Podcasts about Dropbox

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 2,491PODCASTS
  • 4,407EPISODES
  • 42mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 25, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Dropbox

Show all podcasts related to dropbox

Latest podcast episodes about Dropbox

Tierra de Hackers
53. Tesla, Pre-Secuestro de Cuentas, Honda/Acura y SafeGraph

Tierra de Hackers

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 85:50


Un investigador descubre cómo abrir las puertas y maletero de un Tesla remotamente y sin interacción por parte de la víctima. Microsoft publica nuevas técnicas de Pre-Secuestro de Cuentas para comprometer la identidad de usuarios en sitios online, y demuestra que algunas de las mayores plataformas web son vulnerables a estos ataques, entre ellas, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Zoom y algunas redes sociales. Varios modelos de coches de la marca Honda y Acura son vulnerables a «replay attacks» que permiten a un atacante acceder al coche y arrancarlo remotamente. SafeGraph, otra empresa de venta de datos de geolocalización de dispositivos móviles, entra en polémica por la información que ha ofrecido a sus clientes y que permite desanonimizar a usuarios de centros de planificación familiar y pacientes de clínicas de aborto. Notas y referencias en tierradehackers.com Youtube: youtube.com/tierradehackers Twitch: twitch.tv/tierradehackers Si te gusta lo que hacemos, considera apoyarnos en Patreon para que podamos seguir creciendo y crear aun más contenido: patreon.com/tierradehackers. No olvides unirte a nuestra comunidad de discord: tierradehackers.com/discord Gracias a Monad por esponsorizarnos: monad.com

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20 Sales: How To Create and Execute a World-Class Sales Playbook, Why You Should Do Both PLG and Enterprise Sales at the Same Time, Three Non-Obvious Qualities the Best Sales Reps Have & The Four Steps To Sales Team Onboarding with Oliver Jay, Former

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 41:10


Oliver Jay (OJ) is one of the most successful sales leaders of the last decade. Most recently, OJ spent 6 years at Asana where he was hired as the company's first revenue leader. As CRO, OJ was responsible for product-led and sales-led revenue and grew the team from less than 20 to over 450. Before Asana, OJ spent 4 years at Dropbox in a period of hyper-scaling for the business where OJ was Head of APAC and LATAM. At Dropbox, OJ scaled the sales team from 0 to 50 while tripling ARR. If that was not enough, OJ is also an independent board member at Grab, the leading Super app in Southeast Asia. In Today's Episode with Oliver Jay You Will Learn: 1.) Entry into Sales: How did OJ make his way into sales with Dropbox? If OJ were to choose 1-2 lessons from his time at Dropbox and Asana that have stayed with him, what would they be? How did they impact his mindset? What were some of the non-obvious but crucial things Asana and Dropbox did in sales that led to success? 2.) The Playbook: Why does OG disagree with so many definitions of "the sales playbook"? What is the sales playbook to OJ? What are the different chapters? Should the founder be the one to create the sales playbook? What are the signs that the founder has a repeatable and scalable playbook? When is the right time to hire the first sales rep? Should it be a Head of Sales or Sales Rep? How does the first hire depend on whether you are PLG or enterprise sales led? 3.) The Hiring Process: How does OJ structure the hiring process? How does OJ know the qualities that he wants to uncover in each candidate? What questions does OJ ask to unpack whether the candidate has those qualities? How does this differ when hiring sales reps vs sales leaders? How does OJ use the sales demo to test the quality of a candidate? What does he want to see? Who does OJ bring into the interview process? When do they get involved? What are two questions that will immediately tell whether someone is a good manager? 4.) Sales Onboarding: How does OJ segment sales onboarding into 3 crucial steps? Chapter 1: Support: Why does OJ believe it is so important for reps to spend their first week with support? What should they look to learn? What questions should they be asking? Chapter 2: Market Knowledge: How can sales leaders teach and educate new reps on market landscape, dynamics and competition? Why does this have to come before sales training? Chapter 3: Sales Training: In the final step, what does the sales training process? What does OJ look for in the final sales demo? When does OJ let reps speak to customers? How does this differ when comparing enterprise to PLG?

Sub Club
8 Principles for Sustainable Growth — Sean Ellis & Ethan Garr, Breakout Growth

Sub Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 52:40


On the podcast I talk with Sean and Ethan about the importance of a north star metric, optimizing for speed to value, and why product/market fit needs to be dialed in over time.Sean has worked on growth at some of the fastest growing companies in the world, like Dropbox, Lookout, and Eventbrite. He not only coined the term “growth hacking”, but literally wrote the book on it. Today, Sean helps companies around the globe accelerate customer and revenue growth through workshops, keynote presentations, and select advising roles.Ethan got his start in subscription apps working on product at TelTech, which was acquired by IAC in 2018. He co-invented and led the company's flagship app, RoboKiller and helped to grow TelTech's other top communications apps including TrapCall and TapeACall. Ethan now helps companies improve their growth trajectories through workshops, coaching, and as a trusted advisor.In this episode, you'll learn: Sean & Ethan's proven principles for achieving sustainable growth  Tips for dialing in your product/market fit What metrics you should track for your subscription app How to create a better onboarding experience for your users Sean & Ethan's Links Breakout Growth's website Check out The Breakout Growth Podcast Download the Principles of Sustainable Growth PDF Sean Ellis: Hacking Growth: How Today's Fastest-Growing Companies Drive Breakout Success Follow Ethan on Twitter Ethan's LinkedIn page Sean's website Follow Sean on Twitter Sean's LinkedIn page Follow us on Twitter: David Barnard Jacob Eiting RevenueCat Sub Club

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS VOCES: Bilingual Audition Challenge

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 35:47


Anne & Pilar are casting directors! Or at least they were for the first ever #VOBOSS Bilingual Audition challenge. They share the common mistakes, honorable mentions, and (of course) the winners! Tune in to sharpen your auditioning skills & learn what the audition selection process is really like. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, and I am here with the one and only amazing special guest co-host Pilar Uribe. Hey Pilar. How are you? Pilar: Hola todos. ¿Cómo están hoy? Anne: Hola. So Pilar, I'm super excited today because a few weeks back we launched the VO BOSS Spanish bilingual audition challenge. Woohoo! Like it was our first bilingual audition challenge that I've ever seen actually and conducted. And I'm super excited because we sent out the casting first of all through our good friends over there at CastVoices, Liz Atherton and the team over there at CastVoices. We sent out this audition through their system, and we also sent an email to all of you BOSSes out there. And we also published far and wide on social media. So let's talk a little bit about what the specs were for this audition challenge. So the specs were, it could be male, female, non-binary, age range from 25 to 65. So the purpose of this audition challenge was primarily for educational purposes. And so we cast the net far and wide. Our specs were for male, female, and non-binary, age range from 25 to 65. So our specs also wanted to grab a diverse range of voice talent. The voice should be confident, knowledgeable, we have a lot of adjectives here, optimistic, never take themselves too seriously, but at the same time don't come off as sarcastic either, warm, human, down-to-earth, and playful. Their delivery is conversational, relatable, and above all else nothing that is typical commercial sounding ,movie trailer, or announcery at all. Sounds pretty common to me, those specs, right, Pilar? . Pilar: Yeah. And, and the thing is, is that a lot of the times you get just this three paragraphs worth of specs, 'cause they, they want to really throw the kitchen sink in. And the casting directors, they're looking for something. So they're trying to be as helpful as possible. Anne: Yes. Pilar: And sometimes as voice actors, we go, oh my gosh, they gave us so much. Anne: Sometimes it's not helpful. Pilar: Really and truly -- yeah, well right. But they're trying to give you as much information as possible -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- so you can make your creative choices. Anne: Absolutely. We also specified that talent should read both Spanish and English versions with or without a specific regional accent. And we were going to judge on performance. We wanted two separate MP3s delivered and labeled and named in a particular fashion. And also what else did we specify? Oh, it needed to be uploaded to a Dropbox location that we had set up for the challenge. Pilar: Well, and I think we were very conscious of what we do on a daily basis. I mean the auditions that come in from my agents are very, very similar to that. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: So we wanted to make it as close to a real audition as possible. Anne: Absolutely. Pilar: And you get this list of things that you need to look at and you need to look at all the aspects of the audition. Anne: Absolutely. We also gave some references. So if people wanted to learn some more, we pointed back to a couple of episodes that you and I did about bilingual on the VO BOSS podcast. And very exciting, we have prizes. So we are going to be selecting today three winners. We are going to select the best English audition, the best Spanish audition, and the best English and Spanish combined. So the prizes are going to be an amazing choice of swag from the VO BOSS shop. And also thank you so much to, again, our friends over there at CastVoices and Liz Atherton, a one year CastVoices pro membership, courtesy of Liz and CastVoices. So very excited about that. All right. So let's talk overall what we thought about the contest and how it went. And actually we gave, I think it was almost two weeks we gave. The due date was to -- Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: -- have everything submitted by 6:00 PM Pacific on April 15th. And we took that very seriously because that gave you almost two weeks to submit. We did have some people that submitted a couple, and I was okay with that. Normally that's not how it works in the audition process. You wanna get your audition in probably sooner if you can, rather than later, but because this was an educational experiment, an educational process, I said it was okay to upload alternate files as long as they were in by the due date. So let's talk about the good, the bad and the ugly Pilar: Oh yeah. Anne: Let's start with the ugly. I'm just gonna say, we could probably say it together. One of the biggest things was not following directions. I mean, everything from uploading to the wrong spot and the one that you kept catching. So I know you're gonna say no slate. We requested a slate, and there was so many people that did not have a slate. And that made a difference if it came between two close contestants. So it did make a difference. Not auditioning for both spots. And I'm gonna say the ugly would be ugly audio because people didn't have a good recording environment. There might have been noise. People might have been -- noise in the background. I heard like some whirring and hissing and I don't even know, people plosive-ing on the mics. Pilar: Or they were different levels. Anne: Yep. Different levels. Pilar: One was really loud. The other one was way softer. Anne: Exactly. So yeah. What was ugly for you? Pilar: So for me, the reason why we did this was really, we wanted to simulate what a real audition is like. And the whole slating thing is just, I've been in webinars where they say, well, it doesn't really matter anymore. It really does. And I get probably, on any given day, let's say, I'll get 10 auditions, five of them say, please slate your name when you send in your MP3. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: And that's one thing and it's into highlighted. And then the other way it comes in is do not slate anywhere on your file, in bold letters, capitalized, highlighted. So the direction was, and it was really simple, just slate your name. Anne: Right. Pilar: And of -- we had 110 auditions, almost half -- Anne: I think it was 120, yeah. Pilar: 120? Anne: Yeah, okay, so half of them. Pilar: So almost half of them -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- came without a slate. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: So that is just glaring because obviously people were quick to rush. Other things that we got, which weren't really necessary -- and I will tell you, because my agents in LA are a little bit more forgiving, but the agents in New York, they are very clear on their auditions that if you don't do it exactly the way they say, they are just not submitting you. Anne: Yeah. If you can't follow directions, then it's very likely that you can't follow direction. Pilar: Right. Anne: Get it? Pilar: And -- exactly. And so when it says, like your name, you slate your name. Don't slate your hometown, don't slate -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- your email address. When you label -- and this is something that is, you know, you copy and you paste it. You don't try to sit there and memorize it. The reason I say this too is because as a voice actor, I saw a lot of mistakes that I have been guilty of at some point. So it was actually a real learning experience for me to go, oh, okay. Once I have done my audition, I've edited it, and I've checked all these things, I -- and I've been doing this for a while, but it really makes me understand that I have to have an eagle ear -- I go and I put it in a file. I go away, I take my headphones off, and then I come back to it and I listen to it as an MP3. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Because you can't trust your ears. And a lot of the times there are things that just, they don't correlate. So if it says, slate your name, you slate your name. And when you label, you label the way they're asking you to label. So you have to check and recheck your audition because here's the thing about auditions. Auditions are the job. This is what we do. This is what I do every day. The gigs are the hobby, and the gigs are wonderful, but really it is the job. And so if you are submitting to your agent, they need to know that you're serious. They need to know that you're gonna be able to send your auditions the way they asked you to send them. Anne: Mm-hmm. absolutely. Pilar: Because this is not a dress rehearsal. It's not something that you just slap together. It's better not even to send it in, if you're just gonna kind of do it in this sort of half-baked way. Anne: That's such a good point. What happens is, especially if you're sending to your agent, I think that if you become a person and they -- you get a lot of auditions from your agent and you submit all the time -- if you're constantly not following directions, that agent remembers it. And whether or not they mention that to you, I'm sure they will at some point, but it just sticks in their brain. It sticks in my brain when you don't follow directions, because I'm like, ah, that would was a great read, but they didn't name it right. Or I lost it; where did it go? If they had named it right, I would find it. What was that audition that was so good? Or they didn't slate. Oh yeah. What was that guy? So really it becomes something that sticks out in a way that maybe is not as positive as you'd like. And the next time you're asked to submit an audition, I think it just becomes something that gets stuck in their memory. Then it becomes like, well, again, they forgot to slate, or again, they didn't name the file correctly, so now I've gotta go and fix it here on my system. So that just really stands out, I think if you cannot follow directions. And again, if you can't follow directions, it leads me to think that you cannot follow direction either, so. Pilar: Well, and here's the thing that it's even more serious because it's your category, and it's one audition. They're probably dealing with 30 auditions on any given day -- Anne: If not more, right? Exactly. Pilar: Yeah. But let's just put 30 as a, let's just say 30 auditions on one given day. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: So let's say they are submitting five of their best people, but they're sending it out to 50 people for each audition. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: They don't have time to sit there and email you back and say, you did not slate. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: Or you did something or, or there was a mistake here. They're just not gonna submit you the next time. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: They're not gonna tell you because the whole thing is on you. You have to be proud of the fact that you are -- this is -- it's a craft; auditions are a craft. And so it's like, you're giving like a little mini performance. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Because you're basically saying to the person who's hearing on the other end, I can do what you asked me to. Anne: Mm-hmm. Absolutely. Pilar: So you have to make sure that it, it is all in place because if you ask them, because I have. I mean, at the very beginning, when I first started working with my agents and I wasn't booking and I, so I asked them, and they gave me some really constructive criticism. And so I went and I studied more with some specific people, and then I started booking, but they're not gonna sit there and say, oh well, you didn't slate and you keep not slating. And we can't submit you. They're just gonna ignore you. Anne: Everything contributes, everything contributes to it. Pilar: Yeah, exactly. Anne: Absolutely. Pilar: So it, it's so important. For everybody who slated, thank you. And for everybody who followed the directions, thank you. But for the people who didn't, just remember that there's more than one pair of ears listening. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: And so for the next time, make sure that you've crossed your T's and dotted your I's when you send submissions in. Anne: I mean, every time when people are asking casting directors, what are the worst things you can do when you submit an audition? Pilar: What's your pet peeves, yeah. Anne: And that is not following directions. Now, the other thing I noticed for the ugly was the bad audio. So, you know, it's unfortunate. It is part of the business though; you do have to have a good studio or a great studio where you can produce quality audio. And if you have bad audio and, and it becomes between you and another person who had it, maybe an equally great read, I'm gonna pick the person that has the good studio or the, the studio. Because I cannot guarantee, let's say, even though you may not have the best studio sound, that you're gonna be able to come into the studio and then execute by tomorrow, if that's when I need the spot to be done. So you really have to invest in figuring out how to get the best quality audio out of your studio. Pilar: And just, it's so important to note that having the best quality studio does not mean you have to spend $5,000. Anne: Exactly. Pilar: Because what they're looking for to be able to submit to the client, what they're looking for is clean audio. It does not have to be a $10,000 studio, a $10,000 booth. It has to be clean. So there's, there are parameters that you have to follow in terms of getting that -65 DB noise floor. It's not hard, but it just takes work. And you have to be able to put in the time and find out how to get that quality. Anne: Well, the cool thing is is that once you get it set up, usually you don't have to change it. It's not like you're gonna have to improve it afterwards. Pilar: Exactly. Anne: And there's a lot of really wonderful audio engineers out there that can help you. They don't have to come to your house. Pilar: And they don't have to cost an arm and a leg either. Anne: They don't, but they're very well worth -- Pilar: There's some great people out there. Anne: They're very well worth the investment of getting that sound to be in tiptop shape. Pilar: Yeah. Yes. Because once you have it, then you've got it forever. I, yeah, absolutely. Anne: Exactly. Pilar: Good point. Anne: And that's, and it's done, you know, set and done. So let's talk about, okay, that was the ugly. There might be more if we, if we wanna talk about it more, but I'm gonna go into the bad now, which is not quite as ugly, but the bad is -- so let's think about this. Probably 90% of the time for a commercial read these days, we are being asked for conversational, nothing, typical commercial sounding or announcery. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: Honest to God. Every time I see it, it's like nothing that sounds commercially. So I think that for a lot of you, it's hard to hear yourselves because I think what you're trying to do is sound like you're conversational, and you're not actually acting, and you're not actually in a scene and being conversational. So I'm just gonna say that it's not bad. It's just that you need to develop that ear. You need to really put in the hours for getting yourself as best as you can be in the scene, acting it out so that it's believable and it's authentic. And the thing is, is that when you listen to 200 auditions, it is very obvious which ones are sounding authentic and genuine, and which ones are just trying to sound conversational, and of course those that are being announcery. So it becomes very evident to the ear when you listen to it. And I think when we reveal some of the winners, you're gonna hear that as well. So I'm just gonna say maybe not the bad, but I think everybody always, it is our job to be good at what we do and to be able to bring that copy to life in the way that the director wants to. And so to get my ear, the casting director's ear, if you can show me that you can act, I'm gonna hire you because then if I want you to sound commercially, it's a piece of cake. And a lot of times that might be what you hear on the television. But the fact is is that when you're auditioning, you gotta show me that you can act, and that's the audition that I'm gonna pick. Pilar: And the thing is when you know, people will say, well, what do I do? Where do I go? And coaching is so expensive and this and this and that. Well, it does take work, and it does take learning, but here's the thing. YouTube and iSpot TV are your best friends. Anne: Mm, I'm gonna disagree with you there. Pilar: Why? Anne: Because yes, you can go and listen to the commercials. But again, if the end result is being directed to sound commercially, it's not necessarily gonna help you not sound commercially. Pilar: No, but I'm talking about getting an ear for what is being heard on the radio. For example, if you don't know what it sounds like for, let's say a Ford commercial, you go and you look up a Ford commercial. It's like, when you don't know something, you go and you look it up. If you're auditioning, like, let's say you don't know what a microwave sounds like. You go and you look up, what does a microwave sound like? How can I experiment with how a microwave sounds like? Let me play with it. 'Cause that's what we saw, what we heard in these reads, people who were willing to take a little chance and people who were willing to sort of put some of their personality in there. That's what I mean in terms of doing research for trying to figure out, well, what is it, if I don't really know what it is -- go listen and also study. Absolutely. But there's always research to be done when you are voicing something that you might not be super familiar with. Anne: I will agree with you there. If you're not familiar with the brand, I would absolutely go and do a Google search of the brand. And I'm gonna just say, I'm gonna be very careful listening to other commercials on YouTube and or iSpot. Some of them are amazing, but some of them are not -- if they're ask for a particular style of a read, just be careful. Because not everything that you hear on TV is conversational. And so if the specs are asking for that, then make sure that you go and find something that sounds conversational and not commercial. And if you are new to the industry, I would recommend that you get some coaching to help you with that, to help develop your ear. I think you should consider it to be an investment in your business. And I'm not saying this because I'm a coach. I'm really not. I just know that the longevity of this profession, you learn it's a marathon, not a sprint. Over the years, I've studied, I've coached and I've developed an ear. And I think that that is something that doesn't happen overnight. And so you really have to go and study, Google and make sure you're listening to good commercials and great actors and invest in a coach. And I'm not saying you need to invest in a coach for 10 years, but I think even the best still hit up coaches so that they can continue to be their best. All right. So, and now for the really good, now we're going to announce the winners of each category. So let's start with the winner for English, and the winner is....Joe Lewis. Yay, Joe. Let's play his winning audition. Joe: Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: Yay. Congratulations, Joe Lewis. So let's talk about what we liked about Joe's audition. I'll start with saying, I really liked his warm tone. I thought that it was really friendly and super conversational. Pilar: Yeah, absolutely. I will say he did not slate... but his audition was so good, and he made me feel sort of like, oh wow. He made me feel warm. That's what his voice made me feel. Anne: Yeah, me too. Pilar: And that, and that's so important -- Anne: Me too. Pilar: -- when you're listening to any kind of commercial, when you're listening to a voiceover, if they make you feel something -- Anne: I was just gonna say that, yes. Pilar: Then you know that you have reached that person. You've reached that, you know, it's like you've gone through the sound and through the, through the computer, through the cyberspace, and you've reached that person, 'cause you're like, oh yeah, okay. This is, this is cool. I, I, I could trust this person. Anne: Yeah. Such a good point because that is exactly how I felt when I listened to it. And when I listened to it for the first time, I immediately went, oh it wasn't like, oh I love the sound of that. I love the way he did this particular. I mean, there's lots of aspects of it that I love, but it was the feeling that I was left with, and that is gold, pure gold. So yeah, if you can just listen to an audition or listen to a spot and you are able to feel something about it, then I think that is, that is the money, that is the money read. So yeah. Congratulations. And I loved how at the end he really kind of had a different tone, a change of tone. He kind of brought his voice down like, oh it was a secret about the burrito. So I liked his ending burrito. Awesome. All right. So now there were so many good reads that we also decided to award an honorable mention for the English category, and we think you're gonna really enjoy her read too. So the honorable mention in English goes to....Sofia Zita. Congratulations, Sofia. Let's play her audition. Sophia: Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: Oh gosh. So I love Sophia's beep that like that struck me from the beginning. I just thought it was really cute. And I'm gonna say at the very end, like she did something, she went off mic. She did an off mic technique for her burrito, which I thought was super creative and super fun. And I thought that her personality, while I thought there were some places in, you know, maybe her first couple sentences where it may not have the flow of a conversational English, her personality just shown so brightly through it that I couldn't help but smile when listening to her. So again, it evoked a feeling out of me, and that pretty much just said, yep. She needs to get an honorable mention for that. So great work on that, Sophia. What are your thoughts? Pilar: I felt like she was talking right to me. I felt like she was standing right next to me talking to me from the get-go. And I was like, oh wow. It's like, she was right there next to me. I don't know it just, again, it gave me this warm feeling inside, and I was like, okay. Yeah. Anne: Yeah. So that really unique beep and that off mic technique really grabbed me at the beginning and at the end too. Pilar: Yep. Anne: So it made her pretty memorable. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: All right. Congratulations, Sofia. All right. Let's talk about now the winner in the Spanish category, and Pilar, I'm gonna let you handle that. Pilar: So the winner in the Spanish category is.... Milena Benefiel, and this is her submission. Milena: Milena Benefiel. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Pilar: I felt like she was very just right there and very straight forward. And you know, this is how it's done. And there was that little sort of laugh at the end. And I, I just, I love this read. Anne: I thought she had a nice, warm smile and a lot of personality in it. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: And so I really enjoyed her, and there were so many good ones, but I, I think for her, I just felt an immediate connection with that. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: She was, it was almost like she was in my ear. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: And that's a very cool feeling. It's like, hey, telling you a secret and let me tell you about this Toyota. So yeah. Lots of fun and nicely done. Congratulations, Milena. Pilar: Okay. So now we have an honorable mention for the Spanish version and the runner-up was....Nicoletta Mondellini, and here is her read. Nicki: Soy Nicki Mandolini con Dos Thomas. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito ya está listo. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Anne: . I'm all about her beep, I'm just saying. Pilar: Her, yeah, her beeps are really fun. And so since we didn't specify one take -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- or two takes, obviously there a few people who submitted two takes, and I really liked her read because it was different, the first one from the second. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: The first one was very bubbly. Anne: Mm-hmm, yep, absolutely. Pilar: And it was bouncy, and it was full of energy, and the second one was straightforward, but it was still warm, still engaging. Anne: I agree. Pilar: Still talking right to you. And I liked that. Anne: I agree. And I, I think you're right. We didn't say one or two takes, we didn't make a specification, but I think that if you are going to submit two takes, make sure that those two takes are different and different enough so that we can hear that difference. Because for me, that ended up being the point where I said, oh, that was a really cute take. I was like, okay. Short list. But there was a few people on my short list, but when she went on the second take, it showed to me that she could actually have a different take and act. And so I tended to choose her because she did the second take because now I know for a fact that she can give me a different read, and I know I can feel confident that when I'm directing the session, that she can give me what I need. Pilar: That she can deliver. Anne: Yeah. That she can deliver. And so congratulations. And that beep really kind of stuck out. And so here's the thing we asked, 'cause beep beep was kind of a sound effect in the file. We never really specified where the beep was coming from. Even though it seems obvious that maybe it would come from a car or a microwave. But what I loved is most people had a lot of fun with the beep beeps, and I applaud that because that's what made your auditions stand out, if you had fun with the beeps or if you could laugh at yourself. I had a couple of people that really, really went all out for the beeps. And I think that it paid off. Pilar: Because when you bring that little teeny weeny piece of creativity, it affects your voice. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: And it affects your attitude. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: And so that tells us as the casting directors, oh, they know how to play. They know how to give us a, a little bit of a different flavor for that particular moment, even if it's just two seconds long. Anne: Yup. Absolutely. Pilar: So that's really important. Anne: Cool. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: All right. So now our final category, our combination. Pilar: You know what? Anne: Yeah? Pilar: I feel like this deserves two drum rolls. Okay? Anne: because let's talk about the English first and then the Spanish. How's that? Pilar: Exactly. Anne: We'll do that. So one drum roll, one drum roll. Pilar: One drum roll. Anne: Winner of the English is Ramesh Mathani. Congratulations, Ramesh. Let's play his winning read in English. Ramesh: This is Ramesh Mathani. Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and all our new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: So two completely different reads and interestingly enough, he had a little bit of a, a global international accent on his first read and then more of a straight English read on the second, but they were definitely different. And I remember listening to his first read, I thought, oh, that's really, that sounds nice. But I was just like, okay, I let it -- and then when he came in with the second one and had a different read completely, and even had a different like burrito he had a different burrito expression, I really just thought that that really showed his acting ability. And I was, I was just very impressed. Pilar: Yeah. And I just, I wanna reiterate how important it is to have, if you're going to do two reads, make them different. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Obviously you don't wanna, you know, have a low voice and then have a high voice because that's kind of silly, but there were a couple of entries where the exact same thing was uploaded twice. Anne: Mm-hmm. yep. Pilar: Or a read was done double time, much quicker. Anne: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. Pilar: But that doesn't make it a different read. What's your attitude? Who are you talking to? Anne: Right, exactly. Pilar: Are you talking to your mother or are you talking to your best friend? Anne: Sure. Pilar: Are you talking your husband? 'Cause that's going to inform the difference in the read and that's what's gonna make a difference and show us that you know how to act. Anne: Yeah. Change the scene and change your read. Don't just change what it sounds like. Right? Pilar: Yeah. Anne: Change your scene and it'll change your reaction to it and your acting. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: So awesome. So now let's go ahead and play his winning audition in Spanish. Oh! Pilar: One more time for the drumroll. Anne: That's right. Ramesh. Pilar: Ramesh. Ramesh: Soy Ramesh Mathani. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Anne: You know what I love about that? Pilar: What? Anne: So besides that he's got two different reads, what is really strategic that he did is he placed in both his English and Spanish placed his second read right at the end of the first so that there was no time for the casting director to just like, okay, next. So he literally almost ran them into each other so that it was obvious that there was a second read coming, and it was actually really kind of cool that beep beep was the words because it made it even more like distinct that here's the first read. Here's the second read. But he just, he really butted them up against each other to strategically not allow the casting director to take the ears off of the listen. Pilar: Yeah. And that's so important as we've probably discussed in an earlier podcast, how casting directors are gonna listen to you. They say they listen to everything, but my question has always been -- 'cause I listened to every single one of these. Anne: Do they? Yes, I did too. Mm-hmm. Pilar: And to the end. So when I hear casting directors say we listen to every single one, I wonder, do they listen to every single one to the end? Anne: Right. Pilar: Or do they in fact listen to -- Anne: The first part. Pilar: -- six seconds -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- which is what is sort of the average. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: And that's why it's so important to remember the ears that are listening to it on the other end. What you're saying is something that I'm gonna use too is just to -- Anne: Yeah, super strategic. Pilar: -- just to smoosh it right next to it so you you're not giving -- to me, one of the things I learned when I started doing on camera work so many years ago, 'cause I've been doing auditions for like over 30 years, is that you wanna make it really difficult for them to turn you off. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. That's it, that's key. Pilar: Or to discount you. Anne: Yep. Pilar: So you wanna do everything possible and obviously you don't wanna make it sound rushed, but it's -- and that's what it means about making, just perfecting the audition. So it's like a little slice of this perfect 30 seconds, and it's not about, you know, being perfect. That's not the point of it. Anne: Yeah, absolutely, good point. Pilar: But it's just about how much you can give to the audition that you're sending in. And then you just, you know, you send it in, and then you let it go and you release it. Anne: Yep. Exactly. Pilar: And I think that he gave us variation. He gave us warmth. Anne: He gave us the feels. Pilar: I trusted him in both languages. So I felt like, oh yeah, okay. If this stranger came up to me and spoke to me, I'd be like, yeah, this is okay. I can go with this. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: So that's so important because it's about confidence. It's about confidence in what you're doing in the moment as you are acting. And so if you believe what you're saying, the person on the other end is gonna believe it as well. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. Oh, great takeaways. I mean, so let's remember, BOSSes, make sure that first of all, you follow directions . First of all, follow directions, make sure that you've got some good audio coming out, really work on your acting, make us feel something at the end of your read. And again like Pilar, I love that you said it doesn't have to be perfect. And as a matter of fact, there's a lot of imperfections. I even wrote a blog article on it once, but imperfections are beautiful, and imperfections make me listen. They make me connect. It makes you relatable. It makes you real and authentic, and play, have fun. Pilar: Play and have fun. And don't be worried about if your throat does something weird and it comes out -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- and it's funny, keep it. Anne: If you don't think it sounds right. Pilar: Yeah. Right. Like don't get rid of all your breaths. If that's part of the acting, keep them in there. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: It does not have to be perfect. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: But it has to be engaging so we stop and go, oh yeah. That's what that, that's it, that's the one. 'Cause most of the times casting directors don't know what they're looking for. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: But when they hear it, they're like, yes, that's it. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: That's what I want. Anne: Absolutely. Well, to wrap this all up guys, congratulations. Thank you all for participating. It was an amazing challenge, I think. Everyone, I thank you all for participating. Congratulations to our winners, winner of the English, Joe Lewis, and honorable mention to Sofia Zita. Pilar: Winner of Spanish Milena Benefiel, winner honorable mention Nicoletta Mondellini. Anne: And the winner for both English and Spanish, Ramesh Mathani. Pilar: Ramesh! Woo-hoo! Anne: Congratulations, everyone. I'd like to give a huge shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect like BOSSes and find out more atipddl.com. You guys, have an amazing week, and we'll catch you next week. Congratulations, winners. Woo-hoo! Pilar: Ciao. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor’s Journey
Brian Keith Graziani Illustrates How Talent Agents Impact an Actor's Career

Why I'll Never Make It - An Actor’s Journey

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 54:20


Of the many actors I've interviewed and talked to personally I would say that there are at least two main objectives for most of them. One falls under auditions: getting in the biggest rooms for the best roles. And the second one falls under agents: getting representation that can get you into those bigger rooms.  My on-camera agent Brian Keith Graziani and I have been working together since late 2020 for a range of projects--from commercials and industrials to TV dramas and docu-series. Brian himself started out as an actor and singer, and just sort of fell into casting, which then led to talent management and representation. While he still loves performing, this new career path has allowed him to have a greater impact on the careers and livelihoods of other actors. Having had such wide-ranging experiences in theater, Brian is uniquely qualified to guide and represent actors like myself. And he certainly has a lot to say, he's not one to hold back what he thinks at all, especially when it comes to auditioning, communication, and one of my least favorite parts of this business: self-tapes.   Connect with Brian and The Hell's Kitchen Agency - Website | Instagram | Email      Audition and Submissions Tips When Using an Agent by Brian Keith Graziani If you decline an audition through an online system, email your agent as well. They often do not get notifications when you decline for some reason.  Unless your tape request specifies not needing one, always include a slate (stating name, height, and location). Be sure to double check casting self-tape labeling requirements (i.e. how to name the video file) and how to submit it (YouTube, DropBox, eco-cast, etc.). Each office has their own system for receiving and organizing submissions. Be sure to double check if casting specifies they want everything in one file or separate files. If casting doesn't specify, it's probably best to separate files as a safe alternative.  Double check due dates! Extensions are sometimes possible, but asking for it after everything is due just makes everyone look like we dropped the ball.  Be open about needing a break. The self tape fatigue struggle can be real and it's important to communicate such a feeling if you ever need a minute to recharge.  A piece of advice: Say yes and get seen. Unless you feel like the quality of work you're presenting wouldn't present you in the best light, there is always merit to getting into the "room" and making sure casting knows who you are. If you have a major "why" then ask...but remember, every minute spent trying to convince you to submit for a job is a minute that could have spent submitting or pushing you, so trust the process.  Are any traits that make for a successful actor? The answer is always "the actors who work the most and garner the most fruitful results from auditions are the ones who work with an agent daily to make their expectations clear". Clearly communicate what you will do, and want to do, just as much as what you won't do.     Final Five Questions When it comes to theater, Brian Keith Graziani has been many things — actor, singer, casting director, talent agent. And each job has given him new perspective and understanding of what it means to succeed in this very subjective and finicky industry. After sharing his three stories from his time in the business, He also answers five final questions on the WINMI Blog.  

CQ Blind Hams
CQBH 73 NANO VNA Saver 3 on a Mac with Gena M0EBP

CQ Blind Hams

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 5:03


Today Gena M0EBP shows us more with NNANO VNA Saver on a Mac. Transcripts can be downloaded by clicking on DropBox link below. https://www.dropbox.com/s/nm0rwwrnitib48a/NanoVNA-Saver-3.txt?dl=1 Don't forget to visit www.blindhams.com

Free Time with Jenny Blake
094: Top 5 Tools That Power My Business

Free Time with Jenny Blake

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 22:44


It's time to stop Franken-stringing software together. If you've read Free Time or been listening to this podcast, you know I am obsessed with software. Tools are my default go-to team member, given how much they do for my business. Today I'm sharing the top five tools that power my business . . . plus a few bonus “utility” tools that are always running in the background (I couldn't resist).

Les Technos
Applications gratuites, Google en faillite, zero taxe sur les bénéfices

Les Technos

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 49:09


Episode 354 avec Sebastien S. et Sebastien B..Sommaire :A comme Applications Gratuites (00:01:06) Chez Huawei, on peut télécharger les Apps gratuitement sur Android. Télécharger des applications Android payantes sans payer c'était le cas chez Huawei. (source)D comme Déchiffrement (00:06:33) Quand l'Europe veut forcer le déchiffrement des messages. L'europe travaille sur un projet qui obligerait les fournisseurs à autoriser le déchiffrement de certains messages. (source)G comme GDPR (00:11:22) L'Espagne donne 10M€ d'amende à Google pour un soucis de droit à l'oubli. Google écope de 10M€ d'amende pour infraction GDPR sur le droit à l'oubli. (source)G comme Google (00:18:57) Quand Google est en faillite. Suite à la saisie de leurs comptes en banque en Russie, Google Russie se délcare en faillite. (source)O comme OVH (00:22:22) OVH lance un concurrent à Dropbox via Shadow. OVH lance un concurrent à Dropbox via Shadow. (source)S comme Salade (00:29:01) Quand on fait pousser des végétaux dans du sol lunaire. Des scientifiques testent la croissance de plantes dans de la terre lunaire. (source, source)T comme Taxes (00:34:39) L'Allemagne immunise les bénéfices sur la crypto. Pas de taxe sur les bénéfices crypto, c'est en Allemagne! (source)U comme Universel (00:39:43) Quand un bitoniau les remplace tous. Un bouton universel, connecté, pour remplacer tous les autres boutons. (source)

Learn Educate Discover
[126] Transitioning from Product Manager to Founder, Israel Shalom, Product Leader @Google, Dropbox

Learn Educate Discover

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 43:41


What is it like to transition from Product Management in Tech to being the Founder of your own company? What skills are transferrable and what skills do you need to learn afresh? How do you hone these skills on the job? ​Learn about all this and more in this discussion with Israel Shalom, former Product Leader at Google and Dropbox, who has now started his own company (currently in Stealth mode). Israel is also taking applications for those interested in joining a startup! You can reach out to him at iz@goodones.app if you have questions! Thanks for listening! You can subscribe to our newsletter on our website at www.learneducatediscover.com/ You can email us at hello@learneducatediscover.com Follow us on Twitter @LED_Curator

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch
20Growth: Five Signs of Top Growth Talent and How to Detect Them, How to Structure and Conduct the Most Efficient Customer Discovery Process & The Framework to Determine Your North Star and When To Change it with Darius Contractor, Former VP Growth @

The Twenty Minute VC: Venture Capital | Startup Funding | The Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:33


Darius Contractor is one of the pre-eminent growth leaders of the last decade. As a growth OG, he has been VP Growth @ Airtable, where he led the growth, engineering, and product teams. Before Airtable, Darius was Head of Product Growth @ Facebook Messenger and finally, before Facebook, Darius spent 4 years as Head of Growth Engineering at Dropbox; here, Darius helped drive Dropbox to $100M in net new revenue through Dropbox Business. If that was not enough, Darius is also an active angel and fund investor with a portfolio including Calm, Airtable, Clubhouse, Census and LP checks in Maven Ventures and Long Journey Ventures. In Today's Episode with Darius Contractor You Will Learn: 1.) Darius Contractor: Entry into Growth: How did Darius make his way into the world of growth? What was that first entry position? What are 1-2 of the biggest takeaways for Darius from his time at Airtable, Dropbox and Facebook? What 1-2 pieces of advice would Darius give to a growth leader starting a new role today? 2.) When is the Right Time: What does the term"growth" really mean to Darius? How do so many confuse it? When is the right time to make your first growth hire as a startup? Should this hire be a junior growth person or a growth leader? Should this initial growth team be placed inside an existing team or as a standalone team? Where do so many startups make mistakes when making this first hire? 3.) Who To Hire: How does one structure the process for your first growth hire? What are the stages? What are the qualities that we are looking to uncover in these first hires? What are the 4 interview stages to go through to test for these qualities? How should founders use case studies and practicals as a way to test for these qualities? 4.) Onboarding and Integration: What does the optimal onboarding process for new growth hires look like? What do the best growth hires do in the first 30/60/90 days? What are some early red flags that a new hire is a mis-hire? How can leaders encourage cross-functional communication between growth and the rest of the org?

The Design Business Show
The Design Business Show 185: Achieving Visibility Through Public Relations with Lisa Simone Richards

The Design Business Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 40:51


Lisa Simone Richards is a PR & Visibility Strategist for online coaches who want to get seen everywhere. Through her free workshops, masterclasses and mentorship program, she gives you the insider secrets on how to get exposure and reach more people without spinning on social media or wasting more money on Facebook ads. Her clients learn the lather-rinse-repeat formula for more visibility which makes them more sales. They go from invisible to in-demand getting interviewed on top podcasts, partnering with big names in their industry and building their authority expert status getting featured on major media like FOX, NBC, Forbes, Inc., and more. On weekends you can find her playing in the kitchen with her husband, petting ALL the dogs in the park, and watching way too many fashion styling videos on YouTube.   Here's what we covered on the episode:   How Lisa Got Started in Public Relations + Starting Her Own Business  Today Lisa is here to talk about public relations and press, which is a topic we haven't really covered on the show yet  When Lisa first learned about public relations, it was 2002, and she was in her first year of college – she became interested because Samantha Jones on Sex and the City made PR look super fun Right after college, Lisa worked for a beauty company; she also interned at Fashion Magazine and worked at a few fashion agencies where she would be behind the scenes at various shows or working designer suites during film festivals Eventually, Lisa moved into the agency world, where she had more corporate clients like Staples, Crayola, and Virgin Mobile  In 2009, Lisa got a taste of working with small businesses and entrepreneurs and fell in love with how much influence and impact she could have versus being a cog in the wheel at an agency  Lisa shares that she was able to help one company she worked at for four years grow from 30 locations in Ontario to over 100 across Canada and help take the company's revenues from $400k to over 4 million a year  Now in 2022, Lisa loves teaching creatives and online service-based business owners how to get earned media opportunities, how to get interviewed on people's television shows, podcasts, newspapers, magazines, and websites  Your ideal client is hanging out somewhere; Lisa helps show people how they can get access to that place, figure out who they need to know, come up with a creative message and get free access to their ideal clients while getting an endorsement at the same time  When Lisa started her business as a side hustle in 2015, she was running a PR agency called Vitality PR & Communications – what she saw in the market was people wanted to work with PR agencies, but their prices were set very high, and that wasn't realistic for up and coming, new business owners  Through Vitality, Lisa offered 3-month PR packages at a fraction of that cost – so clients could get access to exposure, get up and running, and then they could choose if they wanted to re-sign or not  Lisa wanted to have more impact, scale, and leverage, so she moved from the agency model into doing one-on-one coaching, group mentorship programs, and having courses – and shares that she still has all those things today, but what is fun is now she's starting to revisit the agency model  The differentiator before for Lisa was having shorter retainer plans, and now they have a 6-month model where they also train an in-house team – Lisa says it's like the publicists showing you the secrets that other publicists don't want you to know  Tips for Showing up Like a Pro + ABCs of Visibility  Lisa recommends that if you don't have a full media kit on your website, at least have a shareable Dropbox or Google folder with certain assets in there like, high-resolution images and headshots, and your bio Before you start going out for outreach, Lisa says you'll want to get really clear on your messaging – what is that lather-rinse-repeat message that you can use over and over again Lisa shares that she likes to work with clients on the messaging – she gets to work with a lot of very talented people who come to her with complex ideas and messaging, and then she gets to help deliver it in a way that will be consumer-friendly  The story of when Lisa worked with identical twin chiropractors in 2015, and they wanted to do a piece on what happens to your elbow and wrist alignment when you take a selfie and how Lisa worked with them on making that message interesting for consumers How Kim Kardashian was in the UK and took 1,500 selfies that week, so all of a sudden, they were able to change it into a story about what happens to your elbow and wrists when you take 1,500 selfies like Kim Kardashian – that's when it got picked up by national news, local radio and a magazine  Lisa wants to understand what a person's business goals are, so where she starts with that is what she calls the ABCs of visibility; are you looking to build A) awareness, B) Buzz, C) Credibility – understanding which one of these you are trying to achieve will determine the types of places that make sense for you to be seen Another thing Lisa likes to check in on is who are her clients and what are they comfortable with – someone who is introverted may not want to speak live at a conference or  be on national television – so really understanding a person and where they are going to shine helps Lisa decide where they should get started as well  Lisa shares that it's easy to have relationships in the industry, but they are not necessary - if you want to be on Good Morning America, for example, figure out who the segment producer that covers the topic is, send them an email with a good idea – it doesn't need to be harder than that  Easy Ways to Achieve Visibility + Lisa's Offers  Why you should have a healthy media mix for your audience when it comes to reading content, listening to content, or watching content   When it comes to written media, instead of writing on your website or doing a blog post, Lisa says you could do a guest blog post on someone else's site or go to Google and search write for us + your industry, and you will get websites that are looking for people to write on that topic, so you can put your content out where people are actually looking for it­­  For audio content, Lisa says you could be interviewed on podcasts, radio, or co-host rooms on Clubhouse Moving to visual content, you could be interviewed on a local morning television show, go live in someone else's Facebook group or Instagram, you could do a guest training in someone's mastermind, or speak on live or virtual stages  How imposter syndrome happens to everyone no matter what stage they are at in their business and how Lisa encourages her clients to write a not so humble brag sheet to help build confidence – grab a pen and paper; write down how much time and money you've invested in your specialty, and think about the results you've achieved  Lisa talks about the transition she went through in her business and says if you are going through a transition in your business, an easy thing to do is to take control of the platforms you own – update your profiles, and send an email to your list sharing your transition into your new niche When you are transitioning in your business, Lisa shares that you might have to start from scratch and build your brand according to your new niche – think about the new podcasts, stages, and websites it makes sense to be seen on and start positioning yourself for those opportunities so you can get in front of the right people Lisa's super deluxe package is for service owners who want to done-for-you PR services who don't want to be paying the agency endlessly on retainer – a 6-month package where Lisa does their PR and also trains someone on their team to be able to bring it in-house Where Lisa tends to work with most of her clients is inside her 6-month mentorship program, where she teaches everything she's learned in her 20 years of experience  How Lisa has a few entry-level courses on podcasting or getting on television where people can go through automated modules and teach themselves how to get publicity    Lisa shares that she used to offer a 30-day program but realized that doing it all for people to a certain degree keeps her up at night, so she doesn't offer that anymore – she's learned that she can come up with an amazing PR strategy and hand it off to someone on her team to execute  Although it's great we can now own our social media platforms, Lisa cautions us that our social media content is where we are nurturing our existing audience - It's not the same as visibility, which is why it's so important to get on other people's platforms to increase visibility and get lead generation A line Lisa learned and loves is “don't change your talk, change your audience” – get clear and consistent with your message and put it in front of new people over and over again because for those people, it's going to be the first time that they hear it and if they think about working with you, they will research and Google you, and a consistent message will instill trust  I talk about my business transition and the 3 things I want to offer, and Lisa comments on how I could package my 3 steps and position my message or how I could break down step 1 in-depth and help clients get little wins so when they want to keep going, they come back to me for step 2 and 3  How sometimes simplifying your process is better than overloading your audience with a bunch of content  After listening to this episode, Lisa encourages everyone to write down one thing they took away from the episode that makes sense for them and put it into practice  If you head over to Lisasimonerichards.com/quiz, there is a quiz called ‘How should I get visibility as an online Coach' – based on your answers, Lisa will share 1 of 5 ways to start getting visibility and send a training video so you can get started     Links mentioned:   Lisa Simone Richards Website   Get Clients From Podcasting Course   How Should You Get Visibility Online as a Coach? Like what you heard?  Click here to subscribe + leave a review on iTunes. Click here to download my Sales Page Trello Board Let's connect on Instagram!

Product Hive
Design Leadership Interview with Jasmine Friedl

Product Hive

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:35


Jasmine Friedl—Director of Design at Dropbox—discusses design leadership with Ben Peck, the founder of Product Hive. View this interview on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsR1hZfJju4 Check out producthive.org to see the latest events, join our community on Slack, and much more. Thanks to Joakim Karud for our music: soundcloud.com/joakimkarud/keep-on-going

Elevate with Robert Glazer
Kim Scott on Candor and Justice in the Workplace

Elevate with Robert Glazer

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 56:28


Kim Scott is one of Silicon Valley's most respected leadership experts. She has previously worked as an executive at Google, and as a CEO coach with Dropbox, Qualtrics, Twitter and several other leading organizations. She is also the New York Times bestselling author of two top books on leadership, Radical Candor and Just Work. In her second appearance on the show, Kim joined host Robert Glazer on the Elevate Podcast to discuss the importance of Radical Candor, effective management techniques, and how to create a more inclusive workplace. 

Marketing Against The Grain
Using Social Dynamics to Build Community with Capri Wheaton

Marketing Against The Grain

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:26


How do you mobilize your community as an early-stage startup? Capri Wheaton joins Kipp and Kieran to talk about how to scale a community using unscalable tactics, creating feed-based hype around your product, using social dynamics to your advantage, and how she dropped out of Berkeley to start her fashion-tech company, and more! Who is Capri Wheaton? Dressd Founder and CEO, Capri Wheaton studied at the University of California, Berkeley, before stepping away to start the app company Dressd, expected to launch in May. In business since November 2021, Dressd is funded by Y Combinator, an investor in early-stage startups and such well-known companies as Airbnb, Dropbox, Reddit, Twitch, and Instacart. Plus, Checkout Capri's work! IG: https://www.instagram.com/shop.dressd  TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@shopdressd  Twitter: https://twitter.com/Capri_lynnn  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/capri-wheaton-59863a199/  Thank you for tuning into Marketing Against The Grain! Don't forget to hit subscribe and follow us on Apple Podcasts (so you never miss an episode)! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/marketing-against-the-grain/id1616700934  If you love this show, please leave us a 5-Star Review https://link.chtbl.com/h9_sjBKH and share your favorite episodes with friends. We really appreciate your support. Links: Kipp Bodnar, https://twitter.com/kippbodnar  Kieran Flanagan, https://twitter.com/searchbrat ‘Marketing Against The Grain' is a HubSpot Original Podcast // Brought to you by The HubSpot Podcast Network // Produced by Darren Clarke.

Web Masters
Jesse Lipson @ ShareFile: The Solo Founder Who Bootstrapped an Enterprise SaaS App

Web Masters

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 37:29


As the ShareFile name implies, it's a software for sharing, storing, and otherwise managing files in the cloud. It's not a particularly unique service. In this episode, you'll hear ShareFile's founder, Jesse Lipson, mention some familiar competitors -- companies like Dropbox and Box and YouSendIt. Though, to be fair, in 2005, when the company launched. these types of services weren't so common. Still, cloud file management isn't exactly an obscure niche, meaning, there are a decent number of companies playing in the space, which makes for a challenging, competitive environment.However, despite that challenging environment, Jesse managed to bootstrap his company to an impressive exit over the course of six years.Bootstrapping enterprise SaaS apps isn't common. And it isn't easy, either. On this episode of Web Masters, we're going to hear how Jesse did it.For a complete transcript of the episode, click here.

Unresolved
The Long Island Serial Killer (Update)

Unresolved

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 39:14


There has been an update in the story of Shannan Gilbert, the woman whose disappearance led to the discovery of the Long Island Serial Killer victims (episodes #14-16 from 2016). Authorities in Suffolk County have finally released the audio from Shannan's 911 call(s) on the night of her disappearance, which they have fought tooth-and-nail against releasing for the better part of a decade, fearing that it would impact their ongoing LISK investigation... while also claiming in the same breath that Shannan's death had nothing to do with this unidentified serial killer. To view the transcript, which I put together along with Jesse Pollack and Jeff Adamec back in 2020, please head to the following link: https://unresolved.me/lisk-update You can also download the file at the following Dropbox link:https://www.dropbox.com/s/6tc62llr0ahki0y/Shannan%20Gilbert%20Transcript.pdf?dl=0 Thanks to Jesse Pollack for chatting with me for this episode, and for editing it together while I tended to my daughter"Unresolved" theme song courtesy of Ailsa TravesIf you would like to support this podcast and others, consider heading to https://www.patreon.com/unresolvedpod to become a Patron or Producer

Real Leaders Podcast
Ep. 242 Behind the Man Who Built BitTorrent || Bram Cohen, Founder of Chia

Real Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 64:38


Whether it's DropBox, Google Drive, or iCloud, BitTorrent is responsible for many of the file sharing services we use today and Bram Cohen is it's creator. However, this episode is not about BitTorrent, this interview is about understanding the mind of a very intelligent human being who is continually striving to do good in the world. One of the ways Cohen is positioning new technology for the future is creating the new Chia Network. He and his team are doing this through building a better blockchain and smart transaction platform which is more secure, more sustainable, and more powerful. Have a listen to learn what inefficiency is there and how it is being solved. More From Real Leaders:--> Apply for the Real Leaders CEO Impact Collaborative at: https://members.real-leaders.com/become-a-member --> Take your leadership to the next level at https://members.real-leaders.com/product/annual-subscription/ to unlock access to Real Leaders courses, magazine, and member-only events. Use coupon code: podcast20 for 20% off a $100/year membership.

MinDesign
פרק 20 // מה הקשר בין Growth Hacking & Behavioral Insights? עם רועי פוברצ'יק, Growth hacker.

MinDesign

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 59:58


הפעם אירחנו את רועי פוברצ'יק.רועי הוא growth hacker, מרצה, בלוגר, פודקאסטר, האורח המארח הראשון שלנו (שאירח אותנו בביתו), סוס טרויאני (להגדרתו, תאזינו ותבינו), מוסיקאי ובן-אדם סופר מעניין באופן כללי.רועי שיתף אותנו בסיפורי הצלחה של חברות כמו Dropbox (איך הם פתרו את בעיית ה revenue שלהם) ו Amazon (איך נולד Prime וגם הצצה למאחורי הקלעים של רכישת רשת המזון Whole Foods ב- 13 מיליארד דולר).גם שמענו אנקדוטות מעניינות על החברות Facebook (Meta), Google, Clubhouse, Tinder, Snapchat, Uber, Monday, OKCupid, Starbucksלמדנו על מודלים תיאורטיים וכלים פרקטיים: מודל ה ICE (עם או בלי R), שלושת השלבים באבולוציה של חברה ומבחן הסבתא.~~~

The Breakout Growth Podcast
Growth Snack: Can you win with a “me too” product?

The Breakout Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:43


Is differentiation always important? If you are trying to grow, Sean Ellis and Ethan Garr, say it absolutely is, but it is not just about offering unique features. That’s the topic of this week’s Growth Snack: The Breakout Growth Podcast Short. Learn why it iscrucial to understand what the must-have experience looks like through the eyes of your customers, and why that is important in helping you to differentiate your business even in a crowded market. You might be surprised as you learn how Sean approached differentiation when he was interim head of growth at Dropbox. Or, you might find some inspiration as Ethan describes a company he is working with now that is launching a new product that will compete against products that solve the same problem for customers. Perhaps this will get you thinking about new questions to ask your customers to better distinguish your offerings. Either way, we think you will enjoy it! So jump in, and in less than 10 minutes you will have food for thought as you work to achieve breakout growth. We discussed: * The hot market trap; why copycats struggle to grow (01:03) * Differentiation is not just about nifty features or lower pricing (01:51) * What do customers see as unique? A lesson from Dropbox (03:41) * Why you should never assume fit transfers across products (05:24) * Fast-followers and other takeaways (07:21)

Data Protection Breakfast Club
"Wait, you're a cartographer?" w/ Andrew Howard - Director, Privacy & Data Policy @ Meta

Data Protection Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 48:46


In this episode, Andy & Pedro speak with Andrew Howard, Director - Privacy & Data Policy at Meta, who is also a working colleague to Pedro. They cover many topics including... Andrew's background and how his study of Geography shaped his career Team-building & Management, especially with people who are extremely smart Andrew's time at Microsoft Microsoft now as a company Andrew at Meta and his top 1% status How the landscape has changed at Meta, particularly after 2016 election Privacy issues & approaches at Meta Privacy issues at a small company vs. large company Deciding what is considered "fairness" what the the metric of fairness should be How the landscape of privacy shakes out and how soon Andrew's 80's focus and so much more... Andy and Pedro are active members of TechGC, an invitation-only community of General Counsels of high-growth technology companies and venture funds. TechGC was founded by 2 Venture GC's 2015 and now has over 2,500 GC members around the world and over 1,300 senior in-house counsel as part of the DeputyGC Program. Members range from early startups to late stage companies like Lyft, Slack, Pinterest, Dropbox, Cloudflare, etc.) or from venture funds (like Founders Fund, Softbank, First Round, Battery, etc.). Request invitation to join the TechGC Community here

Intelligence Squared Business
Scaling up Success, with Andrew Chen

Intelligence Squared Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:02


Andrew Chen is a specialist in growing tech businesses and for his new book, The Cold Start Problem, he has spoken to the founders of companies such as LinkedIn, Zoom, Uber, Dropbox, Tinder and Airbnb, to learn how startups can maximise their potential. Andrew has spent a career working with tech companies and tech investors, plus he's also a prolific writer with both a popular blog and newsletter. He joins economist and broadcaster Linda Yueh to discuss the new book and offer his insider's perspective on Silicon Valley success.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends
Coffee Talk Replay: How Inclusive Recreation Helps Ignacio Gallegos Find Purpose in Life — Episode 113

Open Space Radio: Parks and Recreation Trends

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 20:25


In the spirit of registration opening yesterday for the 2022 NRPA Annual Conference, I wanted to replay one of our Coffee Talks from last year's conference, when I had the opportunity to talk with Ignacio Gallegos and his grandmother, Leticia DeLaFuente. Ignacio has been a participant in the programs through Fox Valley Special Recreation Association in Illinois for the last 11 years, which he says has helped him find purpose in life. Ignacio, who was born blind, shares how the programs at Fox Valley have made him feel included, helped him participate in activities with his peers, and learn something that we have all become widely familiar with over the past few years – how to use Zoom and build connections virtually. I hope you enjoy this conversation – and be sure to stick around until the end when Ignacio performs his favorite karaoke song, which is one of his most loved programs to participate in. And, if you enjoy this Coffee Talk, I hope you'll join us at the 2022 NRPA Annual Conference, taking place in Phoenix, Arizona, this September 20-22. Register today at www.nrpa.org/conference. Tune in below to learn: What kinds of programs have improved Ignacio's quality of life the most What skills Ignacio has developed through the programs at Fox Valley Special Recreation How Leticia feels witnessing her grandson thrive and immerse himself in these programs The importance of connection and a sense of belonging How the staff at Fox Valley Special Recreation have made their way into Leticia and Ignacio's hearts, and much more! This episode of Open Space Radio is sponsored by Issuu – the ideal solution to bring your park and recreation program guides to life! Issuu works seamlessly with digital tools you already use, like Canva, Dropbox or InDesign, and allows you to easily create a flipbook with interactive elements and embed it on your park and rec agency's website or share via email and social media. You'll also save on printing costs – some park and rec agencies have saved over $50,000 per year by taking their program guides digital with Issuu! Get started today and get 30% off annual plans – visit www.issuu.com/go/parks. The promo code is already applied!

Pros & Content
Content-Fueled Growth with Zillow, Chime, Nielsen, Dropbox, and Paul Hastings

Pros & Content

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 43:24


Modern leaders recognize that a holistic content strategy not only connects data, product, sales, and marketing, but also helps reduce customer acquisition costs while fueling demand generation and growth.Hear from five growth leaders from different industries as they share how they make content-driven growth the core of their strategies (and how they tackle top-down mandates in their day-to-day). PANELISTSAnda Gansca | Co-Founder and CEO, Knotch (Moderator)Lindsay Chastain | Vice President, Brand & Growth Marketing, ChimeAlison Gensheimer | SVP, Global Digital and Growth Marketing, NielsenDeborah Holstein | VP, Global Marketing, DropboxRavi Kandikonda | Senior Vice President Marketing, Zillow GroupShade Vaughn | Chief Growth and Communications Officer, Paul HastingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Earnings Season
Dropbox, Inc., Q1 2022 Earnings Call, May 05, 2022

Earnings Season

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 39:39


Dropbox, Inc., Q1 2022 Earnings Call, May 05, 2022

Elektronista
#5 Del og Like- Død og data- evigt liv eller træk stikket?

Elektronista

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 63:22


Har du en hemmelig digital skuffe dine efterladte ikke må kigge i? Når et menneske dør, er en naturlig del af de pårørendes praktiske opgaver, at sikre at jordisk gods bliver fordelt mellem arvinger, forsikringer bliver udbetalt, bankkonti bliver lukket og boliger bliver opsagt. Men hvad med den digitale arv? Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, iCloud, LinkedIn, Tinder og Dropbox fortsætter som intet var hændt. Og hvad med alle mapperne med et liv i billeder på computeren? Over 90% af os har ikke taget stilling til, hvad der skal ske med vores data, når vi dør. Det betyder, at døde venner eller familiemedlemmer lever videre på de sociale medier som digitale spøgelser, og det skaber helt nye dilemmaer vi skal forholde os til.I panelet: Iværksætter og CEO for Heartbeats.dk Le Gammeltoft og komiker og forperson for Ateistisk Selskab Anders Stjernholm. Ph.d.-studerende og ekspert i digital arv Astrid Waagstein er denne uges ekspert. Vært er Christiane Vejlø. Programmet er produceret af Ninette Birck og Elektronista Media for ADD-projektet.

Sit Down Startup
DocSend's Russ Heddleston on the importance of getting product pricing right

Sit Down Startup

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 18:30


Since launching at New York's TechCrunch Disrupt back in 2014, DocSend was acquired by Dropbox in March 2021 and has brought on over 20,000 customers. In our Season 5 opener, Adam sat down for a virtual coffee with Co-Founder Russ Heddleston to get the lowdown on: How word of mouth is still important to achieve growth Using customer feedback as a base for making improvements Why founders should monetize their products from the get-go

The Sell More Books Show: Book Marketing, Digital Publishing and Kindle News, Tools and Advice
Episode 421 - Sell More Books, Working Your Backlist, and Changing Bonuses

The Sell More Books Show: Book Marketing, Digital Publishing and Kindle News, Tools and Advice

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 42:58


This week Claire is joined by author Jamie Davis! Join the Sell More Books Show Afterparty group on Facebook and answer the Question of the Week in the comment section. Be sure to leave us a review on Apple Podcast. Top Tips of the week include how to spot book problems, what you shouldn't do with social media, and what new feature Dropbox has. The 5 News stories that matter most to indies this week include how to make your backlist work for you, how KU readers are helping your reviews, what KU bonuses are changing, why Modi files are on the outs, and how groups have the power to sell books. Question of the Week: Do you think traditional publishing is going to change its mindset about backlist vs new release? And how are you leveraging your backlist at the moment?

The Art Of Coaching
E220 | Kim Scott: Just Work

The Art Of Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 55:59


What would we be able to accomplish if our teams, cultures and companies encouraged people to give each other feedback with radical candor, speak up when wronged and challenge colleagues and supervisors to think differently? What would happen if we were able to recognize, attack and eliminate workplace injustice and “just work”?    On today's episode we talk to Kim Scott, author of Just Work: Get *t Done Fast and Fair as well as Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity. Kim co-founded two companies that help organizations put the ideas in her books into practice. She's also been a CEO coach at Dropbox, Qualtrics, Twitter, and other tech companies and held leadership roles at Apple and Google. Earlier in her career she managed a pediatric clinic in Kosovo and started a diamond-cutting factory in Moscow.   We discuss:  How to give and receive difficult feedback  Best hiring practices (how to set checks and balances) Using improv as a way to scenario plan for hard conversations When and why it's okay to get communication wrong   Connect with Kim: Via her books: Radical Candor & Just Work  Via Instagram: @kimmalonescott  Via Twitter: @kimballscott Via her website: https://kimmalonescott.com/just-work   Despite her international acclaim for work in these areas, Kim agrees these skills can't be learned by just reading her books. Like any leadership or interpersonal skills, they must be practiced in real time in the presence of others.    That's why we created The Apprenticeship communication workshop- so coaches and leaders could be around people from different backgrounds and professions, step outside of their own environment and get reps giving and getting feedback and having hard conversations. Check out our upcoming events at artofcoaching.com/apprenticeship.    Support for today's episode comes from Dynamic Fitness & Strength. Dynamic offers the highest quality strength and conditioning equipment designed just for you, your space and your budget. Whether you're looking to outfit your college, high school or professional gym or even just your garage, check out our friends at Dynamic and tell them Team AoC sent you! If you've ever wanted an opportunity to provide more value to others, share your story and sharpen your ability to connect with a crowd, the Art of Coaching Speaker School kicks off May 28th in Atlanta, GA. Just a few spots remain! Check out all the details at artofcoaching.com/speaker.

Software Defined Talk
Episode 355: That's why he runs my Marketing department

Software Defined Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 58:26


This week we discuss Matt's new job at Kubecost, Istio joins the CNCF, the latest cloud earnings and Twitter gets bought. Plus, the first ever Cloud Startup Fantasy Draft… Rundown Kubecost (https://www.kubecost.com) Istio Istio have applied to become Cloud Native Project (https://twitter.com/IstioMesh/status/1518616150258733058) Istio moves to the CNCF - Service Mesh's Past, Present and Future - Solo (https://www.solo.io/blog/istio-past-present-future/) Earnings AWS CEO: We're not spinning out, likely to seek acquisitions (https://www.theregister.com/2022/04/21/aws_not_for_sale/) Amazon's cloud business grows almost 37%, but slows from last quarter (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/04/28/aws-earnings-q1-2022.html) Microsoft earnings beat across the board (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/04/26/microsoft-msft-earnings-q3-2022.html) Alphabet reports weak earnings and revenue on big YouTube miss (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/04/26/alphabet-to-report-q1-earnings-after-the-bell-tuesday.html) Cloud CAPEX: Google and Microsoft (https://twitter.com/charlesfitz/status/1519363715480514560) The Complete History & Strategy of NVIDIA (https://www.acquired.fm/episodes/nvidia-the-gpu-company-1993-2006) Akamai launches managed database offering for MySQL, PostgreSQL, Redis and MongoDB (https://siliconangle.com/2022/04/25/akamai-launches-managed-database-offering-mysql-postgresql-redis-mongodb/) Twitter Back to the Future of Twitter (https://stratechery.com/2022/back-to-the-future-of-twitter/) Elon Musk to Acquire Twitter (https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/elon-musk-to-acquire-twitter-301532245.html) Bezos on Twitter being acquired (https://twitter.com/jeffbezos/status/1518734031566778368?s=21&t=hU6sj6ankANQAZPIf6Pnog) Twitter's top lawyer reassures staff, cries during meeting about Musk takeover (https://www.politico.com/news/2022/04/26/twitters-top-lawyer-reassures-staff-cries-during-meeting-about-musk-takeover-00027931) Relevant to your Interests 7 Best Free RSS Feed Readers (https://bloggingwizard.com/free-rss-feed-readers/) Is Firefox OK? (https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2022/02/is-firefox-ok/) After proving need for no-code apps, Glide rewarded with $20M Series A – TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2022/04/21/with-20m-series-a-glide-expands-no-code-application-building-capabilities/) Good SDT Slack Thread on this (https://softwaredefinedtalk.slack.com/archives/C6CDLDCVB/p1650634994278229) The Founder Who Turned an Automation Startup Into Portland's Biggest Tech Company (https://pnw.ai/article/the-founder-who-turned-an-automation-startup-into-portland-s-biggest-tech-company/121260557) Analysts Predict End is Near for Global Chip Shortage (https://www.tomshardware.com/news/analyst-predicts-end-of-chip-shortage) Hopin: virtual events start-up struggles as real gatherings return (https://www.ft.com/content/312acbb3-eb72-4d2f-b81f-649dcb3583ca) Elon Musk to Acquire Twitter (https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/elon-musk-to-acquire-twitter-301532245.html) Devs Are Up in Arms After Apple Says It Will Remove Games That Haven't Been Updated - IGN (https://www.ign.com/articles/devs-upset-apple-remove-app-store-havent-been-updated) AppDynamics founder's midas touch strikes again as Harness valuation hits $3.7B (https://techcrunch.com/2022/04/26/appdynamics-founders-midas-touch-strikes-again-as-harness-valuation-hits-3-7b/) SonarSource raises $412M to scan codebases for bugs (https://techcrunch.com/2022/04/26/sonarsource-raises-412m-to-scan-codebases-for-bugs-and-vulnerabilities/) Kubernetes Is Here to Stay: Here's Why (https://tanzu.vmware.com/content/blog/state-of-kubernetes-2022) Dropbox unplugged its own datacenter to test resilience (https://www.theregister.com/2022/04/27/dropbox_unplugged_datacenter) YouTube's growth struggles to load (https://thehustle.co/04282022-YouTube-growth) Apple now lets you buy parts so you can fix your iPhone yourself (https://www.cnbc.com/2022/04/27/apple-now-lets-you-buy-iphone-parts-so-you-can-fix-it-yourself.html) Robinhood is cutting 9% of its staff (https://www.protocol.com/bulletins/robinhood-layoffs) Top 10 PaaS providers of 2022 and what they offer you (https://www.techtarget.com/searchcloudcomputing/feature/Top-10-PaaS-providers-and-what-they-offer-you) Nonsense Once the Square CEO, Jack Dorsey is now officially 'Block Head' (https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jack-dorsey-changes-his-official-title-from-ceo-to-block-head-11650663753) Conferences THAT Conference comes to Texas (https://that.us/events/tx/2022/), May 23-26, 2022 Discount Codes: Everything Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriends75 3 Day Camper Ticket ($50 off): SDTFriends50 Virtual Ticket ($75 off): SDTFriendsON75 DevOpsDays Austin 2022 (https://devopsdays.org/events/2022-austin/welcome/), May 4 - 5, 2022 DevOpsDays Chicago 2022: (https://sessionize.com/devopsdays-chicago-2022/), May 10 & 11th, 2022 MongoDB World 2022 (https://www.mongodb.com/world-2022), June 7-9th, 2022 Splunk's ,conf (http://Splunk's> ,conf June 13-16, 2022), June 13-16, 2022 THAT Conference Wisconsin (https://that.us/call-for-counselors/wi/2022/), July 25, 2022 VMware Explore 2022, August 29 – September 1, 2022 (https://www.vmware.com/explore.html?src=so_623a10693ceb7&cid=7012H000001Kb0hQAC) SpringOne Platform (https://springone.io/?utm_source=cote&utm_medium=podcast&utm_content=sdt), SF, December 6–8, 2022. SDT news & hype Join us in Slack (http://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/slack). Get a SDT Sticker! Send your postal address to stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com (mailto:stickers@softwaredefinedtalk.com) and we will send you free laptop stickers! Follow us on Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/sdtpodcast), Twitter (https://twitter.com/softwaredeftalk), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/softwaredefinedtalk/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/software-defined-talk/) and YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCi3OJPV6h9tp-hbsGBLGsDQ/featured). Use the code SDT to get $20 off Coté's book, (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt) Digital WTF (https://leanpub.com/digitalwtf/c/sdt), so $5 total. Become a sponsor of Software Defined Talk (https://www.softwaredefinedtalk.com/ads)! Recommendations Brandon: F1 TV (https://f1tv.formula1.com) Matt: Factorio Story Missions (https://mods.factorio.com/mod/Story-Missions) Photo Credits Banner (https://unsplash.com/photos/_mEuPiaz8pU) CoverArt (https://unsplash.com/photos/7ezFz2Hxd40)

BCP UNFILTERED
LET'S HELP TRUMP! THIS IS A CALL TO CROWD SOURCE HIS DEFENSE AGAINST THE JANUARY 6TH LIE! [PLEASE SHARE]

BCP UNFILTERED

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 15:17


[04.28.22] Please help President Trump's legal team defend him and America by sending January 6th videos to the Dropbox link below, where the legal team will have direct access to the files for immediate evaluation. https://www.dropbox.com/request/h5oWI3WJkEuzcXXY7FPE

Smart Venture Podcast
#100 Notion's CRO, ex-COO of Dropbox, ex-VP at Google, ex-Partner at McKinsey, Olivia Nottebohm

Smart Venture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 51:09


100 Olivia Nottebohm is the Chief Revenue of Notion where she leads the Sales, Marketing, Customer Success, and Customer Experience teams. Prior to Notion, she held multiple leadership positions at various well-known companies. Such as COO of Dropbox, VP at Google, and Partner at McKinsey & Company.  Check out our brand new YouTube Video Podcast!  https://www.SmartVenturePod.com IG/Twitter/FB @GraceGongGG LinkedIn:@GraceGong YouTube: https://bit.ly/gracegongyoutube Join the SVP fam with your host Grace Gong. In each episode, we are going to have conversations with some of the top investors, super star founders, as well as well known tech executives in the silicon valley. We will have a coffee chat with them to learn their ways of thinking and actionable tips on how to build or invest in a successful company. ===================== https://link.blockfolio.com/9dzp/stwlap68 Use code: smartventure

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Tres historias de Mortadelo y Filemón

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 14:33


Las Sims no son Los Sims / Roban unos monos NFT en Instagram / Crece el uso de Mastodon / Google licencia la tecnología de YouTube / Europa aloja la mayoría de imágenes y vídeos de abuso infantil Patrocinador: Hasta el 30 de junio, en las estaciones de servicio de BP puedes conseguir un ahorro de hasta 30 céntimos por litro. Descárgate la app Mi BP para tu Android o iPhone, y úsala cuando vayas a repostar BP Ultimate con tecnología Active. — Lo mejor para tu coche y tu bolsillo. Las Sims no son Los Sims / Roban unos monos NFT en Instagram / Crece el uso de Mastodon / Google licencia la tecnología de YouTube / Europa aloja la mayoría de imágenes y vídeos de abuso infantil -

The Next CMO
The Evolving Importance of Trust for your Brand with Lisa Campbell, CMO of OneTrust

The Next CMO

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 40:41


In this episode, we speak to Lisa Campbell, the CMO of OneTrust, the #1 fastest-growing company on Inc. 500 and the category-defining enterprise platform to operationalize trust. Before joining OneTrust, Lisa spent 18 years at AutoDesk where she ultimately became the CMO.  She is also a member of the board of directors at DropBox.We cover topics including:The importance of trust in marketingThe marketing strategy of OneTrustMarketing to multiple audiences, including the board of directorsThe  importance of the role of chief trust officerHow Lisa thinks about strategic planning at OneTrustLearn more about Lisa CampbellLearn more about OneTrustFollow Peter Mahoney on Twitter and LinkedInLearn more about PlannuhJoin The Next CMO CommunityRecommend a guest for The Next CMO podcastProduced by PodForte

Entreprendre dans la mode
Meryl Chiche — Fondatrice de Sessei — Le bon produit au juste prix

Entreprendre dans la mode

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 109:25


S'adapter face aux imprévus, rebondir d'une situation complexe : être entrepreneur au quotidien, c'est aussi se confronter à un marché en perpétuel mouvement. Pour autant, ce n'est pas ce qui a freiné Meryl Chiche à s'adapter et même à se réinventer. Depuis sa première aventure entrepreneuriale Les Merveilleuses, un site dédié à la création personnalisée de robes de mariée, elle a compris le pouvoir de la personnalisation du produit, mais aussi les pistes exploitées avec moins de fluidité au cours de son business. C'est à l'approche du Covid qu'elle clôt cette première aventure pour en redémarrer une nouvelle quelques mois plus tard. Avec Sessei, elle promeut la sobriété intemporelle de la chemise pour femme, les belles matières assemblées au Portugal et parfois même une broderie en guise de détail singulier. Le bon produit, associé à une vision marketing juste et une stratégie digitale en béton : voilà ce qui a permis à la marque de se démarquer en peu de temps. Dans cet épisode, Meryl nous partage ses best practices pour saisir les opportunités, fixer le juste prix sur le bon produit, mais aussi gérer un business avec spontanéité et humanité. «Tout réside autour du rapport qualité-prix : tu peux avoir le plus beau produit du monde, si tu n'as pas le juste prix, ce n'est pas bon.» Ce que vous allez apprendre dans cet épisode : Meryl se présente Ses premiers projets entrepreneuriaux La fin de sa marque Les Merveilleuses Ce qu'elle a appris Ce qu'elle aurait fait différemment Le déclic de son nouveau business Le concept de Sessei Pourquoi elle a choisi ce marché Les détails du packaging Les marges Le pricing Pourquoi elle a connu un succès immédiat Les coulisses de production Le coût d'un shooting La valeur ajoutée Incarner son business dans le réel et non sur le digital Le lancement Les influenceuses Sa vision sur sa croissance financière La structure interne Les outils qu'elle utilise Les KPI's qu'elle regarde Qui elle souhaiterait entendre dans ce podcast «Aujourd'hui, je dis beaucoup plus non que oui et je m'en sors mieux.» «Quand tu arrives sur un secteur où tout a été fait, il faut avoir une exécution exceptionnelle.» «Instagram c'est génial, mais jusqu'à quand ? L'investissement se fait autant sur l'acquisition de prospects que sur la vente directe. Il faut réussir à avoir un dialogue avec son client et ne plus dépendre de cette plateforme.» N'oubliez pas de vous inscrire à la newsletter de Entreprendre Dans La Mode, les industries créatives et l'art de vivre sur www.entreprendredanslamode.com Aussi, si vous souhaitez me contacter ou me suggérer de nouveaux invités, vous pouvez le faire sur Instagram sous le pseudonyme @entreprendredanslamode Enfin, le plus important : laissez-moi un avis sur Apple Podcast ou iTunes, 5 étoiles de préférence ; cela m'aide à faire connaître le podcast à plus de monde et me motive à faire de meilleures interviews ! Merci de soutenir ce podcast et à bientôt pour un nouvel épisode ! Références : Sessei : https://shopsessei.com @shopsessei : https://www.instagram.com/shopsessei/ Le Bon Marché : https://www.24s.com/fr-fr/ TagWalk : https://www.tag-walk.com/fr/ Drop Box : https://www.dropbox.com Shopify : https://www.shopify.fr Klaviyo : https://www.klaviyo.com/blog/how-to-create-a-newsletter

7 Minute Security
7MS #517: DIY Pentest Dropbox Tips - Part 6

7 Minute Security

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 46:51


Today we're continuing a series we haven't done in a while (click here to see the whole series) all about building and deploying pentest dropboxes for customers. Specifically, we cover: Auto installing Splashtop This can be done automatically by downloading your splashtop.exe install and issuing this command: splashtop.exe prevercheck /s /i confirm_d=0,hidewindow=1,notray=0,req_perm=0,sec_opt=2 Auto installing Ninite This can be done in a batch script like so: agent.msi /quiet ninitepro.exe /select App1 App2 App3 /silent ninite-install-report.txt The above command installs App1, App2 and App3 silently and logs output to a file called ninite-install-report.txt Auto installing Uptimerobot monitoring We do this by first creating a script called c:uptimerobot.ps1 that makes the "phone home" call to UptimeRobot: Start-Transcript -Path c:heartbeat.log -Append Invoke-Webrequest https://heartbeat.uptimerobot.com/LONG-UNIQUE-STRING -UseBasicParsing Stop-Transcript Then we install the scheduled task itself like so: schtasks.exe /create /tn "Heartbeat" /tr "powershell -noprofile -executionpolicy bypass -file c:uptimerobot.ps1" /rl highest /f /sc minute /mo 5 /ru "NT AUTHORITYSYSTEM"

Grind Sell Elevate
#230: Krish Ramineni | Using AI to ROI Your Meetings

Grind Sell Elevate

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 32:31


Krish Ramineni wanted Fireflies.ai to make virtual meetings easy for participants. His cloud-based technology automatically transcribes and takes bullet notes from user calls and meetings, identifying key takeways from the transcription. Fireflies.ai and has key partnerships with top providers including Zoom, Slack, Salesforce, Dropbox and Asana and has raised $19 million from Khosla Ventures and Canaan Partners, among others. The enterprise has grown from 10 employees to 70 in less than a year. Over 300,000 organizations and 2.5 million people have received AI-generated meeting notes from Fireflies.ai. In this conversation we chat about how to use the tech but also Krish's experience as a new entrepreneur. Connect with Krish: Website: https://fireflies.ai/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/krishramineni/ +++++ Subscribe to the Podcast! ▶︎ PODCAST | https://bit.ly/3bU6D3l Please Follow & Connect with me! Link's Below ▶︎ WEBSITE | https://tyzerevans.com ▶︎ YOUTUBE | https://youtube.com/c/tyzerevans ▶︎ INSTAGRAM | https://instagram.com/tyzerevans ▶︎ FACEBOOK | https://facebook.com/grindsellelevate ▶︎ LINKEDIN | https://linkedin.com/in/tyzerevans ▶︎ TWITTER | https://twitter.com/tyzerevans ▶︎ TIKTOK | https://tiktok.com/tyzerevans ▶︎ PATREON | https://patreon.com/tyzerevans Check out Tyzer's other podcast "The Book Legion" at https://thebooklegion.com

Data Protection Breakfast Club
“Flying a Spaceship with a Phonograph” w/ Sonia Siddiqui, Data Privacy Lead @ Coinbase

Data Protection Breakfast Club

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 29:37


Andy & Pedro chat with Sonia about trends in Web3/Blockchain as well as operating as a privacy professional in a high-growth and uncertain space. - How Sonia got into her role - The privacy challenges - The antiquated privacy laws not matching innovation - Trends in Web3 & Blockchain - And many more topics... Andy & Pedro are is an active members of TechGC, an invitation-only community of General Counsels of high-growth technology companies and venture funds. TechGC was founded by 2 Venture GC's 2015 and now has over 2,500 GC members around the world and over 1,300 senior in-house counsel as part of the DeputyGC Program. Members range from early startups to late stage companies like Lyft, Slack, Pinterest, Dropbox, Cloudflare, etc.) or from venture funds (like Founders Fund, Softbank, First Round, Battery, etc.). Request invitation to join the TechGC Community here

Thought Talk
Upcoming Design Trends and The Future of the Gig Economy

Thought Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 39:19


Patrick Llewellyn is the CEO of 99designs, the world's largest graphic design marketplace. Patrick joined the company in 2009 and the team has since grown to over 100+ staff members and has paid out more than $220 million to creators and creatives. In this episode of Thought Talk, Patrick talks about the freelance and gig economy, and where this booming global trend is headed in the upcoming years.   Creativity in its purest form is best represented when people are supporting each other. As the gig economy continues to grow, Patrick discusses some of the benefits a company like 99designs brings to communities all across the world and how designers and creatives are able to make a living on their own terms.   Tips on making the gig economy for you   A platform like 99Designs reaches communities far and wide and it has given people new opportunities that they otherwise wouldn't have had in their small town. People with disabilities have also found a new purpose. There's been a surge in design requests from the wellness sector, plant-based alternative foods, and mushrooms! Local businesses are taking opportunities to create merch (which means more need for creative designs!) to increase revenue in their business. Personalized designs that incorporate the brand's personality are on the rise. People want to see the “who” behind the brand.   About Karen Tiber Leland   Karen Tiber Leland is the founder of Sterling Marketing Group, a branding, marketing, and color strategy and implementation firm helping CEOs, executives, and entrepreneurs develop stronger personal, business, and team brands. Her clients include Cisco, American Express, Marriott Hotels, Apple Computer, LinkedIn, and Twitter.   She is also the best-selling author of nine traditionally-published business books that have sold over 400,000 copies and been translated into 10 languages. Her most recent book is The Brand Mapping Strategy: Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand. She regularly writes for Inc.com and Entrepreneur.com and has had articles published in Self, The Los Angeles Times, American Way, The Boston Globe, and many others.   Karen has spoken for Harvard, The AMA, Direct Marketing Association, and Stanford, among others. She has been interviewed on The Today Show, CNN, CNBC, and Oprah.   Get in touch with Karen on Twitter | LinkedIn | Instagram | Facebook   About our guest   Patrick Llewellyn joined 99designs, the world's largest graphic design marketplace, in 2009. He had previously spent a decade at Nextec Strategic Capital advising Australian technology and media companies with an expertise in growth and capital raising.   In 2010, Patrick moved to San Francisco to open the 99designs U.S. office and oversee U.S. and international expansion. He was officially appointed CEO in January 2011, and quickly guided 99designs to a $35 million first-round capital investment led by Accel Partners (Facebook, Dropbox, Etsy), followed by a $10 million Series B led by Recruit Holdings in 2015.   Llewellyn has since launched 99designs' European headquarters in Berlin as well as localized-language sites across Europe and Latin America. He has grown the company from a handful of staff to 125 with offices in Oakland, Melbourne, and Berlin. As of October 2017, 99designs has hosted more than 650,000 graphic design contests and paid out more than $200 million to its community of freelance graphic designers around the world.   Resources   Karen's book The Brand Mapping Strategy was just produced and released on Amazon's Audible as an audiobook. You can now get an audio version of the book read in its entirety by Karen.   The Brand Mapping Strategy, Design, Build and Accelerate Your Brand

Up Your Creative Genius
Douglas Ferguson: Sparking Change - Facilitating Small Magical Steps to Big Results

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 36:51


Douglas Ferguson is an entrepreneur and human-centered technologist. He is the founder and president of Voltage Control, an Austin-based change agency that helps enterprises spark, accelerate, and sustain innovation. He specializes in helping teams work better together through participatory decision making and design inspired facilitation techniques. He has helped transform teams from Nike, U.S. SOCOM, Google, the Air Force, Apple, Adobe, Dropbox, Fidelity, Vrbo, Liberty Mutual, Humana, and SAIC. Douglas is a thought leader and master facilitator of Design Sprints, Innovation Acceleration, Team Alignment, Meeting Systems, Culture Transitions, and Change Transformations. He is also the author of four books: Magical Meetings, Beyond the Prototype, How to Remix Anything, and Start Within. He has been published in Forbes, Fast Company, Innovation Leader, and is a regular contributor to The Future Shapers. He publishes a weekly podcast called Control the Room. Motivated by a mission to rid the world of horrible meetings and offer meaningful magical meeings in their place, Voltage Control is calling upon fellow facilitators to transform meeting and innovation culture. From free weekly community meetups to Control the Room–the annual facilitator summit, Voltage Control is building a community of facilitators to change the world. Douglas is active in the Austin startup community where he serves on the board of several non-profits, mentors startups, and advises early-stage ventures. Prior to founding Voltage Control, Douglas held CTO positions at numerous Austin startups where he led product and engineering teams.When not facilitating or coaching facilitators you might find Douglas patching up his Modular Synth, boxing, or doing pilates.  Timestamp 2:12 Doug's early years, and getting into the startup space 2:36 From getting fascinated about collaboration, to an interest in facilitation 3:41 How his first experience as a speaker started his thought leader journey 5:26 What makes a meeting Magical 6:37 Small changes, big results 8:32 Personal experience in dealing with career change 13:17 Making clients acknowledge the human problem 16:33 How to face fear and identity issues in the change process 18:08 Dealing with organizational change as a result of the pandemic 19:43 How the tragic loss of a co-worker inspired creation of the Safe Pledge 23:39 Building a community of facilitators 26:19 Designing a memorable, accessible meeting experience for all 28:36 Doug's typical work day 31:44 Curiosity, creativity and self-challenge: taking small steps to start change 33:27 Upcoming activities and plans  Social Media LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/douglasferguson/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/voltagectrl SAFE Alliance: https://www.safeaustin.org/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagram https://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Genius - https://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/  Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello, Superstars! Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast, where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in - because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week, I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to Up Your Creative Genius in any part of your life. Patti Dobrowolski 00:39 Hey, everybody. Oh my gosh, I have Douglas Ferguson here. This guy is an author, a speaker, master facilitator, and he's the president of Voltage Control - and he's going to tell us what Voltage Control is all about - but let me just say that he helps companies to sustain and scale their innovation through design thinking and synthesis of visuals, and creating a Fast to Fail culture - and I love that Fast to Fail idea - so we're gonna get into that for sure. But he's also the author of "A Non Obvious Guide to Magical Meetings" - which if you don't know about the Non Obvious guide books, they're really incredible, and so you want to read his Magical Meetings, reinvent how your team works together. And he's got so much stuff happening that in the shownotes, you got to go right away to Voltage Control and see the events that he runs and the trainings that he has, and the coffee chats - he's just incredible. So, welcome to the show, Douglas. Douglas Ferguson 01:36 Wow, thanks for the warm welcome. And it's good to be here. So excited to talk to fellow facilitators. That's one of my favorite things to do. Patti Dobrowolski 01:45 Yeah, fantastic. I love that you're here. And it was so much fun to read about you and see what you'd been up to, kind of - you know, I love just going behind the scenes and like get any int- Is there any dirty laundry in here? I'm looking for, you know, like, is there anything fun in here? It's all fun in there - your sizzle reel on your website, it's really great and fun to watch, and I was thinking, wow, this is so cool to have you. So tell us a little bit about yourself, would you? Douglas Ferguson 02:12 Yeah, sure. Born in Virginia, it's uh, tobacco farmers and, you know, first generation to make it to college. I was really into computers from a young age, I was playing around on a Commodore 64 programming and even in high school, first program was to make a Frankenstein out of characters, so you know- Patti Dobrowolski 02:34 Yes, yes. (laughs) Douglas Ferguson 02:36 -that was a great use of time, I tell ya. So fast forward after school, I got bit by the startup bug pretty early. This is like in the 90s. I was like working for a startup that wanted to be Facebook before MySpace even existed, you know, it's like, it's like, needless to say, being early is just as bad as being wrong. So I got- I learned a lot, you know, through the years of writing code for tech startups, and then leading engineers and products, people and designers, what it took to build sustainable, highly collaborative teams. Patti Dobrowolski 03:14 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 03:14 And I was always really fascinated about the mechanisms by which people bring forth collaboration. I didn't even know the word "facilitation" nor had I heard about it, but I kind of conflated it with like, moderation, or I was like, someone does negotiations, and I wasn't really quite sure. But I was always really fascinated with, you know, whether it was extreme programming, or agile or lean and experimenting with these different ways to have better meetings. Patti Dobrowolski 03:41 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 03:42 And then fast forward to my last startup, which was - you know, I was kind of done with the startup world, and - but through that experience, I'd met the design team at Google Ventures. And on that team was Jake Knapp, who wrote the book "Design Sprints". So I got a lot of people asking me to come and speak on "Design Sprints", and so that led to a whole new world opening up around being a thought leader on this stuff. It was interesting, because I was able to tap all this other experience I had in this love I had for bringing people together - it was almost like a new lease on life, because I realized that, "Whoa, I can do this for a living". Like, I don't have to like a startup and do this with inside the startup, I can do this for a living. That was really, really pretty incredible. Patti Dobrowolski 04:26 Oh, that's so fantastic. What a great way to describe that. You know, on the podcast, about four episodes before you I interviewed Joni Wickham, who was the Chief of Staff for Mayor Sly James in Kansas City, and she grew up on a tobacco farm too. So just so you know, we got a theme going on here. So for those of you listening, anybody can come from anywhere and really become a game changer. And you really have, in this field of facilitation - I think that one of the things that I know to be true about you is that every experience in your meetings is so interactive, that people are just having a blast - though that you know, even though they're working on hard stuff, they're having so much fun. So tell the listeners, like if they get dropped into a meeting with you, or your team, what will be some of the differentiators between meetings they have been in before? Douglas Ferguson 05:26 Hmm. Well, I think one big one is that they'll know why they're there - before they show up. And while they're there, there'll be a very clear understanding of why they're there, and how they can contribute. And they're going to be invited to shape the outcome. Someone in our community once said that, you know, diversity is inviting everyone to the dance. Inclusion is inviting someone to dance. And so, something that happens in our meetings is that you will be invited to dance. Patti Dobrowolski 05:58 Yeah, that's fantastic. And in that dance, you'll tap into your own piece of the vision, because one of the things you talk about a lot - in some of the interviews with you, you talk about how important it is to make a commitment, adapting to the environment to make small incremental change, and know that those small changes add up to big wins when you want to step into your future. So say something about that for you as a person - how did you decide or learn that small things equal big results, eventually? Douglas Ferguson 06:37 It's interesting, I don't know if I can point to one particular moment where someone says "This is the equation to life", or "This is the way things work". But I think that it was just a culmination of a lot of lived experience, or lived experiences where I was always very curious. You know, I was the kind of kid that liked to take things apart and put them back together, and sometimes they didn't quite work the way they worked before. And so, I think one of the things, maybe, that was super pivotal for me: well, early in my career as a software developer, I got really fixated on what now some folks refer to as the "learning loop". And so, the time it took for me to discover that something was broken, or that I had introduced a bug or a defect was directly correlated to how expensive it was to fix it, or how much damage or pain it caused to my co-workers, or to how much money it made the company lose - the longer it took, the more you know, of an impact, negative impact that it would make - and so if I can reduce that time, it was better and better. And then I started to realize, like: Oh, wow, if I also can start to reduce the time to learnings, even when I'm trying things out in the code or experimenting with the way something works, the quicker I come up with solutions to almost the way it starts to become real time. You're almost intuitive, like you try something and you're instantly seeing the results. And so, I think that led me to this understanding of like, oh, wow, you don't have to have everything figured out at once. You can sort of probe the system and understand, and then probe the system and understand, which, like, years later, I came to understand from learning about complexity theory, that that is exactly how you need to operate in a complex environment or complex system, which is where we all find ourselves these days. Patti Dobrowolski 08:32 Yup. And so, that's something about getting yourself to test multiple tests, at the same time of something. I love this conversation we're having, because, you know, for me, I'm always coming up with these new ideas. And then, you know, I want to see: will this work? What, can this work? What about this? And then, I'll follow my intuition around some things, but the key that I think in design thinking is to get your customer involved in the process early enough. So you see if what the solution you're providing is something they can actually use. Because, you know, I love that book - it's about your mother or something? - I can't remember what the name of it is, but it's all about how we often create things that just our mother will like, because our mother likes anything that we do, right? Most of the time. And so, trying to get yourself to do that. Now, what did you see as challenges that you faced in your career trajectory? What did you and how did you learn to pivot and be able to shift from this software and design of the startup environment into this facilitator thing? What allowed you to feel like you had the confidence to do that? Douglas Ferguson 09:45 You know, I think surrounding myself with lots of mentors, and cheerleaders - yeah, like anyone who was willing to tell me that I could do it and help me see blind spots or gaps - you know, I think that really helped. Also, having someone anticipated the opportunity, you kind of, kind of prepare it a little bit. So I had a little bit saved, so I could, you know, could hunker down and go through a period of growth and building, you know? Patti Dobrowolski 10:16 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 10:17 And then I was just kind of strategic around- it was down to basics, you know, I even created a little bit of budget, like, what do I need to bring in to even live by the most like, economic means necessary. And then, another thing I did is I'm a firm believer in being as economical and scrappy as possible in the beginning. And so, you know, I didn't - we didn't even have a website, we were using- At the time, Medium, let you use custom domains - on Medium. And so I used Medium as my website, because I did- I had a strong desire to blog and write because I felt like if I got my ideas out - Patti Dobrowolski 10:53 - then people would know who you were, and figure out what you were doing? Douglas Ferguson 10:57 Boom. That's the big thing, right? That writing helped me process, and then, meeting with my mentors and talking through those things, and then writing about it just helped me funnel the vision further. And so, those are critical points - are critical elements from the very beginning. Patti Dobrowolski 11:12 Well, now, are you a visualizer? Are you a illustrator, too, as well as being a facilitator? Or do you bring in somebody to do the part of drawing the pictures in that way. Douglas Ferguson 11:24 I'm not an illustrator myself. But I will say that I do like to draw and doodle, and I do express myself visually - but I'm not a finessed illustrator. And so, anytime that we're working with a client, or doing a project, where we want to bring that element in - whether that's because we're wanting to have a multi sensory experience, or you know, quite often we're having to create polished graphics for the website, or for, you know, some kind of like deliverable or whatnot, you know - we have folks on staff, and we have contractors that we work with. And you know, I've got this curse, right, that I have an eye for what I know looks good and is polished and is beautiful, but it takes me forever to get there. And so, that's why it's better for me to work with someone else. I know that deficiency on myself, but it's also somewhat of a curse, right? Because some people will happily be like, that looks fine. And I'm like, oh, no, no, no, no, that's not good. Patti Dobrowolski 12:24 I so know this. I mean, I have a studio artist that I'll use, if I feel like, oh, I need something that is just super dialed in for this client - so I'll send it to him, and I'll say, hey can you do this - and then, you know, it's one of those miraculous things when you get that product back, and then it turns into collateral, and you see it on the website, and all of that. You know, trained eyes can see the difference between what I would consider to be my hack - real time drawing, which sometimes is hacking - sometimes if I've really, you know, dialed it in, it's can be spectacular, but it takes a lot of time, right, which is what you're talking about. And sometimes you don't have the time, especially if you're in a meeting, and you've got a lot of things happening now, who do you- you know, like, what's your best ideal client that you've been working with that you love? What are the problems that they're having, and how do you help them? I'm curious. Douglas Ferguson 13:17 Yeah, you know, we work with all sorts of clients, because we're training folks that come to our website and sign up for a course or even certification. And so those students look vastly different, you know - some of them might be work for a nonprofit, so it might be the leader of a Fortune 100, so one might be a freelance facilitator. And so those cohorts are quite diverse, which is kind of fun, because they all learn from each other - and that's part of why the cohort approach is so powerful. But when we're talking about on the private side, where I'm facilitating, or we're doing, like bigger change efforts for clients, you know, I would say the the ones that are- had, were kind of stuck, and really struggling with the change, but they were receptive to change, and they're receptive to support and help. And so, they sought us out and they said, hey, we know we need help, and we're willing to have a guide here. You know, it's like- because oftentimes, people want to just go down the river rapids themselves, oh they think, "Oh, if I just rent their equipment, I'm good to go", but some folks realize, like, hey, it's gonna be helpful to have a guide to navigate these rapids with us. And, you know, it can be all sorts of different things that they're facing, you know, whether it's like we're trying to migrate all of our stuff to the cloud, or maybe our employee onboarding process is broken - or it has been broken forever, but now that we're all remote, it's very, very clear to how broken it is. Patti Dobrowolski 14:50 Yeah, exactly. Douglas Ferguson 14:50 You know, it can be so many different things, but I think the critical thing - just put the cherry on top - that makes it the best clients is when they really, really understand out of the gate that this is a human problem. And this isn't about like, coming in with some logistical, like, change management- Patti Dobrowolski 15:11 Org chart, org chart. Yup. Douglas Ferguson 15:12 Right. Network theory is really important, and that's one of the things we do - is we start to analyze the network. But the org chart is just one of the networks. Patti Dobrowolski 15:20 Yeah, I love that. I think, you know, for years, I would train people in change management. That's what I did, you know, but I always found that - and that's actually how I discovered Draw Your Future, because the meeting was so- They wanted me - the change management company that I worked for - they wanted me to go in with curriculum, and I knew that was never the entry point. So if I could get people to draw right at the beginning and talk about what the experience was like, everything changed right away. And they were open, and then we could figure out, okay, well, what's the solution? And should we try this, this, this - and I tried to give him like a smorgasbord of things, and let them choose. Which is really what I think, in your case, it's all about choice and accountability in the meeting itself, because you can come in with tons of solutions for people - but they're your solutions, and they're not your problems. You're not the one that's living their everyday experience. You might have a ton of people you've worked with like that in the past, but- So how do you handle the clients, or do you ever come across them that just want you to come in and fix it? Douglas Ferguson 16:25 Well, when they want us to come in and fix it, that we had to- We had to take them on that journey to a realization that it is about the people. Patti Dobrowolski 16:32 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 16:33 -and they have to get on board with the sense of co-authorship, the stuff you talked about, you know, that we are going to be creating narratives about our future, you know, that storytelling is so important. Doing it through graphics, as well as through just oration as well can be powerful. But the point is, like, we had to do that explorative work together, and even look internally around what are the impacts, and how are people feeling, and what are the emotions about all of this? And one big one is understanding the impacts that it can have on identity, because a lot of times change can be very frightening from the sense of like, "I'm not going to be the same person I was". Patti Dobrowolski 17:15 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 17:15 You know, that's very scary. And a lot of times people don't want to face that fear or don't want to admit it. Patti Dobrowolski 17:20 Yeah, I think this is so critical what you're talking about, because it's the scariest thing about knowing you need to shift personally when you're trying to make a change - is that yes, you will be afraid in that, and if you weren't afraid, I would be worried about you a little bit. You know what I mean? Like, then you'd be cliffdiving all the time - which some people can do it - but, if you can understand that to dive into your own psyche to see "who am I, if I'm not this", or "if I become this", then it's so helpful. Where have you had to do that in yourself? Like, did you have to do anything during COVID? Did it impact you? Did you find, you know- what happened to you in that experience? Douglas Ferguson 18:08 Yes, throughout the pandemic, we've had a few major shifts, and one of them was just the lockdown, and just a lot of the upheaval that happened when so many clients shifted to having to work from home, and just the uncertainty of all that. And from a capability standpoint, we saw this coming pretty early; and for us, the major shift was updating marketing language and just speaking to what we already knew, because at the end of the day, we were running remote workshops, because we couldn't fly into town to do a sales discovery. Patti Dobrowolski 18:48 Meetings, yeah, that's right. Douglas Ferguson 18:49 Right? And so we had programmed that stuff to be remote. And that was, you know- and so we just had to reprogram a few things, we had to like, you know, redo some assets, we had to change copy on our website - those are the main things. And then also, we had to spend time supporting our community who were all suffering, because a lot of the community didn't have experience with diverse distributed teams - they didn't have experience with technology. You know, me being a software developer, we were using neural- well, before the pandemic, we were like- I mean, I've been using Zoom since 2007, early 2007, or late 2006. And that's just how we operated, you know, and so, it wasn't that big of a jump for us, but we had to support the community through that. And so, you know, there was a lot to do. So we're busy, but it wasn't as frightening as some, you know, some people had to really, really reinvent themselves in a major, major way. I would say the thing that was the most, the biggest struggle for us to navigate was when we tragically lost our Head of Operations to domestic violence last fall - and many folks will know about this because we dedicated our conference to her this year, and we've been doing a lot of work with Safe Alliance, which is an amazing organization here in Austin, Texas. And we're about to launch - and by the time this comes out, it may already be launched or might be coming soon after - something called the Safe Pledge, that our work toward creating policies, our own internal HR policies around awareness of domestic violence, how to support discovery and conversations, what to do if we notice certain things that might be concerning, but like, should I do anything? Well, there's training for that sort of stuff. And so, socializing that and having policies around it., and then we're going to take that pledge public and try to get as many companies on board as possible- Patti Dobrowolski 20:43 Adopt it. Douglas Ferguson 20:44 - to raise these practices and adopt it. But yeah, that was- Patti Dobrowolski 20:47 Whoa, that's so intense. And so, you know, unfortunately, it's really common. Douglas Ferguson 20:54 Yes. Patti Dobrowolski 20:54 That's the thing. And sometimes you don't even know how common it is. But when it happens to someone near you, it really hits home - I will do everything I can to promote that. So you just know that - you send me that information, I'll send it to all my top clients and get them on board and get in touch with their HR, see if we can promote that. Because there are things you can do, but you need to know how to have the conversation, and how to- in such a way that the person doesn't feel shamed by it, because the shame will just drive them back. And yeah- Douglas Ferguson 20:56 You know, another thing that I learned from working with Safe so far - and I've got tons more to learn, but - the thing that really just, if we don't know anything else, the one thing we should know is, the time that people are most at risk, is when they're confronting it, just before, or just after they leave. Patti Dobrowolski 21:48 Yes. Douglas Ferguson 21:48 Because it's all about control. And so when they're about to leave, or when they've just left is when their controller is feeling the sense that they've lost control, or they're losing control - and that's when they go off the rails, and that's when really bad stuff can happen. And so, that's something to be very mindful of, and a time to bring in experts and make sure resources are available. Anyway, I think there's lots of ways we can support people that are in situations that, you know, are headed in that direction, or worse. And that's kind of where at this point, you know, having navigated this for a little while, where it's just like, how can we help others avoid similar situations. Patti Dobrowolski 22:27 Well, and so much grief around that - I can feel that, you know, just in you talking about it, and I appreciate so much that you're talking about it with the kind of care that you are, because it's really important. Especially during this time, and especially - we live in Texas, you know, you and I - so it's a bit of a different world, but honestly: if you look anywhere in the world, you'll see pieces of this everywhere, in all forms. And so, to be alert and awake to what people are experiencing, and then give a safe space for people to actually talk about what is happening and support them - I love that. I want to just circle back to what you said about the pivot during the change that you were supporting your community. So I'm assuming, you know, you do these facilitation trainings and certifications - so you send people out on their journey to become their own facilitation of design thinking and synthesis whiz, so that they can apply it to whatever they're doing, whether it's their small business they're building or whether they're internal HR or like this, correct? Douglas Ferguson 23:39 Mm hmm. Yeah. You know, in the community even goes beyond folks that have spent any money with us like, we have a free facilitation lab every Thursday. And in fact, I rarely get to facilitate anymore, the facilitation labs, because there's just so much going on with growing the business and stuff. And I'm actually going to facilitate one tomorrow, which just like will be in distant future by the time this comes out. But I'm super excited about it. And- but yeah, every week, we invite a guest facilitator to facilitate - and just hold that space and create something unique. So it's not a presentation, it's not a webinar - but it's a time to come together as facilitators, and watch a facilitator, model a facilitator and do a thing - experiment with something, have a conversation. So we do that every week, and then we have a Slack channel that we bring everyone together as well - and so there's open discussions around whatever is on people's minds, etc. We also kind of consider social media our community as well, because a lot of the people that follow us on social media - sure, there's clients, ex-clients and things and whatnot - but a lot of the folks that are going to tap in in our content and following us and in active dialogue are facilitators that are just there - kind of on that, on that journey, fellow travelers with us. Patti Dobrowolski 24:58 Yes, yes, like 17,000 of them on LinkedIn are following you. So I checked that out, I was like, yeah, way to go! And, you know, you have a beautiful- So, if anybody wants to just read anything that is been written about you and your company - you know, there's a Forbes 2020 article that came out, it's really great, you give some fantastic tips about how to do things online, most of us know some of them - but there's some things in there that I think you can always revisit and remember about creating an engagement, because an online experience, no matter what it is, should be engaging, right? From the beginning, it should be something where you feel like, "Oh, this is gonna be so cool!" right? And as we get further and further into doing more of hybrid work like this, the online experiences should be even better. That's what I, you know, want and strive for it, like, how can we make it even better that people are calling in, or people are, right there just showing up; that people are doing some theatrical presentation, and that they get a wig in a box that arrives, you know, the day before, and, you know, script that they can use or modify, right, to do some piece of it. Because I think we want to create an environment in which people are just exploding in their brain, in a good way, with new ideas. Douglas Ferguson 26:19 You know, I absolutely love that. And I always encourage people to think about, you know, can we think about how we make stuff tangible, physical, send something to someone? Or how are we designing in fun and play into these experiences? The thing I want to make sure we underscore though, is, that can be a bit frightening for folks. As far as like, if you're a designer of this thing, and you're unfamiliar with this stuff. And it's like, oh, how do I even start? What do I even do? And, I just want to say that if you're looking at it going - Well, that sounds great. But I don't even know where to begin? What do I do? This sounds like way over the top for what I'm capable of - just at least, if you do nothing else, think about the meeting equity. Patti Dobrowolski 27:03 Yeah. Douglas Ferguson 27:03 So think about everyone that's gonna show up. If you're doing a hybrid meeting, how are you making sure that the person that dials in, or the people that dial in, had the same or equal experience as someone else? You know, if someone is blind, do they have an equal experience as someone else? You know, there's an accessibility component to the invite and to the software, but there's also an accessibility component to your design, and the activities you're doing, and how you're asking people to dance. Patti Dobrowolski 27:34 Yes. And I think there's something about understanding the culture too, and really being respectful of that. So, you know, that you enter into play, I was thinking, when I was trained as a therapist, when you would do kid therapy, you knew that you hadn't firmly entered the play accurately, if the child stopped playing when you started to play with them - then you had not entered the field that way. And that is really how you think about it with clients, right? That if they stop playing, and they're frozen in fear or frozen in disbelief or whatever, then no, they're not in - and you're going to, then you have to really push the rock up the hill, Sisyphus, and hope it doesn't fall back down again. Right? So I love that. Now, when you just tell me like, what's just a day for you? What's it look like from start to finish? What do you do in the morning? How do you keep yourself centered and balanced? You know, you have a lot of people that you work with. So how do you stay in tune? Tell me, tell me those things. Douglas Ferguson 28:36 Yeah, you know, some days are different - you know, like different days have some different things scheduled on them. But everyday starts off with exercise. I kind of chuckled - I laughed as I started to say it just because I know some people like, aren't really into fad diets and things - but I've found that intermittent fasting really works well for me, so I don't eat breakfast. I exercise very hard in the mornings, either with Pilates or boxing. I'm into hitting hidden heavy bags. So sweat, and in the morning, and then I use- Patti Dobrowolski 29:07 Sweat and starvation, sweat and starvation. That's right. (laughs) Douglas Ferguson 29:12 And then you know, usually I'm starting off with some sort - I usually have some sort of something starting off the day meeting-wise - either, you know, diving in with my team or a workshop or what have you, and spend a lot of time in MURAL. I spend a lot of time in HubSpot if I'm doing sales-related stuff. So it's either kind of thinking about the operations or thinking about executing with the client. Patti Dobrowolski 29:36 And then when does your day stop, how do you end the day? Douglas Ferguson 29:40 You know, I typically work fairly late. I do take frequent breaks and my schedule's fairly fluid. I will kind of schedule around my needs or kind of take some serendipity along the way. But, generally, my evenings are filled with - you know, generally I'll break away and start like, just reading on Reddit or kind of spending a little time on TikTok - you know, my Netflix time got replaced with TikTok time - which like, I've managed to curate some really amazing creators that I think are pretty phenomenal, and they entertain me pretty well. So- Patti Dobrowolski 30:20 Oh, you should put those in your shownotes so we can- because I don't think people know how to curate on TikTok, I don't think they understand that there are some amazing people that you can follow. And to make sure that you are getting, I don't know - because it is so much fun to see what's happening now. And to watch Makers, I that's my favorite thing is to watch Makers in that space - see what they're up to, what are they creating - and then get to see the progression of something that they're building. To me it's exciting, people in a room full of people where it's chaotic, and then it becomes very expansive - you know, these things are fantastic. I'm about to go to Make48 in Wichita, so - I can't wait to go and be in that whole Maker experience. Douglas Ferguson 31:07 That's cool. I'm glad they're still doing those. Patti Dobrowolski 31:09 Yeah, yeah. Yeah, that guy. He's amazing. God, I just felt like when I met him - you know, he's from New Zealand, and he's got a big sheep farm, and outside of Kansas City, and oh, like anybody from New Zealand, I'm in - you know, it's just like the most beautiful country in the world. So,anyway, I just wanted to say thank you for coming and spend time with us. Now tell us, you know, if you have any tips to give people that are listening, who are thinking they want to pivot or make change, are there anything that you would tell them to think about or do to help them? Douglas Ferguson 31:44 Yeah, I think the main thing is just to get started, you know. Like, get started, start small, just start learning - start asking questions, get curious, be creative, challenge your assumptions - you know, I assume that you've got some stuff wrong. That's about the only assumption that's valuable, right? Is that something about your worldview? Or that how you think things are gonna unfold is incorrect, and just assume that it's wrong, you know, share your thoughts. And one of the things I see when I'm mentoring startups - one of the number one things I see really common across startups that fail - are the ones that are like, really protective of their idea, and aren't willing to share the idea, or should be vulnerable about their concerns of their pains and their struggles. If you're not being transparent about those things, you're not - no one's gonna be able to help you. And unless you're just super lucky, and somehow you just like, got it all figured out - which like, I don't know, if I've ever met anyone like that - Patti Dobrowolski 32:50 No, me neither. Douglas Ferguson 32:51 Um, so, just share it out, no one's gonna steal your idea, because there's too many ideas in the world. And then just, you know, just talk to a lot of people and just try things. Patti Dobrowolski 33:02 Yeah, and ask for help. I think that's key, what you said to- Oh, my gosh, I just have enjoyed - the time just flew by with yours, like, this is crazy. So I can't wait to till we are in a face to face experience together at some point, or I'd love to have you back on the show to talk about what else is happening. So tell us a little bit about what you have on an ongoing basis, how people can connect with you. Douglas Ferguson 33:27 You know, one thing that I was gonna share at some point - but then we're just having fun with the conversation. I didn't even think to bring it up, but - was that, you know, we created this Work Now Report, it's - you know, our vision was it would be an annual report, but as we got into it, I think we might make it biannual. So we might do a Summer and a Winter, but we just launched the Winter one back in February, so Work Now 2022. And, one of the things I think's was really fascinating, is out of all the leaders that we surveyed in this research, over 75% of these leaders reported that facilitation played a major role in conducting change within their organization. So, you know, I had a hunch that it's becoming more common in the perception of, you know, valuable skills and roles within organizations - but to be over 75% was pretty shocking. So that's for all your facilitators out there is - we're on the right path, and it's been getting more and more popular. Patti Dobrowolski 34:34 That's job security. That's job security right there, I love that. Douglas Ferguson 34:38 That's right. That's right. Patti Dobrowolski 34:38 That's fantastic. So that's coming out- Douglas Ferguson 34:40 -the Work Now Report, the first one came out in February - we're gonna be releasing more of them, so check that one out, and stay tuned for more. And then we have our weekly facilitation lab. We also have, you know, regular courses and workshops that are available, and we do an annual conference for facilitators every February, so we're going to do that again here in Austin, in February of 2023. Patti Dobrowolski 35:03 Oh, that's fantastic. I can't wait for that. I love that. And I just can't wait to see what you're up to next. I'll follow in your footsteps and get my Non Obvious Guide to Draw Your Future finished, so I get it out there to people - I love that yours is out there, and I would highly encourage people to connect with him at hello@voltagecontrol.com - it's a great way to just post a question or how can you get involved because this is a community you want to be a part of in some way, and just keep up with what they're doing because it's really exciting. I'm just so happy to have met you and connected finally, and thank you so much for your time today. It was really amazing. Douglas Ferguson 35:46 Hey, thank you for having me, and Patti, I really look forward to when we do get together in person. Patti Dobrowolski 35:51 Me too. All right, see you soon. And now, everybody, you know the drill - if you like it, please repost this to all of the friends that you have - and colleagues - so they can learn more about Voltage Control, and until next time, Up Your Creative Genius - we mean it, don't we? Patti Dobrowolski 36:11 Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then, join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring - so get busy, get out and Up Your Creative Genius! And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly, Patti Dobrowolski, and the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast. That's a wrap!