Podcasts about product development

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Complete process of bringing a new product to market

  • 1,563PODCASTS
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  • Aug 9, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about product development

Show all podcasts related to product development

Latest podcast episodes about product development

Back2BasicsMode
Making the world your Color Palette - Quill | SE2/EP119 | Back2Basics

Back2BasicsMode

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 29:30


Tanushree Gupta:Constantly learning and unlearning her way through life. Tanushree has a demonstrated history of working in the Consumer Goods Industry. She is skilled and experienced in Product Development, team building and creating User-Centric products across segments.She is driven by ideas and products that reduce chaos in the world and make it more efficient.A passionate seeker with varied interests. Road trips, mountains and music is her way to centre herself.Fun fact: Gets a dopamine kick from cleaning and organizing.Support the show

BASS TALK LIVE
Episode 764: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT, PRO STAFF, AND RUNNING A BUSINESS WITH JIM VAN RYN FROM Z XONE LURES

BASS TALK LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 71:02


President and Owner of X Zone Lures, Jim Van Ryn, goes in-depth on designing new baits, working with pro staff, and running a business in the tackle industry.  

The Outdoor Biz Podcast
Over 20 Years of Merchandising, Buying, Product Development and Sourcing Experience with Retail Strategy Group Founder Liza Amlani [EP 341]

The Outdoor Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 31:47


Liza Amlani has over 20 years of Industry knowledge and Experience in Merchandising, Buying, Product Development, and Sourcing with Luxury and Mass Merchant Retailers in both Regional and Global markets and has some progressive thoughts on traditional retail business. We get into a little of that and plenty more in this wide-ranging conversation. Facebook Twitter Instagram   The Outdoor Biz Podcast   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!

The Forrager Podcast for Cottage Food Businesses
Makin’ Friends, Sellin’ Food, Havin’ Fun with Connie & Rick Martin

The Forrager Podcast for Cottage Food Businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 47:32


Connie & Rick Martin live in Charleston, WV and sell a very unique product with their cottage food business, We B Fryin Snacks. They sell a meat-free (wheat-based) version of pork rinds along with crunchy cinnamon twists. Their product is so addicting that it practically sells itself, and they've managed to get it into 15 different stores, and counting. For most food businesses, marketing is the biggest challenge. But in Connie & Rick's case, their biggest challenge is keeping up with production. In this episode, you'll get to hear the unique way that they discovered their product, their crazy state fair story, how they've grown the business through the pandemic, and how they're trying to scale it in the future. As you listen, pay attention to how many of Connie & Rick's opportunities came through their networking skills. You will quickly realize that their secret to success lies in making connections and always being willing to ask for help along the way.Get full show notes and transcript here: https://forrager.com/podcast/68

Building HVAC Science - Building Performance, Science, Health & Comfort
EP87 The Energy Conservatory - Focused on Product Development With Steve Rogers and Bill Graber (July 2022)

Building HVAC Science - Building Performance, Science, Health & Comfort

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 38:20 Very Popular


Today we chat with Bill Graber and Steve Rogers of the Energy Conservatory, also known as TEC, a 40-year-old company that is on a mission to unite the tools and test instruments used in the HVAC and Weatherization markets…an important quest I am also dedicated to.   We'll talk what innovation means at TEC.   The dictionary says innovation is the act or process of innovating. OK,   So what is innovating? “To make changes in something established, especially by introducing new methods, ideas, or products.”   “To introduce something new, especially a product.”   Aha, that is it! It's the ACTION or ACTIVITY that is important.   We learn about the challenge of creating something that is “neat” (we engineers understand that you create something because you could, versus creating something that is “neat” AND useful.   This is a rare peek inside the doors of a manufacturer into their R&D labs and into the brains of an innovative company discovering the challenges and types of decisions that need to be made to satisfy their customers and advance the trades. Website links:  www.energyconservatory.com www.HVACairflow.com Email:  srogers@energyconservatory.com bgraber@energyconservatory.com This episode was recorded in July 2022.

Between Two Wings
Between Two Wings at WomenVenture

Between Two Wings

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 29:25


On this special episode of Between Two Wings recorded live at EAA AirVenture 2022 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, we talk with Olga Custodio, a retired American Airlines and US Air Force Pilot; Claire Schindler, a corporate pilot; Kerry Smith, Deputy Chief Pilot for Product Development at Boeing Commercial Airplanes; and Annie Vogel, a GA pilot and aviation journalist. The panel discussed how women across different sectors of the aviation industry can find success and fulfilling careers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9nE2W12nE8

Shock Your Potential
Brand Love - Anne Candido

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:08


“Brand love, in essence is all about creating those emotional connections that transcend your basic product offering.” Anne Candido Until the world is run by robots, there will always be a person on the other side of the sale. Which means a brand's ability to transform life in order to create an authentic relationship that they alone own will continue to be paramount for growth. This, according to our guest today, Anne Candido, is Brand-Love, and it helps companies create tangible value that makes customers stick with them. Anne grew up at P&G - but don't let that fool you - her path was anything but traditional. She spent her first decade in R&D and Product Development and her second in Brand Marketing and Communications. Through this, Anne learned (sometimes the hard way) the imperative role brand building plays to cultivate successful individuals and businesses. Anne's mission is to help all businesses and the individuals within them realize their Brand-Love potential. Because it doesn't matter the size of your business, how long you have been around, the number of people you have or the amount of money you make, forming Brand-Love connections is possible and should be a focus at EVERY STEP on the business journey. It is how commodities become brands and brands become franchises. Media Handles https://www.forthright-people.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/anne-candido-5156929/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/forthright-people/ https://www.instagram.com/forthrightpeople/?igshid=YzAyZWRlMzg%3D https://www.facebook.com/forthrightpeople.marketingagency/ Podcast Link: https://www.forthright-people.com/podcast Book: The Super- Highway of Relevancy: Getting More People to Choose Your Brand, More Often, Indefinitely As I progressed through my career, I decided I wanted to get close to the decision making process, which led me into brand communications and marketing. I got my education on branding and marketing through a lot of experience and understanding how everything works. The idea of brand love is a fundamental way to really grow brands. You have to build an emotional connection to your brand in different ways, in order to continue to grow your brand. What we now do as part of forthright people, is to help small and medium sized businesses understand what their potential is in order to scale and grow their business and brands. Branding and marketing is about consistency and a philosophy which is about putting brand first, thinking about your business from a standpoint of it being a tangible thing. When your brand has life, it starts to take on these emotional connections with people and helps it to mean something to people beyond just the thing that you're selling. The thing that you're actually selling is an emotional connection that people are going to take away from the experience that they're having either through your product, service or through you. We see our personal brand in three different ways which include your characteristics, your appearance, and your behaviors and actions. Making that switch of cultivating your personal brand outside your corporate environment, is the biggest transition you're going to have to make as an entrepreneur. You have to put yourself in the perception and mindset of other people that are going to be a potential targets and start to re-calibrate based on that. Commercial Break Brand love, in essence is all about creating those emotional connections that transcend your basic product offering. It's those emotional connections that create that tangible value, which without it, you're basically just a commodity competing on price. A brand answers three questions including; who am I? how am I different? and why do you want me? What we really appreciate about human interaction and human relationship, and what we believe is fundamentally needed in marketing and branding is the truth. Our whole way, our brand character, the way that we behave, and the way that we interact with others is to always be forthright, but respectful. A lot of times we develop the product that we want, and then try to make it fit somewhere versus thinking about it from the lens of who we actually want to like us. Embrace the fact that your stories and your personal brand are unique. ………………………………………………………………………………………………. Thank you to our August Sponsor: Dial in Your Destiny Challenge or Moira Ní Ghallachóir Are you a coach or Consultant? Do you want to get premium value clients using speaking, and create a lifestyle of freedom and impact? Then the Dial In Your Destiny Challenge is for you. Over the last seven years, Moira has been learning everything she could about speaking and what it takes to make offers that people take action on fast.  Moira invites coaches and consultants to learn how they can use speaking to fill their business with clients and create an amazing lifestyle. Moira will share with you the exact same strategies that she used to make multiple six figures. There are two ways you can join this challenge as well, not just one. The first one is free, and the second is the VIP experience, and you will be able to walk away from this challenge with strategies that you can start implementing in your business right away. To sign up, click this link: https://www.speakmoremakemorechallenge.com/registration

Global Product Management Talk
395: Creating business and product strategy

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode:  We hear a lot about strategy and that product managers need to create a product strategy. In practice, what does that mean and how does a product strategy help you be more successful? Helping us explore that topic is Sean Kim. He is the President and Chief Product Officer at Kajabi, a web platform that helps creators and entrepreneurs turn their knowledge into income. Previously, Sean was head of product at TikTok, where he set the strategic direction and led product teams. Prior to TikTok, he was the global head of product at Amazon Prime.  You can see from his intersection of product and business leadership experiences that he is the perfect person to help us better understand creating product strategy.

Forever Young Radio Show with America's Natural Doctor Podcast
Episode 369: Ep 369 The Four MVPs imperative for Immune Support

Forever Young Radio Show with America's Natural Doctor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 45:02


On this episode we shared some helpful information on ways to support the Immune Response and science-based tips you can add in when dealing with issues surrounding the pandemic. Guest: Melody Martorana has enjoyed being part of the Wellness Industry for over 18 years and is a self-professed “vitamin geek”. She started out as the National Sales Manager of a supplement and skin care company that sold only “clean, additive-free” formulas.  In over 5 years there, she was surrounded by highly educated mentors, soaking up their wealth of knowledge on nutritional science and the benefits of additive-free formulations. As she developed into an educator, she also pursued more knowledge with which to help others and became a licensed Esthetician. In 2009, she went to work for the “source” and became a part of an additive-free supplement manufacturing company.  Here, she developed an even deeper understanding of what it truly meant to produce “quality” supplements from beginning to end.  Today, Melody works in the positions of Executive Director and Director of Product Development, working directly with raw material suppliers and customers alike.

Table Talk
302: The Co-Op chef who's hooked on the food industry

Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 19:44


"There's no industry like the food industry," says Dai Llewellyn. "No other industry encapsulates all of your senses in the same way." Dai is Head Chef of Product Development at Co-Op UK, but it didn't always looks like he would have a successful food career. In fact, he started out studying a business degree: "I fell into a world of business by sort of doing what I thought I was meant to do, or what my parents expected me to do." Everything changed for him when he got his first job in a restaurant. He says he was instantly hooked after experiencing the comradery and fun: "There was just an amazing buzz around the place." Before taking on his role at Co-Op, Dai worked in a number of high-end restaurants, and he used to work in sandwich development at Greencore. He even won some awards, including one for, what he calls "just a chicken sandwich". We think he's being modest. Listen to full episode to find out why he finds the food industry so exciting, why he believes experience is not the be-all and end-all, and what you can expect to earn if you manage to have a career as successful as Dai's. Dai Llewellyn, Executive Chef of Product Development, Co-Op UK Dai has always been fascinated with food, not only the creative, immersive nature of it but its power to share heritage and stories. His food journey started within a small local restaurant in his hometown of Mumbles, Swansea learning and soaking up the hustle and buzz the hospitality industry has to offer before he made the decision to further and test himself in fine dining and made the move to London. He was lucky enough to work in some great kitchens and gain several mentors within the industry which have immensely helped shape his career so far. It is the continuous learning element of food that drove him to make the change out of restaurants and into product development. Starting with food manufactures such as Greencore and Bakkavor and brands such as Charlie Bigham's was a amazing journey into food retail and gave him great understanding of the processes, teams and challenges faced. He has also had experience within retailers themselves having previously held positions in Waitrose and now in his current role as Executive Chef of Product Development at Co-Op. His current role help bring together food trends and culinary knowledge to support the team's of product developers to deliver not only new and exciting products but delicious, convenient, accessible food and drink.

Skincare Anarchy
E 327: RéVive Masterclass Series Episode 3/3

Skincare Anarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 39:05


In this final episode of the master class with RéVive Skincare, Dr Brown is joined by his Product Development lead, Liz Martin for a deep dive into the formulation of the products that have created the foundation of this industry acclaimed line. Liz discusses the fundamentals of formulation such as ingredients, their purpose in the products RéVive creates and much more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/skincareanarchy/message

Adams on Agriculture
AOA - August 2, 2022

Adams on Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 52:52


Today, AOA was on location in Cedar Falls, Iowa for the 3rd event on the Future of Fertilizer tour from Anuvia Plant Nutrients! We started the show with Brett Bell, Anuvia Executive Vice President of Sales about the trajectory of Anuvia and the on going rollout of the Symtrx family of nutrients. In segment 2, Dr. Dan Froelich, VP of Product Development discussed the technology and process behind the scenes at Anuvia, and how the product works. In segment 3, Jacqui Fatka, Policy Editor at Farm Progress, discussed a raft of recently introduced bills to Congress, though most of them likely won't make it to the finish line. And we closed the show with Mason Meyer, Anuvia Technical Sales Rep about how farmers have utilized Symtrx in NE Iowa.

OUTdrive
Access to Fiber Internet in Rural America

OUTdrive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 29:54


Rural Americans and their operations are what keep the world running. Just like anyone else, these business owners, manufacturers and farmers need access to reliable internet, but many rural areas lack a reliable connection or wifi. GoNetspeed, a fiber internet provider formerly known as Otelco, is out to change that. In this episode, Rick Lashley, Director of Wireless Operations and Product Development, explains the company's primary goal of running fiber to rural American communities to support their business and lifestyle.  What you'll learn:  Rick's responsibilities as Director of Wireless Operations and Product Development Rick's favorite parts about serving rural America The purpose and focus of GoNetspeed The relationship between GoNetspeed and the Missouri State Fair Insight on why rural Americans are underserved by their fiber and how GoNetspeed fills the gap How to get in touch with GoNetSpeed at gonetspeed.com The role GoNetspeed has in Military Appreciation Day at the Missouri State Fair Details about how the internet and technology has changed and grown  The role of the good people that make sure rural Americans can depend on their internet connection 

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
AI-Written Code | New CIO Strategies To Address The Global Developer Shortage | A Conversation With Mathew Lodge | Redefining Technology Podcast With Sean Martin & Marco Ciappelli

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 39:58


One of the key challenges organizations face is the lack of technical talent to help the business keep up to speed from a digital perspective. One possible way to help with the digital transformation process is to leverage AI to help write some of the code.Inspired by a LinkedIn post and an article covering this topic, we connect with Mathew Lodge to explore the possibilities — and the boundaries — of AI-written code.______________________________GuestMathew LodgeCEO at Diffblue [@diffbluehq]On LinkedIn | https://linkedin.com/in/mathewOn Twitter | https://twitter.com/mathewlodgeOn YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr5NPniP9toBlaVluUo52tg/______________________________ResourcesHow CIOs can deal with the developer shortage: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/activity-6947174944417959936-3oUH/Software testing is tedious: AI can help: https://hbr.org/2021/02/software-testing-is-tedious-ai-can-helpNew CIO strategies to address the global developer shortage: https://thenewstack.io/new-cio-strategies-to-address-the-global-developer-shortage/Software Ate The World and Soon It Will Write Itself: https://webreprints.djreprints.com/5176990571960.html______________________________This Episode's SponsorsBlueLava ✨ https://itspm.ag/blue-lava-w2qsDevo  ✨ https://itspm.ag/itspdvwebAre you interested in sponsoring an ITSPmagazine Channel?

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S38E16 - How Companies Are Adopting On-Demand Payroll Practices to Attract and Retain Talent, with Jim Colassano and Eric Wade

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 37:30


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Jim Colassano and Eric Wade about how companies are adopting on-demand payroll practices to attract and retain talent. See the video here: https://youtu.be/ku5hbiArpq4. Jim Colassano (https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-colassano-8466096/) is senior vice president of product development and strategy at The Clearing House. Mr. Colassano has more than 25 years of experience in all facets of the Payments and Cash Management business. He joined The Clearing House in 2016 as a Senior Vice President in the Product Development and Strategy group, where he is focused on product strategy and bank readiness for TCH's new real time payments system. In this role he works closely with TCH owner banks on opportunities and applications to address business related payment problems, and identify strategic priorities for this new payments infrastructure. Before joining The Clearing House, Jim spent 10 years with HSBC as a Product Executive in their Payments and Cash Management group. During that period he served as the Global Product Head for their Payables business which had responsibility for faster payments initiatives as well as cash, check and ACH payment products worldwide. Before joining HSBC, he spent 15 years with JPMorgan Chase in a variety of cash and treasury management roles. Mr. Colassano holds Masters Degrees in Banking and Finance from Pace University. Eric Wade (https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-wade-cpp-a2111662/) is a Product Manager at Paychex, a recognized leader in the payroll, human resource, and benefits outsourcing industry. Eric has worked at Paychex for over 28 years and in his current role, he is responsible for payment and tax related products. He has led the research and launch efforts at Paychex on multiple new products and payment strategies including being the first HCM company to offer Same Day ACH in 2016 and now Real-Time Payments in 2020. Paychex serves approximately 670,000 payroll clients, pays one out of every 12 American private-sector employees and moves over $700 billion in funds annually. Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon and leaving a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Go to cardiotabs.com/innovations and use code innovations to get a free Mental Health Pack featuring Cardiotabs Omega-3 Lemon Minis and Curcumin when you sign up for a subscription. Get 3 months of GUSTO free when you run your first payroll, at Gusto.com/HCI. Get up to 20% off by using code HCI for the summer sale at shop.Ekster.com/HCI. Check out the Ready for Takeoff podcast at Wix.com/readyfortakeoff. Check out Zapier.com/HCI to explore their business automations! Go to Swag.com/HCI and use promo code HCI10. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Best of the Money Show
Mental health claims increases as employees struggle to cope with life

The Best of the Money Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 8:53


Guest: Jenny Ingram | Head of Product Development at Momentum Life Insurance| See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Action for Results
#008 - Myths About Customer Needs That Kill Innovation | Tony Ulwick

Action for Results

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 72:30


Innovation without the right outcomes is a recipe for failure for both the project and the business. This simple notion seems obvious, yet countless companies get it wrong from the start, never realizing the missed opportunities for winning products with sustainable value! As a result, mediocre products go out the door to customers every day. In the worst cases, medical device companies have invested 6 to 10 years in a product's development, only to find out that it was the wrong product!   So, how do we remedy this issue? Our recent guest, Tony Ulwick might just have the answer! Tony is the pioneer of Jobs-to-be-Done Theory, the inventor of the Outcome-Driven Innovation® (ODI) process, and the founder of strategy and innovation consulting firm Strategyn. Tony has applied his ODI process at some of the world's leading companies and across nearly all industries to inform breakthrough innovations—achieving a success rate that is 5 times better than the industry average. Philip Kotler calls Tony “the Deming of innovation” and credits him with bringing predictability to innovation. Published in Harvard Business Review and MIT Sloan Management Review, Tony is also the author of best sellers What Customers Want and JOBS TO BE DONE: Theory to Practice

Windowsill Chats
A Deep Dive Into Product Development and How Allowing Yourself to Create as Well as Fail Is Really the Best Medicine with Jennifer Livingston

Windowsill Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 67:33 Very Popular


Inspired by simple gestures, purposeful forms and honest craftsmanship, today's guest, Jennifer Livingston's phone storage is usually maxed out with beauty in the market and in her life. She has equal photos of her family as she does of a great ad campaign, ceramic glaze, or nature's seasonal colorway. She is intrigued with the process of design and the story behind each item. Jennifer got an early start in product design the summer when she was 13. “My mom introduced me to sewing. She showed me how to thread the machine and load the bobbin, and let me have free range.” Jennifer made a pair of shorts every day that summer out of fabric scraps and old clothes lines. From there her creative curiosity was born.   Margo and Jennifer discuss: Allowing yourself and others to make mistakes and then being able to learn from them Networking and why it's important (even if you're an introverted creative) How her curiosity helps her engage with artists and collaborate with manufacturers Permission to fail (or grow, adapt, and be vulnerable) Having a representative for your work  Right vs. left brain operations How she fills her cup and manages to not lose sight of herself despite challenges and busy schedules   Being a mom of three active kids has helped Jennifer develop strong organization skills and she is a better project manager because of it. She has successfully led product design teams, linking with procurement, logistics and international along the way. Connect with Jennifer: jenniferlivingstoncreative.com www.linkedin.com/in/jenniferelivingston https://www.instagram.com/jlivin2/

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Leadership Lessons and Learning From Plants - Nature Inspired Mentor - Tigrilla Gardenia

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 47:14


Fascinated by nature since her earliest memories, Tigrilla Gardenia turned that passion into her vocation.   Her journey began in a polyethnic childhood. She earned a degree in music and electrical engineering, entering the high-tech corporate world via RealNetworks and Microsoft in the early days of the internet.    The desire to escape the confines of the corporate world proved too strong, and Tigrilla soon began following her own spiritual path. She co-owned a circus, produced intentional dance events, taught Kabbalah, and even toured with Cirque du Soleil.    Today, she works as a Nature-Inspired Mentor, Leadership Coach, and studies Plant Intelligence and the Effects of Plant Music on Human Health.    Tigrilla has the honor of being a Damanhur citizen in Italy — one of the largest spiritual eco-communities in the world.    Her roots are firmly planted in the arts, communication, and the avant-garde. Tigrilla uses her expertise to empower mission-driven leaders to achieve personal and professional success by integrating nature-inspired innovation in order to bring meaning to Life and make an impact with work. She is an influential speaker and mentor, running courses and workshops on reconnection with the plant kingdom.   Always eager to learn, she studied with some of the greatest minds in bio-inspired sciences, gaining a masters degree in Futuro Vegetale (Vegetal Future): plants, social innovation, design under Stefano Mancuso, University of Florence. She has also studied Biomimicry for Social Innovation and Product Development.    Tigrilla is a World Ambassador for Plant Intelligence and champions connection to nature as the basis for long-term health, happiness, and success. www.tigrillagardenia.com

Global Product Management Talk
394: How product managers master the art of questions

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 29:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode: Today we are talking about one important skill that separates great product managers and innovators from the rest. It is the same skill that separates great leaders from the rest. It is also seen in great friends. What is that skill? I'm going to leave you in suspense for a moment and first introduce our guest. Tony Poon is the Chief Product Officer for R-Zero, a biosafety technology company creating products for disinfecting shared spaces. He has a long history in technology products that includes Texas instruments, Logitech, AMD (where his customer was Apple), and many others. Tony is going to help us get better at this important skill for product managers, which is asking the right questions.

The UpFlip Podcast
How Paul Akers Developed 800+ Products

The UpFlip Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 45:51


Since 1997, Paul Akers has developed more than 800 products, growing FastCap into an 8-figure business. In this interview, we'll dig into his product development process and find out how to create a product that sells from one of the masters of the industry.Most people know Paul Akers as the mind behind the Lean movement. He introduced this innovative concept to the world with his first book, 2 Second Lean. Lean thinking is a part of everything Paul does, and that includes product development. In this interview, he'll focus on how he build FastCap into a powerhouse of successful new products. Today, Paul's talking through every step of his development process, from coming up with product ideas to researching their potential in the market and designing products that people want to buy. He'll also share tips to help you avoid common mistakes and improve your chances of getting your product to market.ResourcesPaul Akers website - Hear more insights from Paul and check out his books on his websiteFastCap - Explore the products Paul has designed and sells through his companyUpFlip blog - Find more actionable tips for entrepreneurs and business owners on our blog

B2B Mentors
Using Your Marketing Skills for GOOD (Expert Interview)

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 30:52


Sean Luitjens is the Chief Marketing Officer for uFlexReward. His responsibilities include all aspects of uFlexReward's marketing efforts, including brand, customer research, strategy, and customer communications, while assisting in the development of the partner ecosystem and direction of the product roadmap. Sean has an extensive background working in strategic roles across organizations holding positions in Marketing, Product Development, System Architecture, Global Sales, Corporate Strategy, Benchmarking, and M&A. Prior to his current role at uFlexReward, he was the Vice President of Corporate Development & Marketing at AIRINC, Principal at Mercer, and Director of Strategic Technology at Monster.com.Connect with Sean on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sean-luitjens-929136/Connect with the host, Connor Dube, on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Brought to you by the B2B content marketing experts at www.ProvenContent.comGet access to free content marketing courses, no email opt in required, at www.ProvenContent.com/Free

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive
Co-founder of Microbiome Labs Explains Why Spore-Based Probiotics Are King w/ Kiran Krishnan

The Health Detective Podcast by FDNthrive

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 60:13


In this episode, we're talking to an absolute LEGEND in the functional medicine space, Kiran Krishnan! Kiran is the co-founder of Microbiome Labs, a company which puts the research back in probiotics. In this episode, we'll discuss with him how he got into the work he's doing, the research behind the spore-based probiotics Microbiome Labs' uses, and most importantly, how certified FDNs are able to open accounts with this lab upon graduating! We hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed recording it. Make sure to grab a notepad for this one! About Kiran: Kiran Krishnan is a Research Microbiologist and has been involved in the dietary supplement and nutrition market for the past 17 years. He comes from a strict research background having spent several years with hands-on R&D in the fields of molecular medicine and microbiology at the University of Iowa. He left University research to take a position as the U.S. Business Development and Product Development lead for Amano Enzyme, USA. Amano is one of the world's largest suppliers of therapeutic enzymes used in the dietary supplement and pharmaceutical industries in North America. Kiran also established a Clinical Research Organization where he designed and conducted dozens of human clinical trials in human nutrition. Kiran is also a co-founder and partner in Nu Science Trading, LLC.; a nutritional technology development, research and marketing company in the U.S. Dietary Supplement and Medical Food markets. Most recently, Kiran is acting as the Chief Scientific Officer at Physician's Exclusive, LLC. and Microbiome Labs. He has developed over 50 private label nutritional products for small to large brands in the global market. He is a frequent lecturer on the Human Microbiome at Medical and Nutrition Conferences. He conducts the popular monthly Microbiome Series Webinars through the Rebel Health Tribe Group practitioner training program, is an expert guest on National Radio and Satellite radio and has been a guest speaker on several Health Summits as a microbiome expert. He is currently involved in 9 novel human clinical trials on probiotics and the human microbiome. Kiran is also on the Scientific Advisory Board for 5 other companies in the industry. Kiran offers his extensive knowledge and practical application of the latest science on the human microbiome as it relates to health and wellness. Ready to start the FDN course and become a certified practitioner? Then head to www.fdntraining.com to start the course completely for free! No credit card number is required to start. Where to find Kiran and Microbiome Labs' products: www.microbiomelabs.com IG: microbiomelabs IG: kiranbiome

Drum Candy
Product Development, Building a Brand, and Much More with Mike McKee (Delta Rae, Baldman Percussion, Drum Team Collective)

Drum Candy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 74:37 Very Popular


In this episode, touring drummer and serial entrepreneur Mike McKee (Delta Rae, Baldman Percussion, Drum Team Collective) discusses how he launched his companies, how products are developed, and much more.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Helping an absent Product Owner, learn and improve on their role | Salvatore Rinaldo

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 15:49


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The Great Product Owner: The Chief Clarity Officer, providing clarity and decisions when needed  Great PO's are able to influence, without being seen as “the boss”, and they take their work very seriously, even if they don't take themselves too seriously. As Salvatore says: great PO's become the Chief Clarity Officers, being present, answering questions, and clarifying what is necessary for the team to function. In this segment, we talk about the “kill criteria”, a concept you can use to help PO's decide what to remove from the product, a skill that great Product Owners also exhibit.  The Bad Product Owner: How to facilitate a conversation with an absent PO, so they understand the impact they have on the team This PO was unavailable to the team, and that caused a number of problems for the team. In this segment, we talk about the anti-patterns that show up in the team, when the PO is too busy to be present with the team. Salvatore suggests a few things to try, to help the PO understand their impact on the team, and we refer to the Sprint Checklist, a hands-on guide that we produced to help you facilitate that conversation with the PO.  Are you having trouble helping the team work well with their Product Owner? We've put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO's collaborate. About Salvatore Rinaldo Salvatore is an Agile Coach and Scrum Master based in London. His background is in telecommunications and software engineering. For the past 7 years, Salvatore has been helping organizations leverage Lean, agile, Flow principles and system thinking to achieve better business agility. You can link with Salvatore Rinaldo on LinkedIn. 

Futurum Tech Podcast
The 5G Factor: RFFE Technology – An Essential for 5G Ecosystem Product Development and Innovation

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 20:01


In this episode of The 5G Factor, our webcast series here at Futurum Research where we discuss all things related to 5G and the IoT ecosystems, I'm joined by Christian Block Senior VP and GM of RF Front End (RFFE) for Qualcomm. We kicked off our conversation by hearing a little about Christian's back ground, his work in RF Front End, and what led him to Qualcomm Technologies. Our conversation covered: Why RF Front End (RFFE) technology is essential to 5G ecosystem product development and innovation. A dive into Qualcomm Technologies RFFE solutions and the role they are playing in enabling handset capabilities. A look at where is Qualcomm Technologies' RFFE position now, and how Christian see's Qualcomm's differentiation in the market. Christian's thoughts on how he expects that differentiation to change moving forward. The market prospects for Qualcomm Technolgoies RFFE proposition (i.e. the serviceable available market) and what that looks like. Advancements in 5G for the automotive sector and the role Christian sees Qualcomm's Qualcomm's RFFE portfolio playing there. The IoT sector and the opportunities ahead for Qualcomm's RFFE portfolio there. The 3rd gen expansion of the Wi-Fi Front-End Module (FEM) and how this portfolio differentiates Qualcomm Technologies' RFFE solutions. And the importance of Qualcomm performing filter technology for these FEMs. We closed our conversation talking about the future and how Christian sees Qualcomm defining success over the next year and beyond. And finally, Christian shared one final thought about the RFFE market and what he believes it's important to be thinking about — but you'll have to watch or listen to the interview (or read the transcript below) to find out what that advice is. This was a fantastic conversation and a deep dive into all things RFFE, the importance of RFFE's role in 5G ecosystem product development and innovation and how Qualcomm Technologies is innovating in this space.

Global Product Management Talk
393: Tech-driven vs. market-driven innovation

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 41:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode:  Today we are exploring technology-driven vs. market-driven innovation. I want to set up the topic for us a bit. There are times that a technology comes first and later a problem associated with a market need is found that the technology addresses. Examples include the glue that made 3M's Post-it-Notes possible 7 years after the glue was invented, an electric actuator Caterpillar invented that went unused until they later created a digger that couldn't use their standard hydraulics platform, or the magnetic research my daughter is doing as a physics student, studying spin wave properties, for applications that are yet to be discovered. However, I find market-driven innovation is more common—the wants and unmet needs of customers are first discovered and then solutions are considered. This is the innovation process seen in the Jobs-to-be-Done methodology and described in many books including The Innovator's Method. To help us compare and contrast these approaches, Dr. John Cooley is with us. John has five technology degrees from MIT, starting with dual bachelors in electrical engineering (EE) and physics and including a PhD in EE. He founded Nanoramic in 2009 and now serves as the Chief of Products and Innovation. Nanoramic is a nanocarbon composites engineering company, currently working on electric vehicle batteries by reducing their costs while increasing their energy density (more energy in smaller and lighter batteries) and at the same time providing rapid charging.

Trends with Benefits
Model Portfolio Adoption with Matt Apkarian

Trends with Benefits

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 36:03


Ed chats with Matt Apkarian, Associate Director, Product Development for Cerulli Associates, about the growth of model portfolios and the benefits they bring to both advisors and investors.

A Seat at the Table
Partnering with Your Legal Team for Better Business Outcomes

A Seat at the Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 30:17


Every business leader can benefit from greater insight on how to collaborate more effectively with their in-house legal team. In turn, every legal team can provide greater impact when viewed as a strategic partner, collaborating with the business to achieve its goals.  In this episode, Laura Wood, General Counsel, Zoro US; Leading Women Executives alumna, Spring 2019; and Tamela Merriweather, Senior Vice President and Assistant General Counsel at Northern Trust; Leading Women Executives alumna, Fall 2018, discuss their work to build relationships within their organizations and showcase the strategic value of the legal function in business. SHOWNOTES: The Impact of the Leading Women Executives Program [1:46] How In-House Lawyers Can Help Drive Business Outcomes [4:11] Understanding the Legal Aspects of Product Development [9:54] Contracts are Actually Business Roadmaps – What You Need to Know [11:58] “What Happens If…” – Understanding Termination Rights [14:48] How to Develop Strong Relationships with Your Legal Team [21:29] Recommended Reads [28:28]

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Helping Product Owners work productively with stakeholders to maximize feedback! | Ziryan Salayi

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 12:13


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The Great Product Owner: Connecting Stakeholders with the development team as a way to amplify and speed up feedback! This PO was not only able to “own” the relationship with the stakeholders, but they were also able to involve the stakeholders with the development team. This PO strived to create a direct and productive connection between team and stakeholders.  The Bad Product Owner: Helping PO's learn to work with and manage stakeholders and their input This PO came to Ziryan and asked him to facilitate a User Story Mapping session with stakeholders. This was when Ziryan noticed that the team PO was not yet ready to take responsibility for one of their most important tasks: working with, and helping stakeholders make decisions. This helped Ziryan realize that the work with PO's is a critical aspect of the Scrum Master's work, and he decided to help this PO learn about User Story Mapping, by helping her with the facilitation, but clearly separating that facilitation from the management of stakeholders. Are you having trouble helping the team work well with their Product Owner? We've put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO's collaborate. Abou Ziryan Salayi Ziryan is a Scrum Master, Professional Scrum Trainer, and organization coach with a passion for getting the most out of people and teams. His aim is to enable employees to be fully empowered and support self-organization in all areas within agile organizations You can link with Ziryan Salayi on LinkedIn and connect with Ziryan Salayi on Twitter.

High Intensity Business
372 - Imagine Strength Equipment; the New HIT Revolution with Clay Steffee

High Intensity Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 75:40


Clay Steffee (claysteffee @ gmail.com) is the owner of Imagine Strength and is the Vice President of Engineering and Product Development at Exerbotics. He has worked alongside Arthur Jones in designing Nautilus and MedX equipment, as well as engineering strength equipment for LifeFitness.  In this episode, Clay talks about Imagine Strength's equipment line, machine modifications, customer support, maintenance tips, equipment recommendations, and much more. Build a thriving strength training studio business For all of the show notes, links and resources - Click Here

The Worn & Wound Podcast
The Worn & Wound Podcast Ep. 252: A Conversation with Zenith's Romain Marietta

The Worn & Wound Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 55:37


Today on the Worn & Wound podcast, we're happy to be joined by Romain Marietta, Director of Product Development and Heritage at Zenith. Zenith is a favorite brand here at Worn & Wound for their fascinating history, and the way they straddle the line between paying tribute to their heritage and looking ahead. Romain has been with Zenith for 16 years, starting as an intern and working his way up under a total of five different CEOs. In this conversation, we cover Romain's personal history with the brand, the importance of the El Primero, and why he's so interested in continuing to tell Zenith's story. We also talk quite a bit about what makes the Zenith Defy so special, and why it's important for watch brands to continue to take risks as the watch market expands. This is a really fun conversation with a watch executive who is a true enthusiast. If only one thing comes through in this interview, it's that Romain is definitely one of us. This episode of the Worn & Wound podcast is sponsored by Wyoming Whiskey, makers of small batch bourbon at their Kirby, Wyoming distillery. Learn more here.To stay on top of all new episodes, you can subscribe to The Worn & Wound Podcast — now available on all major platforms including iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Soundcloud, Spotify, and more. You can also find our RSS feed here.And if you like what you hear, then don't forget to leave us a review on iTunes.If there's a question you want us to answer you can hit us up at info@wornandwound.com, and we'll put your question in the queue.Show NotesZach's wrist check: Worn & Wound x Seiko 5 Limited EditionBlake's wrist check: Omega SpeedmasterRomain's wrist check: Zenith A386Introducing The Zenith Chronomaster A385 RevivalZenith Goes Old School With Defy Revival A3642 ‘Bank Vault'Review: the Zenith Defy SkylineZenith Revives a Classic Caliber with the Help of Kari Voutilainen and PhillipsReview: Zenith Defy Classic[Opinion] We Need To Talk About The Numbers

Revenue Generator Podcast: Sales + Marketing + Product + Customer Success = Revenue Growth
Leading Product Development at Early Stage Startups vs Tech Giants -- Karthik Suresh // Ignition

Revenue Generator Podcast: Sales + Marketing + Product + Customer Success = Revenue Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 18:15


Karthik Suresh, Co-Founder of Ignition, talks about product management in big tech vs startups. Product management at early stage startups differs incredibly from product management at an established company. However, while the day-to-day duties are different, product leaders within mature organizations will still find themselves leaning on similar skill sets they would have leaned on at the start up level. Today, Karthik discusses leading product development at early stage startups vs tech giants. Show Notes Connect With: Karthik Suresh: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterThe Rev Gen Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterI Hear Everything: IHearEverything.com // LinkedIn // Twitter See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Global Product Management Talk
392: How uncovering customer pains led to launching a rapidly growing product

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 37:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode:  Today we are taking a product journey, exploring how an insight about an underserved market turned into a valuable product and a rapidly growing company. I love hearing stories of a product's journey and enjoy sharing one occasionally on this podcast because, regardless of you role in product management, leadership, or innovation, there are important lessons to be learned.  Joining us is Matt Danna, who graduated Magna Cum Laude from Rochester Institute of Technology, where he focused on web development and human computer interactions. His professional career has entirely involved product roles, most often as Product VP or Head of Product. During his experience he became aware of an opportunity to better serve small businesses that needed to frequently make and manage client appointments. He is now the co-founder and CEO of Boulevard, which provides a SaaS platform for spas and salons to increase sales, in part by increasing client bookings and decreasing no-shows. I'm eager to hear how Matt has made this happen.

Mindset First Podcast
Adding Digital Products as A Service Provider: Identifying the Right Move for You with Katie Hunt

Mindset First Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 36:50


As a service provider who directly works with clients one-on-one, the time in exchange for money game can get tiring. But should you add digital products to help you create other means of revenue? The truth is that it feels like every service provider now also has a digital product to help create so-called passive revenue. But how do you know what's right for you? And how do you deal with some of the mindset traps that come from putting out a product? This week I invited Katie Hunt the founder of Proof to Product, to help us get the answer. She's a business strategist and mentor to product-based entrepreneurs. But this week - she's come to the Mindset First Podcast to help me answer the question of when is the right time to add a digital product - and what we should consider!  This brought a lot of clarity to me even for my own business and can't wait for you to listen to her sage advice.

Shopify Masters | The ecommerce business and marketing podcast for ambitious entrepreneurs
How Eight Sleep Grew to a $500M Valuation By Building Relationships

Shopify Masters | The ecommerce business and marketing podcast for ambitious entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 27:34


The Eight Sleep team has built impactful relationships with investors, manufacturers, and influencers that have helped the sleep fitness company grow.For more on Eight Sleep and show notes: https://www.shopify.com/blog/eight-sleep?utm_campaign=shopifymasters&utm_medium=description&utm_source=podcast
 Tune in to learn: How Matteo made the gradual transition from lawyer to entrepreneur and his experience running and selling his first company.The two-pronged product strategy that Eight Sleep uses to generate repeat purchases and upgrades.How Eight Sleep uses live customer service demos to replicate the in-person buying experience for online shoppers.How Matteo thinks about delegation and extending responsibilities to executives at Eight Sleep.  

The Scope of Things
Episode 04: How the World's First Clinical Trial Market Network Saves Stakeholders Time and Money

The Scope of Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 40:55


ClinEco–a clinical trial ecosystem and market network designed to streamline the process of identifying and selecting clinical trial partners–is the first of its kind. Co-founders Dr. Marina Filshtinsky, SVP of Strategy and Product Development, and Micah Lieberman, VP of Community and Business Development, speak with Deborah Borfitz, Clinical Research News senior writer and podcast host, about the new platform's aim to revolutionize the way stakeholders navigate the clinical trial space. ClinEco reduces costs and increases study speeds by eliminating inefficiencies. “Identifying, validating, and contacting vendors and partners for clinical trials is a well-known bottleneck. The process is time-consuming, labor-intensive, inefficient, and expensive,” explains Filshtinsky. Hear the founders speak about creating a feature-rich platform that adds value over time and their goals for the network's launch and beyond.  Links from this episode:  Clinical Research News ClinEco SCOPE: Summit for Clinical Ops Executives New Study from Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development Establishes Benchmarks for Vendor Qualification Process Barrett International: Leaders in Clinical Research Training World's First Clinical Trials Ecosystem and Marketplace About To Open 

The Product Podcast
Product Development and Data Storytelling by Pinterest Product Leader

The Product Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 16:26


To succeed in Product, you not only have to build great things, you also have to get people on board with your ideas. One way to do that is by using data to back them up and show that they really will solve user needs. Today our guest Jon Yeo, a Product Leader at Pinterest, will be sharing how to craft a captivating story with both data and examples.Get the FREE Product Book and check out our curated list of free Product Management resources here.This episode is brought to you by Amplitude.Amplitude is the pioneer in digital optimization software, helping product leaders answer the strategic question: "How do our digital products drive our business?" More than 1,400 customers, including Atlassian, Instacart, NBCUniversal, Shopify, and Under Armour rely on Amplitude. The Amplitude Digital Optimization System makes critical data accessible and actionable so teams can unlock insights, build winning products faster, and turn products into revenue. Amplitude is the best-in-class product analytics solution, ranked #1 in G2's 2022 Winter Report.Get started today at amplitude.com.

Software Process and Measurement Cast
SPaMCAST 711 - Why Re-read Saturday, Team Leaders In Scrum, Essays and Conversations

Software Process and Measurement Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 21:51


This week we make a quick side trip. Earlier this week I was asked why I “did” the Re-read Saturday column. Today, I offer a short explanation and highlight the experiments I am running as part of our re-read of Coaching Agile Teams by Lyssa Adkins. We also have a visit from Jon M. Quigley. In this installment of his Alpha and Omega of Product Development, Jon and I discuss the role of the team lead in agile teams that have coaches, scrum masters, and just might be self-organizing. There is a role but it is not the classic version that is in common use. Why Do I “Do” Re-read Saturday. Re-read Saturday is a long-running column featured on my blog (tcagley.wordpress.com) and at tomcagley.com. The books selected for the column are nominated and then voted on by readers. Because most books are selected by the acclaim from readers of the blog, the re-read is sometimes actually the first read for me. During the re-read we read, discuss, and highlight concepts chapter by chapter.  There are three major reasons for the column. One, the column draws eyes. A blog without readers is a diary. Over the years, many of the top 10 annual posts have been from the re-read feature. A second reason, and perhaps the original reason was that I had not read some of these books before and really needed to read them. For some of the other books we have re-read, the re-read drove home the point that memory erodes over time. For example, I am embarrassed to say I had forgotten the story of Herby (check out the re-read of The Goal). Reason two is that the re-read is a forcing function to guide behavior. The books we read and re-read help shape how we behave. The third reason is that the column generates a lot of interaction. I have heard from readers and authors with ideas and opinions. The interactions have certainly improved my understanding of how work is done and how to improve. The level of interaction suggests that the readers get similar benefits. Recently, I decided to run weekly experiments based on the chapter I am reading. The weekly experiment is another forcing function. Doing the activity drives home a point so it is harder to forget. For example from the re-read of Chapter 2 of Coaching Agile Teams by Lyssa Adkins titled Expect High Performance I am focusing on using metaphors to guide behaviors. As an experiment, I am establishing a metaphor for myself. The goal is to see whether having a metaphor changes my behavior. The concept of the weekly experiment might end up being the best reason for me to “do” Re-read Saturday and perhaps the best reason for you, the reader, to participate. PS -- I am not convinced that the person that asked was really looking for this much information. I actually think they we asking why read books at all when you watch videos which lead us to a different discussion which I will share another day.  Finally, have you downloaded the book referenced in last week's interview? Check out Seeing Money Clearly at www.agileagonist.com  Re-read Saturday News This week, Chapter 2 of Coaching Agile Teams by Lyssa Adkins (SPaMCAST Amazon affiliate line https://amzn.to/38G0ZD3 - buy a copy). The chapter's title is Expect High Performance. As a coach, you need to have high expectations of yourself and those you are coaching.  Remember to buy a copy of Coaching Agile Teams by Lyssa Adkins and read along. Previous Installments Week 1: Logistics and Introduction - https://bit.ly/3A1aNTe  Week 2: Will I Be A Good Coach - https://bit.ly/3nzDAHg  Week 3: Expect High Performance - https://bit.ly/3Rl4fFf    Next SPaMCAST  Jim Benson has a new book titled, The Collaboration Equation. The first sentence in the description of the book is:  “It is the base of the human condition, we need other people in order to live, but always seem to be at odds with each other.”  We went from there,  

The Variable Design Podcast
A Designer's Guide to Unconsciously Sabotaging Yourself

The Variable Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 59:12


There are a number of ways that we as creatives can inadvertently keep ourselves away from progress. In this episode we talk about common ways we shoot ourselves in the foot as industrial designers, how to avoid them, and what to do to find balance and improve in our craft. This episode was a recorded clubhouse session that took place on May 12,2022Join our weekly discussions on Clubhouse:https://www.clubhouse.com/club/the-variableOther (non-recorded) Clubhouse events hosted by Justin Adleffhttps://www.clubhouse.com/club/objects-experiences?utm_source=clubhouse&utm_medium=share_club&utm_campaign=hAr6ifilAK2P84UTJTMbmw-27939LINKS:Support The Variablewww.patreon.com/thevariabledesignWEBSITE: www.thevariable.designUPCOMING EVENTS: https://www.thevariable.design/qnaNOMINATE STUDENTS FOR SPOTLIGHT: https://www.thevariable.design/spotlightBLOG: https://www.thevariable.design/podcast_____________________________________________DISCORD ►► https://discord.gg/vpypTgPEvYTWITTER ►► https://twitter.com/thevariable_IDFACEBOOK ►► https://www.facebook.com/thevariable.design/INSTAGRAM ►► https://www.instagram.com/thevariable.design/LINKEDIN ►► https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-variable-designSupport the show

Principled
S7E18 | How values inform decisions: Unpacking the role of the CECO

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 31:49


What you'll learn in this podcast episode It's generally accepted that effective E&C programs are based on values as well as rules. But applying those values to real-life situations can be difficult. This has been particularly true during the pandemic, as organizations make hard decisions in many instances and chief ethics and compliance officers play a key role in guiding those efforts. How can values help CECOs sustain ethical performance—and even excel—in the face of such change and adversity? In this episode of LRN's Principled Podcast, host Susan Divers talks with Scott Sullivan, Chief Integrity & Compliance Officer at Newmont Corporation, and Joe Henry, who just retired as US Compliance Officer at Braskem. Listen in as they discuss the difficult choices they faced in providing moral leadership in their organizations—how those choices were made, by whom, and what the examples say about the role of the CECO.   Principled Podcast Show Notes [1:58] - Scott's role as the CECO at Newmont Corporation, the challenges faced and how he applies his values. [4:50] - Ethics and compliance at the heart of Newmont's decision making during the pandemic. [6:10] - Joe's role at Braskin and the challenges he faced. [11:20] - The role of Joe's values in influencing colleagues to change the decisions they made. [13:35] - The lessons learned from these tough experiences in the company. [16:12] - How both company's ethical cultures emerged after the pandemic.  [19:50] - Other circumstances which strengthened the respective ethics and compliance cultures. [27:25] - The most important areas of focus for an ethics leader in resolving difficult questions. Featured Guest: Joe Henry Joe Henry was the US Compliance Officer for Braskem, a multi-national Chemicals and Plastics company headquartered in Sao Paulo, Brazil.  He led the Ethics, Compliance and Risk Management efforts for Braskem's US operations including commercial, manufacturing, logistics, management and Innovation and Technology (R&D) functions.  Prior to joining Braskem in January 2017, Joe was a Compliance Director at GSK, a global pharmaceutical company, and worked in various ethics and compliance roles since 2003.  Investigations oversight, Compliance Operations, Methodology development, process assessment and improvement, policy and procedure management and managing government oversight programs were some of the responsibilities he successfully fulfilled while at GSK.  Prior to his GSK Compliance roles, Joe worked at SmithKline Beecham as an Information Technology Project Director and with IBM Sales, Technical Support and Product Development.  Joe earned a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and an MBA from Saint Joseph's University.  He also earned his certification as a Leading Professional in Ethics and Compliance from the Ethics and Compliance Initiative (ECI).  Joe and his wife reside in Lewes, Delaware and he retiredg at the end of March 2022 to pursue personal interests, travel and enjoy more time with his 3 grown children and two grandchildren.  Joe continues to provide advisory and investigation services on an as-needed basis to Braskem's US Compliance department.   Featured Guest: Scott E. Sullivan Scott E. Sullivan is the Chief Integrity & Compliance Officer of Newmont Corporation, the world's leading gold company. Newmont has approximately 15,000 employees and 15,000 contractors and has 12 operating mines and 2 non-operated JVs in 9 countries. Mr. Sullivan oversees, develops, implements and manages Newmont's integrity and compliance program including ethics, anti-bribery, corporate investigations, and global trade compliance. Previously, Mr. Sullivan was the Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer of a global manufacturer of fluid motion and control products with approximately 17,000 employees operating in 55 countries. Mr. Sullivan has written and contributed numerous articles on compliance programs, anti-bribery/FCPA, export controls, economic sanctions and other ethics and compliance topics to a variety of publications. Mr. Sullivan is also a frequent local, national and international speaker, moderator and conference organizer on compliance, anti-bribery/FCPA, export controls and economic sanctions.   Featured Host: Susan Divers Susan Divers is a senior advisor with LRN Corporation. In that capacity, Ms. Divers brings her 30+ years' accomplishments and experience in the ethics and compliance area to LRN partners and colleagues. This expertise includes building state-of-the-art compliance programs infused with values, designing user-friendly means of engaging and informing employees, fostering an embedded culture of compliance and substantial subject matter expertise in anti-corruption, export controls, sanctions, and other key areas of compliance. Prior to joining LRN, Mrs. Divers served as AECOM's Assistant General for Global Ethics & Compliance and Chief Ethics & Compliance Officer. Under her leadership, AECOM's ethics and compliance program garnered six external awards in recognition of its effectiveness and Mrs. Divers' thought leadership in the ethics field. In 2011, Mrs. Divers received the AECOM CEO Award of Excellence, which recognized her work in advancing the company's ethics and compliance program. Mrs. Divers' background includes more than thirty years' experience practicing law in these areas. Before joining AECOM, she worked at SAIC and Lockheed Martin in the international compliance area. Prior to that, she was a partner with the DC office of Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal. She also spent four years in London and is qualified as a Solicitor to the High Court of England and Wales, practicing in the international arena with the law firms of Theodore Goddard & Co. and Herbert Smith & Co. She also served as an attorney in the Office of the Legal Advisor at the Department of State and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the UN working on the first anti-corruption multilateral treaty initiative. Mrs. Divers is a member of the DC Bar and a graduate of Trinity College, Washington D.C. and of the National Law Center of George Washington University. In 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 Ethisphere Magazine listed her as one the “Attorneys Who Matter” in the ethics & compliance area. She is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Rutgers University Center for Ethical Behavior and served as a member of the Board of Directors for the Institute for Practical Training from 2005-2008. She resides in Northern Virginia and is a frequent speaker, writer and commentator on ethics and compliance topics. Mrs. Divers' most recent publication is “Balancing Best Practices and Reality in Compliance,” published by Compliance Week in February 2015. In her spare time, she mentors veteran and university students and enjoys outdoor activities.     Principled Podcast Transcription Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change makers. Susan Divers: Hello, it's generally accepted nowadays that ethics and compliance programs that are effective are based on values as well as rules, but applying those values to real life situations can be difficult. This was particularly true during the pandemic when organizations had to make hard decisions in many instances in unprecedented circumstances, and ethics and compliance officers frequently played a key role in guiding those efforts. How can values actually help ethics and compliance officers sustain ethical performance and even excel in the face of change and adversity?   Well, hello and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast. I'm your host, Susan Divers, director of thought leadership and best practices with LRN's advisory group. Today, I'm joined by two thoughtful ethics and compliance professionals, Scott Sullivan, the chief ethics and integrity officer at Newmont Corporation, and Joe Henry, who just retired as the US compliance officer at Braskem. We're going to be talking about the difficult choices they face in providing moral leadership in their organizations, how those choices were made, by whom and what the examples say about the role of the chief ethics and compliance officer. Scott, I'm going to start with you. Can you talk about your role as the CECO at Newmont and some of the hard choices you've faced and how you applied your values? Scott Sullivan: Sure. And thank you, Susan. It's exciting to be part of this podcast and it's a subject I'm very passionate about. So while Joe will be tackling some specific examples, I thought it might be more beneficial to start with a bit on process and approach. So when your values are tested in trying times, this is when the rubber meets the road. So the least common denominator approach, or what is accepted, what is condoned, often becomes your culture. It's not the pronouncements and the platitudes, but rather what you do on the ground or in crunch time. So during COVID, which by the way is not yet over or gone, we faced numerous challenges like everyone else, our values of safety, responsibility and integrity were at the forefront of what we did and said every day. As our strategy rolled out, we had to consider the full spectrum of stakeholders from vulnerable indigenous communities in which we operate to suppliers who were dependent on us to our employees.    In some cases in the early days of COVID, we even went into what's known as care and maintenance mode, which is basically shutting down except for essential services to protect the health and wellbeing of a variety of our stakeholders. We also deployed over 20 million in a COVID fund to assist communities around our minds with COVID type issues and challenges. We were active partners in the COVID struggles. We protected our employees with PPE, with vaccines, with health checks, et cetera, all this being said there were numerous and oftentimes competing opinions on what to do, being strong proponents of our values, and always circling back to them as a gut check when we made decisions, some of them which might have turned out to be controversial, was an excellent moral compass. It made us focus on not just what the short term, but what the long term was and what the consequences could be, both the good and the bad. It was our collective corporate decision that we had to make.          As a compliance team. Part of our job was trying to read the tea leaves and anticipating what was coming. Fortunately at Newmont, we have a fantastic executive leadership team who gave us the space to support them and the organization this endeavor. We invited in diverse perspectives, we had spirited debates and we pressure tested key decisions that mattered most. I'm proud of the approach that we took as an organization whereby no means perfect, but I think it has served us quite well. Susan Divers: Scott, before I turn to Joe, one of the things that strikes me about what you just said is it sounds like ethics and compliance was really at the heart of decision making in these difficult areas that you mentioned. Am I reading that right? And if so, how did you achieve that? Scott Sullivan: Yeah, I think, health and safety for sure was I think the heartbeat, if you will. Perhaps we were the supporting role, but really as COVID evolved over times, the issues got more complicated as they went. So you had initial true health and safety issues, in some cases life and death that you had to do, but then you had a whole series of decisions around employment, around vaccinations, around care and maintenance. And what do you do with communities, where the donations go? How do you ensure that you're not supporting corruption when you're doing the good deed of making donations? So I think as COVID evolved and as the challenges around COVID evolved, we became more integral and more integrated to those decisions over time. Susan Divers: Well, and that's really a good example of how it's meant to work. Yeah, the ethics and compliance department isn't defective if it's often a corner, but it is effective if it's right at the heart of difficult choices, and that's a perfect segue to Joe. Joe, do you mind outlining your role at Braskem and then talking about some of the actual challenges you faced in your role in those? Joe Henry: Certainly. Thank you, Susan. Thank you for the invitation to join you all today. Let me start off by saying that Braskem leadership team is a caring and forward looking group and primarily based in the US headquarters in Philadelphia. And that information will be important in a minute or two. Early in the pandemic two of our sites operated for 28 days via a live-in where our workers stayed on site, quarantined from family and other outsiders to operate our plants in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. These plants produce polypropylene, which is a key material for personal protection equipment, such as surgical gowns, face, shields, gloves, and masks. So our workers were willing to do that. And our Braskem leaders provided all the essentials for this live-in. And our team members were paid for every hour on site. So Braskem tries to do the right thing. And during that time, all other team members were directed to work remotely during the pandemic. Eventually after our operations were deemed essential to US business interest, all of our plants reopened with strict masking and quarantine requirements, including restrictions in travel. One of our first policy decisions developed in Philadelphia was to require workers to quarantine for 14 days after travel if they had traveled from their home county. Works for Philadelphia were pretty close around in the urban area. The policy, and it worked for salary team members who could work from home, but not for hourly workers who worked on site and who would not be paid for the time they must quarantine. So at our Texas sites, this policy was problematic in that it would not be unusual for a worker employee to travel to the next county to care or check in on a family member. Therefore, compliance was asked to intervene. And as a result of that, our intervention, we extended the travel range and only had the policy applied to travel outside usual circumstances. The other one is more around vaccines. So one other example as vaccines became available, again, I remember they were under emergency authorization. There became a drive by Braskem management to encourage team members to be vaccinated and to push required team members to be vaccinated or else be terminated. The impetus for this requirement was that several people at manufacturing sites were complaining about being vaccinated and still having to wear a mask because others were not vaccinated. We discussed the proposed requirement at the leadership team meeting, which US compliance is a part. And then there was actually a discussion in our industrial team where we're not a part and they mandated this vaccination or termination requirement by a majority vote, not a consensus vote. I received a call from one of the dissenters. He was concerned that many of his employees would resign or be terminated because they did not trust the vaccine yet. His plant would be greatly affected. I brought this to the attention to the US leadership team that the vaccines were not yet fully approved and that no matter how administratively burdensome the CDC's recommendation was vaccination or regular testing. So I informed the group, I thought our requirement was overly restrictive. It infringed upon employees' rights, and I would not approve any of these terminations, in the US, the US compliance officer approves all terminations. So I had some leverage there. So what happened is we implemented weekly testing for team members who were not vaccinated. And that seemed to resolve the situation. By the way, it was helpful that I was fully vaccinated and boosted and it was clear, my personal beliefs were not a factor. Susan Divers: Wow. That's a very striking example, Joe, there's a couple of things I'd like to pursue a bit. One is, it's clear that people brought you into these decisions that they turned to you as a resource, it sounds like certainly in the case of be vaccinated or terminated before the vaccines were fully approved, but also it sounds like you were asked to intervene on the travel restriction. Is that correct? Joe Henry: Yes. Susan Divers: And was that at a senior, if I can ask, or other level? Joe Henry: I would say the vaccination or termination decision was a senior management at one of our industrial sites had the concern. And then the travel policy was probably, as I recall from one of the HR leaders at the site saying, Hey, we have some employees that are in unique situation here, or maybe not so unique, but different than what we would have from an urban center versus someone working in a more rural area. Susan Divers: Well, that's another good example of how a compliance and ethics and compliance program should work. It should be a resource and be welcomed into decision making, particularly on very difficult and tricky issues like the two that you just described. Can you talk about the role of your values in convincing your colleagues and your leadership to change or moderate the decisions that they made? Joe Henry: Absolutely. That was probably the driving force is our code of conduct, we don't dictate to people how they must behave, especially outside of work. It's fortunate that US compliance and compliance department of Braskem is independent and we're objective. And we're very visible. So people know us and people are willing to approach us. Again, that's why I started off the leadership team, it had the best of intentions. They heard from one group that says, Hey, we're tired of wearing masks. We want to be productive. And they reacted to that without understanding the potential consequences and the potential issues they may have with our own code of conduct. And that we couldn't mandate someone put something that was not yet fully approved. And that actually went further than what the government was telling us we needed to do. Which isn't uncommon. Our policies and procedures are frequently tighter than what the law requires. But in this case, we had to recognize that people have freedom of association and freedom of choice about theirselves. Once we brought all the potential consequences and perspectives of all affected team members, I think we reached the right decision. Susan Divers: So was that a difficult process, would you say, was it time consuming, or once you played that role of honest broker, was it something that people widely accepted? Joe Henry: Yes. Yes. I would say, we did use a lot of influence in... Basically had the show them what the consequences are, why their actions might not be entirely appropriate. So it wasn't a matter of authority. It was a discussion and it was a lengthy discussion, but I think everyone was fairly open minded and recognized that it was going take some more work and maybe we were going to have to spend some more money, especially getting a company to do the testing for us on a weekly basis. But I think they quickly arrived that it was the right decision. Susan Divers: Well, that's a great example. And thank you for sharing that. I'm going to go back to Scott for a minute and then to you Joe and ask. So obviously these were pretty intense situations that you dealt with. What lessons did you learn from that experience given your role in the company? If you could discuss that a bit, that would, I think be very helpful. Scott Sullivan: Sure. Yeah. Building on my prior comments a bit, I would say there were a few learnings and perhaps a few aha moments that we recognize along the curve. I think one was, you need to think both long term and short term. So whether it's your employees or your stakeholders, you might have a decision today that is different than the consequences tomorrow. So really making sure you're not just stuck in the moment, but you're thinking about the long term of the consequences or actions that come out of your decisions today. Playing off one of Joe's comments about culture and values, modifying a Warren Buffet quote a little bit, "Values take a long time to build, but they can be destroyed in a heartbeat." And people watch, I think that's the one that organizations often forget when they're looking at their culture, it's that whatever you allow or condone becomes your actual culture. So I think it's really important to practice what you preach and stay true to those values or before you know it, or right under your nose, you lose them. And that's true, perhaps even more so in the darkest days. So, how you're treating your employees and what people did with respect to terminations, or extending compensation during COVID, all eyes were on that. And I think that has longterm consequences for employees is they think, well, how did my employer treat me during those dark days? Did they exit us from the organization? Did they treat us poorly? Was the mighty dollar, the only thing that mattered? And again, for us, we have a social license to operate in the locations we do. So you have to think about that holistically, the full ESG perspective and look at all your stakeholders. And I think a little bit about what we've been talking about as well is anticipating the pushback, where are those pressure points, or focal points that are likely to come up and figuring out, like we always say, you can't take a program off the shelf, but customizing or figuring out what works best for you? And then hopefully that leads to you and many more in your organization becoming both values, beacons and champions to help the organization propel forward. Susan Divers: So in other words, it really can become a tremendous positive as long as you stay true to your values. And you're actually strengthening your culture, not destroying it to go back to the Warren Buffet quote. And Joe, based on your experience, do you think that your ethical culture at Braskem emerged stronger as a result of the types of difficult choices that people made in those circumstances? And are there any other lessons learned from that, that you would want to highlight? Joe Henry: So I believe our culture has gotten stronger. The ethics and compliance group and officers know they need to stay ever vigilant to ensure that passions do not overtake the organization's foundational values. We live in an impatient society that is quick to react and does not always consider all perspectives and unintended consequences. So this experience gives us an opportunity to talk to the leadership team and say, Hey, let's take a breath here. Let's look at this. I think when you're more thoughtful about these decisions, I think the decision will be better, probably strengthen your culture versus weaken it, or undermine it. But I do know that my successor's still facing these challenges. Susan Divers: Yeah. Although you're building ethical muscle at the same time, I want to highlight what you said about stop, pause, think, or you said it a little differently, but our chairman of our board, Doug Sideman, has written extensively about the benefits of pausing. And we do live in a impatient world and one that moves at light speed, particularly with social media. And I think Scott, you would agree with this too, that stopping and getting everybody to slow down and look at all the potential ramifications and equities. Joe's example of employees in Pennsylvania versus employees in Texas, I think is a very telling one. And that, that is really, I think what's needed to deal with particularly moral leadership issues. Scott, does that make sense? And also if you could talk about whether your ethical culture came out stronger as a result of the pandemic, that would be helpful. Scott Sullivan: Yeah. I think you often see in some areas the short term view or this, in the impatient world, as I like the way Joe characterize it, you see the pitch forks and the torches coming out in any particular topic. And so part of our job is to say, let's pause, let's think this through, the unintended consequences, the longterm consequences, I think for sure our ethical culture has emerged stronger. It really gave us ample opportunities to do the right thing and to put theory into practice. So one of the things coming out of the tragedy of COVID is it really gave us an opportunity to show our values and do the right thing in those dark days. And I think that also that consistency of messaging and values, it's not one offer. There's one big case. I think that really builds trust with stakeholders and gives you an opportunity to show that you're a different kind of company. So even in the dark days with bad or troubling news, you're going to be transparent and that we stand true to our values and hold ourself accountable to those values. So that consistency of operational model, I think extends well beyond ethics into business and health and safety. When faced with a challenge, we're going to think about it, be very thoughtful in what we do and ultimately do the right thing for the entirety of the stakeholder community. Susan Divers: Yeah, that sounds like very sound holistic decision making. Joe let's let's switch gears a little bit. We've talked about the pandemic and the challenges and how both of you feel that your ethical culture got stronger as a result, and you both played pivotal roles in the ethics and compliance programs, played pivotal roles in helping your organizations navigate. Can you give some other examples outside of the pandemic of having to do that? Joe Henry: So I mentioned one of our values is the freedom of association. As a result of the summer of 2020, George Floyd death and all, we had some outsiders, some activists and DE&I consultants recommend some potential path forward for the company. One of those, including tracking managers' social media profiles, and other forms of public expression and see whether they should continue to be leaders in the company or not. For instance, should we sanction a manager for attending a pro-life rally, or another manager for posting their support for the police on their Facebook page? That type of monitoring is not aligned with our code of conduct. We declined that recommendation. Again, the passion was there. Hey, we got to weed these people out. Well, no, we have to make sure that when they're working for Braskem, they're aligned to Braskem's values and that they're not diminishing our name in the public.   And then most recently we've discussed how and when should compliance be involved in handling microaggressions. And we've agreed that microaggressions are supposed, should be handled between the two people in the first instance, maybe in a second or third occurrence, that it's handled, the person's called out publicly. And if it's repeated, then it's no longer a microaggression, it's an aggression. And then it comes to human resources or compliance. But those are some of the choices where, again, we relied on our code of conduct and relied on our proven policies and procedures regarding our ethics line to preserve the culture and continue to move the company forward and evolve the company. Susan Divers: Well, and that's another excellent example of pausing and looking at all the ramifications and carefully analyzing whether it is consistent with your code or not. Scott, do you have similar examples outside of the pandemic experience? Scott Sullivan: Yeah. So we've been on a journey of what I would probably call radical transparency in the ethics and compliance space, so where we're willing to show the good, the bad and the ugly to advance the health of our culture. It is a journey, so we're not perfect by any chance, but we're now more transparently and willing to share internal stories and struggles with our employees. I used to laugh all the time that most companies will say something happened to somebody, sometime, someplace with some result. And that leaves everybody, what the heck is that? What happened? And what are the expectations I know? So we've decided that we want to clarify expectations for employees. We want to at least establish the baseline for ethical behavior. And we want to ensure really that fraudsters or predators are held to account in the organization wherever and whenever we can. And also there's an evolving view about when something happens in our organization, what do we do to ensure that those individuals or groups of individuals are not just set free and allowed to go into the general community and repeat those damage?     How many times have we all learned in the compliance profession, individual moves from company A to B, to C to D. And when you do the investigation, there's a long track record that history being repeated at different organizations. So we have done cradle to grave exposes, including one with a public press release, where we actually lifted the hood and told the full story. So most times it's fairly detailed internally and the reception has been excellent. It's advanced our culture ball pretty dramatically. As I mentioned, that being said, it's really, we're still on the journey, but we feel that practicing what we preach and not allowing performance to excuse misconduct or cornerstones of our culture. So even when the outcome is internally painful and extremely disappointing, we've been trying to promote this. So it's not just you do it once, because you can't fake it. And if you do it once, you see big scandals in organizations and periodically it's a big splash in the paper. And we've had similar things where you've had a case that we did our first radical transparency case. And I think the organization, the employees were saying, okay, is this a new way that we're going to operate, or is this the company's hand was forced and they felt they had to do it, so they did it? And so I think that whole concept of you can't fake, it's got to be genuine, it's got to be demonstrable and it's got to be sustainable, is really important. And as an aside, I think most companies can get compliance correct, or they get it right. That's to say that it's the right side of the brain, it's the math science side. It's one plus one, plus one equals three. But when you get to integrity, you get to ethics and culture, that's the equivalent to me, the left side of the brain, it's the English history. It's a little bit more soft. It's touchy, feely. It's hard to measure, but I think it's far more impactful. And that is often where I see organizations fall down, because it's so hard to do. And it's so hard to say, what is it? And it feels like it's subjective, or judgemental, or it's just real hard to do. So I think companies that focus on getting the integrity or the culture piece right, are so far ahead of the curve and getting everything else right. And that's not just in the ethics and compliance space, because I think that could be a proxy for good governance. It could be something that is a springboard for doing other things in an extraordinary way or well above peer organizations. Susan Divers: That's so interesting that you framed it in those terms. Something we talk about a lot and we're not alone in that in this area is that you can't just look at your ethics compliance program as a checklist and say, I'm good to go because I've got policies, code, training, audit, it has to be living and breathing. And that's where the touchy feely comes in. And the research, interestingly, it shows that if you have organizational justice where you're holding people to the same standard, and I hear you both talking about that in what you've described today, then you have the lifeblood and a strong foundation for your ethics and compliance program and activities. But if you don't, if there's two standards of justice, or what I'm hearing today too, is if there's a rush to judgment where some people get trampled in that rush, then you don't really have a strong foundation for your program. Joe, would you agree with that as well? Joe Henry: Yes, I absolutely do. Yeah, it has to be thoughtful, fair. We haven't gone to the extent from a transparency as Scott Newman have us to naming particular people, but we do anonymize those situations and publish them or even present them as lessons learned. Susan Divers: Yeah. That's very powerful. Well, we're starting to run out of time, but two questions before we terminate, which is what are the most important areas of focus by an ethics leader in resolving difficult questions? You've both given great examples of how central ethics and compliance was to tough decisions. But if you're a relatively new ethics leader, what are some of the key things to really bear in mind when those tough issues come up? Scott, you want to lead us off on that? Scott Sullivan: Sure. So I think as we've both mentioned, and same with Susan, the tone at the top is really important. So getting your executive leadership on board, otherwise the likelihood of success drops pretty dramatically. And I think as we've also both said, relationships matter. So build them wherever and whenever you can. And I think it's always that rainy day fund, you build credit in the bank, you build street credit. So for the bad news bear moment you have to come in, I think that's really important. So they understand who you are. You're not just a cry wolf person, you're thoughtful, you're methodical. You do all the things the way the organization would expect. And I think, for all of us, unfortunately, and you can see the business partnering go too far. So I think not withstanding that you always have to remember that there will be times undoubtedly as a compliance officer, where you have to put your neck on the line and hopefully your organization does not have a kill the messenger culture, that's not a fun organization to be a part of. And I think value based decisions are toughest in downturn markets and during crises. So we've come out of a pandemic and now we're going into what seems to be a downturn market. So I think the key message there is really prepare in advance and look at your rainy day credits and figure out where you're going to have to put your stake in the ground and move forward. Susan Divers: So build up your relationships and your credit and your goodwill. Joe, something to add. Joe Henry: I do that. I wholeheartedly agree. I think that what Scott mentioned is the most important area, but another area of focus is the company's values, which usually describes in the organization's code of conduct and implemented through your policies and procedures. And I remind the executives and our team members, employees, the code of conduct and policies are approved by the board of directors after thorough and thoughtful review by the executives, by the stakeholders and by compliance. So they're not done instantaneously and there's a lot of thought, there's a lot of reason why we have them and they shouldn't just be dismissed quickly because the particular circumstance. These documents provide the desired ethical direction of the company and have been very useful in resolving difficult decisions in the past, especially with well-meaning, but passionate team members. Go back to the foundation and consider it maybe, maybe, maybe we do need to make a change to the code of conduct or a change to our values, but at least reference it and have that discussion before taking any severe action that may have unintended consequences. Susan Divers: That's a very good point. One of my colleagues describes the code of conduct as your culture written down, and using it as a focal point and a way to ensure that major decisions and discussions include values, I think helps make it a living and breathing document. Well, this has been such an insightful conversation. I wish we could continue it talking about tough choices, I think is really helpful for people at whatever stage they are in their ethics and compliance journey and profession. So I want to thank our listeners. My name is Susan Frank Divers, and we'll see you the next time on Principled Podcast. Thanks Scott. Thanks Joe. Joe Henry: Thank you. Scott Sullivan: Thank you all. Outro:   We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN. At LRN, our mission is to inspire principle performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures, rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at LRN.com to learn more. And if you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen. And don't forget to leave us a review.  

CoIQ with Dr. Roxie
From a side hustle to a successful exit w/ Shawn Zimmerman

CoIQ with Dr. Roxie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 36:04


Most successful entrepreneurs will tell you that they had a plan from the start - it was all figured out and they just followed their path to success! Did they really? When you're at the pinnacle it's often easy to forget the trials and challenges it took to get to that lofty spot - and rightly so because it's a lot of grueling work. You earned a break. But that's just exactly the thing: it's work. Very few people begin commercialization of a solution with a plan they follow to the letter. Things happen - changes come along - adaptation is necessary. Then there's folks like Shawn Zimmerman who showed up to the party without much of a plan at all. He just had a good idea that he knew one organization needed. It took some hustling on his end to craft a solution that he, at first, thought was niche - only to find out that every hospital organization needed what he was building. And he was off to the races. Whether you're having a difficult time trusting your instincts or just second guessing yourself out of a successful commercialization run, you need to give yourself a break and listen to Shawn's story - then get back to the hard work of reaching your pinnacle! Here are the show highlights: If you can build it and deploy it: COMMERCIALIZE IT (6:41) How to transition from a side hustle to a viable business (8:01) So, you're building a business….what happens next? (13:38) Sometimes successful plans aren't planned at all - they just happen (17:56) Success doesn't always look like a billion dollar IPO (22:59) Why it's smart to never undervalue your solution (31:37) Guest Bio Shawn Zimmerman is the Vice President of Product Development at AccuReg, a healthcare industry software designer. Over the last two decades, Shawn has held many positions in the healthcare industry, allowing him to gain unique and real insights into the daily challenges of health institutions. His hands-on approach has earned him a wide range of skills in the healthcare industry, where he leverages his experience in order to provide innovative software solutions. If you'd like to talk to Shawn about AccuReg's work, or simply wish to reach out to him, you can find him on LinkedIn @Shawn Zimmerman

The Digital Supply Chain podcast
Reducing Friction In Product Development - A Chat With Calico's Kathleen Chan

The Digital Supply Chain podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 12:42


Product development is obviously a key part of supply chain. In the apparel industry communicating with manufacturers can be challenging, so enter Calico to help reduce that friction.To find out more about how this young startup Calico raised money from Serena Ventures, and is helping direct to consumer brands in the apparel industry more easily connect to their factories, I invited Calico CEO Kathleen Chan to come on the podcast.We had a fascinating conversation. I learned loads, I hope you do too...If you have any comments/suggestions or questions for the podcast - feel free to leave me a voice message over on my SpeakPipe page or just send it to me as a direct message on Twitter/LinkedIn. Audio messages will get played (unless you specifically ask me not to).If you want to learn more about how to juggle sustainability and efficiency mandates while recovering from pandemic-induced disruptions, meeting growth targets, and preparing for an uncertain future, check out our Oxford Economics research report here.And if you want to read up on our Industry 4.0 blueprint repost, head on over to https://www.sap.com/cmp/dg/intro-industry40/index.html, and if you liked this show, please don't forget to rate and/or review it. It makes a big difference to help new people discover it. Thanks.And remember, stay healthy, stay safe, stay sane! 

The Thomas Green Podcast
#235 - Product Development With Oren Schauble

The Thomas Green Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 27:17


In this episode, I speak with Oren Schauble on the topic of product development, common misconceptions, product marketing and the supply chain.★ Oren's Bio: ★ Oren is a serial entrepreneur and builder. He served for years as president of Unrivaled Brands, a public west coast cannabis MSO.He is a founding partner of Guinn Partners, a successful high-tech product development agency in Austin, TX. He served in leadership and advisory roles in marketing at startups such as TrackingPoint, Lift Foils, 3DR, Hangar Technology, and more.Connect with Oren:https://twitter.com/orenmeetsworld/status/1482425242546950145https://www.productworld.xyz/

The Vitalize Podcast
Organic Growth Loops, Customer-Led Product Development, Raising a $13.5M Series A, and the No-Code Landscape, with Mariam Hakobyan of Softr

The Vitalize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 36:45


Justin Gordon (@justingordon212) talks with Mariam Hakobyan (@mariam_hakobyan), Co-Founder and CEO of Softr, the easiest no-code platform for building custom apps and portals, in minutes. With Softr, you can build client portals, internal tools, marketplaces, online communities, resource directories, websites and more. They believe the world is missing out on some of the most creative minds, ideas and innovation (99.7% to be exact), and have set out to change that with Softr by democratizing software building so anyone can build businesses without tech skills.Softr grew from 0 to 50K+ users in

Tech for Non-Techies
A surprising outcome of Speaking Tech (& a lesson from Apple Watch)

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 14:12


Listen to what happened when Apple forgot a key market and how to avoid the same mistake. When product teams consist of entirely white males, they make products for white males. When non-technical professionals learn to Speak Tech, you get better products, happier customers & better profits. Learning notes from this episode: While there are plenty of programs to get minorities into STEM, they will take years to have an effect. In the next few decades, most developers will continue to be white males. To prevent baking unconscious bias into products, the simplest, cheapest and fastest way is to teach non-technical teams how to work with the techies.  Bringing diverse voices into product development is not a moral issue; it is capitalist self-interest. E.g. if women are not involved in product innovation, companies can lose up to 50% market share.  To get Sophia's monthly business update, register here.    ----- Get your FREE guide to the top 10 concepts non-technical leaders need to work with developers, designers and data scientists.  ----- There are 2 ways to apply this work to your goals: For individuals, APPLY FOR A CONSULTATION CALL for Tech For Non-Techies membership. For companies: If you want to increase productivity, innovation and diversity, then your non-technical teams need to learn how to collaborate with the techies.  BOOK A CALL to discuss bespoke training & consulting. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co   Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok will make you smarter.   

Action and Ambition
Eddy Soffer Helps The Younger Generation of Investors To Invest in The Future Consciously

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:19


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today is Eddy Soffer, a Sustainability Executive with a great passion and deep experience in ESG Strategy & Integration, Product Development, and Sales. He is the ESG Manager of Interactive Brokers, the best online broker in 2022. They recently launched the IMPACT App which is geared towards the new generation of socially conscious investors. The app has several features that set it apart from the rest including a charitable feature that allows users to give back to their communities. They can also align and adjust investments. Tune in to learn more!

Game Changers for Government Contractors
Ep 205 - Product Development That Solves A Problem

Game Changers for Government Contractors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 17:11


In this episode, we talk with Dr. Russ Barnes about Product Development that Solves a Problem. Some of the most successful companies in the world built their brands by identifying a problem in the market and then building a product or service to solve that problem. One of the reasons this model is extremely effective is because the buyer already understands and acknowledges the problem. When a solution presents itself, they are excited to buy it. This is what coined the sales phrase, 'this product sells itself." On the other hand, some companies develop their widget and then try to force that into the market whether there is a need or not. This doesn't often turn out the way companies hoped. This podcast will walk you through a methodology for developing products or services based on needs/problems. ----- Federal Access is helping Government Contractors win more contracts. It can help you too. Here's a special offer. Visit https://federal-access.com/gamechangers today and get started for just $29. *You are going to get access to a digital copy of the Government Sales Manual. * Over 85 strategy videos * More than 30 webinars * 300 documents and templates AND * SME support. So when you run into an issue, you can email me directly for help. Go check out this special offer today at https://federal-access.com/gamechangers

The Plaidcast
Florian Moreno, Stephanie Macejko & Nikko Ritter by Taylor, Harris Insurance Services

The Plaidcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 88:43


Piper and Michael Tokaruk are joined by Stephanie Macejko to talk about the Breyer model horse world and Breyer's yearly event, BreyerFest and Florian Moreno to talk about the different therapies he has developed for our horses that can aid in recovery and can help to prevent injuries. Piper also speaks with top rider and trainer Nikko Ritter about growing up in the horse industry and the challenges that young equestrian professionals face. Hosts: Piper Klemm and Michael TokarukGuest: Florian Moreno grew up in France and began riding at the age of four and eventually established a career as a professional rider. Florian competed at the Grand Prix level for years and found himself looking for the right support to help his horses- cryotherapy was his answer. After seeing the benefits and abilities of cryotherapy firsthand, Florian established America Cryo. America Cryo offers a range of products and devices that aid in rehabilitation and recovery while providing preventative care. Guest: Stephanie Macejko is the Vice President of Marketing and Product Development at Breyer. Stephanie's passion for horses has always steered her personal and professional lives. Stephanie received her Equine degree with a Business minor at Centenary University in Hackettstown, New Jersey. Stephanie's extensive horse world knowledge and marketing sense have been assets to Breyer's growth, evolution, and commitment to quality for over 25 years.  At Breyer, Stephanie oversees wide-ranging responsibilities including BreyerFest, social media, direct-to-consumer ecommerce sales, and collector programs, plus relationships with horse owners and artists.Guest:  Nikko Ritter grew up riding and showing under the tutelage of his mother Wendy Peralta and a number of top professionals in the industry. After a highly successful junior career which included winning the 2004 Southeast Regional Maclay, winning the 2005 Calvin Klein Show Jumping Derby at the Hampton Classic which he was also youngest rider ever to win, winning the 2006 ASPCA Maclay Regionals and winning the 2007 USEF Talent Search East Coast, Nikko became a professional, training and showing young horses and teaching riders of all levels. Nikko rode professionally for Mclain Ward at Castle Hill, Missy Clark at North Run, Frank Madden at Old Salem Farm and most recently for Peter Leone at Lionshare Farm. During this time, Nikko gained a vast amount of experience and knowledge in both the training and competition rings. In 2016, Nikko Ritter Showstables was born as a result of Nikko's decision to take the knowledge and experienced he had amassed from riding for top industry names.  Since then, Nikko has produced horses and riders to international levels in the jumpers, hunters and equitation.Title Sponsor: Taylor, Harris Insurance ServicesSubscribe To: The Plaid Horse MagazineEquestrian College Courses with Dr. KlemmAmerican Equestrian SchoolSponsors: Excel Supplements, Purina Animal Nutrition, America Cryo, Alexis Kletjian

Shopify Masters | The ecommerce business and marketing podcast for ambitious entrepreneurs
How Stonemaier Games Went From Crowdfunding Campaigns to a Multimillion-Dollar Business

Shopify Masters | The ecommerce business and marketing podcast for ambitious entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 23:52


Check out Shopify's official merch store: https://shopify.supply/ and use the code: PODCAST for 10% all your complete order. Our collab series with Learn With Shopify is coming soon in July, subscribe to the Youtube Channel at: https://www.youtube.com/c/learnwithshopify?utm_campaign=shopifymasters&utm_medium=description&utm_source=podcast
Learn how Stonemaier Games launched successful crowdfunding campaigns, found the ideal manufacturing partner, and built a strong online community.For more on Stonemaier Games and show notes: https://www.shopify.com/blog/stonemaier-games-crowdfunding?utm_campaign=shopifymasters&utm_medium=description&utm_source=podcast