Podcasts about Google Chrome

Web browser developed by Google

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Best podcasts about Google Chrome

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Latest podcast episodes about Google Chrome

The Bad Crypto Podcast
Web Pioneer Legend Brendan Eich

The Bad Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 49:45 Transcription Available


A long time ago in a galaxy the same as this one, pointy-headed nerds built the foundation of the Internet. One of those pointed-headed nerds was the CEO of Mozilla, a co-founder of the Firefox browser and the creator of Javascript. Today he is the creator of the Brave browser, a wonderful privacy-based alternative to Chrome and the rest of the corporate browsers. His name is Brendan Eich and today he joins us to discuss the early days of the web, the mess he helped create and how he is helping to clean it up and lead us into a decentralized web 3 world. Join us for a discussion with this Brave legend on our “pioneers get all the arrows” episode #653 of The Bad Crypto Podcast. TIME STAMPS 00:00 - Intro 03:45 - Featured Guest: Brendan Eich 11:00 - We created data tracking cookies for people to be tracked across the web. Oops.  12:15 - What was the intention with the launch of Mozilla?  16:50 - Why do users want to use Brave over other browsers? 18:30 - Brave is the best YouTube ad blocker out there.  21:24 - Google Chrome is basically its own spyware. How does Brave improve on the standard Google experience, both on the web desktop browser and mobile?  32:53 - Let's talk about ad tech. How does Brave serve relevant advertisements if they're not tracking users? 39:34 - What do you think is next in web3 and for Brave Browser? 44:35 - Closing Remarks FULL SHOW NOTES: http://badco.in/653  SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: iTunes: http://badco.in/itunesSpotify: http://badco.in/spotifyStitcher: http://badco.in/stitcherGoogle Play: http://badco.in/playSoundcloud: http://badco.in/soundcloudYouTube: http://badco.in/youtube FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @BadCryptoPod - @TheNiftyShow - @JoelComm - @TeeDubyaFacebook:  /BadCrypto - /JoelComm - /teedubyawLinkedIn: /in/joelcomm - /in/teedubyaInstagram: @BadCryptoPodcast DISCLAIMER: Do your own due diligence and research.  Neither Joel Comm, Zach Comm nor Travis Wright are FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency.  We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS.  Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt.  You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations.Support the show: https://badcryptopodcast.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The CSS Podcast
66: Season 3 recap & what's next

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 36:21


Listen to Adam and Una recap all of the exciting landings they talked about in 2022 in this end-of-season recap. If you missed the others, don't miss this one! Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Brave and Strong and True
Chris Monaco

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 62:28


My guest is Chris Monaco. Chris graduated from Strath Haven High School, Temple University, and Villanova University. He's an incredible performer, and his burgeoning love for theater began in middle school and continues to this day. Chris is a teacher at Gladwyne Montessori and he also directs the theatre program at Upper Darby High School. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here. Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.You can follow Chris on Instagram @gingerbeard1992.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

Federal Contracting Made Easy's podcast
10 MAC Productivity Apps 2022

Federal Contracting Made Easy's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 4:20


Today, I am listing my Top 10 Mac Productivity Apps that I use daily.  I must warn you this are NOT the typical apps recommended by Productivity Experts. 10 - Snagit 9 - Clean My Mac 8 - Microsoft Office 365 7 - Final Cut Pro 6 - Grammerly 5 - Google Calendar 4 - Google Chrome 3 -  Google Drive 2 - Audacity 1 - Zoom What are you favorite productivity apps?  I know that many will not think Clean My Mac is a productivity app but keeping my iMac in top shape makes me more productive.

The CSS Podcast
65: Nesting

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 31:59


In this episode Una and Adam talk about CSS Nesting, per the current 2022 spec draft. They'll cover the syntax basics, some gotchas and of course a bunch of examples.    Links Nesting 1 Spec - https://goo.gle/3VgnoJR  Adam exploring the prototype implementation in Canary - https://goo.gle/3UGsMpv  @scope and @layer and nesting - https://goo.gle/3EyJ3Hq    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Talking Drupal
Talking Drupal #373 - Performance, Privacy, and the Open Web

Talking Drupal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 77:01


Today we are talking about Performance, Privacy, and the Open Web with Andrey Lipattsev & Tim Lehnen. For show notes visit: www.talkingDrupal.com/373 Topics What is the Open Web and what does it have to do with performance and privacy What do we mean by web performance What are the core vitals What are the non core vitals What is the benefit of performance Performance is usually granular for a developer, what is different when looking at industry trends from a browser side What does d.o do DA and Google at DrupalCon What is privacy What is the privacy sandbox in chrome Resources Web Vitals MOTW discussion Performance https://web.dev/learn-core-web-vitals/ https://pagespeed.web.dev/ https://web.dev/vitals-business-impact/ https://make.wordpress.org/performance/2022/07/26/welcome-to-the-performance-team-blog/ Example: https://web.dev/measure/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdrupal.org https://github.com/GoogleChrome/lighthouse-stack-packs/blob/master/packs/drupal.js https://github.com/tag1consulting/google-drupal/projects/1 Privacy https://privacysandbox.com https://github.com/WICG/first-party-sets cls - cumulative layout shift IMDB pagespeed Core vital affect on search ranking blog post Direct business impact Collaboration on lazy load Core vital tech report Talks on performance for chrome Lessons learned from performance monitoring in Chrome | Annie Sullivan | performance.now() 2019 Annie Sullivan :: Understanding Cumulative Layout Shift :: #PerfMatters Conference 2020 webp Webprofiler Guests Andrey Lipattsev - www.linkedin.com/in/andreylipattsev @AndreyLipattsev Tim Lehnen - @hestenet Hosts Nic Laflin - www.nLighteneddevelopment.com @nicxvan John Picozzi - www.epam.com @johnpicozzi Randy Oest - randyoest.com @amazingrando MOTW Correspondent Martin Anderson-Clutz - @mandclu Entity Autocomplete Anchor Nominated by matthieu, who has been a guest on the show and is himself a maintainer of a number of useful modules Provides a widget that allows users to add anchors to entity reference links

The CSS Podcast
64: Subgrid

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 9:43


In this episode Una and Adam discuss subgrid, a special value for grid-template-rows or grid-template-columns. Learn the general details of usage, use cases, tips, tricks and gotchas, so you can use the feature with confidence.   Links CSS Grid Spec - https://goo.gle/3EfjoDq  MDN - https://goo.gle/3tbooTx  Smashing Magazine - https://goo.gle/3DUb7Ds  Ahmad Shadeed on Subgrid - https://goo.gle/3EeStaP  State of CSS (subgrid) - https://goo.gle/3fQDvP4  Full Bleed Subgrid demo - https://goo.gle/3TkZ1Jv    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Brave and Strong and True
Marcus Stevens

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 55:58


My guest is Marcu Stevens. Marcus does it all, tremendously. He's an incredible performer, a wonderful writer, and an amazing director. Not only is he a musical theatre powerhouse, but he is also a genuinely nice person. Simply stated, Marcus Stevens is impressive. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here. Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.Visit www.marcus-stevens.com to keep up with Marcus' work. The soundtrack to Mythic is available here https://www.tfront.com/p-50788-mythic-a-new-musical-original-london-cast-recording-lyrics-by-marcus-stevens.aspxBrave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Support the show

Tech Refresh from Kim Komando & Friends
Update Chrome now, cash-saving travel tips, stop your boss from spying

Tech Refresh from Kim Komando & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 43:57


Got a trip coming up? These are the best days to book a flight. Plus, update Google Chrome now if you have a Mac, why people are trying to get out of work, how to know if your boss is spying on you, use your PC's step recorder feature and Amazon review tips. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Komando On Demand
Update Chrome now, cash-saving travel tips, spot the real Amazon reviews

Komando On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 43:57


Got a trip coming up? These are the best days to book a flight. Plus, update Google Chrome now if you have a Mac, why people are trying to get out of work, how to know if your boss is spying on you, use your PC's step recorder feature and Amazon review tips. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

No B.S. Job Search Advice Radio
Interview Q&A: What's The Most Difficult Decision You've Had to Make?

No B.S. Job Search Advice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 4:13


EP 2497 This interview question can be asked of people at any level but will usually be directed at a manager level and above. There is a typical answer and I add a twist to it. SUPPORTERS: Skillshare TheBigGameHunter.us/skillshare (like Netflix for courses) AND Grammarly https://thebiggamehunter.us/grammarly The free Google Chrome extension will help your writing ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. He is hired to provide No BS Career Advice globally. That can involve job search, hiring staff, management, leadership, career transition and advice about resolving workplace issues. Schedule a discovery call at my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with over 2400 episodes. I do a livestream on LinkedIn, and YouTube (on the JobSearchTV.com account) Tuesdays and Fridays at 1 PM Eastern. You can send your questions about job search, hiring better, management, leadership or to get advice about a workplace issue to me via messaging on LinkedIn or in chat during the approximately 30-minute show. Website: www.TheBigGameHunter.us LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/TheBigGameHunter Courses: www.TheBigGameHunter.us/courses Main YouTube: www.JobSearchTV.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/jeffaltman Facebook: http://facebook.com/nobscoachingadvice Podcast: anchor.fm/nobsjobsearchadviceradio Video Podcast: Spotify Twitter: http://twitter.com/jeffaltmancoach Medium: jeffaltmancoach.medium.com Resume & LinkedIn Profile critiques My courses are available on Skillshare CareerFitter offers a free test and if you want career recommendations, upgrade to the paid version https://www.TheBigGameHunter.us/career We grant permission for this post and others to be used on your website as long as a backlink is included to www.TheBigGameHunter.us and notice is provided that it is provided by Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter as an author or creator. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nobsjobsearchadviceradio/support

The CSS Podcast
063: Media query range syntax

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 5:57


Media query range syntax is a really nice addition.    Links Polyfill: https://goo.gle/3TXcyYD  New syntax for range media queries: https://goo.gle/3DQlHg0    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

The CSS Podcast
062: Color functions: An update

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 13:14


In this episode Una and Adam cover changes to the color level 5 and new color level 6 specs, so you can stay HD on the topic. Plus, a dive into CSS color functions for manipulating colors. Links CSS Color Module Level 5 → https://goo.gle/3f8BgpT  CSS Color Module Level 6 → https://goo.gle/3TIsPAI    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

The Bad Crypto Podcast
Rich Dad Author Says US Dollar is “Toast” - Bad News For October 24, 2022

The Bad Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 26:34


UK Prime Minister of the Month Club has a new featured member,  Google is sued over biometric data collection that took place without consent, and financial guru Robert Kiyosaki says the US dollar is “toast”.  The Dogechain token price has tripled over the last week, women remain bullish on crypto in spite of bear market, and Polkadot hits an all-time high in on-chain development. Talk.. talk.. It's only talk. Babble, burble, banter, Bicker, bicker, bicker, Brouhaha, balderdash, ballyhoo. It's only talk.  And it's what we do as we put the spotlight on current events in the blockchain world. Pay careful attention and you'll find out how to get an original Bad Crypto US dollar toast NFT dropped into your wallet on our “a toast to the bear market” Bad News episode #637 of The Bad Crypto Podcast. Full Show Notes at: http://badco.in/637 Bad Crypto Nifty Club: http://badcrypto.uncut.fm SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: Apple Podcast: http://badco.in/itunesGoogle Podcasts: http://badco.in/googleSpotify: http://badco.in/spotify FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @badcryptopod - @joelcomm - @teedubyaFacebook: /BadCrypto - /JoelComm - /teedubyawFacebook Mastermind Group: /BadCryptoLinkedIn: /in/joelcomm - /in/teedubyaInstagram: @BadCryptoPodcastEmail: badcryptopodcast[at]gmail[dot]comPhone: SEVEN-OH-8-88FIVE- 90THIRTY BE A FEATURED GUEST: http://badco.in/apply TIME STAMPS 00:00 - Intro 04:15 - UK Prime Minister of the Month Update - Rishi Sunak 06:30 - Robert Kiyosaki says US Dollar is toast 09:30 - Chinese intelligence officers paid $61k in BTC to bribe US gov't officials to steal documents 11:15 - Google being sued over biometric data collection without consent; get off Google Chrome and use Brave browser; get off Google Mail and go to ProtonMail 14:05 - Warren Buffet backed neobank has selected Polygon for web3 token; waiting for $MATIC to pump 14:45 - Axie Infinity dropped another 22%; once an exclusive form of income for players during COVID-19, now dumping 15:30 - Polkadot hits an all-time high in development activity with more than 500 contributions each day in September to the chain's GitHub 17:08 - Ripple launching testing sidechain; could Ripple fly once their SEC lawsuit clears?  18:17 - Apple metaverse applications coming to life; if you want to brush up on our recent metaverse conversation with Cathy Hackl, tune in to http://badco.in/319  19:50 - Women remain bullish on crypto despite bear market 20:05 - NFT royalties top $1.8 billion; royalties is money programmed into the smart contracts and is transferred back to the creators and artists 21:33 - A free NFT; Bad Crypto US Dollar is Toast NFT  23:20 - Closing Remarks DISCLAIMER:Do your own due diligence and research. Joel Comm and Travis Wright are NOT FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency. We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt. You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations.Support the show: https://badcryptopodcast.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Brave and Strong and True

My guest is Andy Brown. When I interviewed Andy, he was in his dorm room at George Mason University in Fairfax County, Virginia. Andy is my 25th guest and also my youngest one. His enthusiasm and love for Summer Stage will amaze you. Not only is Andy still a member of Summer Stage, but also he is the reigning Summer Stager of the Year. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here. Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein. If anyone would like to contact Andy, please send him a message at brownandy739@gmail.comOur music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More
How to Use Passkeys in Google Chrome and Android

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 4:36


Google wants to make your digital life—in its ecosystem, anyway—passwordless and more secure.

The CSS Podcast
061 :has()

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 23:06


:has() is a new CSS selector which allows developers to query for the presence of a child or state. It has been called the “parent selector”, but it's much more than that! Using :has() you can style up and down a DOM tree, making this an incredible powerful feature. Learn how to take advantage of this new API with lots of examples in this episode. Links Blog → https://goo.gle/3CIs1EF  Selectors → https://goo.gle/3EQsPde  Pseudo-classes → https://goo.gle/3SgvH69  Creative CSS Layout → https://goo.gle/3yRv4sZ  Quantity Queries for CSS → https://goo.gle/3a4NPwT    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Tinsel Town Tea
Chrome Extensions for Writers

Tinsel Town Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 45:25


We're taking a short break. We'll see you in the new year! Cory and Judith discuss a ScreenCraft article about Google Chrome extensions for screenwriters https://screencraft.org/blog/the-best-chrome-extensions-for-screenwriters/ News: https://shadowandact.com Niggas You Should Knows: Laura Harrier (who is NOT Zendaya): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Harrier Ryan Coogler: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3363032/

Brave and Strong and True
Garry Lennon

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 63:42


My guest is Garry Lennon. Garry joined Summer Stage in 1978 and contributed 13 years of service, first as a performer, and then as a designer, and a director. His love of theatre and his accumulated experiences led to a career in theatre designing, directing, and teaching at California State University, North Ridge for the past two decades. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . . We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein. You can discover more about Garry's design work at Garry Lennonwww.csun.edu/TADW is Garry's summer workshop programhttps://mixedblood.com/ is a theatre company run by Mark Valdez, Garry's husband.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  Apple chooses to promote shows that receive a lot of ratings and comments.If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com. You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Support the show

RNZ: Morning Report
Google extension aims to help point out ethical products

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 6:40


A new digital feature called Find Fair being launched today aims to help people cut through the 'woke-washing' when shopping online. It's a Google Chrome extension which flags products considered to have been made ethically. Find Fair co-founder Susan Maiava spoke to Guyon Espiner.

Radiogeek
#Radiogeek - El resumen diario tech en #podcast - Nro 2186

Radiogeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 34:19


#Netflix anuncio cuando estará disponible el plan con publicidad, ademas del valor y los países que lo tendrán disponible (un valor muy elevado con pocas funciones disponibles, un fiasco); #Steam disponible para Android e iOS; Xiaomi's Gallery Sync se cierra, las fotos se pueden transferir a Google Photos; La historia de Spotify ha llegado a Netflix en forma de miniserie y mucho más... Los temas del día: #Steam disponible para Android e iOS https://infosertecla.com/2022/10/13/steam-disponible-para-android-e-ios/ #Netflix anuncio cuando estará disponible el plan con publicidad https://infosertecla.com/2022/10/13/netflix-anuncio-cuando-estara-disponible-el-plan-con-publicidad/ #DíaMundialdelaVisión – los efectos del COVID en la salud visual de los argentinos https://infosertecla.com/2022/10/13/diamundialdelavision-los-efectos-del-covid-en-la-salud-visual-de-los-argentinos/ Xiaomi's Gallery Sync se cierra, las fotos se pueden transferir a Google Photos https://www.gsmarena.com/xiaomis_gallery_sync_seems_to_be_shutting_down_photos_can_be_transferred_to_google_photos-news-56152.php Vivo va ser el patrocinador oficial del Mundial Qatar 2022 https://phandroid.com/2022/10/12/vivo-is-now-the-official-smartphone-and-sponsor-of-the-fifa-world-cup-qatar-2022/ Signal la app abandona los mensajes SMS https://signal.org/blog/sms-removal-android/ La historia de Spotify ha llegado a Netflix en forma de miniserie Chrome ya permite iniciar sesión en webs sin contraseñas: así funcionan las Passkeys https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/chrome-permite-iniciar-sesion-webs-contrasenas-asi-funcionan-passkeys El modo icógnito de Google Chrome es tan falso que hasta los empleados de la firma se quejan https://www.genbeta.com/actualidad/modo-icognito-google-chrome-falso-que-empleados-firma-se-quejan APOYANOS DESDE PAYPAL https://www.paypal.me/arielmcorg APOYANOS DESDE PATREON https://www.patreon.com/radiogeek APOYANOS DESDE CAFECITO https://cafecito.app/radiogeek Podes seguirme desde Twitter @arielmcorg (www.twitter.com/arielmcorg) También desde Instagram @arielmcorg (www.instagram.com/arielmcorg) Sumate al canal de Telegram #Radiogeekpodcast (http://telegram.me/Radiogeekpodcast)

The CSS Podcast
060: Inert

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 7:31


In this episode Una and Adam explain a non-CSS property, but very relevant front-end UI property, called inert. It's a way to have a visually guarded part of the UI also be guarded for keyboard and screen reader users. Links Inert spec - https://goo.gle/3SXid0C  MDN - https://goo.gle/3rK1Ybd  Chrome Developers: Introducing Inert - https://goo.gle/3CLygZE    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Brave and Strong and True

My guest is Ann Pinto McCarney. Ann spent a solid decade as a Summer Stager from 1981-1990. She self-proclaims that she was boy crazy, had many crushes, was a picky dater, and eventually settled down with the love of her life, getting married in a royal Summer Stage wedding to Dean McCarney. Ann kept performing her whole life and is best known for her stunning voice and outrageous sense of humor. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . . We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.You can find Ann on Tik Tok and Instgram @anntics67Subscribe to Ann on https://www.youtube.com/c/annpintomccarneyOur music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

The CSS Podcast
059: Container queries

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 15:45


Container queries (also known as @container) are a new entrypoint for truly component-based responsive design. In this episode, Adam and Una will walk you through how to use them, what browser support looks like, and upcoming features that will give you even more control over your responsive interfaces! Links CQ + :has() → https://goo.gle/3ymiwJS MDN Docs → https://goo.gle/3ogyIrp   Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Root Causes: A PKI and Security Podcast
Root Causes 246: Google Chrome Root Program Announced

Root Causes: A PKI and Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 12:00


Google Chrome recently announced the formation of its trusted root program. It may be surprising to learn that the world's most popular browser has existed for more than a decade without its own root program. In this episode we explain why that is the case, why Chrome is launching a root program now, and the implications of this announcement.

Brave and Strong and True

My guest is Brian Mahoney. Brian found out about Summer Stage from a classmate at Scranton University. He was hired in 1978 as a tech director. He is remembered for his inspiring leadership, work ethic, and sense of humor. He became a big brother as many of us looked up to him. Well, he is very tall. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . . We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here. Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.Brian would love to hear from his old friends and can be reached at Domino17@gmail.comBrave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Support the show

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline
Weekend of September 30, 2022 – Hour 1

Into Tomorrow With Dave Graveline

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 43:48


Tech News and Commentary Dave and the team discuss 3d printed drones building structures in flight, and more. Joe in Hazleton, Pennsylvania”I use Windows 10 and Jaws 2020, the screen reader for the blind. And for privacy, I use DuckDuckGo with Google Chrome. Is that really private, or does Google Chrome still collect data through […]

TrustedSec Security Podcast
5.11 - Word Clouds, Password Clouds

TrustedSec Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 27:46


Welcome to the Trusted Security Podcast – a podcast dedicated to bringing the latest news on information security and the industry. This episode features the following members: Geoff Walton, Scott White, Justin Bollinger, and Patrick Mayo.   Stories   URL: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/lastpass-says-hackers-had-internal-access-for-four-days/?mibextid=d3iphx Author: Sergiu Gatlan   Title: Microsoft Edge and Google Chrome enhanced spellcheck feature exposes passwords URL: https://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-edge-and-google-chrome-enhanced-spellcheck-feature-exposes-passwords/ Author: Steve Bennett   Title: AttachMe: critical OCI vulnerability allows unauthorized access to customer cloud storage volumes URL: https://www.wiz.io/blog/attachme-oracle-cloud-vulnerability-allows-unauthorized-cross-tenant-volume-access Author: Elad Gabay

Brave and Strong and True

My guest is Monica Horan Rosenthal. Monica joined Summer Stage when she was a dancer at Prendie. She is remembered for playing Veta in Harvey, Mrs. McAfee in Bye Bye Birdie, Adelaide in Guys and Dolls, and Miss Hanigan in Annie. Monica has also appeared in 66 episodes of Everybody Loves Raymond as Amy McDougall Barone. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein. Monica would like you to know more about the Delaware County Literacy Council https://delcoliteracy.org/champions-of-adult-literacy/Of course, Bob botched the quote from Crimes and Misdemeanors. It really is “Don't listen to what your teachers tell you, you know. Don't pay attention. Just, just see what they look like and that's how you'll know what life is really gonna be like.”The final lines from the same film are thus: “We are all faced throughout our lives with agonizing decisions. Moral choices. Some are on a grand scale. Most of these choices are on lesser points. But! We define ourselves by the choices we have made. We are in fact the sum total of our choices. Events unfold so unpredictably, so unfairly, human happiness does not seem to have been included, in the design of creation. It is only we, with our capacity to love, that give meaning to the indifferent universe. And yet, most human beings seem to have the ability to keep trying, and even to find joy from simple things like their family, their work, and from the hope that future generations might understand more.”Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesI'd like to thank Jane Baker for editing this episode.Please subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com. You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast
Tami Altschuler - Improving AAC Access and Training in the Hospital

Talking With Tech AAC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 69:15


This week, Chris interviews Tami Altschuler, a medical-based SLP and graduate instructor who focuses on supporting AAC and communication in the hospital setting. She shares about her journey helping the doctors and nurses understand that communication is a medical necessity, and the patient and employee satisfaction improvements that have come from better supporting communication and AAC access for every patient that needs it.    Before the interview, Rachel and Chris discuss one of Rachel's clients who has optical nerve damage that makes visual processing difficult. The family is concerned that he is not able to access his coursework and reading materials due to his visual difficulties.  Rachel shares some of the assistive technology strategies she suggested, including voice typing in Google Docs, using Read & Write for Google Chrome, using text-to-voice using a camera, making text high contrast, and more!    Key ideas this week:     

The CSS Podcast
058: Cascade layers

The CSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:08


In this episode Una and Adam cover Cascade Layers (aka @layer). It's a way for authors to control and orchestrate their own CSS layering which can help avoid specificity and asynchronous loading issues. Instead of styles taking the most recent style based on order of appearance, orchestrate layers and place styles inside them to control which overrides which. Links MDN - https://goo.gle/3UjB6vL  Smashing Magazine - https://goo.gle/3ByUT1u  Una on YouTube - https://goo.gle/3Sm2zLc  Bramus at CSS Day 2022 - https://goo.gle/3LtfxVg  Bramus's blog - https://goo.gle/3xEj2CM  Subscribe to Google Chrome Developers YouTube - https://goo.gle/ChromeDevs    Una Kravets (co-host) Twitter | Instagram | YouTube Making the web more colorful ✨

Brave and Strong and True
Erich Glasbrenner

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 32:35


My guest is Erich Glasbrenner. Erich started doing plays at Drexel Hill Junior High and joined the inaugural season of Summer Stage. During our conversation, he bravely recalls how Summer Stage began as his life was at a crossroads. By the end, we are both laughing our heads off. This episode is rated “mature audience” due to a few expletives. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here. Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
American Invents Act Has Destroyed Innovation - Cops want to keep mass surveillance secret - Hackers Hide Malware in James Webb Space Telescope Images - TikShock: 5 TikTok scams - Ukrainian Police Bust Crypto Fraud Call Centers

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 85:22


American Invents Act Has Destroyed Innovation - Cops want to keep mass surveillance app secret; privacy advocates refused - Hackers Hide Malware in Stunning Images Taken by James Webb Space Telescope - TikShock: Don't get caught out by these 5 TikTok scams - Ukrainian Police Bust Crypto Fraud Call Centers Well, the birds are coming home to roost. Well, not the chickens in this case, but this is called the death warrant for American ingenuity. We'll start by talking through this great article from this week's newsletter. [Automated transcript follows.] Well, I hate to say this, but in reality, we are looking at some very, very bad times for inventors, and I've had some of these problems myself before, but last September, there were scores of patent holders who demonstrated in six cities across the US. [00:00:34] They had on these black t-shirts that said homo sapiens, inventor. Endangered species. They were protesting America's decade of stolen dreams. Great article here in the American thinker. It was in my newsletter this year, or excuse me this week, but, uh, but here here's weirdly what happened here. Back in 2011, president Obama pushed through Congress and signed into law. [00:01:04] What they called the America invents act. Now just like the inflation reduction act is going to increase inflation, right? It's all double speak. Isn't it? The American invents act turned over the patent process basically to the biggest Democrat party donors. Big business billionaires, right? Because that's who really is funding them, the Hollywood millionaires, these massive billionaires, Zuckerbergs and, and others. [00:01:35] And what happened here? Is they changed the whole patent law and the basis for it. They flipped the table here, basically. Here's the idea behind the patent law that we've had in place in the United States for well, over a century and patents that are guaranteed in the cons. It used to be that you, if you were first to invent something, if you could show that you were first to invent something, you could file a patent and gain that patent. [00:02:14] Well, what happened is because of all of the donations that went into the Democrats in 2011, from these big, big companies that were lobbying. A, and this is part of the reason I have a huge problem with all this money going to Washington DC, frankly, because it just attracts rodents like these big companies that want to use the law to control you, to gain profit for them. [00:02:39] And really in this case, squash. Potential patent holders. You see there have been piracy for years in the patent field. And this happened to me. I spent a year of my life designing some software, writing some software that emulated an older computer system and allowed you to take. Any of that software and run it on the new system. [00:03:05] And it would run exactly the same way. And a lease on the new hardware was cheaper than just a maintenance contract on the old stuff. Plus it was faster, used less electricity, had more options, et cetera. Right. It was, it was really something, frankly, and I was invited to their headquarters to show them a little bit about. [00:03:27] Did, and, and I was so excited because they wanted to start selling it, right. So they need to understand a little bit better. So I went to the headquarters and met with them, you know, of course paid my own way. Flew down there, stayed in the hotel, rented a car, you know, all the stuff that you have to do. [00:03:43] And then nothing happened afterwards. Wouldn't return phone calls. It just, all of a sudden went silent. And then about a year and a half later Tata, they had an alternative product out on the. . Yeah, and they tried to emulate what I had done, but they did a very, very poor job at it. That's patent theft, that's piracy in this particular case, uh, if you are an inventor, you've probably experienced that sort of thing before, you know, you can put employees all of the non-disclosure agreements you want to have in place, but in reality, good luck enforcing those, especially against a big company. [00:04:25] Well, piracy went on steroids because of president Obama's America and events act. They, as part of that established something, they called the patent trial and appeal board. And it's just gone downhill ever since. So a professor that has more than 40 patents, I'm gonna read a little quote of his, this includes some inventions used in the space shuttles, by the way, which by the way, my invention was used with the space shuttle. [00:04:57] Um, so Dan brown invented something called the bionic wrench. I have one of those. I bought one of those some years back, this is a one size fits all wrench that does not strip bolt corners like it does if you're trying to use vice scripts or some pair of pliers, right. Because you're just too lazy to go and get the right socket size or box wrench or whatever it is. [00:05:22] That's the right size. It very, very. And professor brown says that Sears stole his idea for this bionic wrench right down to the marketing pitch. And then Sears, according to him, went out and hired a Chinese company to make it. And all of a sudden now, what kind of invention does he have? How's he gonna battle somebody like that? [00:05:49] I know a guy who is, uh, completely unethical. You know, I've done many shows from the consumer electronic show and it's really kind of cool, cuz I would get in depth with the inventors and, and explain what they were doing on the air. It was really neat all the way around. It was just a whole lot of fun. [00:06:08] And I met a guy there who was going to the consumer electronic show to find cool new consumer electronics. He thought might be popular. And then he'd go and talk to the people who were exhibiting that wonderful new electronics and say, Hey, I'm interested in, in selling your stuff. I have, you know, retail space and, uh, you know, kiosks in the mall. [00:06:33] What can, uh, what kind of deal can we work out here? Well, you know, first I, can I, let me get a, I, I need a copy of, uh, of your device here. I want a copy of it so I can mess with it and see, see if we really wanna follow through on. Oh, and I, I don't want to carry it around the floor of the consumer electronic show. [00:06:51] So I need you to ship it to me. So they'd ship 'em off. They might be a little speaker. They might be a charger. They might be who knows what? And consumer electronics is pretty broad. And if he liked it, he wouldn't buy it from them. He sent them over to his contacts in China. And had them reverse engineered and make the same thing with his brand label on it. [00:07:16] And he'd sell it in the stores. Now, when it comes to software and a lot of consumer electronics patents, aren't really a big deal because things. Changed so quickly. Right? And if you're a small guy, it's very hard to file a patent. And that's how president Obama sold this American Bens act to us. I remember this very, very clearly where he said, Hey, listen, this is gonna make the patent process way more streamlined, way easier for the small guys to be able to get patents, uh, not only applied for, but actually get them out to market. [00:07:52] And it's just gonna be an absolutely wonderful. It, it isn't because what happens now? Is big companies are not investing in research and development. That is true across the board. Now you might say, Hey Craig, well, how about big companies? How about Tesla? That's R and D. How about SpaceX? That's R and D. [00:08:14] Yes, but they are R and D companies. They're not big companies out there like Facebook, does Facebook try and come up with this or that new invention? Well, yeah, they kind of do from time to time, but most of the time what's been happening is corporate America looks for a winner. And then tries to buy the winner. [00:08:35] Microsoft has been doing that forever. Microsoft in court has lost cases because of what they did to inventors. And now it's been codified in law for over 10 years. So our American ingenuity, which is what we rely on in order to grow our economy, the ingenuity, the, the brain skills, the science, the true science that we have gives us a major competitive advantage because that particular, uh, type of intellectual property has a much higher profit margin than something like manufacturing a widget. [00:09:14] When you get right down to it, that's where the real money is. so a very interesting article and I would suggest you take a little bit of time to read it. If you've ever thought about patenting something, if you had a great idea, it used to be, you know, this is kind of the, the, uh, old wives tale. If you will, if you've got a great idea, you think you might wanna patent it, write it all out, take all of your notes, do it in a, a, a workbook that you can. [00:09:43] Alter right. You can't tear out pages or things. Uh, mail it to yourself in a Manila envelope and make sure you put stamps on it. And then the post office is going to date, stamp it for you or send it to your attorney even better. Right. And your attorney's gonna go ahead and keep that on file. And then when it's time to file the patents, you can say, Hey, look, it here's the proof. [00:10:06] I invented this in April of 2019. It doesn't matter because if some other company sees what you're doing or comes up with a similar or the same idea, and that company has the money to have the lawyers that know patent law inside out and backwards and can go ahead and file that patent claim. You've lost it. [00:10:31] you know, as early as the constitutional convention of 18 or 1787, our founding fathers recognize the need to promote innovation and we have to be promoting it. We've gotta get rid of this Obama era law. Absolutely. We've gotta go from first to file, which is what it has been for a decade. The first person to file you. [00:10:54] And move back to the way it was intended, the way it worked for well over a hundred years where it is a first to invent, it's very, very important for all of us, for economy, et cetera. The, the third law of Congress was a patent act of 1790. It it's just man, have we come a long way, stick around. We'll be right back online. [00:11:19] Craig peterson.com. [00:11:22] You know, we've had firewalls in our cars for a very long time for a very good reason. Right? You wanna keep the engine stuff out of the passenger compartment? The same thing is true. When we're talking about our networks, we're using firewalls to keep things out. [00:11:39] Firewalls are there to keep things out. And we have firewalls in our homes. [00:11:44] If you've got an internet service provider, you've probably got a firewall right there. Something that you don't even think about, right. It's just, there's gonna protect. You, it might, it's providing some services. You might be familiar with them. It's obviously doing a network address translation for you in this day and age. [00:12:06] Pretty much everything is especially with the internet transition that's been going on for years now from, um, IP four to IP six, but, uh, the firewall. is critical for every person and every business out there. But when we get into the configurations of firewalls, frankly, they are really a touchy subject. [00:12:29] You know, every network security professional has their own preferred hardware and software, uh, use Cisco. As a rule, Cisco has some great stuff. What I like the best about the Cisco equipment that we use in software and install at our clients is it is one pane of glass. It's a single vendor that covers everything from endpoint security. [00:12:54] In other words, security on your desktop, through the network itself, the switches, the firewalls, the email filters Absolut. Everything is there and is taken care of by all of the Cisco gear. It it's really quite something to look. I saw, in fact, a survey just last week at businesses who are trying to consolidate, there's just too many vendors in there selling this piece of endpoint, that piece of endpoint. [00:13:25] And, you know, that's part of the problem that I see happen pretty frequently, which is people look at Gartner report. Gartner, of course, a research company. They've got a lot of great research out there that I've used before. I've had Gartner on the radio show before, as well as some of their competitors talking about trends. [00:13:44] Well, There is something known as the upper right quadrant in those Gartner reports where they are rating various vendors for various pieces of software. So there might be for instance, a report on firewalls and the upper right hand cor quadrant is kind of what you want, cuz it's new, it's innovative. It, it innovative. [00:14:06] It's uh, really cool and wonderful. And it's the best. Since life spread. So they go out and they buy that cuz it's upper, right. Gartner quadrant. And then man, they find out, uh, okay, so now we need desk desktop, desktop. Okay. So they find the or buy actually the Gartner report for five to 10 grand. That's like a page long is crazy how expensive these things are. [00:14:32] They then look at that and say, okay, so the best desktop is vendor Y so let me see, we got X for the firewall. We've got Y for the endpoint and then, oh, they need switches. So let's go to the Gartner report. Who's in the upper right quadrant here for switches. Oh, it's uh, vendor Z. Okay. So we got Z. So now all of a sudden. [00:14:51] You end up with all of these different pieces of hardware, different pieces of software that have limited offerability at best interoperability at best. Right? So the, this day and age, when we're talking about cybersecurity, There are so many legitimate attacks every day. I mean, thousands of attacks going on even against a single business. [00:15:18] And there are hundreds potentially of false alarms every day. So how do you deal with that? That that's a good question. So, uh, a lot of businesses turn to companies like mine now, you know, full disclosure, I've been doing internet security work for businesses since, uh, early 1990s. So whew, 30 years now. [00:15:40] And I've been doing internet work for even longer than that, helping to develop it. So they'll go and they'll say, Hey, we need a managed security services provider. Uh, there's a big problem with that. And I, I was watching, uh, Yellowstone that TV show and I, it was a great little example of what we're seeing in the world today. [00:16:05] And Frank, frankly, we've seen forever obviously. And that is if there's a demand for something, all of a sudden, a lot of people will be hanging up shingles. and if they know, if that vendor knows more than you do, or is able to kind of turn, twist your ear and convince you to buy from them, you'll buy from them. [00:16:26] We saw that man around the year, 2000, all of the people who were trying to sell web services that had no idea what they're doing now, we're seeing all kinds of people trying to sell network services, security services that have little idea of what they're doing. We support. These companies that call themselves manage security services providers, where we actually go in, we design the system, we build the system and we implement the system. [00:16:53] We run the system and the third party here builds the client. Right. Cuz it's their client. And you know, that's all fine. It's so well and good, but what should you be looking. Particularly if you are a business, if you want to have a managed firewall, which is, I think important again, it's kind of a long tail thing to have a firewall vendor and, uh, this vendor and a managed vendor, and now it can get to be a headache pretty quickly. [00:17:23] But if you're going to focus on one thing, It's probably the firewall and your end points. Right? So maybe it's two things. So here's what a managed firewall service provider should be able to offer you. First of all, firewall system health and alerting. Software life cycle management, which means your updates, your patches, service, and incident management. [00:17:48] Whenever there's an alarm, they should know about it and they should be handling it. Security policy implementation your reporting, your analysis, your remediation, some of that is required by these various regulations and laws that are out there. You. To do it, uh, you know, without getting in a lot of detail right now, um, network monitoring, uh, the traffic monitoring, you know, the idea here behind any kind of managed service is to bring in a true expert rather than just completely outsourcing. [00:18:24] So you're partnering with someone. One of the things I've, I've bated my head against the wall for, for decades now, is that the it department. Thinks that they're up to snuff to be able to do something, or maybe they just want to do it because it's gonna be wonderful for them on the resume for the next job. [00:18:45] Right. Uh, man, I've seen that a lot of times when, when you are looking at all of this stuff and you've got an it department, maybe you're better off bringing in a very narrow expert to support your it department rather than fight against your it depart. good questions here. Uh, bottom line, they should have better expertise than what you have. [00:19:11] And you've got to read between the lines between your it staff that are currently doing it and the other vendors reducing the burden on your staff. So that maybe what they can do is. Focus more on things that are, uh, revenue generating that are more important to your business. You'll get faster incident response with any luck here. [00:19:33] With service level agreement, proactive security from the managed security services providers, or just regular service providers. Your burden on updates is going to be lower, improved manufacturer support. Because a lot of times, like we do my company mainstream, we have direct connections to the manufacturer. [00:19:56] Our case is usually Cisco because of the volume or services that we have and the equipment that we buy from them, uh, easier to scale there. There's a whole bunch of things, right. Uh, But be careful. One of the things you gotta watch out for too is where are their service people, their support people physically located, and are they us citizens? [00:20:20] A lot of the regulations. In fact, pretty much everyone. I can't think of an exception require us persons to be the ones in control of your network and data. So lots to consider. But keep that all in mind. I think it's an important thing to understand. Stick around. We'll be right back. And in the meantime, visit me online. [00:20:42] Craig peterson.com and sign up for my free newsletter. [00:20:49] The best way to secure a system is something, you know, and something you have, well, many systems have been securing themselves with your phone, right? They send you a text message, but it turns out that that isn't working well. [00:21:05] Having an SMS message sent to you in order to authenticate who you are, has turned out to be well, a problem we've seen over the last few years, people who have things like cryptocurrency who have a cryptocurrency wallet who are keeping their money, if you will, in this wallet and are using. [00:21:30] SMS to verify who they are. So here's how that works. You log into a website using a username or perhaps an email address. Again, it should not be asking for an email address for a login because you probably use the same email address or maybe two or three. And. Have for what? 50, a hundred different sites, maybe a thousand, I've got 3000 records, uh, logins on my one password account. [00:22:02] Okay. So there's a lot of them. They really should be letting you set up your own username so that it can be unique. For every single website that you go to. So, but anyway, that aside, you've got your username, which may be your email address. You've got a password and we've talked about passwords before. [00:22:21] Hopefully you're following the current guidelines, which are, don't worry about random characters, make sure it is long. And that means. A past phrase. So you string three or four words together. You put some digits, some special characters in between the words, maybe, you know, one word is all upper case. You, you play with it a little bit, but it's easy to remember. [00:22:48] So if someone then gets your email address and they get your password, they can potentially log into a website. Correct. And that website might be your bank account. It might be your work account. We've had a lot of problems lately. The FBI is saying that about every 12 hours, they're filing a new report of a company that got their intellectual property stolen. [00:23:22] one of the ways the bad guys steal it is they'll log to your RDP server, your Microsoft remote desktop server, using your credentials that you used at another website. It's that easy. It really is. They might be trying to log in via a VPN again, the same thing. So how do you secure this? How do you secure this? [00:23:47] Well, how to secure this properly? That's where the something you have comes into play. We all have a smartphone of some sort, even if it's not considered a smartphone, it can still receive text messages. So what a lot of these companies did is they asked their underpaid it people to set it up so that when you enter in your username and your password, it then sends you a text message. [00:24:16] Usually with a six digit text message and you then have to type that into the website as well. Seems pretty good. Doesn't it? Well, and, and in 30 it is pretty good. There are however, a few problems. Those people I mentioned who have cryptocurrency accounts and have been using this SMS methodology, which is SMS, of course, text messages have found that sometimes their phones have been hijack. [00:24:48] easy enough to do. And if they know you have a fair amount of cryptocurrency, it's probably worth their effort to spend a few hours to try and get into your account. And they have been getting into your account and people notice, Hey, wait a minute, I'm a kid. They do phone calls or text messages. What's what's with that. [00:25:07] And you found out that they have dismissed you, they have stolen your. Your, uh, SIM card, basically, even though they don't have to physically have hold of it. And there's a number of ways that they do that there's a new scam or newer scam that's out right now that the fishers are using. And that is they're sending out these SSMS, these text messages that are trying to get people to respond. [00:25:34] So how do they get people to respond? Well, In this case, they're primarily going after this company called Octo Octo post. And, uh, there's a number of different types of Octos out there, but anyways, they are trying to get you to. Do something you shouldn't do let me just put it that way. Right. So what they're trying to do is get you to, uh, enter in your username and your password. [00:26:04] Okay. Well, that's been around for a long time. Craig, you're telling me we've had fake bank account, uh, bank website. So they'll send you an email and in it, they'll say, Hey, I need you to go right now. to our bank page and, uh, authorize this $2,000 transaction that wasn't you. And so now you're freaking out, you click on the link, you go to the bank, you try and log in and the login doesn't work well. [00:26:31] That can be because what the fishers did is a made a webpage that looked like the bank's web page. And when you went there and entered in your username and password, you just gave it to the crooks. That's happened a lot. Well, there's a company called Octa O K T a. That is an authentication company. And what the bad guys have done is they have registered domains similar to a company. [00:26:59] So for instance, they went after CloudFlare, which is a huge, um, company they're number one, I think they have like 80% of all of the protection for denial of service and caching a business on the internet. It's just amazing. Cloudflare's huge. And I've used them and continue to use them for some customer. [00:27:19] So, what they did is they found a whole bunch of people that worked for CloudFlare sent them a message. And, and here's what it said. It said alert, your CloudFlare schedule has been updated. Please tap cloudflare-okta.com to view. The changes. So you go there, it looks like a regular Okta login page and they go ahead and ask user name and password, but CloudFlare is smart. [00:27:47] They're using Okta. So they're sending an SMS message to the user to make sure it's really, them turns out what was really happening is yeah, it was sending that guy a text message and it was using telegram. To relay that his response back to the hackers. So now the hackers have your username, they have your password and they have your six digit login key. [00:28:15] That's supposedly unique that supposedly went to you. And in this case, they didn't even have to bother a hijacking your SIM card. In this case, they just sent you that text message. So it's been causing some serious problems. They've been going after all kinds of different companies out there, uh, food service company, DoorDash you've heard of them. [00:28:37] Right? August 25th, they said that there was a sophisticated fishing attack on a third party vendor that allowed a attackers to gain access to some, a door dashes internal company. Tools DoorDash said, intruders stole information on a small percentage of users that have since been notified, big deal, or what a tech crunch, by the way, reported that the incident was linked to the same fishing campaign that targeted Twilio. [00:29:07] That also, as we just mentioned, targeted cloud. So we have to be careful with this. We cannot be using SMS text messages to authenticate ourselves. Some banks now allow you to use one time passwords from things like one password or others. However, some banks don't turn off the SMS, the text messages for authentication, which they really should be doing. [00:29:36] And the other thing I wanna let you know is I like UBI. Y U B ico.com. Yubico check them out. I'm not making a dime off of this, but they have a physical token. That you either have to plug in or the connects via Bluetooth. That is something you have that authenticates you to all major popular websites out there, and many of the tools. [00:30:03] So if you have any questions, just email me, me@craigpeterson.com gimme a few days, but I'll get back to you. [00:30:12] Have you heard about fog reveal? They it's almost invisible when you search for it online, but it's something that police departments have started using. And they're trying to keep all of this secret. So we're gonna tell you what's happening there and got a few others too. [00:30:29] Great little article that was in the newsletter this week. [00:30:32] Hopefully you got my free newsletter, but it is about fog reveal. This is an ours Technica. Often some of these ours Technica stories are carried in multiple places online. It's kind of interesting because we know to some degree what the federal government's doing to collect information on people, they go to open source. [00:30:57] Sources of information. In other words, things that are put out there publicly online, so they might search you your Facebook information or what you've been saying on Twitter, uh, or more, they go to data brokers that anybody can go to. And those data brokers have more information. They probably. Bought records from the states and they know from each individual state what property you own. [00:31:25] If you have a car, if there's liens on it, any mortgages that you might have, right. Putting all of the stuff together. It's kind of an interesting problem, frankly, but that's a, again, they say it's legitimate. Now the federal government is not allowed to collect this information. So they just go to third party data aggregators. [00:31:45] And remember again, If you have apps on your phone, if you have an Android phone, this does not apply to iPhones. Generally it does apply to iPhone apps. However, but, and this is part of the reason I say never, ever, ever use Android. Okay guys, I, I just. Blows my mind. I, I was talking to an old friend of mine. [00:32:09] Uh, he was the, the CTO in fact for the state of New Hampshire. And he was telling me that, uh, you know, we were talking and telling me, yeah, yeah, I got an Android phone. He says, don't you just love Android? And he knows that I do cybersecurity. He knows I've been in it. He hired my company to do a bunch of different tasks for the state, right over the years, we still do business with the state and he's using Android. [00:32:41] He's probably listening right now. BU get a little note from him, but, uh, it, it, it's a problem to use Android any. Those free apps that you're using, that Google maps app that you're using. And of course you can use that on iOS as well is tracking you. They know where you live because they know where your smartphone stays at night. [00:33:04] They know all of this stuff. How do you think the FBI is able to seize a smartphone at a Hardee's drive through. they know where you are. Well, they have some more access to information as it turns out. Uh, one Marilyn based Sergeant, according to the article wrote in a department, email TDY, the benefit of quote, no court paperwork and quote before purchasing the software. [00:33:37] And the Sergeant said the success lies in secre. interesting. So the electronic frontier foundation, FF, who I have supported over the years and the associated press got together. Now, the associated press won a Pulitzer center for crisis reporting, uh, award, I think. But anyways, the Pulitzer center for crisis reporting also got involved here. [00:34:05] So she had these three different organizations trying to figure out. what could, or what would be considered local places best kept secret. So they went online. They started doing some searching, trying to figure this out. And according to ours, Technica, the reporting revealed the potentially extreme extent of data surveillance of ordinary people being tracked and made vulnerable just for moving about. [00:34:38] Small town America. So it isn't just the big cities where you're tracked anymore. Reports showed how police nearly two dozen agencies. One record shows the total figure could possibly be up to 60. Use Google maps, like technology called frog reveal. now this is licensed by fog. I, I keep saying frog it's fog licensed by fog data science, and it gives state and local police a power to surveil. [00:35:10] Hundreds of billions of records from 250 million mobile devices. And if that doesn't scare you, I don't know what does now FF, the electronic frontier foundation found that fog reveal gets its data from veal. That's the same data source the feds use. neither companies disclosing the nature of their business relationship. [00:35:33] Okay. They fog, reveal. Didn't say what Tel is providing and vice versa, right? Yeah. But it really appears that fog reveal is getting data location services to local police at its steep discount. So it's making it more affordable for smaller police departments and private security companies to access major amounts of data and trace devices across months or even years. [00:36:03] isn't that something. So typically FF found that police agencies license the software annually for costs as low as six grand to nine grand. Some agencies spend even more on this tech to track people as they are moving and exactly where they are. Again, think being in a Hardee's drive through having the FBI show up. [00:36:27] Knowing you're there. Uh, ours reviewed one annual contract in Anaheim, California. That was for more than $40,000. So it took months for these three organizations that are used to digging into this sort of stuff, uh, to figure this out, took more than a hundred public records requests to gather thousands of pages of evidence to trying to compile a picture of how local law enforcement. [00:36:55] Is using and mining the location data. Now, to me, this is scary because we look at abuses of power. Through the years and I it's happened again and again and again, we are smelling more and more like Venezuela than we are free us. It's frankly scary, scary to me, but I'm talking about it cuz I think it's important. [00:37:21] That I bring this to light to everybody else out there. Okay. Now fog data science, managing partner, Matthew Brodrick told the associated press that fog reveal has been critical to police to save time and money on investigations, suggesting police who are under-resourced and investigation suffered from reliance on outdated. [00:37:44] Outdated tech now that's true. Isn't it? But isn't it also true that, uh, that's why we have some of these policies and procedures in place. That's why the Supreme court Miranda decision has some policies and procedures. That's why a warrant, a search warrant is supposed to be specific in what they're looking for and where it is located. [00:38:11] We don't allow these broad warrants that the king used to issue, but we are doing that nowadays. It seems against political enemies and that's where it starts really, really scaring me. It isn't that I think that the, the current administration it, or even the next administration in Washington, DC, is going to be rounding up its enemies and putting them up against a. [00:38:38] But when would it happen? Well, it would happen if everything were in place for it to happen. What's one of the most important things for fastest regime. It's to have a citizenry where they know everything about everyone. It, it reminds me of the Soviet era. Show me the man. I'll show you the crime. There's a great book out there right now. [00:39:04] I think it's called, um, three felonies. a day, I think is what the name of it is. But the, it points out how every last one of the people that call ourselves Americans in the United States of America, every one of us commits at least three felonies a day. Now a lot of these things are just absolutely crazy. [00:39:26] You know, there's been a lot of jokes about, oh, did you chair the label off of that pillow? Well, you can cuz you're the consumer, right? It's. The people that are selling it that are in distribution chain that cannot tear that off by law. Okay. But in reality, there is a lot of stuff that could be used against you. [00:39:46] So it it's like when they say, uh, you know, give me this, or why don't you answer that question? It's none of their business. You have a right to be secure in your papers right now, if they have a warrant that's specific, then you need to surrender it. But hopefully the warrant's actually issued by real court. [00:40:08] Some of these agencies now, uh, like the IRS have their own courts that are paid for by the agency. The judges are working for the agency. So you really think they're gonna be fair. I wonder, I wonder. Okay. Couple more things. Next up these pictures taken by the James web space telescope. Have you seen these? [00:40:35] It is amazing. I've seen them side by side with our latest or, you know, our previous high tech pictures. And we're seeing what maybe galaxies that we never could see before. It's just absolutely crazy. Well, guess what bad guys have seen them as. And they are embedding malware inside of some of these amazing images taken by the James web space telescope. [00:41:05] If you can believe this, by the way, they're writing them in go. Uh, so the Phish and emails, they've got a Microsoft office attachment. That's the entry point for the attack chain when you open it, it retrieves and obfuscated, VBA, macro, which in. Auto executed. all of a sudden there is a macro that is de obfuscated and run on your computer. [00:41:34] So be careful careful with that again. And good news. Microsoft is now turning off the execution of macros by default. Double check your machine, making sure that macros are blocked by default. So, yay. Okay. So they are, by the way, changing campaigns to rogue link and ISO files because of the blocked macros. [00:41:56] But, uh, it's good that Microsoft is doing that. Thank goodness. And you Ukraine, the police busted a crypto fraud call center. In fact, more than. And they're also shattering two more Russian bot farms. So we shouldn't be getting as many of those, uh, phone messages from the, uh, the bad guys scammers as we used to get. [00:42:20] Thank you, Ukraine. All right. Online Craig peterson.com. Get that newsletter and stay on top. [00:42:29] Well, we got some election news here from our friends at Google and at Twitter, they are taking opposite directions about exactly how they're gonna handle news postings about the elections. This is an interesting thing. [00:42:46] The federal election commission is the branch of the us government that monitors elections. [00:42:53] It does things like impose fines for misuse of funds. It sets some of the standards for funds and for their use. And. and one of the things it looks at is what are called in kind contributions. This is where someone might, uh, for instance, run a whole bunch of ads on behalf of a candidate. And those ads are coordinated with the campaign and that is illegal. [00:43:24] You're not supposed to do that. And because it's illegal, you know, they try and stop it. But most of the time they end up finding after the fact. And that's part of the reason they want campaigns to be filing their financial reports fairly frequently so they can catch it quite quickly. Well, There have been many complaints from the G O P about what has happened with some of the campaign finance stuff, where you have someone like Facebook or Twitter or Google, who seems to be meddling with the election. [00:44:02] They are running ads for your competition. They are really screening the results from people's searches. And from that those results they're, they're benefiting. There was a study down in orange county here a few years back where they looked at. Google results that were related to the elections going on in orange county and found that the Google results were tainted in such a way that it dramatically favored the Democrats that were running in those districts in orange county, California. [00:44:39] Pretty interesting when you get right down to it. So the GLP says, wait a minute, now that sort of thing is worth millions, tens of millions of dollars, because if they were going to run TV ads, for instance, to get as many eyeballs, to get as much attention to convince people that this is the way they should vote, that would cost them tens of millions of dollars. [00:45:02] So how much is it worth? Where do you go to really straighten things out in order to ultimately make fairness work and well, you know, that's kind of what the federal election commission's supposed to do. Well, here's, what's happening with the next elections. The federal elections commission has decided that Google. [00:45:28] Getting rid of their anti spam measures for. Candidates does not violate a ban on contributions on inkind contributions. So this is an interesting approach because Google's saying, Hey, listen, we want to allow pretty much any political message to come right through to Google Gmail users, inboxes, and not filter those. [00:45:59] Which I frankly think is a smart move on their part. Now some of these campaigns get pretty crazy. They're sending money requests all of the time. It it's been crazy to watch both sides do this and both sides complain about the other side, doing it. But at least by getting rid of these spam rules for the politicians, their messages are gonna get through. [00:46:24] I think that's ultimately a very good thing. So what kind of messages are gonna get through how and why? Well, ultimately they're saying we're gonna let all of them through. and what that means for you. If you already get some of these messages from the politicians, it means your mailbox. At least if it's a Google Gmail box, you are going to be seen even more during elections. [00:46:51] And I think this is gonna go on for very long time. Because Google doesn't want to get caught in the middle. When we're talking about these in kind contributions. If this were to be done for the Republicans or were to be done just for the Democrat, can you imagine the noise that would be made? By both sides and in kind contributions where the Republicans tens of millions of dollars Googled get dull tied up in some of these, uh, you know, lawsuits that would really be inevitable. [00:47:23] Bottom line. Well, Republicans have accused. Google of giving Democrats an advantage in its algorithms. And, and as I said, there have been studies on that that have proved that they have. The big question is why. And there's an article in ours, Technica talking about a meeting that happened in may 20. 22 between Senate Republicans and Google's chief legal officer. [00:47:52] And he said that the most forceful rebuke came from Senator Marco Rubio from Florida who claimed that not a single email from one of his addresses was reaching inboxes. And the Washington post, which of course is a mouthpiece for the Democrat party reported in late July. That the reason it was getting blocked was that a vendor had not enabled an authentication tool that keeps messages from being marked to spam. [00:48:21] Now, if that's true, The Washington post accidentally reported the truth here. And it might be true. I had a company call me up this week. They had their Google ads account banned, and they were trying to figure out the details of why and what happened. And I went in and we solved that problem, and I noticed that they had. [00:48:44] Properly configured their email. There's there's gets technical here. I have a paper we've put together on this, a special report talking about what's called D K I M. These, uh, SPF records DMAR records and how they should all be set up and why I need to use them. So this company was doing marketing. [00:49:04] Obviously they had a Google, Google ad account. They were sending out emails, but because they had not properly and fully configured their email. They were not getting delivered at the rate that they could get delivered. Now that's kind of a very, very big deal when you get right down to it. And the Washington post is saying, well, that's what happened to center to Rubio. [00:49:26] Now there's other things that might happen too. There are. Keywords that are used. There's software called spam assassin. That's very, very common. I have used it since it came out decades ago. I can't even remember how long spam Assassin's been out there, but it looks for certain things in the emails. , it looks for a lot of graphical content, a lot of HTML, even a lot of links and it kind of, it gauges, you know, this is likely spam on this scale. [00:49:56] And typically if the, the score is higher than five or eight, or in some cases, some people said as high as 15, that email is bounced. Well, one of the real big checks as to whether or not this is legitimate email is to check and see. Who is the domain? Does that domain have these special keys that tell us? [00:50:19] Yes, indeed. This did come from us. In other words, in this case did come from Marco Rubio or in the case of my client, it came from their company.com. And is it signed encrypted so that we know that nobody's kind of playing a man in the middle thing, trying to mess things up on us. And they say, okay, well that's a really good score. [00:50:40] So we will, we'll lower that spam score. And, and that's how that game is played. So what by Google doing what it. Talking about doing it's really gonna help out because I have of every company I've checked for email, email deliveries, we've got a, a new customer that is a startup and you know, what do they know? [00:51:02] They they're very narrow. Right? They understand their. Basic technology and their email again, was set up kind of like apparently Senator Rubio's email was set up and, and didn't have these things. And just like this company that I helped this week, they didn't have it set up properly. And, uh, they had experts who supposed experts who had set it up, but both cases, right. [00:51:26] It was outsourced. Yeah. You know how that goes. Now, some Gmail users submitted comments to the federal elections commission and they were criticizing Google's plan cuz they did not want to get more spam. Okay. And there were more than 2,500 comments. You can find them by the way, online, all of the stuff is a matter. [00:51:48] Public record and they call it the docket. And so there's a page out for this particular docket and the commissions through Republicans and Democrat commissioner voted for the order appro Google's plan. I think this is a very, very good deal. And it's really kind of the opposite of what Twitter is planning on doing Twitter has. [00:52:12] essentially announced that it's going to. In the elections. Yeah. So you got Google on the one side saying our hands are clean. We're staying away from this. We don't want anything to do with this. Thank you very much. We love you, but, uh, forget about it. We're just gonna let all the emails. Through, Twitter's saying that it's going to have its wonderful sensors who have been proven right. [00:52:39] Every time he said with his tongue firmly planted in his cheek, and they're gonna have those wonderful sensors that, you know, they're sitting in the basement and, and eating pizza and drinking Coke or red bull. I, I still kinda understand why somebody that's 30, whatever years old needs, energy drinks, you know, come on, come on. [00:53:00] Uh, but anyways, They're they're saying that they, Twitter is going to be the determiner as to whether or not something that is posted on Twitter is correct. Or if it should be censored or if it should be blocked entirely. And they're admitting that they're gonna shadow ban conservative content, they don't like isn't that. [00:53:25] So. Yeah. Uh, that's from the gateway pundit good article. And you'll find it in this week's newsletter. Uh, I think it went out Monday this week and you can follow the link through to these articles on Google and Twitter and the elections or any of the others that we have out there. So stick around, we'll be right back and make sure you sign up. [00:53:46] If you didn't already get that newsletter. Absolutely free. Craig, Peter son.com/subscribe. [00:53:59] I'm not sure a week goes by where I don't hear from a listener saying that somehow Facebook is tracking what they're talking about because all of a sudden ad starts showing up. And they're related to things that they've been talking about. [00:54:16] Meta is the owner of Facebook and Instagram and, and some other things like WhatsApp, which is part of the reason I don't trust WhatsApp, but we've had, I don't know how many complaints from people saying that Facebook is listening in to what they're talking. [00:54:36] And people are kind of wondering, well, wait a minute. Is it listening in on my phone calls? Is it listening when and how? It's a very, very good question. Now Facebook says in a statement that Facebook does not use your phone's microphone to inform ads or to change what in the newsfeed. Some recent articles have suggested that we must be listening to people's conversations in order to show them. [00:55:06] Ads. This is not true. We show ads based on people's interests and other profiled information, not what you're talking out loud about. We only access your microphone if you've given our app permission. And if you are actively using a specific feature that requires audio, this might include recording a video or using in an optional feature. [00:55:30] We introduced two years ago to include music. Or other audio in your status updates. So there it is. There's the official word from our friends over at Facebook. But do you notice there's a little bit of an out in there, right? Facebook does not use your phone microphone to inform ads or change what you see in your news. [00:55:55] Doesn't use your microphone. So there's a study out right now. That is from an X Google engineer. And this article is in the guardian and they are talking about what he found. So, let me explain the background on some of this technology. First, if you are an app developer, if, if you're a developer of any software of any kind you use libraries and these libraries do things like search for a specific set of characters called a string or in search. [00:56:31] Them or move things around or open a connection to another machine. So rather than having implement the whole T C P I P stack and ethernet underneath it and, and all of the operating system work that you'd have to do with all of the interrupts and the buffer fills and reading, toggling. As switches in the hardware, doing all of that sort of stuff. [00:56:52] You just make one library call and say, listen, and you give the port and TA anybody who tries to connect you. It just comes right through. It's all taken care of for you, right? That's what libraries are all about. And they've become much more complex, more recently libraries nowadays can do things like provide you with a full web browser. [00:57:16] Many of the applications that we use on a daily basis, these apps in our phones, particularly, but it's also true with some of the apps on our computers are actually. Just web browsers. They're web browsers that talk to a server out on the internet and yeah, there might be wrapped in various things, but oftentimes if you're trying to pay within an app, it'll go to a third party site. [00:57:44] And part of the beauty of that is. Becomes a, a service to them. They don't have to worry about coding it all up. Right. They don't have to worry about taking your money, keeping everything safe. Am I using really good algorithms here to encrypt it can bad guys hack in? No, no, no. There's, they're just calling this routine that spins up a little web browser. [00:58:07] Inside the application and uses a secure connection to talk to the web server somewhere who cares? Not mine. I'm just the app developer, right? I'm letting you play your farming game or whatever it might be. That makes sense to you guys. So it makes their life much, much easier. Why bother if you've got a website that does everything, why bother coding it all up from scratch in an app? [00:58:34] They don't people don't. Why would. Well, we've seen that again. And again, for instance, look at Microsoft's latest browser out there, edge, not the original edge, but the latest edge, you know how Microsoft is, right. They call it the same thing, even though it's entirely different. Uh, yeah. How many versions of windows where they're like 20 at one point, right? [00:58:56] Different ones or different architectures and just crazy. But now the edge browser is. Built on chromium, which is Google Chrome, which is built on Apple's libraries to manipulate, draw things, et cetera. So you're running your edge browser on your Microsoft windows, computer. You're actually running code libraries. [00:59:21] If you will, from Google and from apple. And that way, if you're developing a browser like edge, you don't have to worry about every little nit bitty thing. That's all taken care of by other programmers who are making a smaller piece of code. Now that's been the whole Unix philosophy forever, by the way. [00:59:42] Instead of having these monolithic applications. That could be just full of bugs and security problems. You just have nice small, easy to maintain, easy to research applications and let other people worry about the little pieces, which is really kind of cool. It's great. Many browsers in fact are based right there on chromium and they modify it around a little bit. [01:00:07] Microsoft added all kinds of spyware to it. Well, it turns out. According to this research from an ex Google engineer that both Facebook and Instagram apps have been taking advantage of this in-app browser technology. And what they're doing is users who click on links inside the Facebook app or inside the Instagram at gram act are actually taken to the webpages. [01:00:39] Using an in-app browser controlled by Facebook or Instagram rather than sending you to your default browser. So if you are using iOS, your default browser might be safari, which is a rather safe. Browser and good for privacy, or you might have decided you wanna use the Chrome browser on iOS or maybe Firefox or brave, or one of dozens of different browsers that are out there. [01:01:10] No, no, it's not gonna use those. It's not gonna use your default browser. It's going to use the in-app browser. And what it's doing with that in-app browser now is here's a quote from him. The Felix Crouse, he's a privacy researcher founded an app development tool that was acquired by Google in 2017. He says, quote, the Instagram app injects their tracking code into. [01:01:37] Website shown, including when clicking on AB ads, enabling them to monitor all user interactions. Like every button that you press, every link you taped, every piece of text that you select or highlight any screenshot you take, any forms, you fill out any user forms, things like passwords addresses, credit card numbers. [01:02:06] Are all seen by the Instagram app? Yes, indeed. So in the statement, of course, uh, medicated that injecting a tracking code, obeyed users preferences on whether or not they allowed apps to follow them. And there was only used to aggregate data before being applied for targeted advertis. Now, this is interesting because according to Crouse, this code injection, uh, was tracked and he was able to look at doing, doing it right for normal browsers. [01:02:42] His test code detected no changes, but for Facebook and Instagram, it finds up to 18 lines of code added by. App into the webpage. So there you go. JavaScript injection and more from our friends at Facebook and Instagram. So they are tracking you, but apparently. They're not listening to your microphone, but they're watching you as you cruise around the web thinking you're using your browser, but no, no. [01:03:18] You're using theirs. Hey, stick around Craig peterson.com. [01:03:24] Cell phone security is something I've talked about for a long time. And you guys know my basics here. If you've been a listener for really any length of time, when it comes to smartphones, we're gonna get into this in more detail, particularly after this raid. [01:03:41] Well, of course everyone's heard, I'm sure about the rate on Trump's property, Mar Lago. [01:03:48] There was something else that happened right. About the same time. And that was representative. Perry Scott Perry was traveling with his in-laws, uh, who are described as elderly. They were on vacation. He's a Republican representative in the house of Congress from Pennsylvania. And he told the Fox news people that three FBI agents approached him, issued him a warrant and demanded he hand over his. [01:04:24] He said they made no attempt to contact my lawyer, who would've made arrangements for them to have my phone, if that was what they wanted. He says I'm outraged. Although not surprised that the FBI. Under the direction of Merrick Garland's DOJ would seize the phone of a sitting member of Congress. My, my phone contains info about my legislative and political activities, personal private discussions with my wife, family constituents, and friends. [01:04:53] None of this is the government's business. Now that's really an interesting point. And, and it brings up the discussion about our smart devices, you know, what should we be doing with our phones and, and what is it frankly, that our phones have in them. Now, just think about that for a minute. Scott Perry rec he, he not recommended. [01:05:21] He mentioned that he had all kinds of records. That were in that phone. You do too. You've got your contacts. Of course. The phone contains information about who you called, where you went, cuz it's got a GPS tracker, but even if GPS is turned off, it's still tracking which cell towers you've connected to. [01:05:43] Uh, we've got all kinds of email in our phones, which are gonna contain business documents, private documents, attorney, client, privilege documents, all kinds of stuff there. And we have the fourth amendment, which protects the right of privacy against unreasonable searches and seizures by the go. Now, in this case, obviously the government got a warrant we could argue about, you know, how legitimate is the warrant and should they have issued it, et cetera. [01:06:16] Right. That that's not what I'm talking about. This is not a political show. In reality. What we're talking about here is the technology. The technology we're using to store this information, this personal information, what should we be using? What shouldn't we be using? How should we use it? Right. All of that sort of stuff. [01:06:38] Well, okay, so we've established that there was not apparently a fourth amendment violation here. There, there might have been, we don't know. We may never know. It doesn't really matter, but if someone gets a hold of your smartphone or your tablet or your computer, what information does it have on there? [01:07:01] And we also have a right under the fifth amendment. against self-incrimination. So if someone's thumbing through our phone, what are they gonna find? People plead the fifth amendment all of the time, because they don't want to get trapped in one of these traps where maybe you don't remember the date. [01:07:24] Right. And all of a sudden you're in a perjury trap because you said something that wasn't true. Well, you know, our, our memories aren't the best, particularly when we're on vacation, we've been drinking a little bit, right. if someone finds your phone, opens it up, someone steals your phone and opens it up. [01:07:44] Someone gets a warrant for your phone and opens it up. What's in there. Now some people have in the past said, okay, what I'll do is I'll just go ahead and I'll wipe my phone remotely and they've done it. Right? The police have had the phone in evidence and in evidence locker and somebody remotely went ahead and wiped their phone. [01:08:04] The police are onto. And what the police have been doing more recently is they put it into a special bag that blocks any sort of signals coming in or out as well as the room. Right. It's kind of a fair date cage anyways, and that way, bad guys, good guys who, if the phones are stolen, they can't remotely wipe them, which is a good thing here, frankly. [01:08:30] But what are we ultimately trying to protect from? That's the question, right? It it's, who's gonna have your phone and what are you trying to protect it from personally? I'm not someone who truly trusts the government. I'm a firm believer in our constitution and our bill of right. Ultimately governments become corrupt. [01:08:52] It happens every time. And even if the whole government isn't corrupt, there's guaranteed to be people within the government, within their bureaucracy, the deep state, if you will, who are out there to get you right. makes sense to you. Makes sense to me. I don't know, but our phones, our smartphones, our computers have a lot of stuff in them. [01:09:14] I've talked on the show before how you should not be taking them to China. If you go to China, because of the evil made. T where they are grabbing your phones. They are duplicating them. Same thing with Russian travelers. Not as much as has been happening in China, but it's happened in Russia, probably a lot now with the whole war thing. [01:09:36] Right. But you shouldn't be taking them because they can be duplicated just like rep Scott. But Scott Perry's phone was duplicated. Now the, the FBI apparently said, well, we're not gonna look through well, why you're duplicating it then. And you know, maybe it's just to preserve evidence. I really don't know, but the bad guys can get at your phone employers if they own your phone can get at your phone and they can get a lot of data out of that. [01:10:06] What do you do? Well, bottom line, if you are traveling internationally, you're gonna wanna make sure to wipe your phone and just bring along maybe a, a basic little flip phone. Uh, cetera. Now there is software that we use. For instance, we use one password and duo in order to keep track of all of our stuff, right. [01:10:31] Our personal information. And. That's the two factor authentication stuff that we use, and we can tell it, Hey, we're traveling out of the country and we will only need these passwords. And it goes ahead and wipes out the password database so that we're not carrying a whole bunch of stuff with us that might be compromised by, uh, a government agency right within what is it? [01:10:54] The USS 50 miles of the border. They can confiscate and examine anything that you have, even if you're not trying to cross the border. and they'll do that at airports. They'll do that at a whole bunch of places. And then you've got the employer side and then you've got the bad guy side. Look at what happened to Khai with the Saudis right here. [01:11:16] He was, uh, you know, a journalist. We could argue that I suppose, but he's a journalist. He is abducted and he is murdered by the Saudis. They get their hands on the phone and they decrypt the. this has happened and it'll happen again. So Apple's done something here that I think is a good step in the right direction. [01:11:40] Apple, of course I've recommended for a long time. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever use Android. Okay. Don't. Use it, Google's using it to track you. You're losing your privacy and the security. Isn't very good. Particularly if your phone's more than three years old, apple has come up with this new lockdown mode on their phones and the lockdown mode is meant for. [01:12:09] People who are really under thumb, you know, people living in Russia or Ukraine, or you name it, Iran, all of these countries that are really out to get their citizens and it it's coming out in iOS. You'll see it there. You probably don't want to use it as a regular person, cuz it does block some of the things you can do, but it also locks it down against these Israeli based companies that have been selling software and hardware to break into cell phones. [01:12:44] So consider iPhones. And if you are one of these people, who's at a high risk consider lockdown mode. [01:12:51] I warned last week about using the ring camera as well as Google's camera. We've got some more news about that today. I was right. A major breakthrough in nuclear fusion and a new toolkit released. Talk about it all now. [01:13:08] Well, quite, quite a time, you know, I, I remember when I first started doing the radio show, uh, 22 years ago, now it started right there year 2000 Y two K and I, I was, uh, wondering, you know, am I gonna have enough stuff to talk about? [01:13:27] and my wife, who was just the most amazing person had been helping me and we subscribed to a bunch of newspapers. Yeah. There used to be newspapers back then. And she went through and was clipping articles that we thought might be good, that people might want to, uh, to hear about. And so she had all. Files. [01:13:49] And we, we subscribe to like four or five different newspapers, including the trashy ones like USA today, just so we knew what was going on out there. We had the financial times and the London times and New York times, and we got just files and files worth of stuff. And didn't take us long to realize, Hey, wait a minute. [01:14:14] There is so much tech news out there and stuff to talk about, uh, that weren't, we don't have to worry about that. So we canceled our subscriptions to all of these different things. I, I have actually a subscription to the New York times still, cuz they gave me a buck a week, which is not a bad deal for the online version because the old gray lady still does have some good text stories. [01:14:39] Some of the other stuff obviously is a problem, but, uh, yeah, tech stories anyways. Now we do a lot of this stuff online, the research, and I put it together and send it out in my newsletter every week. And man, did we have a lot of you guys reading it on Monday was the most, most, uh, red newsletter of mine. [01:15:01] The insider show notes newsletter. Of any of them ever. It was really great. It was like I had a, almost a 50% open rate there within the first day. So that's cool. Thank you guys. And obviously you really value it or you would not have opened that newsletter and click through you. See what I do? Is, uh, you probably know, I appear on radio stations all over the place and I I'm also of course have my own radio show here and elsewhere, and my podcasts, which are on every major podcast platform out there. [01:15:40] And I've been doing this for so long this week. What am I at here? Show? Number, I think it's like 1700. I'm trying to remember weeks. Okay. That's weeks of shows and, uh, we, we have never hit the same stuff twice, which is really rather cool. One of the things I brought up and this was in, uh, a recent show is about. [01:16:09] These ring cameras. And I warned everyone not to use ring and went through the whys. So if you have my newsletter from. A few weeks back, you can just probably search your email box

Surveillance Report
Has TikTok Suffered A Breach?! - SR102

Surveillance Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 46:24 Very Popular


TikTok allegedly had a data breach, leaked documents about an $8m iOS zero day, Google Chrome had a bug that copied data to your clipboard, the US gov is suing a location data broker, and a lot more! Welcome to the Surveillance Report - featuring Techlore & The New Oil to keep you updated on the newest security & privacy news. Support The Podcast Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/surveillancepod Monero: 46iGe5D49rpgH4dde32rmyWifMjw5sHy7V2mD9sXGDJgSWmAwQvuAuoD9KcLFKYFsLGLpzXQs1eABRShm1RZRnSy6HgbhQD Timestamps SR102 Sources: https://github.com/techlore/channel-content/blob/master/Surveillance%20Report%20Sources/SR102.md 00:00 Introduction00:33 Support us!01:12 Highlight Story02:56 Data Breaches09:54 Companies21:32 Research25:58 Politics36:30 FOSS40:39 Misfits44:14 Q&A44:51 Outro46:21 Support us! Main SitesTechlore Website: https://techlore.tech The New Oil Website: https://thenewoil.org/ Surveillance Report Podcast: https://www.surveillancereport.tech/ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@surveillancereport:2 PeerTube: https://apertatube.net/c/surveillancereport/videos

Brave and Strong and True
Grace Kocsko Vouvalis

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 31:49


My guest is Grace Kocsko Vouvalis. Grace was a member from 1977 to 1984. Trained as a dancer, Summer Stage developed her vocal and dramatic skills. She is remembered for her portrayals of Cinderella, Tuptim in The King and I, Fiona in Brigadoon, and of course, Maria in West Side Story. She relocated to Florida where she worked as an ATF agent. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . . We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.Grace requests that anyone who would like to contact her here do so at gkvouvalis@gmail.com.Correction: I said "MacNuggets" not "McDonald's."Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Please click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

SANS Internet Stormcenter Daily Network/Cyber Security and Information Security Stormcast
ISC StormCast for Tuesday, September 6th, 2022

SANS Internet Stormcenter Daily Network/Cyber Security and Information Security Stormcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 5:46 Very Popular


James Webb JPEG With Malware https://isc.sans.edu/diary/James+Webb+JPEG+With+Malware/29010 Windows Defender False Positive https://www.theregister.com/2022/09/05/windows_defender_chrome_false_positive/ Google Chrome 0-Day https://chromereleases.googleblog.com/2022/09/stable-channel-update-for-desktop.html Sharkbot Android Infostealer in Google Play Store https://blog.fox-it.com/2022/09/02/sharkbot-is-back-in-google-play/ Nmap 7.93 - 25th Anniversary Release https://seclists.org/nmap-announce/2022/1

Tech Breakfast Podcast
266: GeoEye-1 - Apple - Security - Google Chrome vulnerability

Tech Breakfast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 44:45


Topic Summary: - GeoEye-1 - Apple - Security - Google Chrome vulnerability

The Remarkable Project
051: Scaling a Business through a Niched Community with Brent Weaver

The Remarkable Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 60:05


In this episode of The Remarkable Project Jay speaks with UGURUS founder, entrepreneur and author, Brent Weaver, about why minor tweaks to your niche can have major business impacts, how a killer community is the safety net you need as you scale, and the benefits of building out your own interactions engine.Brent Weaver leads the vision for UGURUS, a platform and set of educational programs which help digital agencies get more leads, win higher-value clients, and delight customers in a way which allows founders and owners to scale their businesses, whilst creating freedom in their professional and personal lives.He built his first website at 15 and created his debut web-design business just two years later. That company grew into a successful 14-person web agency that was acquired in 2012, with Brent since going on to help thousands of other web professionals master business skills and make more than $10m as an entrepreneur himself.Written during one of the most disruptive times in history, with people floundering around where to focus their buying power, his 2020 book ‘Get Rich in the Deep End' looked at how to commit to a niche, own a market and “audaciously” scale an agency. Equally targeted at digital marketing agency owners concerned about how to stay essential and anyone else running a client based business, the book drives home a solution based on becoming a specialist in everything you do, but at the same time knowing what not to do, and why.Married with two sons, Brent enjoys his road bike and swimming laps, and as for his favourite program…Google Chrome.Remarkable Takeaways Why making even minor changes to your niche can have a major impact the downstream elements of your business as well as your marketing position. How finding your core community of comrades and confidants offers a valuable safety net of expertise and emotional support as you scale.The benefits of creating and fuelling an engine which increases ongoing interactions with customers or clients.Connect with BrentEmail him here! Learn more about UGURUS via their website

Brave and Strong and True
Donna Kelly Romero

Brave and Strong and True

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 40:40


My guest is Donna Kelly Romero. Donna grew up in Upper Darby and enjoyed watching children's theatre at Summer Stage as a child. In 1987, she started as an Apprentice and worked her way up to staff in the late 90s where she developed a deep appreciation for her mentors which led to her pursuit to study theatre along with education. Donna returned as a staffer from 2008-2013. At Harry's request, she returned to help out in the Apprentice program for the summer of 2021. I hope you enjoy our conversation, so, come along and have some fun. . .We all have stories to tell and they can be heard here.Welcome to Brave and Strong and True, a podcast created to engage Summer Stage alumni of all ages. I'm Bob Falkenstein.Our music is composed and performed by Neil McGettigan https://neilmcgettiganandtheeleventhhour.bandcamp.com/releasesPlease subscribe to Brave and Strong and True on Apple Podcasts. While you're there, please rate the show and leave a comment.  If you want to be a guest on Brave and Strong and True, please contact me at braveandstrongandtrue@gmail.com.You must have a desktop or laptop computer running the latest version of the Google Chrome browser. It helps if you have an external microphone and headphones, but Apple earbuds work too.Brave and Strong and True relies on financial support from its listeners. Click the “Support the Show” link at the bottom of the show notes to support the show.Support the show

Frugal Debt Free Life
Episode 69: SO MANY Easy Money-Saving Tips

Frugal Debt Free Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 11:47


CTA: Check out this week's sponsor Steady and browse side hustles and freelance gigs. https://link.steadyapp.com/3a2Z/gj5ecqle"Apps Mentioned in Today's show: Fetch gives you points every time you shop for groceries by simply scanning your receipt- https://fetchrewards.onelink.me/vvv3/referraltext?code=6F8VW Dosh you link your card and get a percentage every time you shop at qualified retailers https://link.dosh.cash/LYDIAS76 Honey is a Google Chrome plugin that gives you coupon and promo codes every time you do your online shopping joinhoney.com/ref/vyvkb07

LinkedIn Ads Show
How Are Your LinkedIn Ads Being Affected By The Cookiepocalypse? - Ep 70

LinkedIn Ads Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 38:18


Show Resources Here were the resources we covered in the episode: Data about cookies Browser fingerprinting Audience segmentation 1st party vs 3rd party cookies How Apple's ITP treats cookies Server side tracking with Google Ads Website demographics episode Sites the LAN shows up on NEW LinkedIn Learning course about LinkedIn Ads by AJ Wilcox Contact us at Podcast@B2Linked.com with ideas for what you'd like AJ to cover.   Show Transcript Are you prepared for the cookiepocalypse? We're going full prepper on this episode of the LinkedIn Ads Show. Come step down into our homemade bunker. Welcome to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Here's your host, AJ Wilcox. Hey there LinkedIn Ads fanatics! If you haven't been living under a rock, then you've likely heard about the impending doom of the browser cookie. Well, a lot of what we do as digital marketers is dependent on cookies. So you may have asked yourself, how much of your work will be affected. The subject is highly technical, so we wanted to simplify it as much as possible for you, just in case you're not a JavaScript developer. I'm going to run you through the basics of what cookies actually are, and what's happening to them. Then we'll get to jump into the cookiepocalypse and how it's affecting LinkedIn Ads specifically. As a bit of a disclaimer here, I did do a lot of research for this episode. But as a favor to those of you who are highly technical, if I got anything wrong here or overlooked anything, please do reach out and I'd love the correction and insights. Credit where credit is due, this is an episode that was requested again by Mark Bissoni like the last one. So thanks, Mark for the great ideass. I think we have one more from you here in the can. First in the news, my apologies for missing last week's episode. Our company went on a retreat, and we went down to beautiful St. George Utah. It was like a four hour drive for us. We rented a really cool mansion that had its own arcade and theater and pool. And we even spent a day at the sand dunes in side by sides and on dirt bikes. All of that was way cool, but my favorite part about it was that because we're a remote team, and we talk a lot over zoom, we discovered that no amount of zoom calls can take the place of the effectiveness of an in person conversation. As an example, a group of us were just sitting at a table working, and a conversation naturally started up. The result of the conversation was after an hour, we got way more movement on our own sales and marketing strategy than we've made the whole past year on it. Our company meetings went very much the same way. We found opportunities that we never would have found over zoom. We set company team and individual goals. And the excitement from that was palpable. Between you and I, I didn't know if the investment in the retreat was going to be a worthwhile expense. But boy, now after having done it, I'm a huge believer in company retreats. If you listen to episode 67, that was all about the organic side of LinkedIn. I have some sad news, our guest Mark Williams, his dad just passed away. I heard from his podcast. So those of you who aren't following that, if you're connected to him reaching out and just passing your condolences could probably go a long way. There have been a couple of LinkedIn features that have been rolled out or are in the process of rolling out some good, some bad. Let's talk about the audience insights tool. We talked about this one in the news section of episode 57. It's a really cool feature where you can go in and look at any given matched audience. And LinkedIn will tell you in great detail about the audiences and what they like and what they're into and what makes them up. And this is a feature we've been really excited about. We got to play around with it a little bit in its alpha or its beta. And now it's fun to see it out in everyone's accounts. If you want to access it go to plan in your navigation instead of campaign manager, and then audiences and then you can click the checkbox next to any of those audiences and click insights, then it will take you to the Insights page. If it hasn't been rolled out to you yet. It should very shortly we've seen it in the vast majority of our accounts. A new update that we were not fans of, LinkedIn made some changes to how they calculate reach. One of our loyal listeners, Tom Tigwell from the UK, he reached out to me about it and said, "Hey, did you see what LinkedIn is doing with reach? Looks like they're sunsetting it." We posted about this on LinkedIn, and Jay Rathell, another one of our loyal listeners, he talked to his rep and clarified a few things. And LinkedIn's response here is actually really applicable to today's topic. He said, as a result of identity changes, we're making updates to reach and frequency metrics in the campaign manager tool. The current reach frequency, and cost per 1000 members reached metrics will be replaced with a one day, seven day, and 30 day averages for each. The key result for brand awareness campaigns will be updated to a seven day average reach. Honestly, because LinkedIn is talking about these being a result of identity changes. I don't see how that's the case. These were already metrics that were done behind the scenes in Lincoln's back end. None of that was actually exposed to us except for general like reach and frequency numbers. So I don't see how that has anything to do with it, but I would love to be corrected there. I will say the reach and frequency numbers really never made sense to me the way they were reported. So it's possible that they're correcting something that never really worked anyway. But even if they were working as planned, I'm not a fan of this change with these metrics being bucketed together into 30 day, seven day, and one day averages. Because I wonder if I set my time range to overlap two of those different buckets, does that mean that my numbers are going to be horribly misreported because it's just taking a chunk of averages. I don't know, this is something we're going to be still exploring quite a bit. But thanks to Tom and Jay for helping us discuss these topics. We also had some interesting occurrences happen in the last few weeks, where some of our campaigns would overspend their budget. So we had two different of our reps reach out to their LinkedIn reps to get an answer of why this happened. And the reps responded in a way that was really mind blowing. So here's what they said, what we ended up doing was in these campaigns, we would lower the budget mid day. And then they went ahead and spent the entire allotted budget from before. So when we asked these reps about what was happening, they said, daily budget changes are not updated in real time, because that could create a loophole in which advertisers could take advantage of the system. For example, an advertiser could set a daily budget of $1,000 at the campaign activation, and then get a massive amount of impressions and clicks, then a few hours later, the same advertiser would lower down the budget to $10, and only pay a fraction of what the ad has been served. In terms, this is by design. And you'd have to wait till the next day to see the new daily budget reflected in the back end. And that answer didn't seem correct to me. Because at any point, if you lowered your budget down, LinkedIn can see on the back end what your budget was, and what changed. So no one would be able to pull the wool over LinkedIn's eyes here, and claim that they should only be spending $10 a day for that campaign. But definitely we expect that when we make a bidding or a budget change, it should be reflected in real time. We asked that same rep for clarification. And they responded, "Let's remember that if an advertiser sets a high budget and or high bids, they are increasing subsequent delivery, and thus chances to receive clicks, conversely, preventing other advertisers who can't compete with that budget to win the auction and push their ads on the platform. This is why even if the first advertiser decides at the end of the day to decrease the budget to minimal cost, our system will still honor the initial budget set for that day." That answer didn't seem very correct either. Then another one of our account managers that this happened to one of their accounts, they launched new campaigns with a daily budget of $100, just as a placeholder. And then after they'd spent about $85, we knocked him down to a $33 daily budget, but then the campaign's just kept spending. So we lowered him down to $20, trying to slam those brakes on. And then by the end of the day, they'd spent $150, which is the original budget plus 50%, which LinkedIn is allowed to spend. But the fact that we had lowered that budget down during the day before that spent happened, that was a little bit crazy. We sent that to the account rep. And this is a different rep altogether, we got a similar response back, but it wasn't word for word. So we know this wasn't just a copy paste from LinkedIn. If this actually is the case, how the auction system works, this is a big deal for us. I would have expected LinkedIn to have some sort of a formal announcement about it. Because the way that it is right now, if you make any changes to your bids, or budgets during the day, they wouldn't actually kick in until midnight, UTC time that day, which could be many hours, if not, most of the day. As we were posting about this, a LinkedIn employee actually commented and said, this isn't how it's supposed to work. I'm gonna reach out to you, let's get those campaign IDs and we can investigate a little bit. So we are working with LinkedIn to figure this out. I hope this isn't the case. I hope our bids and budgets are actually done in real time, and that this was just a one off aberration. But I'm curious if any of you have experienced the same kind of thing too. It sounds like it might not be expected behavior, but we'll see. I want to highlight one review the user on Apple podcasts, Nosremetnarg, I hope I pronounced that right. I have no idea what that is. They said, "Such a great resource, the episode on AV testing." And then they had two minds blown emojis. Thanks so much for leaving that review. And for everyone else. If you haven't already, please do leave us a review. We put a whole lot of work and effort into releasing these podcast episodes. They're totally free. We don't get anything out of it. And so we hope that your fee in a way you can pay us back would be to go and leave a review. It would be sincerely appreciate it. And as a bonus, when you leave a review, I'm going to shout you out and feature you. 9:32 Okay, let's hop into our topic here, the cookie pocalypse. So to understand what's happening with the cookie pocalypse, we need to understand what a cookie is. And it's not very hard to understand. A cookie is just a little text file that a website will stick into your browser through JavaScript when you visit. Okay, so it's a little text file. But what does that text file potentially contain? Well, it contains a randomly generated and unique number that is used to recognize your computer and because As of that, since the website knows who it is that's communicating with, it makes things like online shopping and online banking totally possible. If you didn't have a cookie, if you added something to your shopping cart on an Ecommerce site, and then navigated to a new page, it wouldn't know it was still you and you'd lose whatever was in your cart. I think we can all agree that would be a really annoying user experience. 10:22 The cookie also contains the domain name of the website that actually created it. And a website can actually generate several cookies. It can also store things like user settings, such as your language preference, or special preferences, like how many items show up in a list when the page loads. For user experience, you definitely wouldn't want someone to have to come back and adjust that and change it every time they visit your website. So the cookie is going to help remember those things. The cookie file also is going to hold things like the time spent on the website, or individual sub pages, any data that you enter into forms, they can store as a cookie as well. So your email address, your name, your telephone number, maybe even the terms that you searched for on the site. And then quite a few other pieces of just normal metadata. Things like the expiration date of the cookie, and that kind of thing. So cookies were originally intended to be really helpful in just remembering you so that your user experience on websites was going to be better. And then analytics packages, like Omniture, which is now Adobe Analytics, and Google Analytics found that they could use the cookies to stitch activity together and follow the user journey. For instance, the analytics package can place a cookie on your browser when you arrive on the site. And then when you come back, it can report that you are a returning visitor, and then stitch both this session and the previous session together, since it now knows that these were the same person. So you're really building a profile about who someone is when they're visiting your website, even if you don't have them personally identified. And these were super helpful in stitching user behavior together over multiple sessions for things like your marketing automation system. So how this could work, let's say, and I'm a big fan of Les Miserables. So let's say we have user 24601. That's their unique identifier. They go to your website, and they look at an article. And then three months later, they come back and they look at another article. Well, your marketing automation system would know that this is the same person, because the first time that they came, you gave them a cookie. And then three months later, that cookie is still in their browser. And they can see oh, this is that same user. Then let's say two months later, they come back, they look at something else, and they fill out a form. Before that we only had users who for 601, we know that they visited two different pages. But now after they filled out a form, we've stitched that user together, we now know which two pages they've visited, as well as their name and email address that we collected from the forum. So now we're building this whole profile of which users on the website are more engaged than others. And if your sales team is looking for people to reach out to the engaged users are probably high on that list. And of course, ad platforms realize that they could retarget users based on their interactions with a website. So for instance, if I visit B to link.com, the LinkedIn pixel or the Insight tag it fires, and it's going to check to see if I have a cookie from LinkedIn.com. If it does, it's going to identify me as a LinkedIn member, which they know because they know which member that identifier represents. So then if be two links retargeting audience was set up within campaign manager to say anyone who visits the website, stick them into a retargeting audience, then it would add me. So then the next time I go to visit Linkedin.com, LinkedIn looks at the cookie, and it sees that I had visited B2Linked.com and understands that that should be in a retargeting audience, and then it can start serving me retargeting ads byB2Linked. And this is all really cool. I think the vast majority of people out there, even those who are really concerned with privacy, don't really have an issue with how this is all done. As it doesn't really feel like an invasion of privacy to me. It's more like just being able to cater a marketing experience to someone. But then you have cases where some really bad actors decided to exploit cookies in a way that took way too much data about users, and they even used it for invasive or unethical practices. And of course, when unethical behaviors happening, it's right for everyone to be up in arms and start creating legislation to shut it down. And I think it's important to understand that cookies were never meant to be the solution that they've become. They were created for things like remembering who someone is, but then they were co-opted later by marketing and other purposes, to try to do statistics and analysis that they were never really intended to do. So cookies have always been a little bit imprecise, a little bit problematic, but we've made do and there are two kinds of cookies. There's a first party cookie and a third party cookie. 14:52 So let's talk about the differences between those. First party cookies are highly trusted. When you're visiting a site that seit places a cookie in your browser. So for instance, if I go to LinkedIn.com, in my fresh browser, brand new installation, LinkedIn is going to put a cookie on my computer after I've logged in identifying me as AJ Wilcox, and associating that with my unique LinkedIn ID. That way, if I open up a different browser tab, it still knows it's me. Now this war on cookies is not directly targeting first party cookies. Although I believe that there are some casualties with this one that we'll go over. First party cookies only work on the website, which created them and they are considered essential cookies by data privacy laws. So this is great, because those of us who really appreciate the user experience that cookies provide, those are most often done with first party cookies. And we're likely not going to see anything changed there. But third party cookies are totally different. They're not nearly as trusted. This would be like if you visited B2Linked.com and then Linkedin.com placed a cookie in your browser. Which it can do because B2Linked has the LinkedIn insight tag installed. So technically, LinkedIn could do that they could place a third party cookie on your computer, when you're visiting our website. It's my understanding that third party cookies were mainly created for marketing and analytics. And so they started out innocent enough things like being able to just retarget you with certain ads, because you'd landed on a certain page before, I think most people would be okay with that kind of behavior. But then some really unethical marketers took it to the point of tracking users without their consent across the whole web, they can personally identify you, they can sell that information to data aggregators, and use it however they wish. And then really bad actors have even used third party cookies, to steal your identity to hijack your browser fill your newsfeed with propaganda, and all those things that maybe many of us remember spyware, adware that would infect your browser. So the war against cookies is really a war against third party cookies. You've always been able to go and clear your cookies, which is something I would do, if I were ever inundated by a certain kind of ad that I just didn't want to see anymore, I would jump into my browser and delete that cookie or just delete all my cookies. You can also serve in incognito mode, because that's not going to store the cookie past when you close that session. And the vast majority of browsers now have a mode called Do Not Track that you can turn on and it's just going to throw the cookies away. 17:22 All right, so then we have the cookiepocalypse. And this all originated from Apple. Because obviously, there's no reason for Google or Facebook to enforce privacy around cookies, because both of them own ad platforms that rely heavily on cookies. Also, Google owns Chrome, which means it can technically gather any behavioral data it wants, although Google claims to keep it very sparse on the collection of personally identifiable information in the browser. So those two brands highly invested in cookies. But then you have Apple who has no dog in this fight whatsoever, because it doesn't have an ad platform or a retargeting solution. So they took the angle of deciding to step up and become the consumer watchdog, your privacy guardian, and it's definitely good branding. If I were on Apple's team, I definitely would have been proud of this idea, too. But it definitely stepped on a lot of toes. Google, Facebook, and all pretty much digital marketing platforms around the world were all negatively affected here, the technology that they run on was under attack. So the way this worked is when Apple released the iOS 14 update the Safari browser, which is the main browser that all Apple devices use, it used something called ITP, or intelligent tracking prevention, to basically stop storing third party cookies. And in my opinion, this wasn't a huge deal, because so many people on Apple devices actually don't use Safari, they use the Chrome browser. So I didn't expect to see a ton of data loss. But then when Apple released the update for iOS 14.5, when it did was at the operating system level, it stopped storing third party cookies. So no matter which browser you are using, whether it's Safari, or Chrome or anything else, it would just block the third party cookies from being stored, regardless of the settings that you had in your browser. They were all overruled. So now any Apple device that's an iPhone and iPad, your MacBook Pro, would essentially stop providing accurate reporting data inside of analytics. And this is crazy because at least in the US, Apple traffic represents about half of all the traffic. So it's absolutely huge the effect that it has. And that's the reason that we're calling it the cookie pocalypse. That put a lot of pressure on all the other tech companies because they don't want to be seen as trying to take advantage of someone's privacy. So they all felt the need to follow suit. Mozilla Firefox was right behind positioning itself as the privacy first browser. And I'm fairly certain that this was the first browser to set up the ability to change it to a Do Not Track setting that told websites not to track the user. That eventually became the default. So then we lost tracking for Firefox users as well, regardless of which device they were using, if they were on a Windows or Android or whatever. Then Google Chrome stepped forward and did something that I was not expecting, back in January of 2020, it announced that it would block third party cookies by 2022. But then, in June of 2021, they delayed it until mid 2023, which is good because it's 2022 right now at the time of recording, and we still have a little while. And if you had asked me a couple years ago, I predicted that because Microsoft has become such an advocate for user privacy, that Microsoft Edge would have beaten Google to the announcement. But I never saw an announcement like that. And I think I figured out why I'm fairly certain that the Microsoft Edge browser runs off of the architecture called chromium, which as you guess it is the architecture of Google Chrome. So basically, Microsoft Edge, as soon as Google Chrome makes this change, Edge would follow suit automatically. And I'm obviously overgeneralizing what's happening here, because with Apple's logic of intelligent tracking prevention, it can decide whether to block a cookie or to accept it just based off of their own intelligence. So my understanding is that no cookie is really safe. ITP inside of Apple, or the logic within any browser can decide whether to block a first party cookie, or it could even on rare occasions, decide to keep a third party cookie. So if you run a website, one of the things that you can do to make your cookie more likely to persist is have a login on your site, since a user who logs into your site and gets a first party cookie to remember that. So the next time they come back, they don't have to enter their username and password for the 30th time is really helpful to users. And so Apple and all the browsers are going to be a lot more likely to keep that cookie because it represents being behind a login, which is already showing a lot of trust. I have an article down in the show notes that has a great breakdown of the logic that Apple's ITP takes with cookies, and you can go and compare that it's from a site called cookie saver.io. So here's a quick sponsor break, and then we'll dive into what this means for us as digital marketers. The LinkedIn Ads Show is proudly brought to you by B2Linked.com, the LinkedIn Ads experts. 22:19 If you're a B2B company and care about getting more sales opportunities with your ideal prospects, then chances are LinkedIn Ads are for you. But the platform isn't easy to use, and can be painfully expensive on the front end. At B2Linked, we've cracked the code to maximizing return on investment while minimizing your costs. Our methodology includes building and executing LinkedIn Ads strategies, customized to your unique needs, and tailored to the way that B2B customers buy today. Over the last 11 years, we've worked with many of LinkedIn's largest spending advertisers. We've spent over $150 million on the platform, and we're official LinkedIn partners. If you want to generate more sales opportunities with your ideal prospects, book a discovery call at B2Linkedin.com/apply. We'd absolutely love to get to work with you. 23:08 Alright, let's jump into how this all applies to LinkedIn advertisers. There are a whole bunch of different marketing solutions that are affected by this. First off, I think we need to talk about analytics. You may have noticed that Google Analytics came out with GA 4 in pretty peculiar timing. It would have been really easy for Google to say because of what Apple's doing, we blame them. We're now trying to find a way around it with a new analytics platform. But Google took the high road, they don't blame Apple publicly. They just shared that they're building from the ground up because the old one had become a Frankenstein's monster. My guess is though, that GA 4 is very much connected to analytics and user tracking through a cookieless kind of world. What about conversion tracking, probably every ad platform you use has a conversion tracking element to it. The way this works with LinkedIn is that when you have the insight tag installed on every page of your website, when the visitor comes after clicking on an ad, it places a cookie in that user's browser. And that cookie identifies you as the same person who just clicked an ad on Linkedin.com. And now you're on another site. So when that user now visits a page of your website that is set up to fire a conversion, LinkedIn sees that user journey that this is the same person who recently clicked on an a, LinkedIn knows which ad, and then registers a conversion for that ad and that campaign, all within campaign manager. My understanding is that LinkedIn has converted all of its cookies from a third party cookie to a first party cookie, meaning it should persist and be respected a lot more. I don't know the technicality of how this works or why it works, but it sure sounds great. So it seems to me that if this is now a first party cookie, and even Apple devices have a cookie duration of seven days, that conversion tracking shouldn't be too badly affected. Even inside of a Safari browser. or someone can still click from ad to landing page to a thank you page and still have that all reported back to LinkedIn. That being said, we have seen a significant variation in click conversions reported in campaign manager versus the actual form fills that we find within the CRM. I love to hear if you guys are seeing the same thing with conversions in campaign manager being under reported, I know that LinkedIn is working on solutions behind the scenes trying to bridge that gap. But if what we're seeing right now is all Apple devices and we're seeing in effect, when Chrome stops accepting third party cookies in 2023, looks like midyear, we'll probably end up seeing twice the impact. So I can't overstate the importance of making sure that your form data is all flowing into your CRM because really, who cares about what the conversions number is inside the ad platform, if you have an actual record in your CRM with a name and an email. That's the only way as far as I'm concerned to make sure that you have 100% accurate way of tracking conversions. 26:02 Then we have retargeting solutions. LinkedIn is web retargeting is 100% reliant on cookies in your browser. So once third party cookies are gone without further development, I just don't see the technology even still working. I haven't heard anything from LinkedIn on this. And I do hope they're working on a variant that will live past 2023. But it's a little scary to me right now looking at the future of LinkedIn is website retargeting solution. So even if the LinkedIn insight tag places a first party cookie for retargeting purposes, I'm still not sure it can be reliably recognized for retargeting when they come back to LinkedIn, especially if it's outside of Apple's seven day cookie persistence window. What about the LinkedIn Audience Network? Well, the LinkedIn Audience Network or LAN, as they refer to it internally at LinkedIn, it's the ability to show your sponsored content ads to very specific users, even when they're not on Linkedin.com. So LinkedIn has a network of over 1000 really high quality sites and apps that it can show members ads on, it's great, and I highly recommend it. And if you remember from Episode 22, we talked about which sites and apps that LinkedIn Audience Network actually can reach. While I don't recommend the Audience Network on either Google or Facebook, I love it on LinkedIn. So the way that the LinkedIn Audience Network works from my understanding is that when you're logged in to linkedin.com, so obviously LinkedIn knows who you are, it places an identifier cookie in your browser. And then when you visit one of those partner sites, LinkedIn has a script on that page to check the LinkedIn cookie and see if there are any advertisers who are specifically wanting to target you. And then your inventory enters the auction for advertisers to target you. My thought is that this is negatively going to be impacted by the cookie pocalypse. But I'm just not sure how much it's being affected by it. I'm guessing that the LinkedIn cookie, even if it is first party, probably won't be able to reliably be read by those partner sites. Or if they can read that cookie, the first party cookie would be gone after seven days, if this isn't an active LinkedIn user who's logging in at least every seven days. So if that stops working, that would truly be sad. 28:10 Another one is that website demographics. We talked all about this one on episode 54. But one of the little appreciated features of LinkedIn is the free website demographics that you get just by putting the Insight tag on your website and letting it run. I actually call it LinkedIn analytics, because it's so similar to that of like Google Analytics, or Facebook analytics. What it does is it shows the professional makeup of those who are visiting your website. From my understanding, this works by the LinkedIn member having their Linkedin.com cookie in the browser, which is identifying who they are. And then your insight tag on your website, inspects that cookie, and then reports it back to LinkedIn, who you are. And because of privacy, obviously, they're not going to expose that to you, but they will aggregate that behind the scenes to show you general information about the different job titles who are interacting with your website, or which companies are coming the most often are the levels of seniority, etc. There's like nine different reports in there. And similar to LinkedIn, Audience Network and retargeting and any other products that relies on the LinkedIn insight tag and browser cookies, I don't know what the effect will be, but I'm guessing it's going to be significantly adversely affecting each of those products. And they may not be useful after like mid 2023. Since I love this product, I really do hope that LinkedIn finds a way to make it continue past the cookiepocalypse. 29:35 So now that I've totally scared you. Let's talk about the different actions that you can take in preparation for the cookiepocalypse. Remember I told you we were going to be full prepper on this episode. Get that tinfoil hat ready. Jump on down in the bunker. My first recommendation is around LinkedIn website retargeting. I'm predicting that after 2023 LinkedIn's website retargeting feature won't be nearly as reliable, but what that means If you want to take advantage of it now while we have it. I haven't been very bullish on LinkedIn's website retargeting in the past, just because it's weaker than other solutions. But boy, it's really capable of producing lower cost traffic on LinkedIn, and continuing to tell a segmented story. So I'm definitely a fan of it. Use it while you've got it. But in addition to that, LinkedIn has all of these event based retargeting features that happens just for those who are on the platform. And these have nothing to do with cookies, every action that someone takes on Linkedin.com. LinkedIn knows who they are and what action they took. So it's just keeping track on the backend. So I would highly recommend take advantage of things like single image ad interaction retargeting, or 25% video viewers, or form retargeting company page visits. If they're interested in a LinkedIn event, really anything you can take advantage of there. In the past, I've always recommended using Google and Facebook's retargeting features. And that certainly isn't changing here. Google and Facebook are by far the most advanced ad platforms on the planet. So I'm not sure how their tech is going to keep working. But if anyone is going to have a retargeting solution that works, it's going to be theirs. So definitely set up LinkedIn website retargeting, but also have Facebook and Google's as well. And then all your platforms can all hold hands and sing Kumbaya around the fire. You may notice that this is going to shrink the size of your audiences on LinkedIn from your retargeting campaigns. So you may find that you have to combine retargeting audiences just to get large enough list sizes. This obviously isn't great. But combining multiple lists is much better than just having retargeting audiences that won't run. If you've never paid attention to it, go check out website demographics now. If you have the LinkedIn insight tag installed, you've already got this make use of it. Now while the sun is shining. Because after cookiepocalypse is over, we don't know if this is still going to work. Similarly, use LinkedIn Audience Network in your sponsored content campaigns as much as possible before it may go away. Like I mentioned before, CRM tracking from your LinkedIn Ads is critical. If you don't have form fields coming from your LinkedIn ads being passed into your CRM with UTM parameters or other tracking parameters, informing you where those leads came from which ad they clicked, etc, you need to stop the presses right now and go get that set up. That is table stakes. There's another awesome feature on LinkedIn that isn't going to be affected by cookies going away. And that is the list uploads feature. You can always upload lists of individuals or company names for targeting or for exclusion back into LinkedIn. So make sure you are building your lists. When you own someone's email address, you can then do a lot with it, you can upload it into so many different ad platforms, as well as email them through your marketing automation solution. So build those lists, own that data. Because if you're just using LinkedIn targeting, you'll pay dearly, and you're just building on rented land. But there's so much more you can do if you actually own that data. 33:07 So let's get really technical. Here again, let's talk about the different alternatives to cookies that people are figuring out. One that I'm hearing a lot of advanced Facebook and Google advertisers doing is called server side tracking. There's a cool article all about this that we've linked to in the show notes by a site called Magic X. Sometimes it's called server to server or S to S, it works by cutting the user's browser completely out of the picture. Instead, the ad platform either Facebook or Google, in this case, it's going to cooperate right with your website's web server. It's capturing info about the user session directly from the server. So the ad platform, it's going to assign a unique identifier, because Facebook obviously knows exactly who you are. So they can link your identifier and your identity on their side. And then your website's server is going to receive that identifier and send information back to Facebook about the pages that it loaded during that session. And then when a conversion occurs, Facebook receives it right through its API. So there's no need to check the user's cookies in their browser or anything like that. This is the solution that the largest advertisers are using now. And there's a marketer by the name of Simo Ahava that I have great respect for. If you're running Google ads, there's an awesome article by him all about how to set up serverside tagging and tracking with Google ads inside of Google Tag Manager. So that's down in the show notes below at simoahava.com. Simo, if you're listening, huge fan. There's also another technology called fingerprinting. And again, really cool article about fingerprinting down in the show notes below. This one is by pixelprivacy.com, but fingerprinting works by the website creating a profile around each browser that's accessing this profile. It's a combination of your browser type, your browser version, your operating system, which plugins you have enabled, your timezone, language, screen resolution, and potentially a bunch of other active settings. And you might think that packaging this up is all pretty generic. But when you realize that any specific combination of all these browser elements is only going to occur about one in every 286,000 browsers, you can see how you might be able to consider it reliable as a marketer. And that's just the information about the browser to identify a user. So you can imagine a business could combine the browser fingerprint with its own data about you. So let's say that you fill out a form, they can then combine that data with now your name and email address, and then they can place you into some sort of a behavioral segment that they could follow up with. I don't hear a whole lot about fingerprinting. So it's possible that fingerprinting is even one of the things that server side tracking is using. But I don't know, that's a little past my paygrade. I do know that under GDPR, browser fingerprinting isn't illegal, at least not yet. So this is something that people are doing. I think server side tracking is so cool. I really wish we could do it on LinkedIn. So I hope LinkedIn releases a version of server side tracking that us LinkedIn advertisers can use. Bonus points if it makes the audience Network website demographics and retargeting more accurate. All right, I've got the episode resources party coming right up. So stick around. 36:25 Thank you for listening to the LinkedIn Ads Show. Hungry for more? AJ Wilcox, take it away. 36:36 All right, like we talked about here in the episode, there's an article by ionos.com all about what cookies are. There's the pixelprivacy.com article all about browser fingerprinting. There's a termly.io article all about first party versus third party cookies. There's the cookiesaver.io article all about how Apple's intelligent tracking prevention treats cookies. So if you're a site owner who deals with cookies, that's a great one to read. There's of course, the Simo Ahava article all about server side tracking with Google ads. And then we mentioned a few episodes, there's the website demographics episode, Episode 54, that you'll definitely want to check out if you haven't already. And then episode 22, we talk about all the different sites and apps that LinkedIn Audience Network can show up on. If you or anyone you know, is looking to learn more about LinkedIn Ads, point them towards the course that I did with LinkedIn Learning. It's of course linked to here in the show notes below and it's by far the least expensive and the most in depth course out there. If you're not already, subscribe to this podcast, if this was great info and you want to hear more geekiness about LinkedIn Ads in the future, hit that subscribe button. And then like I talked about before, please do rate and review the podcast. It makes a huge difference to me and I would be personally very grateful. If you have any corrections for us or suggestions for other episodes, or even feedback about the show, reach out to us at Podcast@B2Linked.com. And with that being said, we'll see you back here next week. Cheering you on in your LinkedIn Ads initiatives.

TWiT Bits (MP3)
SN Clip: Google Chrome's Fifth 0-Day of 2022

TWiT Bits (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 2:50


On Security Now, Steve Gibson discusses CVE-2022-2856 as Google suffers another 0-day. For this story and more, check out Security Now: https://twit.tv/sn/885 Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte You can find more about TWiT and subscribe to our podcasts at https://podcasts.twit.tv/

Techmeme Ride Home
Fri. 08/19 – The Biggest Google Search Algo Change In Years?

Techmeme Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 17:05 Very Popular


Looks like Evan Spiegel is retrenching in his dreams of making Snap primarily a camera company. Are we about to see the biggest Google Search algorithm change in years? Does TikTok effectively have a keystroke logger, and will this lead to more calls to crack down on them? And of course, the weekend longreads suggestions.Links:Snap Scraps Development on Flying Selfie Pixy Drone (WSJ)Google search updates will prioritize real reviews over clickbait (The Verge)New Google Helpful Content Update To Change SEO Much Like Panda Did (Search Engine Roundtable)TikTok's in-app browser could be keylogging, privacy analysis warns (TechCrunch)Weekend Longreads Suggestions:Browser Startups Take Aim at Google Chrome, Apple Safari (WSJ)The Crypto Geniuses Who Vaporized a Trillion Dollars (Intelligencer)Streaming Is Starting to Look A Lot Like Cable TV (Lucas Shaw/Bloomberg)Woman Pictured In The Viral 'Girl Explaining' Meme Explains The Origins And Her Reaction To Sudden Internet Fame (Know Your Meme News)How Nokia Ringtones Became The First Viral Earworms (The Verge)See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All the Hacks
My Favorite Apps, Products and Services for a Productive and Optimized Life

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 28:48 Very Popular


#73: In this bonus episode, Chris shares all the apps, products, services and chrome extension he uses to make his life more productive and efficient. That includes optimizing email, scheduling meetings, storing information and accessing everything quickly from your computer. He'll also share the products he uses at home to make life more efficient, including his desk A/V  setup.Full show notes at: https://www.allthehacks.com/productivity-apps Selected Links From The EpisodeGmail ShortcutsGmail GTD MethodSuperhuman (1 month free)CalendlyNick Gray's Calendly GuideNotionAlfred AppRectangle AppChrome ExtensionsLibrary ExtensionCapital One EnoLushaTab to Window/PopupDon't F*** with PasteCardPointers + 20% off ProKeepaOneTabBlueStacksPaprika1PasswordMicsATR2100XShure SM7B + Cloudlifter + Focusrite 2i2HeadphonesApple AirPodsAudio-Technica M50xBose QuietComfort 35 IIVideoLogitech C920 + C930Sony a7c + Elgato Camlink 4kILOKNZI TeleprompterDuet DisplayElgato Ring LightLumeCube LightDuet Display AppUnifi Wifi SystemAugust Smart LocksRing Alarm SystemSonos Sound SystemOura Ring ($50 Off) Full Show NotesHow to optimize your email and inbox [00:58] Easily schedule events with Calendly [6:08]Where to store information online [6:50] Using Notion to organize everything [8:43] My favorite productivity app: Alfred [10:43]Organize your desktop windows with Rectangle [12:04]The best Chrome extensions for productive browsing [12:33]Running mobile apps on your computer [15:46] Organizing recipes and meal planning with Paprika [17:09] Storing passwords and 2FA keys with 1Password [17:59] Upgrading your audio with a microphone [19:58] My favorite headphones [21:30]Improving your video setup {22:26]The ultimate home WiFi setup with Unifi [24:44] Home Tech: Locks, Alarm System + Speakers [26:01]Tracking your fitness and sleep with the Oura Ring [26:59] Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

5bytespodcast
Two Apple Zero-Days Being Actively Exploited! Patch Tuesday Fallout! Cool PowerToys Feature!

5bytespodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 28:22


On this week's episode of the podcast I cover the worrying fact that Apple have disclosed two new zero-days in iOS, iPadOS and macOS that are being actively exploited. I also cover some apps and services broken by August's Windows updates, new Google Chrome patches and more! Reference Links: https://www.rorymon.com/blog/episode-243-two-apple-zero-days-being-actively-exploited-patch-tuesday-fallout-cool-powertoys-feature/

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 677: Clemson Salmon - Android 13, Amazon's football deal, USB Rubber Ducky

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 145:51 Very Popular


Google launches Android 13, rolling out now to Pixel phones. Android 13 changelog: A deep dive by Mishaal Rahman. Pixel 6 series can't go back to Android 12 after updating to Android 13 due to security vulnerability. Google Pixel 7 and 7 Pro may have just passed through the FCC, ahead of fall launch. Biden admin says about 20 models will still qualify for EV tax credits. Hank Green IRA explainer. Amazon and Nielsen close 'Thursday Night Football' ratings deal. Meta Just Happens to Expand Messenger's End-to-End Encryption. The new USB Rubber Ducky is more dangerous than ever. A New Jailbreak for John Deere Tractors Rides the Right-to-Repair Wave. Chokepoint Capitalism by Rebecca Giblin, Cory Doctorow. The Unintended Consequences of OTC Hearing Aids. Oracle begins auditing TikTok's algorithms. Signal says 1,900 users' phone numbers exposed by Twilio breach. Adam Neumann Gets a New Backer. Ringtone interpretive dancing. Kindergarten teacher talks to politicians. music street. Google's official Android 13 statue sure looks a bit like a butt. Google Photos renaming 'Archive' to 'Hidden'. Google Chrome can now become your default browser on Windows without even opening settings. How a Third-Party SMS Service Was Used to Take Over Signal Accounts. Google Meet now shows you how noisy your office is. "Existing connections will be shut down" — Google is killing off Google Cloud IoT Core. Picks: Stacey - Hearing Test - Mimi Health. Jeff - BOOX is an electronics brand offering innovative E Ink (ePaper) tablets and devices based on Android. Jeff - Jeff history of media in :45. Ant - I set a Clemson wallpaper to see what color options would show up in #Android13. Sorry, no true orange. Ant - Lisa Carney and Photoshop World. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Secureworks.com/twit nomadgoods.com/TWIG

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 677: Clemson Salmon

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 145:51 Very Popular


Google launches Android 13, rolling out now to Pixel phones. Android 13 changelog: A deep dive by Mishaal Rahman. Pixel 6 series can't go back to Android 12 after updating to Android 13 due to security vulnerability. Google Pixel 7 and 7 Pro may have just passed through the FCC, ahead of fall launch. Biden admin says about 20 models will still qualify for EV tax credits. Hank Green IRA explainer. Amazon and Nielsen close 'Thursday Night Football' ratings deal. Meta Just Happens to Expand Messenger's End-to-End Encryption. The new USB Rubber Ducky is more dangerous than ever. A New Jailbreak for John Deere Tractors Rides the Right-to-Repair Wave. Chokepoint Capitalism by Rebecca Giblin, Cory Doctorow. The Unintended Consequences of OTC Hearing Aids. Oracle begins auditing TikTok's algorithms. Signal says 1,900 users' phone numbers exposed by Twilio breach. Adam Neumann Gets a New Backer. Ringtone interpretive dancing. Kindergarten teacher talks to politicians. music street. Google's official Android 13 statue sure looks a bit like a butt. Google Photos renaming 'Archive' to 'Hidden'. Google Chrome can now become your default browser on Windows without even opening settings. How a Third-Party SMS Service Was Used to Take Over Signal Accounts. Google Meet now shows you how noisy your office is. "Existing connections will be shut down" — Google is killing off Google Cloud IoT Core. Picks: Stacey - Hearing Test - Mimi Health. Jeff - BOOX is an electronics brand offering innovative E Ink (ePaper) tablets and devices based on Android. Jeff - Jeff history of media in :45. Ant - I set a Clemson wallpaper to see what color options would show up in #Android13. Sorry, no true orange. Ant - Lisa Carney and Photoshop World. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Secureworks.com/twit nomadgoods.com/TWIG

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 677: Clemson Salmon - Android 13, Amazon's football deal, USB Rubber Ducky

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 146:32


Google launches Android 13, rolling out now to Pixel phones. Android 13 changelog: A deep dive by Mishaal Rahman. Pixel 6 series can't go back to Android 12 after updating to Android 13 due to security vulnerability. Google Pixel 7 and 7 Pro may have just passed through the FCC, ahead of fall launch. Biden admin says about 20 models will still qualify for EV tax credits. Hank Green IRA explainer. Amazon and Nielsen close 'Thursday Night Football' ratings deal. Meta Just Happens to Expand Messenger's End-to-End Encryption. The new USB Rubber Ducky is more dangerous than ever. A New Jailbreak for John Deere Tractors Rides the Right-to-Repair Wave. Chokepoint Capitalism by Rebecca Giblin, Cory Doctorow. The Unintended Consequences of OTC Hearing Aids. Oracle begins auditing TikTok's algorithms. Signal says 1,900 users' phone numbers exposed by Twilio breach. Adam Neumann Gets a New Backer. Ringtone interpretive dancing. Kindergarten teacher talks to politicians. music street. Google's official Android 13 statue sure looks a bit like a butt. Google Photos renaming 'Archive' to 'Hidden'. Google Chrome can now become your default browser on Windows without even opening settings. How a Third-Party SMS Service Was Used to Take Over Signal Accounts. Google Meet now shows you how noisy your office is. "Existing connections will be shut down" — Google is killing off Google Cloud IoT Core. Picks: Stacey - Hearing Test - Mimi Health. Jeff - BOOX is an electronics brand offering innovative E Ink (ePaper) tablets and devices based on Android. Jeff - Jeff history of media in :45. Ant - I set a Clemson wallpaper to see what color options would show up in #Android13. Sorry, no true orange. Ant - Lisa Carney and Photoshop World. Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Secureworks.com/twit nomadgoods.com/TWIG