She has spent years fine-tuning her practice and building her business into something more than a standard full-time private practice. In this conversation she tells us how she has achieved this - with practical and actionable steps we can all implement. She began writing for Huffington Post as an expert, which then catapulted her into writing for other major online sources which include Marriage.com where she is a verified expert, YourTango.com, ThriveGlobal.com, and has been quoted in Oprah Magazine, and on Fastcompany.com, Inc.com, Forbes.com, MSN.com, Bustle.com, Popsugar.com, Buzzfeed.com, Nylon magazine, Getstigma.com, and Justluxe.com. She has also been a guest on Onward Nation with Stephen Woessner where she talked about OCD and intrusive thoughts, as well as on the radio in Chicago and Reno speaking about stress and anxiety. Through her writing and hearing from her clients how difficult it was finding an understanding therapist—one who could actually teach coping strategies to manage difficult emotions—she decided to create the Worried to Well-Balanced: Practical Skills to Deal With Everyday Stressors: Worried to Well-balanced course to reach more people other than those she could meet within her office. The course is designed to help those who have significant stress in their lives and struggle to find ways of coping and managing their emotions. You can find Angela Ficken and Progress Wellness: Pinterest.com/progresswellnes Facebook.com/progresswellness Instagram.com/progresswellness   You can find me, Ingrid Thompson: website: www.healthynumbers.com.au LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/ingridthompson   My guess is you are listening to these podcasts because ..... My guess is that you are here because you are a business owner and what you really want - is to build and grow a successful business - whatever that means to you. We know that business owners want to feel more confident when it comes to the money side of business. Having a successful business might mean making business decisions with reliable information - facts & data as well as your "gut feel." …  ultimately you want to do what you do best AND have a successful business AND make a difference. I'm here to help you. Everything I do in my business, every decision I make is based on this question:  Will this make a difference? Will this help you, my listener - will this help you to build your business? will this help you to create your successful, viable and robust business so you can achieve Financial Independence? This is why I do what I do There are 2 ways you can access all my best material: Read my book! It is a Business 101 and can answer pretty much all your business questions. This book is designed to help you build your business - whether you are starting from scratch and creating something new or you have been in business for a couple of years and want to build from your foundations. The book is your step by step guide to building a business smarter and faster. "So You Want to Start a Business" Order your copy now from Booktopia, Amazon or Book Depository It's so exciting to be sharing it with you. If you prefer the kindle Head straight to Amazon Happy reading! AND I regularly run webinars on a range of money related topics: Managing Cash Flow so you never run out of money Understanding where your money goes - getting those expenses sorted out Understanding the Profit First book Pricing - getting it right for your studio The things you need to know before signing a commercial lease How to make more money ... and many other topics If you'd like the replay of any of these recent webinars, please email me ingrid@healthynumbers.com.au and put "Replay" in the subject and let me know which one you'd like to watch. I'll send you the link to the replay   Truly, I'm always keen to hear from you. Please send me an email ingrid@healthynumbers.com.au I personally answer all my own emails

Cup Of Nurses
CON EP 73: Brain Implants for Depression and NLP

Cup Of Nurses

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 27:50


In this episode, we are going to talk about a new brain implant that relieved treatment-resistant depression, in a world-first using deep brain stimulation (DBS) Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) in any given year. And one in six people (16.6%) will experience depression at some time in their life. Can the new brain implant treat severe depression? Find out more about the study in this episode.   Cup of Nurses: https://fanlink.to/CONsite Frontline Warriors: https://fanlink.to/FWsite Youtube https://fanlink.to/CONYT Apple https://fanlink.to/Applepodcast Spotify https://fanlink.to/Spotifypodcast Cup of Nurses Store https://fanlink.to/CONshop Frontline Warriors store https://fanlink.to/FWshop Interested in Travel Nursing? https://fanlink.to/TravelNurseNow Free Travel Nursing Guide  https://fanlink.to/Travelnursingchecklist Nclex Guide https://fanlink.to/NCLEXguide Cup of Nurses FB Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/cupofnurses Frontline Warriors FB group https://fanlink.to/FWFBgroup   0:00 Cup of Nurses Introduction 2:12 Episode Introduction 8:12 New Brain Implant Treats Severe Depression 12:00 Brain implant treats resistant depression 17:35 Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) 18:40 How Neuro-linguistic Programming Works 19:00 n NLP Technique Difference between NLP vs CBT

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Imi Lo: Reflections on Psychotherapy & Conceptual Frameworks

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 58:35


While most psychotherapists identify with one predominant theoretical orientation, in practice it is common for clinicians to adopt an "eclectic" approach that aligns with the varied lens/interests a clinician might hold as well as to meet the varied needs of clients.  Consultant, coach, author and podcast host, Imi Lo, joins host Dr. Pete Kelly for a very wide-ranging discussion of a variety of topics related to psychotherapy including:   Imi's preferred theoretical orientation, conceptual framework and why she has chosen to focus on work with emotionally intense and highly sensitive peopleblending psychodynamic and CBT principlesa brief discussion of the schema therapy model, with a focus on mode workthe judgment that can be inherent in the conceptualization of personality disorderscurrent conceptualizations of mental illness and the functional utility of "symptoms"the inner lives of highly sensitive, intense peoplethe notion of emotional "over-control" and a brief consideration of the utility of RO-DBT in this contextnavigating & integrating the ongoing tension between champions of "vulnerability" vs "radical self-responsibility"Imi's reflection on process-related aspects of therapymanaging emotional depletion to avoid burnoutreflections on principles of acceptance, and not resisting one's experience (for clinician and client, alike)description of, and navigation of the so-called "midlife passage" some overall thoughts on current areas of interest and growth in psychotherapyImi Lo is a consultant for emotionally intense and highly sensitive people. She is the author of Emotional Sensitivity and Intensity, available in multiple languages, and The Gift of Intensity. Imi is the founder of Eggshell Therapy and Coaching, working with intense people from around the world.  Imi has practised as a social worker and therapist in London (U.K). She has trained in mental health, psychotherapy, art therapy, philosophical counseling, and mindfulness-based modalities. She works holistically, combining psychological insights with Eastern and Western philosophies such as Buddhism.  Imi's credentials include a Master in Mental Health, Master of Buddhist Studies, Graduate Diploma in Psychology, Bachelor of Social Science in Social Work, Certificate in Logic-based Therapy, and an Advanced Diploma in Contemporary Psychotherapy. She has received multiple scholarships and awards including the Endeavour Award by the Australian Government. She has been consulted by and appeared in publications such as The Psychologies Magazine, The Telegraph, Marie Claire, and The Daily Mail.eggshelltherapy.com

Springs Lighthouse Podcast
Frank Gonzalez – Joshua 4:1-4:24

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


Joshua 4 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Frank Gonzalez – Joshua 4:1-4:24 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Your Anxious Child
Expert Interview #27 Eli R. Lebowitz, PhD and the SPACE program for anxious children

Your Anxious Child

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 32:16


Dr. Eli Lebowitz has developed a parent based program, SPACE (Supportive Parenting for Anxious Children's Emotions). This innovative program helps anxious children by working exclusively through the parent. It has been proven as effective as individual CBT for children. For more information and a list of SPACE providers go to www.spacetreatment.net

MyCBT
How To Find Intimacy

MyCBT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 21:56


The desire to be loved, needed, touched and supported by another human being is completely normal.But how can you achieve that kind of relationship in your own life?What is healthy intimacy?How can you deal with trust issues to successfully form a close, intimate relationship?In this episode, Dr Julie shares with you the CBT tools and mental framing that can help you improve your ability to achieve real, healthy intimacy in your relationships. Click to listen now!

Your Anxiety Toolkit
Ep. 209: An ERP Success Story (with Taylor Stadtlander)

Your Anxiety Toolkit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 36:30


SUMMARY:  There is nothing I love more than sharing the success stories of people who are using ERP to manage their OCD and intrusive thoughts.  In this week's podcast, I interview Taylor Stadtlander about her OCD recovery and how she used ERP School to help her manage her intrusive thoughts, compulsive behaviors.  Taylor is incredibly inspiring and I am so thrilled to hear her amazing ERP Success story. In This Episode: Taylor shares how she learned she had OCD  Taylor shares how she created her own ERP recovery plan and the challenges and successes of her plan  Taylor shares how she used ERP School to help her put her ERP recovery plan together and how she now uses her skills in her own private practice. Links To Things I Talk About: Taylor's Private Practice: https://www.embracinguncertaintytherapy.com/ Taylor's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/acupofmindfultea/ ERP School: https://www.cbtschool.com/erp-school-lp Episode Sponsor: This episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit is brought to you by CBTschool.com.  CBTschool.com is a psychoeducation platform that provides courses and other online resources for people with anxiety, OCD, and Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors.  Go to cbtschool.com to learn more. Spread the love! Everyone needs tools for anxiety... If you like Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast, visit YOUR ANXIETY TOOLKIT PODCAST to subscribe free and you'll never miss an episode. And if you really like Your Anxiety Toolkit, I'd appreciate you telling a friend (maybe even two). EPISODE TRANSCRIPTION Kimberley: Welcome. I am so excited to have here with me Taylor Stadtlander. Taylor: Yes. Thanks. I'm so excited to be here. Kimberley: Oh, thank you for being here. I am so excited about this interview. You're someone I have watched on social media, and it's really cool because out of there, I realized you were someone who had been through CBT School and I just love hearing the story of how you things get to me. I love that story. So, thank you for being on the show. Taylor: Of course. Thank you so much for having me. Kimberley: Tell me a little bit about you and your mental health and mental wellness journey, as much as you want to share. Tell us about that. Taylor: I'll start with, I am an OCD therapist right now. And I start by saying that because, honestly, if you were to tell me when I was in high school, that I would have become an OCD therapist, I would have laughed at you because I, at that time, was really when my OCD started in high school. Of course, now, knowing what OCD is, I can look back and I can see definitely symptoms back as young as eight or nine years old. But when I was in high school, it was really when I had my sophomore year, pretty intense onset of compulsions. And then, of course, the intrusive thoughts, and it really was all-consuming. But the interesting part, and I'm sure a lot of people can relate to this, is it was something I kept very hidden, or I at least tried to. So, a lot of the earliest compulsions I had were checking compulsions. So, it was these intense, long rituals before I would go to bed, checking that the door is locked, the stove was off, all safety things. I felt this immense amount of responsibility. And I remember thinking like, where did this come from? One day I was just so concerned with safety and all these different things. But no one would have known other than, of course, my family, who I lived with, and my sister, who I shared a room with, who of course saw me getting up multiple times at night to recheck things. But from the outside, it looked like I had everything together. I was the A student, honors classes, volleyball captain, lacrosse captain, and just kept that façade of that picture-perfect high schooler. I did end up going to a therapist and she wasn't an OCD specialist, but I have to say I got very lucky because I actually have some of the worksheets that she used with me back when I was 15. And it is in a sense ERP. So, I was very lucky in that sense that even though I wasn't seeing a specialist, because I don't think any of us knew what was going on, to even see an OCD specialist, I did get to-- and it helped. And that's where I was like, “Okay, you know what, I'm going to go to college and become at least major in Social Work.” So, I went to college, majored in Social Work, got my Master's in Social Work, and my OCD pretty much went away and I thought I was cured or whatever that means. And I thought that, “Okay, that was a chapter of my life. And now for whatever reason, I had to go through that. Now I'll become a therapist and help other people.” I say that because I had no idea what was coming. My first year out of grad school, I began working and I had the most intense relapse of OCD ever. It came back stronger than ever this time. We call it “pure O.” So like mainly intrusive thoughts. And I had no idea what ERP was. It's sad because I went through grad school for Social Work and we never talked about that. I remember this one day, and this is circling back to even how I found you, I had stayed home from work because I was just for like a mental health day, and I didn't want to be on my phone because going on social media was triggering, watching TV was triggering, all these different things. But I was like, you know what, I'm sitting at home. I might as well turn on the TV. So, I turn on the TV, and an episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians is on. I am a fan of that show, so shout out to them. And I remember watching and I was listening half not. I think I was trying to take a nap. And one of the family members had this OCD specialist on the show. And I remember pausing the TV because they had the name of the OCD specialist on the TV. And I wrote it down and it was Sheba from The Center of Anxiety and OCD. So I was like, “Okay, let me Google that.” That was the first time I've ever even heard of an OCD specialist. So, I stopped watching the show, went on my phone, Googled her name and her Instagram came up and I just started scrolling. It was like my world, my eyes were just open and I was like, “Oh my gosh, other people have OCD, and there's a treatment, ERP.” Then I just kept scrolling. And then funny enough, I came across your page, Kimberley. And through that, that's where I discovered CBT School. Anyway, long story short, at that time, I wasn't able to afford an OCD specialist. So, I was seeing a therapist, a different therapist from high school because now by this time I was married, on my own insurance, trying to navigate that. In the back of my head, I knew that I needed to see an OCD specialist. I just, again, couldn't afford it. So, I had a conversation with my husband. I'm like, “Look, I'm going to pay for this, the CBTS course.” And I said, “I know it seems like a lot of money, but it's really not. If I was going to see an OCD specialist, this is probably what one session would cost.” And that's how I learned about ERP. That's your course. It's how I learned about ERP. So, it honestly traces back to Keeping Up With the Kardashians. I love telling that story because it's so weird. And honestly, that changed my life because learning ERP, it finally clicked that, okay. Because I was just applying CBT techniques. Like, think of a red stop sign when you have an intrusive thought, thoughts popping, and things like that. And as we know, that was making it so much worse. So, I just dove into your course and taught myself through your course what ERP is, which then led me to seeing that at work, and then wanting to specialize in ERP, and now working with clients who have OCD. So it's really been an amazing journey, to say the least. Kimberley: I'm nearly in tears hearing this story. Oh my goodness, how funny, your story has gone from reality TV to here, and that's so cool. That just blows me away. Taylor: Well, and it really goes to show. I know that there can be negative sides, like technology and Instagram, but for me, most of, if not all of my education, initially about OCD and ERP was from Instagram accounts, like yours or Sheba's. And it was like, again, I knew that, okay, this can't replace therapy, but it was such a good in-between for me, especially being in the place where I was, where I was trying to navigate. Because it can feel like you're stuck when you either can't find an OCD specialist or you can't afford it. And I know what that feels like. So, to have that in between, not as a replacement, but just as a bridging point was so helpful for me. Kimberley: Wow. And for the listeners, I have not heard that story. This is new to me. So this is so cool. So, actually really, I'm so curious. So, when you took ERP PA school, were you like, “She's crazy, I'm not doing that”? Or what was your first take on that? Taylor: I think I was at the point where I was so determined to find relief, I was willing to do anything. And I had researched about ERP before I took your course. I wasn't like, “Oh, I'm just going to trust this randomly.” Kimberley: Random lady. Taylor: Right. So, I did do my own research obviously. And again, I'm in the field and I have a degree in Social Work. It's just so interesting to me that that was not discussed, and I think that's lacking in a lot of programs. So, once I researched it myself, I was like, “Okay, this is the evidence-based treatment. This is the gold standard. It looks like I got to do this.” I just remember I would come home. I was working at the time at a partial hospital program and I would come home from work. And that would be my routine. I would get my little notebook out, I'd pull my laptop out, and I treated it as if I was-- again, I know it doesn't replace therapy, but I treat it as if I was in an intensive program. I would spend an hour or so going through your videos and then printing out the worksheets. And that's just what I did. And I just started to do it. I had had before that a brief, very minimal understanding of exposures. And I think I was trying to do them on my own. But through your course, I was able to understand the response prevention piece. I was just exposing myself to all these things and then leading myself in a tailspin. But yeah, I see this again, even in my own clients now that there's just I think a certain point that you reach, that yes, it's scary to take this step, to start ERP, but because we're so determined to not feel the way we're feeling, it makes it so worth it. Kimberley: Wow. Oh my goodness, I'm seriously close to tears listening to your story. So, thank you for sharing that with me. I mean, wow, what an honor that I get to be a part of your journey, but how cool that you were the journey. You deal with these works. So, what was that like? Okay, so you said you would come home from work and you would sit down and you would go through it. Tell us a little bit about how you set your own. Taylor: I think I mentioned this, I was still seeing a therapist. What was funny is, I would come to my sessions and be teaching her about ERP, because in a way I was becoming this mini expert. And as I think a lot of our clients do, because it is such a unique treatment, you do have to become an expert. So, yeah. I mean, I remember using that worksheet where, okay, identify the what-if fear then list out the compulsions. I remember at the time I was like, “All right, I need to print out 10 of these because I have so many themes right now.” I remember doing that. And then, yeah, I would just pick away-- I would write them and then go through the whole process really as if I was going through ERP treatment. That's what I was doing. Like the same process I do now with my clients is just what I did. And I'm so lucky and blessed to have a background in mental health to have that. And even the resources that I could have had self-taught myself ERP because I know that that's not everyone's situation. And then what was really helpful, and I think this is really important to mention, is my husband. And I think a lot of people can relate to this. We all have our one person who we seek reassurance from. So, when I was still living at home, that person was my mom. Once I got married, it became my husband. And so, he had to learn a lot about OCD treatment and ERP and not providing reassurance. So, the poor thing, I would have him sit down and watch your video, and he would. And he is amazing and just the best support system. But that was really helpful because again, even if you are in therapy and doing this as a supplement to therapy, to be able to have those resources to watch again and again, once you buy the course, you have it. And I still reference it to this day if I am for myself or even if I'm working with something with a client. So, that piece was huge because then I could say, “Hey, look this is the science behind what I'm doing. This is why you can't give me reassurance and things like that.” Kimberley: Right. This is so cool, and it's so cool that he was able to watch it and wasn't intimidated by the whole process. I mean, he probably was, but he still went through with that, which was so cool. Taylor: 100%. Yes. This was about two years ago almost to the date actually. And because now I can look back on it, I think I do lose the anxiety that I had with starting it. And I'm sure him wondering, “What the heck are you doing?” But I think that's so important to have your partner or just your support system understand ERP because it can be very confusing to the outside. If you're doing exposures. What was very upsetting and hard for me that I really had to come to accept is, a lot of my harm obsessions were unfortunately targeted around him. So, I'd be writing these scripts and I would feel this guilt, this horrible amount of guilt and shame, similar to what I felt back in high school when I was trying to hide my compulsions. Here I have this amazing supportive husband and I'm writing these scripts. So, I would want to try and explain that. And him understanding it, I think made the whole process so much easier, for sure. Kimberley: Yeah. And those scripts can be hard, right? I even remember-- Taylor: I think that's the hardest part for me. Kimberley: Yeah. I even remember recording that and looking into the camera and saying, “You need to write a story about this.” And I do these with my patients all the time, but thinking like, “Why would anyone trust me?” That's a hard thing to do when you haven't-- so that's really amazing that you did that. The good news, and I'll tell you this, you're the first person to know this, is we just renewed the whole imaginable script module. They're three times as long now. Taylor: Oh, amazing. Kimberley: Yeah. So, you're the first to know. By the time they start, everyone will know, but yeah, we tripled the length of it because people had so many questions about that process. Taylor: In fact, I had a session yesterday with one of my amazing clients and she's fairly new in the treatment and we were introducing the idea of scripts. And you're absolutely right. When you're describing it, you're like, “What am I saying? This sounds horrible.” I was like, “All right, we are going to pretty much write out your worst fear coming true in as much detail as possible.” And she was like, “What the heck is going on?” And sometimes I have to take myself back to that starting point, especially with working with clients, because now I'm like, “I have an intrusive thought come up. All right, I know I have to go write a script when I get home.” So for me, it's become second nature. But I think remembering how painful it was the first several times to actually write down those thoughts and then not only write down them but say them out loud and look into them, that-- I was reminded yesterday, I can't lose sight of how painful that is initially, but then how rewarding it is once you realize it works. Kimberley: Yeah. You get so much bang for your buck, don't you, when you use those. This is so cool. You're obviously a rockstar. So exciting. I can't tell you how much this brings me such joy to hear. What would you say to somebody who's starting this process? What was important to you? What got you through? Tell us all your wisdom. Taylor: I think the biggest thing would be to know that you're not alone because I remember that was the biggest thing for me. Before I knew what OCD and ERP were, I thought that I was the only person on the planet experiencing these intrusive thoughts, these horrible, violent images or sexual intrusive thoughts or whatever it was. So, first and foremost, knowing that you're not alone, that there are so many of us who have experienced this, not only experienced the pain of it, but have gone through and are now in recovery. And that you don't have to let fear dictate the choices that you make because that's how I lived my life. I avoided things because of my OCD. So, I wouldn't be triggered. I let fear make the decisions for a lot of my life. And when you do go through ERP treatment, you get to be in control again and you get to live again according to your values. For example, I've always wanted to be a mom and I've always dreamed of having kids. And I remember so many times OCD in so many different ways that I can't even get into, say, “Oh, you could never do that.” Actually, I'm in my first trimester right now, which is so exciting and has been such an incredible journey. That's a completely different topic for another day. I'm handling my OCD attached to that. But I was thinking and reflecting about it the other day of just like, wow, I now get to live life according to my values and not let fear and OCD make the decisions. Even though the treatment seems so scary and weird at first, it is so worth it because it works. And that's why I wanted to become really a specialist in this specific field because I fell in love with the treatment. I fell in love with the fact that it gives people their lives back. And that's so cool to witness. So, you're not alone. You're also not a bad person because of the thoughts that you're having. And I'll briefly share, I'm a Christian and I know that a lot of the thoughts that I've had for a long time, I just thought, okay, I'm a horrible person, or I'm a sinner. And whatever your faith is, whatever spirituality or anything, whatever morals you have, just know that you're not your intrusive thoughts. You are just a person with thoughts and that's it. Kimberley: Yeah. That's so powerful. So, number one, congratulations. I just love when people say, “I have OCD about it, but I did it anyway.” Taylor: I know. Talk about facing your fears, it's like-- Kimberley: Right. And then the second piece where you're really, again, speaking from a place of values, even your religion, I'm sure got attacked during that process. And it's really hard to keep the faith when you're being harassed by these thoughts. So, I just love that. What motivated you to keep going? Besides you said just the deep wish to be better and well, how did you keep getting up? Was there lots of getting up and falling down or did you just get up every day? Taylor: Oh my gosh. In fact, there's times where I still feel like I am picking myself up because-- I'm so happy you brought that up because that was something that I wasn't prepared for, the feelings of relapsing I call it, where you feel like, oh my goodness, my symptoms have gone away, whatever. And then it hits you like a ton of bricks. And I always find that it comes back so strong. And it can be really discouraging at first. And I've even experienced that with the first couple of weeks of this pregnancy of just like, “Wow, I thought we were over this.” Even themes coming back from when I was 15 or 16 and like, “Okay, looks we have to deal with this again.” I'm able to laugh about it now, but in the moment, it's really hard. And so, I think the biggest thing for me that I try to keep myself reminded of in those moments where I do feel like I'm-- because it feels like you're taking a step backwards in a sense sometimes. And I always try to remind myself that so much can change in a matter of a day and that this is temporary. And even the worst moments of my ruminating or obsessing or the nights where I would literally spend hours completing compulsions, they always passed, if that makes sense. It sounds so cliché, but the sun always rose again. I always got another chance. And I would say that I am a naturally driven and motivated person. So I think that definitely did help me. But that's not to say that there weren't times where it's a hopeless feeling when you are living in your own personal hell of intrusive thoughts. The way I remember describing it to the first therapist I went to is that I was, and I don't play tennis by the way, but I was like, I pictured myself in a tennis court with a tennis racket and someone just throwing balls at me. And those are the entries of thoughts. And I walk one away and another one comes back. It was exhausting. But being reminded that-- And also now too, and I wrote this down, I definitely wanted to talk about this, was you have to find the community support and that has been so vital for me. And again, thank you, Instagram, I've been able to connect with so many people who have OCD or a related disorder who I text or DM and are now some of my closest friends. And we hold each other accountable on days where it's like-- because OCD can be really weird sometimes. And it's really nice to have people who understand and have been there. So, that's really helpful for me too on days where it's like, man, it just feels like I can't pick myself up. Kimberley: Yeah. It's so important. In fact, I'll tell you a story. A client of mine, who I've been seeing for a while, could do the therapy without me. And she knows it as well as I do. And we hit a roadblock and it kept coming up. I just feel so alone. And not having support and other people with similar issues, it was a game-changer for her. And I think we're lucky in that there are Facebook groups and Instagram and support groups out there that are so helpful. Taylor: Yes, totally. And that's one of the reasons I actually decided about a year ago to create a mental health Instagram because I knew how much Instagram and using that platform helped me. I literally remember saying, “Even if it helps one person.” And at first, it was really scary sharing some of the things, talking about the more taboo themes and different things like that, and thinking like, oh man, what are my coworkers thinking of me or my family members when I post this. But what's been so rewarding is countless people have reached out to me who either I know and I've either grown up with my whole life or people across the globe really of just saying, “Hey, thank you for letting me know I'm not alone.” And to me, that makes it totally all worth it. So, it's so important to find that connection. Kimberley: Yeah. And is there anything else that you felt was key for you? Something that you want people to know? Taylor: I think that it's so important to-- a huge piece of it too was incorporating act, like acceptance and commitment therapy, which I also believe I learned from one of your podcasts. So, thank you. And that was a huge piece for me too, because again, I think that-- to be very honest, I didn't even say the words “OCD” until two years ago. I knew in my head that I met the criteria in the DSM, but I never-- that label for me was so scary. I don't really know why, looking back, but maybe because it was just so unknown. So a lot of the work that I've had to do personally that's been really helpful is just acceptance of any emotion really, especially learning that acceptance doesn't mean that you have to love something, and it ties into tolerating uncertainty. Tolerating, I was talking about this with a client yesterday. Tolerating is not an endearing word. If someone says, “Oh, I tolerate that person,” that's not a compliment. We were not being asked to love uncertainty or love the fact that we have OCD or whatever we're struggling with, but just learning to sit with it and tolerate it has been an absolute game-changer for me. As much as the exposures and response prevention was so new to me, that whole piece too was a game-changer. Kimberley: Yeah, I agree. I think it's such an important piece, because there's so much grief that comes with having OCD too, and the stigma associated. I've heard so many people say the same thing. They had to work through the diagnosis before they could even consider-- Taylor: And I also had a lot of anger in two ways towards the fact that I had to deal with this. I always thought, and of course, I think a lot of us think this about anything else, I was like, “If only I just “had” anxiety and not OCD, or just had depression, that would be so much easier to deal with,” which I know is ridiculous. But in the moment, it's like, I think whatever we're going through seems so impossible. And then the other piece of the anger was just the misuse of people saying, “Oh, I'm so OCD,” or seeing it displayed on TV or on social media in the wrong way. And I'm like, “Oh my gosh, if only you knew what OCD was, you would never say that.” So now, it's been cool because I can turn that frustration more into advocacy and education, but that was a huge hurdle to jump to. Kimberley: Yeah. Well, especially because you're over here tolerating OCD. And then other people are celebrating and it just feels like taking the face. Taylor: Oh my gosh, yes. Kimberley: Yeah. I love all of that. Thank you so much for sharing that story. Number one, it brings me to tears that we get to meet and chat. I think that that is just so beautiful and I'm so impressed with the work that you're doing. So, thank you. Tell me where people can hear more about you or follow you and so forth. Taylor: Sure. So, my Instagram is acupofmindfultea, and there you can also find-- I definitely share my personal story, but just also ERP tips. I'm also very big on holistic findings. So, obviously, medication has been a huge part of my story as well and helpful, but I also love finding natural ways and different ways that have helped my anxiety and just building my toolkit. So, I share a lot about that on there as well. So, yeah, I would love to connect with you guys on social media, for sure. Kimberley: Yeah. I would have to admit, when I saw your pregnancy announcement, I was with my kids and I was like, “Woo-hoo!” And they were like, “What?” And I'm like, “Oh, it's just somebody I've never met, but I'm so excited for her.” Taylor: Isn't that so great? I know, I love it. I feel the same way for other people. Kimberley: Yeah. Well, thank you so much. Number one, thank you for coming on the show. I love how that creates itself organically. And number two, thank you for sharing this because I think this will hopefully give some people some hope. We were overwhelmingly encouraged to have people with stories of their recovery. So, I think this is a really wonderful start of that. Taylor: Awesome. Well, thank you so much. I've been listening to your podcast for two years now, and it's been such an encouragement for me and such a huge form of education and help. So, this was truly special. So, thank you. Kimberley: Thank you.

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Zechariah 7-8 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Zechariah 7:1-8:23 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment
Dialectical Behavior Therapy Interpersonal Effectiveness skill: DEARMAN

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 29:52


DEARMAN is an interpersonal effectiveness skill that helps us speak with others as we assert ourselves, or as we practice saying no to situations. It is an incredibly helpful and effective tool that we can use in challenging conversations.     For more information, visit our blog: https://www.taproottherapynyc.com/blog-dialectical-behavior-therapy-skills/dearman-interpersonal-effectiveness   Erin will be hosting a 5-day Dialectical Behavior Therapy Foundational course for therapists and clinicians in February 2022! For more information, or to sign up, visit our website at www.taproottherapynyc.com or www.eriniwanusalcsw.com.

Springs Lighthouse Podcast
A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23 (2021) – Psalms 23:4-23:4

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021


Psalm 23:4 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23 (2021) – Psalms 23:4-23:4 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

The Psychology Podcast
Aaron Beck || Humanizing Psychiatry

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 29:09


Hi everyone, today is a very special episode of The Psychology Podcast. A few nights ago, the legendary psychiatrist Dr. Aaron Temkin Beck passed away peacefully in his sleep at the age of 100. Tim, as his friends and family affectionally called him, lived an exemplary, full life well lived. Personally, he was a dear mentor and friend of mine. I used to live in the building next door to him in Philadelphia and we'd have tuna sandwiches together on Sundays at his place and discuss humanistic psychology and how to treat patients as humans first. He was always so encouraging of my work, and I enjoyed our discussions about his life and work immensely. I will miss his bow tie, fist bumps, and a sharp mind, which lasted all the way until the end. In my last in-person meeting with him just before the pandemic hit, I handed him a microphone and asked if he would talk about what research he was most excited about these days and whether he could give any advice to young psychologists. That recording is what you will hear today on the podcast.Remarkably, Tim worked all the way up until his death. To many, he is most known for his work in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), which is a time-sensitive, structured, present-oriented psychotherapy that has been scientifically tested and found to be effective in more than 2,000 studies for the treatment of many different health and mental health conditions. When implemented correctly, CBT can help individuals get better and stay better.However, not many people know this, but Tim's work was much more than the seminal work he did pioneering CBT. Tim was recently working on a new form of psychotherapy with his colleagues Ellen Inverso and Paul Grant called "Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy”, which deeply humanizes psychiatric patients. Guided by Tim's cognitive model, Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy (CT-R) is an evidence-based practice that provides concrete, actionable steps to promote recovery and resiliency. Originally developed to empower individuals given a diagnosis of schizophrenia, Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy applies broadly to individuals experiencing extensive behavioral, social, and physical health challenges. It is a highly collaborative, person-centered, and strengths-based approach, as it is focused on developing and strengthening positive beliefs of purpose, hope, efficacy, empowerment and belonging. The approach is specially formulated and effective for individuals (i) who have a history of feeling disconnected and distrustful of service providers, (ii) who are not help-seeking, or (iii) who experience challenges that impede action towards aspirations. The reach of Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy extends to mental health professionals across all disciplines, families and loved ones, and peers with lived experience.One other thing I'd like to mention before we get to today's episode is the Beck Institute. In 1994, Tim and his daughter, Dr. Judith S. Beck, founded Beck Institute as a 501(c)3 nonprofit with the mission of improving lives worldwide through excellence and innovation in Cognitive Behavior Therapy training, practice, and research. In 2019, Beck Institute opened the Beck Institute Center for Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy to train professionals and staff who work with individuals given a diagnosis of a serious mental health condition, such as schizophrenia. Beck Institute honors the legacy of Dr. Aaron Beck by providing training and resources in both CBT and CT-R to people around the world. In the nonprofit's 27-year history, over 28,000 health and mental health professionals have received training in CBT or CT-R through a variety of programs. You can help honor Dr. Aaron Beck's legacy by making a gift to the Aaron T. Beck Fund at Beck Institute. This enables the organization to continue Dr. Beck's latest work with the Center for CT-R at Beck Institute, develop programs, fund scholarships for trainees, and everything in between. The Beck Institute website can be found at beckinstitute.org. OK, now without further ado, I bring you our guest today, Dr. Aaron Beck. RIP,  Tim.       

Interior Integration for Catholics
Obsessions, Compulsions, OCD and Internal Family Systems

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 80:50


Join Dr. Peter to go way below the surface and find the hidden meanings of obsessions, compulsions and OCD.  Through poetry and quotes, he invites you into the painful, distressing, fearful and misunderstood world of those who suffer from OCD.  He defines obsessions and compulsions, discusses the different types of each, and evaluates two conventional treatments and one alternative treatment for OCD.  Most importantly, he discusses the deepest natural causes of OCD, which are almost always disregarded in conventional treatment, which focuses primarily on the symptoms.   Lead-in OCD is not a disease that bothers; it is a disease that tortures. - Author: J.J. Keeler   “It can look like still waters on the outside while a hurricane is swirling in your mind.” — Marcie Barber Phares  Poetry or word picture (prayer of the scrupulous)  Aditi Apr 2017  Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.  OCD.  That is what we are addressing today. Here is what OCD is like for Toni Neville -- she says:  “It's like being controlled by a puppeteer. Every time you try and just walk away he pulls you back. Are you sure the stove is off and everything is unplugged? Back up we go. Are you sure your hands are as clean as they can get? Back ya go. Are you sure the doors are securely locked? Back down we go. How many people have touched this object? Wash your hands again.”  Introduction We are together in this great adventure, this podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics, we are journeying together, and I am honored to be able to spend this time with you.   I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, we are taking on the tough topics that matter to you.   We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.    Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com  Today, we are getting into obsessions and compulsions -- a really deep dive into what's really going on with these experiences.  I know many of you were expecting me to discuss scrupulosity today -- And you know what?  I was expecting I would be discussing scrupulosity well, but in order to have that discussion of scrupulosity  be well-founded, we really need to get into understanding obsessions and compulsions first.  I have to bring you up to speed on obessions and compulsions before we get into scrupulosity, and there is a lot to know The questions we will be covering about obsessions and compulsions. What are Obsession and Compulsions? Getting into definitions.   Also What are the different types of obsessions and compulsions, the different forms that obsessions and compulsions can take What is the experience of OCD like?  From those who have suffered it.   Who suffers from obsessions and compulsions -- how common are they?  Who is at risk?  Why do obsessions and compulsions start and why do they keep going?  How do we overcome obsessions and compulsions?  How do we resolve them?   What does the secular literature say are the best treatments"  -- Medication and a particular kind of therapy called Exposure and Response Prevention Alternatives   Can we find not just a descriptive diagnosis, but a proscriptive conceptualization that gives a direction for healing, resolving the obsessions and compulsions  Not just symptom management. Definitions  Obsessions  DSM-5: Obsessions are defined by (1) and (2): Recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or impulses that are experienced, at some time during the disturbance, as intrusive and unwanted, and that in most individuals cause marked anxiety or distress.  The individual attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, urges, or images, or to neutralize them with some other thought or action (i.e., by performing a compulsion).  Not pleasurable   Involuntary My compulsive thoughts aren't even thoughts, they're absolute certainties and obeying them isn't a choice. - Author: Paul Rudnick  To resist a compulsion with willpower alone is to hold back an avalanche by melting the snow with a candle. It just keeps coming and coming and coming. - Author: David Adam   Individual works to neutralize the obsession with another thought or a compulsion.   From the International OCD Foundation:  Obsessions are thoughts, images or impulses that occur over and over again and feel outside of the person's control. Individuals with OCD do not want to have these thoughts and find them disturbing. In most cases, people with OCD realize that these thoughts don't make any sense.  Obsessions are typically accompanied by intense and uncomfortable feelings such as fear, disgust, doubt, or a feeling that things have to be done in a way that is “just right.” In the context of OCD, obsessions are time consuming and get in the way of important activities the person values.  Common Obsessions  Sources What is OCD? Article by the International OCD Foundation on their website  WebMD article How Do I Know if I Have OCD? By Danny Bonvissuto February 19. 2020  Northpointrecovery.com blog What Types of OCD Are There? Get the Breakdown Here by the Northpoint Staff from May 3, 2019  Article entitled Common Types of OCD: Subtypes, Their Symptoms and the Best Treatment by Patrick Carey dated July 6, 2021 on treatmyocd.com   Contamination Body fluids --- blood, urine, saliva, feces -   I gave my baby niece a serious illness when I held her --  I'm sure I got a disease from using the public restroom.   Germs for communicable diseases -- may be afraid to shake hands, worried about catching gonorrhea  Environmental contaminants -- radiation, asbestos  Household chemicals -- cleaners, solvents  Dirt  If you put the wrong foods in your body, you are contaminated and dirty and your stomach swells. Then the voice says, Why did you do that? Don't you know better? Ugly and wicked, you are disgusting to me. - Author: Bethany Pierce   Losing Control Giving in to an impulse to harm yourself --  I could jump in front of this bus right now.   Fear of acting on an impulse to harm others -- what if I stabbed my child with this knife?  Fear of violent or horrific images in your mind  Fear of shouting out insults or obscenities --  Fear of stealing things   Harm Fear of being responsible for some terrible event (causing a fire at an office building)  Fear of harming others because of not being careful enough (leaving a stick in your yard that fell from a tree in a wind storm that may trip and hurt an neighbor child)   Relationships Doubts about romantic partner -- is she the right one for me?  Is there a better one I am supposed to find?  What if we are not meant to be together, but we wind up marrying each other?  Is my partner faithful?   Unwanted Sexual Thoughts Forbidden or perverse sexual thoughts or images  Sexual obsessions involving children  Obsessions about aggressive sexual behavior toward others   Obsessions related to perfectionism Concern about evenness or exactness   need for things to be in their place Arranging things in a particular way before leaving home   Concern with a need to know or remember  Inability to decide whether to keep or discard things  Fear of losing things  Fear of making a mistake -- may need excessive encouragement from others  Needing to make sure that your action is just right -- I need to start this email over, something is not wright with the wording.   Obsessions about your Sexual Orientation Obsessions about being embarrassed in a public situation Getting a non-communicable disease such as cancer Superstitious ideas such as unlucky numbers or certain colors Religious Obsessions (Scrupulosity) Concern with offending God  Concerns about blasphemy  Concerns about right and wrong, morality.   Compulsions  Definitions  DSM-5 Compulsions are defined by (1) and (2): Repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rules that must be applied rigidly.  The behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation; however, these behaviors or mental acts are not connected in a realistic way with what they are designed to neutralize or prevent, or are clearly excessive.  Most people with OCD have both obsessions and compulsions.   From the International OCD Foundation Compulsions are the second part of obsessive compulsive disorder. These are repetitive behaviors or thoughts that a person uses with the intention of neutralizing, counteracting, or making their obsessions go away. People with OCD realize this is only a temporary solution but without a better way to cope they rely on the compulsion as a temporary escape. Compulsions can also include avoiding situations that trigger obsessions. Compulsions are time consuming and get in the way of important activities the person values.   Common Compulsions in OCD  Sources What is OCD? Article by the International OCD Foundation on their website  WebMD article How Do I Know if I Have OCD? By Danny Bonvissuto February 19. 2020  Northpointrecovery.com blog What Types of OCD Are There? Get the Breakdown Here by the Northpoit Staff from May 3, 2019  Article entitled Common Types of OCD: Subtypes, Their Symptoms and the Best Treatment by Patrick Carey dated July 6, 2021   Washing and Cleaning Washing hands excessively or in a certain way  Excessive showering, bathing, toothbrushing, grooming  Cleaning items or objects excessively   Checking Checking that you did not or will not harm anyone  Checking that you did not or will not harm yourself  Checking that nothing terrible happened  Checking that you did not make a mistake  Checking specific parts of your body   Repeating Re-reading or re-writing   Repeating routine activities Going in and out of doors  Getting up and down from chairs   Repeating body movements Tapping  Touching  Blinking   Repeating activities in multiples Doing things three times, because three is a good, right or safe number   Mental Compulsions Mental review of events to prevent harm (to oneself others, to prevent terrible consequences)  Praying to prevent harm (to oneself others, to prevent terrible consequences)  Counting while performing a task to end on a “good,” “right,” or “safe” number  Cancelling” or “Undoing” (example: replacing a “bad” word with a “good” word to cancel it out)    Putting things in order or arranging things until it “feels right” or are in perfect symmetry Telling asking or confessing to get reassurance Avoiding situations that might trigger your obsessions  Obsessions and Compulsions go together  The vicious cycle of OCD -- Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at helpguide.org Obsessive thought  --  I could stab my nephew with this knife.  Anxiety -- that would be a terrible thing to happen, I can't let that happen  Compulsion -- Locking all the knives away, checking to make sure they are all accounted for when your sibling and her family are visiting  Temporary relief -- the knives are all there.  “A physical sensation crawls up my arm as I avoid compulsions. But if I complete it, the world resets itself for a moment like everything will be just fine. But only for a moment.” —  Mardy M. Berlinger Harm Obsession     Compulsion:  Keeping all knives hidden away somewhere What if I killed my nephew and I just can't remember?  Repeatedly going back to check if you ran someone over DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both:  The obsessions or compulsions are time-consuming (e.g., take more than 1 hour per day) or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.  The obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or another medical condition.  The disturbance is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder   Specify if: With good or fair insight: The individual recognizes that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are definitely or probably not true or that they may or may not be true.  With poor insight:  The individual thinks obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are probably true.  With absent insight/delusional beliefs: The individual is completely convinced that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are true. 4%  With Tic disorder up to 30%   What is the experience of OCD Poem By Forti.no   Quotes: “You lose time. You lose entire blocks of your day to obsessive thoughts or actions. I spend so much time finishing songs in my car before I can get out or redoing my entire shower routine because I lost count of how many times I scrubbed my left arm.” — Kelly Hill  “Ever seen ‘Inside Out'? With OCD, it's like Doubt has its own control console.” — Josey Eloy Franco  “Imagine all your worst thoughts as a soundtrack running through your mind 24/7, day after day.” — Adam Walker Cleveland  “Picture standing in a room filled with flies and pouring a bottle of syrup over yourself. The flies constantly swarm about you, buzzing around your head and in your face. You swat and swat, but they keep coming. The flies are like obsessional thoughts — you can't stop them, you just have to fend them off. The swatting is like compulsions — you can't resist the urge to do it, even though you know it won't really keep the flies at bay more than for a brief moment.” — Cheryl Little Sutton  “It's like you have two brains — a rational brain and an irrational brain. And they're constantly fighting.” — Emilie Ford   Who 12 month prevalence is 1.2% with international prevalence rates from 1.1 to 1.8%  NIH Women have a higher prevalence 1.8% than men 0.5%.  Males more affected in childhood.  Lifetime prevalence 2.3%   Risk Factors:  DSM-5  Temperamental Factors Greater internalizing symptoms  Higher negative emotionality  Behavioral inhibition   Environmental Factors Childhood physical abuse  Childhood sexual abuse  Other stressful or traumatic events   Genetic Monozygotic concordance rates --.57  Dizygotic concordance rates .22   Physiological  Dysfunction in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and striatum have been implicated.   Streptococcal infection can precede the development of OCD symptoms in children Therapy  Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) -- Developed originally in the 1970s Stanley Rachman's work a type of behavioral therapy  that exposes the person to situations that provoke their obsessions causing distress, usually anxiety which leads to  the urge to engage in the compulsion  that gives them the temporary relief.   The goal of ERP is to break the cycle of obsessions --> anxiety --> compulsion --> temporary relief.  So you are exposed to you anxiety provoking stimulus, and have the obsession, but you prevent the compulsive response, and you don't get the temporary relief.  Basic premise: As individuals confront their fears and no longer engage in their escape response, they will eventually reduce their anxiety. The goal is to habituate, or get used to the feelings of the obsessions, without having to engage in the compulsive behavior.  This increases the capacity to handle discomfort and anxiety.  Then one is no longer reinforced by the temporary anxiety relief that the compulsion provides.   Patrick Carey writes that: Any behavior that engages with the obsession– e.g. asking for reassurance, avoidance, rumination– reinforces it. By preventing these behaviors, ERP teaches people that they can tolerate their distress without turning to compulsions. It thereby drains obsessions of their power.  Division 12 of the APA   Essence of therapy: Individuals with OCD repeatedly confront the thoughts, images, objects, and situations that make them anxious and/or start their obsessions in a systematic fashion, without performing compulsive behaviors that typically serve to reduce anxiety. Through this process, the individual learns that there is nothing to fear and the obsessions no longer cause distress. From the IOCDF :  With ERP, the difference is that when you make the choice to confront your anxiety and obsessions you must also make a commitment to not give in and engage in the compulsive behavior. When you don't do the compulsive behaviors, over time you will actually feel a drop in your anxiety level. This natural drop in anxiety that happens when you stay “exposed” and “prevent” the compulsive “response” is called habituation. Instead, a person is forced to confront their obsessive thoughts relentlessly. The goal is to make the sufferer so accustomed to their obsessions that they no longer feel tempted to engage in soothing compulsions. Types of Exposure -- GoodTherapy.org article Imaginal Exposure: In this type of exposure, a person in therapy is asked to mentally confront the fear or situation by picturing it in one's mind. For example, a person with agoraphobia, a fear of crowded places, might imagine standing in a crowded mall.  In Vivo Exposure: When using this type of exposure, a person is exposed to real-life objects and scenarios. For example, a person with a fear of flying might go to the airport and watch a plane take off.  Virtual Reality Exposure: This type of exposure combines elements of both imaginal and in vivo exposure so that a person is placed in situations that appear real but are actually fabricated. For example, someone who has a fear of heights—acrophobia—might participate in a virtual simulation of climbing down a fire escape.   Steven Pence, and colleagues in a 2010 article in the American Journal of Psychotherapy:  "When exposures go wrong: Troubleshooting guidelines for managing difficult scenarios that arise in Exposure-based treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder The present article reviews five issues that occur in therapy but have been minimally discussed in the OCD treatment literature:  1) when clients fail to habituate to their anxiety -- they don't calm down2) when clients misjudge how much anxiety an exposure will actually cause3) when incidental exposures happen in session -- other fears in the fear hierarchy intrude.  4) when mental or covert rituals interfere with treatment -- covert compulsive behaviors5) when clients demonstrate exceptionally high anxiety sensitivity.  Stacey Smith Counseling at stacysmithcounseling.com -- ERP failures Utilizing safety behaviors  Not sitting with the anxiety until it dissipates -- distracting yourself  Not working through all the irrational, unhelpful thoughts  Not practicing often enough.   ERP criticisms  Can be really unpleasant for clients -- repeated exposures to terrifying stimuli -- can there be a better way? Concerns about safety and security   Concerns about flooding with anxiety  Ben Blum: Inside the Revolutionary Treatment That Could Change Psychotherapy Forever  elemental.medium.com July 21, 2020 Robert Fox is haunted by a memory of a germophobic woman with OCD whom he met once while she was hospitalized. As part of her ERP therapy, the therapists took her into the bathroom and had her wipe her hands over the toilet and sink and then rub them through her hair. She wasn't permitted to shower until the next morning.   Concerns about dropout rates.   Dropout rate of 18.7% across 21 ERP studies with 1400 participants Clarissa Ong and colleagues in 2016 article in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders Dropout rate of 10% among youth for ERP in a 2019 meta-analysis by Carly Johnco and her colleagues in the Journal "Depression and Anxiety" 11 randomized trials I'm concerned that it doesn't go deep enough  Not getting to root causes -- staying at the symptom level -- seeing symptoms as nonsensical One thing which I can't stress enough is that OCD is completely nonsensical and will not listen to reason. This is one of the most frightening things about having it. I knew that to anyone I told, there are Salvador Dali paintings that make more sense. - Author: Joe Wells   What is the fear really about.  Let's not just ignore it.  Fear is a response to something. Tracing back layers, going back through grief and anger, all the way to shame.  Shame episodes 37-49.   Doesn't get to any spiritual issues Medication  International OCD Foundation Drugs and dosages High doses are often needed for these drugs to work in most people.   Research suggests that the following doses may be needed:  fluvoxamine (Luvox®) – up to 300 mg/day  fluoxetine (Prozac®) – 40-80 mg/day  sertraline (Zoloft®) – up to 200 mg/day   paroxetine (Paxil®) – 40-60 mg/day   citalopram (Celexa®) – up to 40 mg/day*   clomipramine (Anafranil®) – up to 250 mg/day  escitalopram (Lexapro®) – up to 40 mg/day   venlafaxine (Effexor®) – up to 375 mg/day   How Do These Medications Work?  From the International OCD Foundation.  It remains unclear as to how these particular drugs help OCD. The good news is that after decades of research, we know how to treat patients, even though we do not know exactly why our treatments work. We do know that each of these medications affect a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Serotonin is used by the brain as a messenger. If your brain does not have enough serotonin, then the nerves in your brain might not be communicating right. Adding these medications to your body can help boost your serotonin and get your brain back on track.   Discussion of conventional approaches  Medication  I am not a physician -- I'm a psychologist and I don't have prescription privileges I don't give advice on medication choices or on dosages or anything like that.  If you think your medication is helping your OCD, I'm not going to argue with you about that --  I don't want to try to dissuade anyone from taking medication for psychological issues if they think it's helping them.   Here's the thing, though.  So much of your thinking about medication depends on what you see as the cause of the problem It makes sense to take medication if you think the obsessions and compulsions pop up because of chemical imbalances.   You take the medication to restore the chemical balance and reduce the symptoms.  So many of treatments for OCD treat the obsessions and compulsions as meaningless, as irrational, as just the random epiphenomena of consciousness, or just as nonsensical expressions of miswiring in the brain or just the effects of poorly balanced neurochemical in the brain.     And so these approaches, like ERP that and medication that target the obsessions and compulsions for eradication, that seek to vanquish them result in multiple problems  I think that is a major, major mistake.   And here is what I want to emphasize.  Obsessions and Compulsions are symptoms.  They are symptoms.  Obsessions and compulsions, as painful and as debilitating as they are for many people, those obsessions and compulsions are not the primary problem.  They are the effects of the primary problem.  Obsessions and compulsions happen late in the causal chain.  I see meaning in every obsession and in every compulsion.  I see a message in every obsession and compulsion.  A cry for help, a signal of deeper distress.   There are cases in which a psychological problem can be purely or primarily organic -- due to a medical condition -- for example due to head trauma that causes brain damage.  Or a brain tumor on the pituitary gland that disrupts your whole endocrine system, resulting in mood swings. But, Most of the time, though, psychological symptoms have psychological causes.   As a Catholic psychologist, I want to move much further back in the causal chain.  I want to address and resolve the underlying issues that give rise to the obsessions in the first place.   Self Help  Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at helpguide.org  Identify your triggers Can help you anticipate your urges  Create a solid mental picture and then make a mental note. Tell yourself, “The window is now closed,” or “I can see that the oven is turned off.”  When the urge to check arises later, you will find it easier to re-label it as “just an obsessive thought.”   Learn to resist OCD compulsions by repeatedly exposing yourself to your OCD triggers, you can learn to resist the urge to complete your compulsive rituals --  exposure and response prevention (ERP)  Build your fear ladder -- working your way up to more and more frightening things.   Resist the urge to do your compulsive behavior The anxiety will fade You're not going to lose control or have a breakdown Practice Challenge Obsessive thoughts Thoughts are just thoughts   Write down obsessive thoughts and compulsions Writing it all down will help you see just how repetitive your obsessions are.  Writing down the same phrase or urge hundreds of times will help it lose its power.  Writing thoughts down is much harder work than simply thinking them, so your obsessive thoughts are likely to disappear sooner.   Challenge your obsessive thoughts. Use your worry period to challenge negative or intrusive thoughts by asking yourself What's the evidence that the thought is true? That it's not true? Have I confused a thought with a fact?   Is there a more positive, realistic way of looking at the situation?  What's the probability that what I'm scared of will actually happen? If the probability is low, what are some more likely outcomes?   Is the thought helpful? How will obsessing about it help me and how will it hurt me?   What would I say to a friend who had this thought?   Create an OCD worry period. Rather than trying to suppress obsessions or compulsions, develop the habit of rescheduling them. Choose one or two 10-minute “worry periods” each day, time you can devote to obsessing.  During your worry period, focus only on negative thoughts or urges. Don't try to correct them. At the end of the worry period, take a few calming breaths, let the obsessive thoughts go, and return to your normal activities. The rest of the day, however, is to be designated free of obsessions.  When thoughts come into your head during the day, write them down and “postpone” them to your worry period.   Create a tape of your OCD obsessions or intrusive thoughts. Focus on one specific thought or obsession and record it to a tape recorder or smartphone.  Recount the obsessive phrase, sentence, or story exactly as it comes into your mind.  Play the tape back to yourself, over and over for a 45-minute period each day, until listening to the obsession no longer causes you to feel highly distressed.   By continuously confronting your worry or obsession you will gradually become less anxious. You can then repeat the exercise for a different obsession.   Reach our for support Stay connected to family and friends.  Join an OCD support group.  Manage Stress Quickly self-soothe and relieve anxiety symptoms by making use of one or more of your physical senses—sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste—or movement. You might try listening to a favorite piece of music, looking at a treasured photo, savoring a cup of tea, or stroking a pet.   Practice relaxation techniques. Mindful meditation, yoga, deep breathing, and other relaxation techniques can help lower your overall stress and tension levels and help you manage your urges. For best results, try practicing a relaxation technique regularly. Lifestyle changes Exercise regularly  Get enough sleep  Avoid alcohol and nicotine   Not sure this is going to work.  Doesn't get to root causes.   IFS as an alternative From Verywellmind.com  What is Internal Family Systems?  By Theodora Blanchfield, August 22, 2021    What Is Internal Family Systems (IFS) Therapy? Internal family systems, or IFS, is a type of therapy that believes we are all made up of several parts or sub-personalities. It draws from structural, strategic, narrative, and Bowenian types of family therapy. The founder, Dr. Richard Schwartz, thought of the mind as an inner family and began applying techniques to individuals that he usually used with families.  The underlying concept of this theory is that we all have several parts living within us that fulfill both healthy and unhealthy roles. Life events or trauma, however, can force us out of those healthy roles into extreme roles. The good news is that these internal roles are not static and can change with time and work. The goal of IFS therapy is to achieve balance within the internal system and to differentiate and elevate the self so it can be an effective leader in the system.   Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God and also its own approach to sexuality.  Robert Falconer calls them insiders.  Robert Fox and Alessio Rizzo  have done the most work with IFS to work with obsessions and compulsions.    Sources IFS and Hope with OCD with Alessio Rizzo and Robert Fox -- Episode 102 of Tammy Sollenberger's podcast The One Inside -- September 17, 2021  Podcast IFS Talks:  Hosts Aníbal Henriques & Tisha Shull  A Talk with Robert Fox on OCD-types -- Robert Fox   February 20, 2021   Robert Fox, IFS therapist with OCD  Ben Blum: Inside the Revolutionary Treatment That Could Change Psychotherapy Forever  elemental.medium.com July 21, 2020 https://elemental.medium.com/inside-the-revolutionary-treatment-that-could-change-psychotherapy-forever-8be035d54770   Robert Fox, a therapist in Woburn, Massachusetts, also wishes more people knew about IFS. Diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder at age 21 after a lifetime of unusual compulsions, he spent 23 years receiving the standard care: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure response prevention (ERP). Neither had much effect, especially ERP, which involved repeatedly exposing himself to things he was anxious about in the hopes of gradually habituating to them. “When you think about it, it's a very painful method of therapy,” he says. Fox discovered IFS in 2008. Before, he had always been encouraged to think of his compulsions as meaningless pathologies. Now, for the first time, they began making sense to him as the behavior of protectors who were trying to manage the underlying shame and fear of exiles. After two particularly powerful unburdenings, his symptoms abated by 95% and stayed that way. “[OCD] used to be almost like kryptonite around my neck when I would have serious flare-ups,” he says. “I feel a lot of freedom and peace and I really owe it to Dick [Schwartz] and the model.” Concerns about ERP  ERP doesn't bring the curiosity -- why did this happen?   Obsessions are not irrational and Compulsions are not meaningless Alessio Rizzo Conventional OCD diagnosis and treatment ERP and medication -- nothing points back to underlying causes. Alessio Rizzo:  Evidence-based approaches for OCD that work -- they work by drawing a manager part into a role of suppressing OCD symptoms  Needing to continue ERP.   Causes:  Fox Repressed anger. -- not a parent who could witness   Intense shame that is dissociated Shame from childhood -- exiled  Shame from the OCD itself.  -- sarcasm from others, especially from his older brother.   “OCD is like having a bully stuck inside your head and nobody else can see it.” — Krissy McDermott   We hide what we are ashamed of -- not easy to treat.   Fox on his treatment:  Right. I didn't see it myself until one day I was out for a walk with my dog Gizmo around my block, walking around the block with him and I had been to all these lectures about shame and I was walking one day and all of a sudden it was like, it just came to me “Holy, Holy, Holy shit. I carry that shame.” And it was like a dark cloud that was overhead and just kind of followed me wherever I went. And it was actually not an awful thing to realize. That's what had been basically walking around on my back for so long. It was this deep shame. In agreement with how central I think shame is to OCD Obsessions and compulsions develop gradually and experiment with different ways of drawing attention away from the intensity of underlying experience.  All happens in silence in the inner world.   An obsession or compulsion distracts us from the pain of an exile.  If I'm worrying about the gas in the lawnmower overflowing and blowing up the house -- takes me away from the shame of feeling inadequate at work.   Needs to be powerful enough to hijack my mind So many layers of protectors  -- takes time Alessio Rizzo Post dated March 3, 2021 entitled "IFS and OCD -- A Comparison Between CBT and IFS for OCD.  https://www.therapywithalessio.com/articles/ifs-and-ocd-how-does-the-ifs-method-work-for-ocd In IFS, we use the language of parts to describe how we function. As a consequence, the OCD is considered a part of the person. This means that, even if the OCD seems quite a strong presence in the client's life, there is much more to a person than OCD.  At this stage CBT and IFS might look similar because CBT also encourages clients to label the anxieties and the intrusive thoughts that form the OCD and not engage with them.  The main difference between CBT and IFS is in how we relate to the OCD part.  One of the foundational elements of IFS is that all parts are welcome, and, therefore, the OCD part is not dismissed or ignored, but it is respected. Respect does not mean that the client will believe the content of intrusive thoughts or that they will follow up on whatever behaviour the OCD wants. IFS gives us a way to make sure that there is enough safety and calm before offering respect to the OCD part. This might take a different amount of attempts depending on the severity of the OCD, and on the strength of the relationship between therapist and client.  Healing OCD with IFS  The main difference between CBT and IFS is in the definition of “cure” of OCD.  CBT therapy has the ultimate goal of empowering the client to overcome OCD thoughts and anxieties by never engaging with them or by using exposure therapy to demonstrate that the OCD fears and obsessions have got no evidence to exist.  IFS believes that healing is the result of the re-organisation of parts so that extreme behaviour is substituted by more functional ways of thinking and acting, and, above all, IFS aims at healing the traumatic events that have led to the development of OCD symptoms.    The result of healing the trauma that fuels OCD is a spontaneous decrease of OCD anxieties and intrusive thoughts and, in my opinion, this form of healing is preferable to the one described by CBT. Using IFS language, the CBT approach aims at creating a new part in the system that is tasked with managing the OCD, while there is no attention paid to discovery and healing of the trauma that is fueling the OCD.Choosing the method that best suits you There is no way of saying what method works best for a person.  Therapy outcomes depend on many factors and not only on the method used. Sometimes the quality of the therapeutic relationship is the biggest healing factor, and it is ultimately up to the client to find the best combination of therapist and method that can best suit them. Colleen West, LMFT LMFT  December 20 post on her website colleenwest.com  Treating OCD with Internal Family Systems Parts Work Just a word about treating OCD with IFS versus Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP). Treating obsessive and compulsive parts with IFS is diametrically opposed to treating it in the Exposure and Response Prevention, the most commonly recommended approach. IFS treats OCD parts as what they are--managers and fire fighters, they have jobs to do. If you can help the exiles underneath these protectors, there will be less need for the OCD behaviors. (This might be complicated if there are still constant stressors in the client's life, for which they need the protection.)   IFS does work, and I have successfully treated people with full blown OCD who now have about 5% of their original symptoms only during moments of high stress, and they do not consider themselves OCD anymore. These clients have been helped by taking SSRIs as well, which I will say more about below.ERP works to suppress those same protectors that IFS seeks to understand/care for. It does "work", as people get a strategy for the thoughts that are driving them nuts, but the folks I know who have gone through this treatment find they have to do their 'homework' forever or the OCD comes back, and they always feel it threatening. In short, it is stressful, and the fight is never over.For anyone doing ERP, they have to commit fully to that approach, the homework is hours a day, and one cannot be halfhearted about it or it won't work. The good thing about ERP is that it gives people some control, which they strongly desire, because they feel so powerless. Next episode Episode 87, will come out on December 6, 2022 Scrupulosity --  I have such a different take -- Scrupulosity is what happens with perfectionism and OCD get religion.   Spiritual and Psychological elements.   In the last episode we really got into understanding perfectionism.  In this episode, we worked on really getting to know about obsessions and compulsions.  Next episode, we get much more into scrupulosity.  My own battle with scrupulosity.   Remember, you as a listener can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Resilient Catholics Community.  Talked a lot about it in episode 84, two episodes ago.  We now have 106 on the waiting list.  Reopening the community on December 1 for those on the waiting list first.  Can learn a lot more about the RCC and you can sign up at soulsandhearts.com/rcc.  We have had heavy demand.  We may have to limit how many we bring in.  I am working to clear time in my calendar to review the Initial Measures Kits and help new members through the onboarding process -- all the individual attention takes time.  I'm also hiring more staff to help.   Pray for me.  Humility.  Childlike trust   Invocations        

Seize The Moment Podcast
Dr. Rachel Zoffness: Managing Chronic Pain with Psychotherapy | STM Podcast #108

Seize The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 54:08


On episode 107, Leon speaks with Dr. Rachel Zoffness about the medical history of pain management; how the opioid crises is fueled by a purely biological understanding of pain; the emotional, social, and biological components of pain; the neurological anatomy of pain; the unhealthy thoughts and actions associated with pain and how changing them helps us modulate it; why therapists often fear treating chronic pain; the negative correlation of opioid use, wherein opioids cause us to become more sensitized to pain as we become desensitized to them; why thoughts and emotions are physical and should be discussed in relation to our bodies; and the critical components of CBT for chronic pain. Dr. Rachel Zoffness is a Health and Pain Psychologist, international speaker, author, and thought-leader in pain medicine. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCSF School of Medicine, lecturer at Stanford, pain education faculty at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and a 2021 Mayday Fellow. Dr. Zoffness was trained at Brown, Columbia, NYU, UCSD, and Mt. Sinai Hospital. Dr. Rachel Zoffness | ► Website | https://www.zoffness.com/ ► Twitter |  https://twitter.com/DrZoffness ► Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/therealdoczoff ► The Pain Management Workbook: https://amzn.to/3my4L5C Where you can find us: | Seize The Moment Podcast | ► Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/SeizeTheMoment ► Twitter | https://twitter.com/seize_podcast  ► Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/seizethemoment ► TikTok | https://www.tiktok.com/@seizethemomentpodcast

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Genesis 1:26-31 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Genesis 1:26-1:31 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Springs Lighthouse Podcast

Zechariah 5-6 New King James Version —Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU)—Amuzgo de Guerrero (AMU) —العربية (AR)—Arabic Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AR)Ketab El Hayat (NAV) —अवधी (AWA)—Awadhi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-AWA) —Български (BG)—1940 Bulgarian Bible (BG1940)Bulgarian Bible (BULG)Bulgarian New Testament: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-BG)Библия, нов превод от оригиналните езици (с неканоничните книги) (CBT)Библия, синодално издание (BOB)Библия, ревизирано издание (BPB) —Chinanteco de Comaltepec (CCO)—Chinanteco… The post Zechariah 5:1-6:15 appeared first on Springs Lighthouse.

Actually, You Are a Real Runner
Ep 356: When you're an all or nothing thinker and it stops you from living your life!

Actually, You Are a Real Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 12:36


Do you know you're an all or nothing thinker? Do you struggle to find positives and only focus on negatives?  Today we chat more about congitive distortions and finding the help you need to change.   CBT book: https://www.amazon.com/Retrain-Your-Brain-Behavioral-Depression/dp/B07C2ZQLQF CBC book: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/889086.Life_Coaching Betterhelp: https://www.betterhelp.com/  

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment
IMPROVE the Moment

Taproot Therapy: A Mindful Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 25:03


In today's episode, we explore the Dialectical Behavior Therapy skill, IMPROVE the moment. This acronym is a helpful tool when we are feeling distressed and need to distract ourselves from a challenging moment. By using imagery, meaning, relaxation, vacations, encouragement, and mindfulness, we can help ourselves in challenging moments and in times of crisis. If you want to read about this skill, check out our blog: https://www.taproottherapynyc.com/blog-dialectical-behavior-therapy-skills/improve-the-moment   Follow us on Instagram (@taproottherapynyc) and Facebook (@TaprootN). Email us at erin@taproottherapynyc.com, and find us at www.taproottherapynyc.com.

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence
Ep. 153: Shelly Tygielski — How to Make the Powerful Shift from"What If?" to "Why Not?"

Think Act Be: Aligning thought, action, and presence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 55:54


My guest this week is Shelly Tygielski, author of the recent book, Sit Down to Rise Up: How Radical Self-Care Can Change the World. Shelly is doing some really remarkable things, though she insists that anyone can do the things she does if we're just willing to show up as ourselves and take some risks. What she's doing is even more remarkable when you hear about the illness that she's had to deal with for the past twenty years or so. But then again, our struggles often make us who we are, and lead us to places we hadn't imagined, as Shelly as I discuss. I also enjoyed talking with her about how mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can work together.

Deep into Sleep
Ep099: CBT-I: Treating Insomnia the Right Way - With Dr. Bonet

Deep into Sleep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 27:45


For this week's episode, I am so happy to have again on the show Dr. Elizabeth Bonet, a Certified Professional Hypnotist. And earlier this year she just got a certification in CBT-! . In this episode Dr. Bonet will impart her knowledge about CBT-I and how it can help in treating insomnia. She will also share her experience of why she chose to become a sleep specialist. Tune in and find out the right way of dealing with insomnia and sleepless nights! Show Note: www.deepintosleep.co/episode/cbt-i-treating-insomnia-the-right-way Thank You for Listening! I really appreciate you taking your valuable time listening to our show. If you want to share your thoughts, I would love to hear from you! Leave a comment Ask a voice question at http://www.deepintosleep.co/askyishan (this link) If you enjoyed today's episode, and want to help out the show, please consider: Share it using the social media buttons on this page Leave an honest rating and review for the podcast Subscribe on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/deep-into-sleep/id1475295840 (iTunes), https://playmusic.app.goo.gl/?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&apn=com.google.android.music&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iibdvq2ogbjimuuhgu44lkuq4ha?t%3DDeep_into_Sleep%26pcampaignid%3DMKT-na-all-co-pr-mu-pod-16 (Google Podcast), https://open.spotify.com/show/2Vxyyj9Cswuk91OYztzcMS (Spotify), https://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=450952&refid=stpr (Stitcher), https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-deep-into-sleep-47827108/ (iHeartRadio), etc. These can help the podcast reach out more to those who struggle with sleep and those who want to learn more about sleep. Finally, feel free to join our community by signing up for the Deep into Sleep newsletter. You'll learn valuable tips about sleep and get the podcast episodes delivered right to your inbox. Find out more about https://www.mindbodygarden.com/insomnia (Dr. Yishan Xu's Insomnia Treatment Group (CBT for insomnia, CBT-I).) Join https://www.facebook.com/groups/deepintosleep (Deep into Sleep Podcast group) on Facebook for more discussions. You can also follow our Instagram account https://www.instagram.com/mind_body_garden/ ( https://www.instagram.com/mind_body_garden/) to keep you posted on our new podcast episodes. Or if Mandarin is your native language, you may also check my sleep coaching course in Chinese here - https://www.mindbodygarden.com/course/sleep (Mind Body Garden) If you want to find a certified CBTi provider in the United States, please visit our https://www.deepintosleep.co/resources (resource page for CBTi providers and sleep-related resources.) Support this podcast

Zen Parenting Radio
Cognitive Distortions and CBT- Podcast #624

Zen Parenting Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 51:25


Todd and Cathy discuss cognitive distortions, or habitual ways of thinking that are often inaccurate and negatively biased. They discuss how addressing these distortions are at the heart of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). They also share their favorite scary shows for spooky season and why it's best to not work through other people's problems.