Podcasts about Google Chrome

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Web browser developed by Google

  • 977PODCASTS
  • 1,789EPISODES
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  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Google Chrome

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Latest podcast episodes about Google Chrome

Fluent Spanish Express Podcast
122. Language Reactor para practicar español con Netflix y YouTube

Fluent Spanish Express Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 11:25


En el episodio de hoy, una nueva recomendación para practicar vuestro español. En este caso, una herramienta o aplicación para añadir dobles subtítulos a los vídeos de YouTube y a las películas o las series en Netflix. Se llama Language Reactor, anteriormente conocida como Language Learning with Netflix. Es una extensión del navegador Google Chrome que, como decía, sirve para añadir doble subtítulos en los vídeos de YouTube y Netflix. Pronto estará disponible para Firefox y Edge. Una herramienta súper interesante ya que, además, te permite consultar mientras reproduces el vídeo el significado a través de un diccionario incorporado y la pronunciación. También, tiene varias funcionalidades en fase beta muy útiles para la traducción de textos o el uso de flashcards. Echadle un vistazo porque está genial. Espero que os guste tanto como a mí y, sobre todo, que os sirva como herramienta para practicar y mejorar vuestro español. Muchas gracias por vuestras valoraciones de 5 estrellas en iTunes, Google Podcasts y Spotify. Nos vemos en el próximo episodio.

Risky Business
Risky Business #644 -- USA sanctions NSO Group, hits REvil

Risky Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


On this week's show Patrick Gray and Adam Boileau discuss the week's security news, including: US sanctions NSO, Candiru, COSEINC and Positive Technologies We wrap up the action in ransomware Why exploit tournaments are boring in America and exciting in China More malicious npm packages in the wild Pentagon updates CMMC to 2.0 Much, much more We'll hear from Corelight's CISO Bernard Brantley in this week's sponsor interview. We're talking about how attackers think in graphs and defenders think in lists.. Microsoft's John Lambert wrote a post about that back in 2015, and Bernard joins the show this week to talk about why it's just as relevant as ever. Stick around for that one. Links to everything that we discussed are below and you can follow Patrick or Adam on Twitter if that's your thing. Show notes U.S. sanctions Israel's NSO Group over Pegasus spyware - The Washington Post Risky Business #310 -- Export exploits? Wassenaar says no - Risky Business Positive Technologies says US sanctions had little or no effect on its business - The Record by Recorded Future Hungarian official confirms government bought and used Pegasus spyware - The Record by Recorded Future NSO's Pegasus spyware found on the devices of six Palestinian activists - The Record by Recorded Future “A grim outlook”: How cyber surveillance is booming on a global scale | MIT Technology Review Spyware providers are flocking to international arms fairs to sell to NATO foes Ukraine discloses identity of Gamaredon members links it to Russia's FSB - The Record by Recorded Future PRC says FCC decision to pull China Telecom license was ‘based on suspicion,' not facts - The Record by Recorded Future China says a foreign spy agency hacked its airlines, stole passenger records - The Record by Recorded Future Hackers with Chinese links breach defense, energy targets, including one in US Pwn2Own Austin 2021: Synacktiv crowned Masters of Pwn after Sonos One, WD NAS exploits | The Daily Swig House approves massive infrastructure plan that includes $1.9 billion for cybersecurity - The Record by Recorded Future Malware found in coa and rc, two npm packages with 23M weekly downloads - The Record by Recorded Future Pentagon issues revised cyber standards for contractors - The Record by Recorded Future Hacker steals $55 million from bZx DeFi platform - The Record by Recorded Future Suspect in scheme to breach major Twitter accounts is now charged with hacking crypto executives Scammer Convinced Instagram That Its Top Executive Was Dead GitLab servers are being exploited in DDoS attacks in excess of 1 Tbps - The Record by Recorded Future Dangerous XSS bug in Google Chrome's ‘New Tab' page bypassed security features | The Daily Swig US offers $10 million reward for info on Darkside ransomware group - The Record by Recorded Future Hackers Apologize to Arab Royal Families for Leaking Their Data A ransomware gang shut down after Cybercom hijacked its site and it discovered it had been hacked - The Washington Post BlackMatter ransomware says its shutting down due to pressure from local authorities - The Record by Recorded Future CERT-France: Lockean ransomware group behind attacks on French companies - The Record by Recorded Future The ‘Groove' Ransomware Gang Was a Hoax – Krebs on Security Ransomware crackdown spreads in U.S., Europe and Asia US Treasury sanctions crypto-exchange Chatex for links to ransomware payments - The Record by Recorded Future Shared/Defenders think in lists. Attackers think in graphs. As long as this is true, attackers win.md at master · JohnLaTwC/Shared · GitHub Compare to open source Zeek

Ignite Visibility University
Third-Party Cookies and Digital Marketing: Preparing for 2022

Ignite Visibility University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:11


In this episode, Ignite Visibility's CEO John Lincoln will discuss how the elimination of third-party cookies will impact the future of digital marketing. Learn actionable strategies and insightful techniques to help you prepare for 2022 and win in a cookieless world! John will Cover: 1. Third Party Cookies: what are they and why are browsers like Google Chrome removing them? 2. Laws and Updates on Cookie Tracking and Removal 3. Different Companies Approaches to Dealing with the Transition 4. The Future of Marketing Without Third-Party Cookies 5. Actionable Ways to Address a Cookieless Web 6. A Third-Party Cookieless Web Checklist 7. The Future of Digital Marketing (2022 and Beyond) Make sure to stay up-to-date on the status of third-party cookies and their removal. Get prepared for digital marketing in 2022!

TendenciasTech
Desinstalar Google Chrome de tu Android ¡Yá!

TendenciasTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:32


Te recomiendo desinstalar Google Chrome de tu Android inmediatamente► ¡No olvides de suscribirte!https://youtube.com/berlingonzalez► Contacto (English - Español)tendenciastech@outlook.com► PodcastApple Podcast: http://apple.co/2CtwnidSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2lJKPzyAmazon Music: https://amzn.to/3dHBosPGoogle Podcast: https://bit.ly/3eqNnKzCastBox: https://bit.ly/33jyB4e► Redes SocialesFB: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinGonzalezsTT: https://www.tiktok.com/@berlingonzalezsTW: https://twitter.com/berlingonzalezsIN: https://www.instagram.com/tendenciastech► Donacioneshttps://www.paypal.me/tendenciastechhttps://www.patreon.com/tendenciastech#BerlinGonzalez #Google #ChromeSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/tendenciastech. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Android Central Podcast
Facebook in the Metaverse of Madness

Android Central Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 99:22


Facebook has changed their corporate name to 'Meta', and we have thoughts! The gang chat about this and its impact on Oculus.They also check out some Samsung rumors, One UI 4 beta, and some lingering issues with Pixel 6. Links: Facebook changes company name, is now called 'Meta' | Android Central Is a Meta rebrand enough to heal the toxicity of the Oculus name? | Android Central Facebook's Meta rebranding could start a trademark battle with a PC company | Android Central Oculus Quest to become Meta Quest, drop Facebook login requirement in 2022 | Android Central Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas is coming to Oculus Quest 2 | Android Central Meta acquires popular VR exercise app Supernatural, a sign of things to come | Android Central Beat Saber surpasses $100 million in revenue on the Oculus Quest platform | Android Central Meta says it's shutting down the Facebook facial recognition system | Android Central Privacy in the new Metaverse | Android Central Leaked Galaxy S21 FE backplate shows a familiar design, with one exception | Android Central Samsung Galaxy S22 ready for early 2022 launch, reportedly in mass production | Android Central One UI 4 (Android 12) beta arrives for U.S. Galaxy Z Fold 3, Flip 3 models | Android Central Samsung Internet is finally getting one of Google Chrome's most useful features | Android Central Google to fix Pixel 6 'residual light' flickering issue with December update | Android Central Google Pixel 6 loses its smooth display when this Telegram feature is turned on | Android Central Google Pixel 6 Pro stock is running low following its release | Android Central Google is reportedly already working on a new Tensor chip for the Pixel 6 successor | Android Central Generator giant Generac acquires smart thermostat maker Ecobee for $770 milllion | Android Central NVIDIA's $40 billion Arm acquisition set back yet again by EU regulators | Android Central Sponsors: Indeed: Choose Indeed and join 3 million companies worldwide who use Indeed to hire great people and help grow their teams faster. Get started right now with a free $75 sponsored job credit at indeed.com/acp. Offer valid through December 31. Terms and conditions apply. Mint Mobile: Switch to Mint Mobile and get premium wireless service, starting at JUST $15 bucks a month at mintmobile.com/acp!

ALEF SecurityCast
Ep#82 - 60 let vězení hrozí vývojáři malwaru TrickBot

ALEF SecurityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 14:48


VIDEO: 60 let vězení hrozí vývojáři malwaru TrickBot - SecurityCast Ep#82 - YouTube Facebook žaluje občana Ukrajiny za to, že údajně ukradl data více než 178 milionům uživatelů Facebooku a následně je prodával; Státní příslušník Ruska, o kterém se předpokládá, že je členem týmu pro vývoj malwaru TrickBot, byl vydán do USA; Němečtí vyšetřovatelé údajně identifikovali Rusa, o kterém se domnívají, že je jedním z hlavních členů gangu za ransomwarem REvil; Nový dekryptor pro Babuk od Avastu; ENISA Threat Landscape Report; MITRE CWE Most Important Hardware Weaknesses; Nový update pro Google Chrome; Web Content Filtering v MS Defender for Endpoint; Nový podcast Světlá Strana Internetu. Sledujte nás na Twitteru @AlefSecurity a @jk0pr

Loop Matinal
Segunda-feira, 1º/11/2021

Loop Matinal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 9:50


Patrocínio: Linode Acesse linode.com/loopmatinal, crie sua conta e ganhe US$ 100,00 de crédito para contratar os serviços de computação na nuvem e servidores Linux da Linode. -------------------------------- Sobre o Podcast O Loop Matinal é um podcast do Loop Infinito que traz as notícias mais importantes do mundo da tecnologia para quem não tem tempo de ler sites e blogs de tecnologia. Marcus Mendes apresenta um resumo rápido e conciso das notícias mais importantes, sempre com bom-humor e um toque de acidez. Confira as notícias das últimas 24h, e até amanhã! -------------------------------- Apoie o Loop Matinal! O Loop Matinal está no apoia.se/loopmatinal e no picpay.me/loopmatinal! Se você quiser ajudar a manter o podcast no ar, é só escolher a categoria que você preferir e definir seu apoio mensal. Obrigado em especial aos ouvintes Advogado Junio Araujo, Alexsandra Romio, Alisson Rocha, Anderson Barbosa, Anderson Cazarotti, Angelo Almiento, Arthur Givigir, Breno Farber, Caio Santos, Carolina Vieira, Christophe Trevisani, Claudio Souza, Dan Fujita, Daniel Ivasse, Daniel Cardoso, Diogo Silva, Edgard Contente, Edson  Pieczarka Jr, Fabian Umpierre, Fabio Brasileiro, Felipe, Francisco Neto, Frederico Souza, Gabriel Souza, Guilherme Santos, Henrique Orçati, Horacio Monteiro, Igor Antonio, Igor Silva, Ismael Cunha, Jeadilson Bezerra, Jorge Fleming, Jose Junior, Juliana Majikina, Juliano Cezar, Juliano Marcon, Leandro Bodo, Luis Carvalho, Luiz Mota, Marcus Coufal, Mauricio Junior, Messias Oliveira, Nilton Vivacqua, Otavio Tognolo, Paulo Sousa, Ricardo Mello, Ricardo Berjeaut, Ricardo Soares, Rickybell, Roberto Chiaratti, Rodrigo Rosa, Rodrigo Rezende, Samir da Converta Mais, Teresa Borges, Tiago Soares, Victor Souza, Vinícius Lima, Vinícius Ghise e Wilson Pimentel pelo apoio! -------------------------------- Pokémon Cafe Remix chega ao iOS: 
https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/28/pokemon-cafe-remix-available-iphone-ipad/ Microsoft compra a Two Hat: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/29/22752421/microsoft-two-hat-acquisition-xbox-moderation Microsoft vira a empresa mais valiosa do mundo: https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/29/microsoft-overtakes-apple-as-most-valuable-public-company/ Samsung lança o Galaxy M52 5G no Brasil: https://tecnoblog.net/527036/galaxy-m52-5g-chega-ao-brasil-com-snapdragon-778g-e-suporte-para-ram-plus/ Xiaomi lance o 11 Lite 5G no Brasil: 
https://tecnoblog.net/525732/xiaomi-11-lite-5g-ne-chega-ao-brasil-com-tela-de-90-hz-e-snapdragon-778g/ Xiaomi lança os Redmi Buds 3 Pro no Brasil: https://tecnoblog.net/526746/fones-redmi-buds-3-pro-com-anc-e-xiaomi-pad-5-chegam-ao-brasil/ Deputado é cassado por mentir sobre urna eletrônica: 
https://tecnoblog.net/527244/tse-cassa-mandato-de-deputado-por-espalhar-fake-news-sobre-urna-eletronica/ Huawei divulga resultados financeiros: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-29/huawei-posts-fourth-straight-sales-slump-as-u-s-sanctions-bite Amazon estima faturamento abaixo do esperado: 
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-28/amazon-projects-holiday-sales-that-suggest-pandemic-boom-is-over Amazon divulga resultados financeiros: http://www.techmeme.com/211028/p40#a211028p40 Twitter Spaces ganha gravação:
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/28/22750341/twitter-spaces-recording-feature-sharing-option TikTok testa gorjetas: 
https://techcrunch.com/2021/10/28/tiktok-is-testing-a-new-direct-tipping-feature-with-select-creators/ Facebook está fazendo um relógio inteligente: https://9to5mac.com/2021/10/28/meta-working-on-new-smartwatch-with-built-in-camera-to-compete-with-apple-watch/ Google Chrome corrige falhas de segurança: 
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/google/emergency-google-chrome-update-fixes-zero-days-used-in-attacks/ Google Fotos para iOS ganha pasta oculta: 
https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/29/22752239/google-photos-locked-folder-one-vpn-security-hub Apple volta ao 2º lugar no ranking de vendas de telefone: 
https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS48342021 Apple divulga resultados financeiros: https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2021/10/apple-reports-fourth-quarter-results/ Apple One Premier custará R$ 70: https://macmagazine.com.br/post/2021/10/28/apple-one-premier-custara-r70-no-brasil-fitness-r30/ -------------------------------- Site do Loop Matinal: http://www.loopmatinal.com Anuncie no Loop Matinal: comercial@loopinfinito.net Marcus Mendes: https://www.twitter.com/mvcmendes Loop Infinito: https://www.youtube.com/oloopinfinito

Der ichbindochnichthierumbeliebtzusein.com PodCast - Technik, Gadgets, Meinungen und aktuelle Themen, die das Netz und die We
#177 Neue Serie: Die restlose Auflösung meiner bisherigen To-do-Apps und die Zusammenführung unter Getting Things Done (GTD) - TEIL 1

Der ichbindochnichthierumbeliebtzusein.com PodCast - Technik, Gadgets, Meinungen und aktuelle Themen, die das Netz und die We

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 23:29


Neue Serie: Die restlose Auflösung meiner bisherigen To-do-Apps und die Zusammenführung unter Getting Things Done (GTD) - TEIL 1Mein erstes echtes Smartphone war ein SonyEricsson Xperia X1: kleiner handlicher Knochen, mit Stift und hoch schiebbarem Display, darunter war, dann in der Querformat-Bedienung, eine vollwertige Tastatur. Betriebssystem: Windows Mobile. Allerdings: der beste Kalender und erst recht die allerbeste Kontakterfassung EVER! Da ist bis heute nichts Besseres gekommen - und trotzdem gab es damals diverse Hersteller, die noch schickere Apps und Interfaces gebaut haben. Und so zog die erste To-do-App auf meinem X1 ein. Und so ging es weiter... auf dem Androiden, dem HTC Hero, kurzer Abstecher auf ein HTC mit Windows, weitere Andrioden, kurzer Ausflug zu Apples Technikschrott namens iDings und wieder schnell zurück zu Android, nun auf der Google-eigenen Schiene namens Nexus und heute dann Pixel. In so gut wie jeder Generation der Geräte entdeckte ich eine neue To-do-App, die meine bisherige bzw. bisherigen ergänzte... und das teilweise bis heute! Nun ist der Moment gekommen: Was auch immer noch da ist, wird gelöscht und das alles zusammengeführt, und zwar unter einer "GTD", Getting Things Done Struktur. Und dafür kommt für mich nur eine, ja, kostenpflichtige, App infrage. Im Rahmen eines mehrteiligen Blogs und Pods hier der Weg dahin, alle Schritte zu GTD, die Implementation in die App und um welche App es überhaupt geht - und was mir unterwegs so alles passiert ist. Start heute: ich führe meine alten Apps zusammen... Wenn du regelmäßiger Leser und Hörer von mir bist, weißt du, dass ich aktuell auch dabei bin, alte "Blogleichen" fertigzustellen und online zu bringen. In meinen Entwürfen schlummern gute 64, teils fast fertige oder nur aus einer Überschrift als Gedankenstütze befindliche Texte, die auf Fertigstellung und, wenn auch, was die ältesten angeht, über ein Jahr Verspätung, noch auf Veröffentlichung warten. Klar, ein Teil war mein Eigenhosting und die damit verbundenen To-dos. Auch, dass mich diverse Kita-Viren nun bereits zum dritten Mal außer Gefecht setzen und somit kein konzentriertes Arbeiten oder eine Podcast-Aufnahme möglich war. Aber: auch einen entscheidenden Beitrag, gerade für die "ganz" alten Themen, ist meine weite Verstreuung von Notizen und selbstgesetzten Deadlines in verschiedenen Apps. Ich weiß, ihr glaubt mir das, ohne, dass ich Beweise antreten muss, aber, um euch ein Bild des Chaos als Abschreckung zu geben, hier meine - NOCH! - aktiven und in Nutzung befindlichen To-do-Apps: Die älteste Variante, die ich während meinen diversen Karriereschritten in der Luftfahrt nutze, auch weil ich Inhalte mit weiteren Kollegen und/oder Vorgesetzten freigeben konnte: Remember the Milk. Gut, die Anzahl an offenen Aufgaben hielt sich in Grenzen oder hat sich durch meine berufliche Neuorientierung erledigt, aber ein oder zwei aktive und immer noch aktuelle Erinnerungen waren da noch drin. Daher wird der manuelle Übertrag, da keine Export-Funktion vorhanden ist, obwohl ich zahlender Kunde bin, sehr schnell und einfach! RTM hat ein sehr gewöhnungsbedürftiges Interface und benötigt, wenn eine Notiz noch Notizen und Teilen haben möchte, diverse Taps, kann aber durch eine Webseite mit Sync etwas komfortabler genutzt werden. Mich störte anfangs am meisten, dass man keine Dokumente anhängen kann. Daher führte mich parallel als Dokumentenablage Evernote in der Bezahlvariante in mein privates papierloses Ablagesystem. Allerdings hatten verschiedene Strategiewechsel und damit verbundene eher schlechte oder rückläufige Update die Freue schon lange vermiest, aber es ging halt immer irgendwie. Bis das letzte Update kam, die Kosten gleich blieben und viele der vorherigen und mir wichtigen Funktionen, vielleicht nur erst mal aber auf jeden Fall vorübergehend verschwunden sind - und so auch meine Einstellung und die Bereitschaft dafür weiterzuzahlen. Dank einem c't-Artikel konnte ich, soweit möglich, meine Daten lesbar und in einer zweiten Variante auch durchsuchbar sichern - und damit starb auch Evernote. Zwischendurch und je nach Erscheinen und Einstellung, Wiederauferstehen und unveränderter Version stieg ich nach dem Apple-Ausflug dankbar auf die Google eigenen Tools um. So lagerte ich auf Google Tasks, Google Notizen, Wunderlist und auch GMail mit Erinnerungsfunktionen aus. Aber jedes hatte seine Vor- und meist Nachteile: Tasks war eine Umsetzung der bis dato genutzten Papierversionen: endlos lange Listen zum Eintragen und Abhaken, ohne viele Extras. Google Notizen kann Erinnerungen, sonst ist es eher ein Postit-für-die-Ewigkeit-Aufbewahrungs-System. Wunderlist? Ich kann mich schon gar nicht mehr erinnern - aber das Vergessene und die Tatsache, dass sie von Microsoft gekauft wurden, ließ mich die Nutzung beenden. Und GMail? Klar sind die Erinnerungsfunktionen super und jeder guckt täglich mehrfach in seine Mails, warum also To-dos und Fristen nicht hier per kurzer Notiz in einer Mail an mich mit Termin und auch Anhang zurückstellen? Nun: es ist und bleibt eben ein E-Mail-Programm...! Und in Summe hat mich all das, außer meine Daten, nichts gekostet... Dann habe ich was cleveres neues im Web entdeckt: workflowy. Kostenfrei bis zu einer gewissen Grenze nutzbar, ohne weitere Einschränkungen kann man hier "Endloslisten" aber mit Unterpunkten und professionellen Gliederungsebenen anlegen. Auch eine Android-App ist bis heute auf meinem Pixel. Aber je mehr ich geschrieben und "abgelegt" hatte, desto mehr störte mich der Mehrnutzer-Ansatz, den ich nicht brauchte. Auch hier versickerten ein paar Blogposts, die noch stückchenweise in den nächsten Wochen und Monaten nachgereicht und endlich live gehen werden. Die Liste könnte ich noch weiterführen, aber ich möchte auch einen Vertreter benennen, der meine Arbeitsweise an sich abdeckt. Und nein, es sind sogar auch hier mehrere, zum Beispiel meistertask oder als Weblösung Asana - und noch einige mehr. Warum die zwei? Beide kamen auf persönliche Empfehlungen nach Netzwerktreffen und intensivem Austausch, wie andere es machen zu mir, eines davon auch, weil ich gerne einfach mit Kanban-Boards arbeiten... aber... auch hier, viel zu viel statt klarer Fokus für mich in App oder Web - und so kommen auch diese beiden weg. Jetzt habt ihr eine Vorstellung, wie meine Ausgangsbasis aussieht. Und als ich so am Schreibtisch für mich überlegt habe, wie es nun weitergeht, ist mir ein Klassiker der "Erledigungs"-Geschichte, der seit Jahren in meinem Bücherregal schlummert, wieder eingefallen: Vom Produktivitätsguru David Allen, der Klassiker: Wie ich Dinge geregelt bekomme (Link zu amazon). Ich stehe persönlich mehr auf die englische Ausgabe, Getting Things Done (auch hier der amazon Link). Und wer es richtig ernst mein, nimmt noch das für die Praxis sehr nützliche "Workbook" (auch über amazon) dazu. Das Workbook habe ich als Kindle Version immer auf Handy oder eBook-Reader greifbar. So wird für mich aus der Buchmethode mit Beispielen und typischen täglichen Anwendungsszenarien, wie zum Beispiel explodierende Inboxen bei E-Mails oder auch dem täglichen "To-Do-Listen-Chaos" plötzlich ein Schlachtplan mit Übungen und eben auch, zumindest für mich, schneller Umsetzung. Allerdings muss man sich auf das Verständnis von David Allen und seine zugrundeliegenden Vorschläge, Umsetzungen und Ideen auch einlassen, sonst wird es auch hier ein Rohrkrepierer! Ich mache euch einen weiteren Blogpost und PodCast zum Thema "Getting Things Done". In dem zeige ich euch die "Eigenheiten" und "Regelungen" des Systems, damit ihr ein Verständnis bekommt, was es bedeutet, seine To-do-Listen oder digitalen Ebenbilder komplett auf GTD umzustellen. Das kann tatsächlich eine Herausforderung oder sogar eine komplette Umstellung der bisherigen Arbeitsweise sein. Und, in einem nächsten Schritt, zeige ich euch, wie man, mithilfe einer App, die ich hier und heute noch bewusst geheim halte - na, wer hat da "Spannungsbogen" gesagt? - das GTD-System auch digital auf das Handy, Tablet, Computer, Google Chrome und sogar in GMail umgesetzt bekommt. Spoiler: Es gibt ein paar Spielregeln zu befolgen, damit Hirn und Verstand dem System trauen. Hört sich vielleicht komisch an, macht aber mit dem nächsten Blogpost und PodCast plötzlich Sinn. Und: Du musst akribisch das System sichten, aktualisieren und abarbeiten, sonst ist es nur ein weiterer Zettelkasten, der dich nicht weiter bringt. Wenn dich nun die Neugierde gepackt hat, kannst du mit den Links schon mal das System "Getting Things Done" kennenlernen: Wie ich Dinge geregelt bekomme (Buch), Getting Things Done (das Buch in Englisch, das ich nehmen würde, da es in Teilen besser ist als die deutsche Übersetzung) und, wenn du typische Anwendungsszenarien schon voruntersucht und umgesetzt haben willst, das englischsprachige Workbook. Alle Links gehen zu meinem Lieblingsversender amazon, sicherlich findest du sie auch bei deinem Lieblingsbuchhändler. Sollte ich eure Neugierde geweckt haben, bleibt dran für Teil zwei und drei, wo zuerst die Methode und dann eine passende App nebst Umsetzung kommt. Oder: überspringt Teil zwei und greift euch die Bücher ab und legt schon mal selbst los... so oder so, ich freue mich auf euer Feedback zu der Idee, der Auswahl von GTD, der "Abschaffung" zahlreicher To-do-Apps auf meinem Handy und was euch sonst noch so dazu einfällt! Wir lesen uns dann in Teil zwei wieder! PodCast abonnieren: | direkt | iTunes | Spotify | Google | amazon | PROUDLY RECORDED AND PRODUCED WITH Ultraschall5 Folge direkt herunterladen

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Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 85:09


How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You. And Why ExpressVPN Isn't Safe to Use. Ransomware, Trojanware Adware. What's the difference between these different types of malware.? And when it comes down to our computers, which should we worry about the most and which should we worry about the most? [Automated Transcript Follows] [00:00:17] There are a lot of different types of malware that are out there and they're circulating and scaring us. [00:00:23] And I think for good reason, in many cases, ransomware of course, is the big one and it is up, up, up. It has become just so common. Now that pretty much everybody is going to be facing a serious ransomware attack within the next 12 months. The numbers are staggering. And what are they doing while now they're getting you with the double whammy. [00:00:50] The first whammy is they encrypt your data. Your computers are encrypted, everything on them. So you can't use them anymore. Bottom line. Yeah, they'll boot they'll run enough in order to be able for you to pay that ransom. But any document that you might care about, any PDF, any word doc, and the spreadsheet is going to be encrypted. [00:01:14] And the idea behind that is. You have to pay in order to get that decryption key about 50% of the time. Yeah. About half of the time. Even if you pay the ransom, you'll get your data back the rest of the time. No, you you'll never see it again. So what do you do about that type of ransomware? Well, obviously most people just pay the rent. [00:01:39] But that's gone up as well. We've seen over a hundred percent increase in the amount of ransom people happy. So what's the best thing to do. What's the easiest thing to do in order to help you with this type of ransomware while it's obviously to have good backups. Now I'm going to be doing a bootcamp. [00:02:00] We're going to talk about this and a workshop. I really want to get going with these one week long workshops. So we'll do a, at least a couple of times a month in these boot camps that we'll do pretty much every week here, but they're coming up fairly soon. You'll only know about them. If you are on my email list, that is Craig peterson.com and the number one thing that you can do to. [00:02:27] You when you're hit with this type of rent somewhere, because if you're not taking all of the other precautions, you should be digging under really good that you're going to get hit the better than 50%. And once you do is have a good backup, and I want to warn everybody because I've seen this again and against people just keep making this mistake, probably because they don't get it. [00:02:51] They don't understand why and where and how, when it comes to ransom. The mistake is they do a backup to a local desk. Now, many times the backup is on a thumb drive or USB drive. So you just go to the big box store. You go to Amazon, you order an external drive. You're just amazed how cheap they are. [00:03:16] Nowadays. Once you've got that drive, you plug it in. You turn on some backup software. Maybe it's something you've used for some years, maybe. If you have a Mac, you're just using the built-in backup software. Even the windows operating system now comes with some built-in backup and you think you're off and running because every so often it back. [00:03:40] If we're using a Mac is smart enough to not only back up your whole machine, but as you're editing files, it's going to go ahead and make a backup of that file as you're editing it. So if there is a crash or something else, you're not going to lose much. I just love the way apple does that. Huge problem. [00:03:59] Because if the disc is attached to your machine, or let's say that disc is on a file server, cause you're smart, right? You set up some network attached storage of some sort and your machine has access to it. And so you're sending it off of your machine to a central. Well, you still got a problem because if your machine can read or more particularly right to a location on your network or locally, that ransomware is going to also encrypt everything, it can find there. [00:04:37] So, if you are sharing a network drive and you get ransomware, when you remember the odds are better than 50%, you're gonna get it. Then what happens? What would this type of ransomware it not only encrypts the files on your computer, but encrypts them on the backup as well. And it also encrypts them on any of the. [00:04:58] File servers or network attached storage the, to have on your network. So now everything's encrypted. You wonder why someone and people pay the ransom? Oh, that's a large part of the reason right there. And I keep saying this type of ransomware because there isn't another type of ransomware and they usually go hand in hand. [00:05:21] The bad guys were not making enough money off of holding your files. Rants. So the next thing the bad guys have done is they've gone to a different type of extortion. This one is, Hey, if you don't pay us, we are going to release your files to the world. Now they might do it on a dark website. They might do it on a publicly available site, which is what many of them are starting to do now. [00:05:51] And you're going to either be embarrassed or subject to a lot of fines or both, because now if your files have. Confidential information. Let's say it's your intellectual property. Now, anybody who bothers to search online can find your intellectual property out there. If you have anything that's personally identifiable information. [00:06:18] And it gets out. Now you are subject to major fines. In fact, in some states like California and Massachusetts, you are subject to fines. Even if the bad guys don't post it online. So that's the second type of ransomware and it's a bad type. And usually what'll happen is the bad guys, get their software on your machine and they can do it in a number of different ways. [00:06:45] One of the popular ways to do it now is to just break in because. Our businesses, we've, we've set up something called remote desktop, and we're using remote desktop for our users to get in. And maybe we're using some form of a VPN to do it with, or maybe we've made the mistake of using express VPN. And, uh, we have that now connected up to our homes and we think that that's keeping us safe. [00:07:13] And I got a few things to say about that as well. These VPN services. What happens now while Microsoft remote desktop has been under major attack and there are some major flaws. Some of these were patched more than a year ago now, but according to recent studies, 60%, almost two thirds of businesses have not applied the patches. [00:07:42] You know, th this is basic stuff. And I understand how hard it can be and it can be confusing and you can break your systems, but you have to weigh that against well, what's going to happen if our systems are broken into, because we didn't apply the patch. So that's the second type of ransomware and that's what most people are afraid of and for good reason. [00:08:07] And one of the things we do for businesses and we do ransomware audits, we have a look at your systems, your firewalls, et cetera, and make recommendations to. Man. I got to talk about this too, cause it really upset me this week. I signed up for a webinar just to see what was going on. There's a company out there that sells these marketing systems to managed services providers. [00:08:33] And I, I, I had to turn it off like instantly because it was just such. Garbage that they were telling managed services providers MSPs to do. I couldn't believe it. So this guy was talking about how, again, I turned it back on and I said, Hey, I've got to watch us anyways, because I need to know what's going on. [00:08:54] And this guy was telling these managed services providers, how they can double their clothes. I couldn't believe this guy. Cause he was saying that what they do is they offer to do a ransomware audit for businesses and they say, normally we charge $6,000 to do a ransomware audit, but I tell you what we'll do it for you for. [00:09:20] Now, this is a guy that he had an MSP managed services provider. Apparently he had started it and he was bringing in more than $1 million per month in revenue. Can you imagine that monthly recurring revenue over a million dollars? And so he's telling people businesses, Hey, I have a $6,000 audit that we'll do. [00:09:47] For free, Hey people, how long have we said, if you're not paying for something your, the product remember Facebook, right? Google, Instagram, all of those guys, Twitter, you don't pay for it, but your information is the product. So what's this guy doing well, guess what? His audit, it's going to show his audit. [00:10:10] It's going to show that you need him. And he's sucked in hundreds of businesses and he didn't even know what he was doing when it came to the audits or protecting them. It is insane. What's going on out there. I am ashamed of my industry, absolutely ashamed of it. You know, I've got my first attack, successful attack against my company back in 91 92. [00:10:42] And I learned this stuff because I had to, and I help you guys because I don't want you to get stuck. Like I was so important, important word of advice. If you want to nod it, go to someone that charges you for the audit. That's going to do a real one. It's going to give you real advice that you can really need and use rather than, Hey, you knew do use me. [00:11:11] Because my free audit tells you so, so many scams. [00:11:15] What is ad where in what is crypto, where these are two types of real, kind of bad things. Won't gray areas, things that are hurting us, our mobile devices, our businesses. And our homes. [00:11:32] Adware is also a type of malware that's been around a long time. But it does live in a gray area. [00:11:42] And that gray area is between basically marketing and, uh, well outright fraud. And I don't even want to call it just marketing because it's very aggressive market. What they will do with add where is they? They will have some JavaScript code or something else that's embedded on a webpage, and that's usually how you get it. [00:12:09] And then once it's in, in your browser, it sits there and it pops up things. So it'll pop up an ad for this, pop up an ad for that, even if it's. Uh, part of the site that you're on right now, and it can live for months or years on your computer. We've known for a long time about ad where on the windows environment and how it has just been just terribly annoying at the very least Microsoft and genetic Explorer. [00:12:40] One of the worst web browsers ever. Perpetrated on humankind was well-known for this. And of course, Microsoft got rid of internet Explorer, and then they came up with her own symposer browser, the edge browser that was also openly scorned. And so Microsoft got rid of their edge browser and switched over to basically Google Chrome chromium, and then changed his name to the edge browser. [00:13:11] And so you think you're running edge, but you're kind of not, you kind of are. So they did all of that in order to help with compatibility and also to help with some of these problems that people have had using that Microsoft browser online, very, very big problems. So what can you do about it and what does it do to you and where can be very. [00:13:37] You might've had it before words always popping up again and again and again on your browser, just so crazy knowing it it's insane, but it can also be used to spy on where you're going online and potentially to, to infect you with something even worse. Sometimes some of this ad where we'll purposely click on ads, that the people who gave you the ad were, are using as kind of like a clickbait type thing. [00:14:09] So you go to a website and it was. Automatically click certain ads and click on unbeknownst to you, right? It's as though you went there so that people have to pay for that ad. And sometimes aids are very, very complicated. Sometimes they'll use. In order to drive a competitor out of business or out of the market, because the ads are so expensive because so many people are supposedly clicking on the ads. [00:14:40] But in reality, you didn't click on the ad. You're not going to see that page that you supposedly clicked on, and it's going to cost that advertiser money, whole bunch of money. You might not care. Right. But it is. Ad ware over on the Mac, however, is the only real malware menace at all I had to where is something that choosed fairly frequently on the Mac? [00:15:09] It is pretty darn easy to get rid of. And as a general rule, it doesn't work very well on the Mac. Although I have seen some cases where it got very, very sticky. Where someone ended up installing it, it wasn't just running in the browser, but they installed it on their Mac, which is something you should never do. [00:15:29] But apple has some things in place to help stop any of this from happening. And it's gotten a lot better. I haven't seen this problem in a couple of years, but apple is using the signature based blocking technology called export. They also have at apple, this developer based notarization of apps. And so the run of the mill malware, which includes most of this Al where really can't find a foothold. [00:15:57] But I want to remind everybody that if they can get Al add where onto your computer, they might be able to get something worse. So you really got to keep an eye out for no two ways about it. There are some companies out there, for instance, there's this one. Parrot, which is a program linked to this Israeli marketing firm that gains persistence on your browser and potentially could gain root access to the Mac system. [00:16:30] So careful, careful on all fronts now. Anti-malware stuff that we use for our clients is called amp, which is an advanced malware protection system. That's been developed by our friends over at Cisco it's amp is very, very good. Unfortunately, you cannot get it unless you buy it from somebody like us and you have to buy so many seats for some of this stuff, it gets gets expensive quickly. [00:17:00] Um, if you can't do that much, a lot of people like Malwarebytes, there are some very good things about it, but be careful because in order for this to work, this is Railey parrot software to work. It has a fake install. So again, it's just be careful if you know how apple installed software, you know that unless you have instigated it, it's not going to be installed. [00:17:30] You're not just going to see an installer. And say, Hey, we're apple install us. Right? Apple just does it in the background when it comes to updates patches. But they're very sneaky here trying to install things like the Adobe floor. Player, which has been deprecated. Deprecated is completely now gone from Mac systems and from windows systems, you should not be using flash at all anymore. [00:18:02] It was very, very bad. So up becomes you, you go to wound stole the leaders flash player, or, and I'm sure they're going to change this or something else, right? It won't be flashed in a future. It'll be a Adobe. Would you also don't need on a Mac. So anyhow, that's what you got to be careful of ad were still a big problem in windows. [00:18:25] Not much as much as it used to be. Uh, thanks to the change to Google Chrome, which Microsoft has rebranded as of course its own edge browser. Much of a problem at all on Macs, but be very, very careful in either platform about installing software that you did not start installing. Now earlier this year, there's a security firm called red Canary that found something that's been named silver Sparrow. [00:18:58] That was on a. 30,000 Mac computers. And apparently the developers for this malware had already adapted it to apples and one chip architecture and have distributed this binary, this program as a universal binary. Now in the macro, the member doesn't just use Intel. It used to use power PCs and then it used Intel. [00:19:21] And now it's using its own architecture for the chips themselves. So a universal binary is something that will run on Mac Intel based and Mac architecture base. But, uh, the bottom line is that this proof of concept. Malware, if you will had no payload. So we know it's out there, we seen it now on almost 30,000 Mac computers, but at this point it's not really doing much, much at all. [00:19:53] So. These are malicious search engine results and they're directing victims to download these PKGs, which are Mac packaged format installers based on network connections from your browser shortly before download. So just be very careful about all of that. It can be something as annoying as malware or something as a malicious. [00:20:17] Well, potentially as ransomware. Particularly if you're running windows, Hey, if you want to find out more about this, if you want to get into some of my free courses here, we got free boot camps coming up. Make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. More than glad to send you my show notes, a little bit of training, and of course, let you attend these free bootcamps that are now to sell you stuff, but solve problems for you. [00:20:49] Hey, if you use VPNs to try and keep yourself safe, particularly if you use express VPN. Wow. What just came out is incredible. It is anything but safe and secure. [00:21:06] Express VPN was purchased by a company called Cape K A P E. Cape is a company that had changed its name because oh, things were bad. [00:21:19] Right. It was originally founded under the name of cross writer. And you might've seen notices from your anti-malware software over the years for everything from Malwarebytes on saying that, oh, it blew up. To this cross writer piece of malware, most of the time it's ad ware, but it is really interesting to see because this company was founded by a person who was part of the Israeli secret service. Right? So it wasn't of course not. It's not called the secret service over there in Israel. And it, frankly, it compares to our NSA, you know, no such agency. Yeah. It's part of unit 8,200 in the Israeli intelligence military. And it's been dubbed, of course, Israel's NSA. Teddy Saggy, which was one of these investors also was mentioned in the Panama papers. [00:22:24] Remember those? We talked about those back in 2016, those were leaked and that showed these law firm, this one particular law firm in panel. And that we're sheltering assets for people all over the world. And so now that express VPN is owned by this company that is, this company built entirely by intelligence agents for almost a billion. [00:22:55] Dollars in cash and stock purchases. That's a much, they sold express VPN for almost a billion dollars, which is kind of crazy when you think of it as a VPN service, but makes a lot of sense. If you're going to want to monitor what people are doing, where they're going, maybe even break into their systems or better choice than a VPN provider and the. [00:23:20] The company has been buying up VPN providers and is now the proud owner of express VPN. If you attended my VPN workshop that I had, oh, it's probably been a year and I'm going to start doing these again. I promise, I promise. I promise, but you know how much I just like VPNs. In fact, one of you guys, I'm sorry, I forgot your name. [00:23:46] Send me. A couple of weeks ago now about VPNs and saying, I know how much you disliked VPN look at this article. And it was talking about this whole thing with express VPN. So they just now all over the place, the discussions online about what. Been to hear who the founder was, the CEO, the CTO, this growing portfolio that they have in Sunbrella of ownerships, that now is centralized in a multiple VPNs. [00:24:15] Now, Cape technology only started acquiring VPN companies about four years ago. And they've been in business now for over a decade. And what were they doing before? They started buying VPN companies? While they own VPN companies. Oh, they were a major manufacturer and distributor of. Malware of varying types. [00:24:40] Now the first part of the show today, of course, I was explaining some of the differences, like ad words, et cetera, so that you could understand this story. Right? Ghulja that? So you can understand this. That's what these guys have been doing. It's absolutely crazy. So the F the co-founder of Cape technology and former CEO started his career in information technologies while serving in the Israeli defense forces. [00:25:08] As I mentioned, Israeli intelligence Corps under unit 8,200 it's that unit is responsible for. Dean what's called signal intelligence and data decryption. Now we have signal intelligence here as well, and that's basically intercepting signals, figuring out what's being said, what's going on? Where they are, the size of the forces, et cetera. [00:25:32] I have a friend of mine, a young lady who is in signal intelligence in, I think it's the Navy, but every part of our military has it is. However, our military doesn't directly control VPM services like express VPN that can be used in a very big spike capacity. That's what I'm really concerned about. Now. I also, I found an interesting article on zero hedge about this, uh, you know, this company express, VPN being acquired. [00:26:06] But they're also pointing out that companies that were founded by former operatives of unit 8,200. That again, the Israeli version of the NSA included. Ways Elbit systems, which is right in my hometown of Merrimack, New Hampshire and slews of other startups now ways. Right. I, I used ways I recommended people to use it and of course, Google bought it a few years back and that's when I stopped using it, but it was really nice. [00:26:39] It worked really well. And I had no idea the information was likely going to. The Israeli defense Corps. Oh my goodness. There's spy agencies, uh, and a bunch of other startups, by the way. It's estimated that there have been over 1000 stack tech startups that came out of the people working at unit 8,208. [00:27:07] Again, they're CIA NSA, uh, guys, their spine on everybody. You can, you believe that? And they've been bought by a mentioned Google, but other companies like Kodak, PayPal, Facebook, Microsoft have bought them. So in addition to the thousands of companies, according to zero. Uh, unit 8,200 has also fostered close working relationship with the U S government, which you would expect, right? [00:27:33] Edward Snowden. You remember him? He disclosed leaked documents. He obtained, which included an agreement between the NSA and the Israeli defense force. The agreement showed that the U S intelligence. Agency would share information. It collected under domestic surveillance operations with it. Israeli counterpart. [00:27:53] You remember we talked before about the five eyes, seven eyes searching eyes. It's up in the twenties. Now these countries that spy on each other citizens. For the other countries, right? Yeah. Your information might not be collected by the U S government, but the U S government gets it by buying it from private contractors, which it says it can do because we're only barred from collecting it ourselves. [00:28:17] We can use private contractors that collected on you. And also by going in partnership with foreign government. Because again, we can't collect that information, but we can certainly have the Israelis or, or the Brits or the Australians or Canada. They could collect it from. Can you believe this, how they're just stretching these rules to fit in what they want to fit. [00:28:39] Okay. Completely ignoring not only the constitution, but the laws of the United States. It's, it's just absolutely incredible. So critics of this unit, Eddy 200 attested that the Israeli intelligence outfit routinely uses the data received from the NSA by providing it to. Politicians Israeli politicians for the basics of blackmailing. [00:29:06] Yes. Blackmailing others. Yes. Indeed. Other whistle blowers have revealed any two hundreds operations have been able to disrupt Syrian air defense systems, hack Russia. Cap Kaspersky labs. You remember I told you guys don't use Kaspersky antivirus and has outfitted several Israeli embassies with Glendale, seen surveillance systems, cleanse Stein. [00:29:31] However you want to pronounce it. By the time Cape technologies acquired his first VPN company. Uh, the CE original CEO had left and he went on to found cup pie before leaving as it CEO in 2019, it goes on and on, uh, bottom line gas, SWAT express VPN, which is advertised by so many conservatives. Now looks like it is actually part of a spy operation. [00:30:01] So sign up now. Craig peterson.com. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You're going to want to attend my free VPN webinar. Hey, I don't have anything to sell you when it comes to VPNs. I just want you to know the truth. [00:30:17] Labor shortages are making businesses turn direction. And now that we're laying off people or firing them because they didn't take the jab, what are businesses going to do? Well, I have news for you that reduced workforce, well, guess what?. [00:30:34] U.S. Businesses are really seriously moving to automation. [00:30:39] Now they've been doing this since the start of this whole lockdown. They were doing it even before then. I tell the story of when I was in France, a boom went four or five years ago now, and I stayed off the beaten path. I was not in the touristy areas. I speak French. So I went just where the. I decided to go, my wife and I, so we rented a car and we spent a month just kind of driving around where do we want to go next to, or do we want to go next? [00:31:08] It was a whole lot of fun. And while we were there on a Sunday, I came to realize that these small French towns have no restaurants open on Sunday, nothing at all, talking about a bit of a culture shock. That's not true. There was one restaurant opened in the town and that restaurant was, and McDonald's. [00:31:30] So when I go to McDonald's here a few years ago in France, central France. And when I walk in, there's nobody at the counter, but they're all. Oh, half a dozen kiosks out front. So you go and you order your hamburger, whatever might be, or your drinks, et cetera, right there in the kiosk, you pay for them riding the kiosk. [00:31:53] And there's some people working out back that are then making the hamburgers or the milkshakes or coffee, whatever you ordered and bringing it up to the front. And then they just put her right there for you to grab that simple. And this was of course, pre. Down days, I assume that it has gone even more automated. [00:32:14] Uh, they're in France, but hard to say. And I've seen the same thing here in the us. I was out in Vermont just about a month ago and I was riding with a buddy of mine, motorcycle riding, couple of buddies, actually. And we stopped in this small. Town. And we went to this little breasts, breakfast restaurant and the breakfast restaurant had maybe four or five tables inside. [00:32:42] And you just sat at the table. No waitress came up, but there's little sign with the QR code. So it said a scan, the QR code to get started. So you scanned it, it knew based on the QR code, which table you were at, and it showed you the menu that was in effect right then and there. So the lunch menu or the breakfast or the all day, you got to pick it and then you selected what you wanted. [00:33:08] It used whatever payment you wanted. I used apple pay. And in order to pay for my breakfast and my buddy ordered what he wanted. And then out came a waitress who delivered the food. Once it was already in the drinks, it was very automated. It allowed them to cut back on some people and others, this small restaurant, they probably had one last waitress, but when you kind of had in the shifts. [00:33:33] Days and vacation days is probably two waitresses. So they're saving some serious money because a system like this that you just scan a QR code and do the order and it prints up in the kitchen is cheap compared to hiring. Well, of course, it's hard to hire people, especially in the restaurant industry nowadays heck and in my business where we go in and we do analysis of computer networks and systems, it's almost impossible to find people that are really well qualified that understand the regulations that apply to these different businesses. [00:34:10] So it's like, forget about it. There's more than a million of these jobs open right now. And just in this cybersecurity. Well, September mark, the end of the real lockdown induced unemployment benefits workers. Didn't just flood the labor market as we kind of expected. And we have now few, we have more people now. [00:34:38] Who are out of the workforce. Who've decided not to look for a job than we did in 2008. So that's telling you something 2008 during the great recession. Interesting things are about to happen, but there's a great little article that I found in. Times this week, and it's talking about this quality local products company out of Chicago, the prince logos on merchandise, like t-shirts water bottles, you know, the little stress balls, all of that sort of stuff. [00:35:10] And he said prior to the pandemic, we had over 120 employees. That's the co-founder talk in there. And he said, Primary focus was on growth. We simply plugged any holes or any efficiencies that we could along the way with human capital, bringing people in. But once the lockdown happened, of course, all of a sudden now you don't have the access to employees you had before. [00:35:36] So they had a huge decrease also in business. So those two went hand in hand. They let a lot of people go and they use the opportunity to program many of the previous manual and human controlled activities into computers. So now 18 months later, yeah, two weeks to flatten the curve. Right? 18 months later, the company employees, 83 workers. [00:36:03] And as managing a workload, that's pretty much the same as pre lockdown. So they went from over 120 employees down to 83. So basically they cut 40 employees from the workforce. That's a whole lot of quarter of the workforce gone. They don't need them anymore. So that's going to help produce more profits for them. [00:36:27] A lot more profits. Cause usually automating. Yeah, it can be painful, but it usually has major paybacks and that's exactly what it had for them. And they're saying that they anticipate that they can reduce employees even more by the end of this year and get their head count below. 50 now 50 is a magic number. [00:36:48] So it was a hundred when it comes to employees. Well, one is like the biggest magic number because when, once you have one employee, you all of a sudden have to comply with all kinds of rules, regulations, state, local, federal. But if you hit 50 employees, you have the next step of major new regulations that are gonna affect your business. [00:37:09] And then when you hit a hundred employees, Even more, so many people try and keep their businesses below 50 employees because it's just not worth it to have all of those regulations, additional regulation, taxes, and everything else. Another company, this is a California based property management. The managing more than 90,000 commercial and residential properties. [00:37:33] And what they've done is they added a chat feature to the website, the company's called sea breeze. And he says, even though we have the live chat, you can still reach us outside of business hours. Well, You are using the chat or you can call us either way, but they're saying people like the simple form and someone gets back to them as soon as they can. [00:37:57] So they're avoiding now having staff available 24 7 to respond to chat messages and to respond to the voicemails and phone calls that come in. So it's pretty good all the way around, frankly, new shopping models are in place. I'm looking at a picture of a business and it has. Of course, a window up front and in the window they have jewelry. [00:38:21] This is a jewelry store and they've got QR codes in front of each of these pieces of jewelry right on the inside of the window. So if you're interested in finding out more about that piece of jewelry, Just scan the QR code. It'll take you to the right page on their website and we'll even let you buy the jewelry and they will mail it to you again. [00:38:46] How's that for? Great. If you have a business in a tourist jury area and you don't want to be open until 11:00 PM at night, your story can keep selling for you. Even when you're close. This is window shopping, taken to an extreme, very simple. To do as well. This company is called full me waiter. Obviously they've got a bit of a sea theme here. [00:39:10] So once someone orders the jewelry and the other merchandise sent right to them, or they can have it set for pickup in the store, when they next open it's phenomenal. They're calling. Alfresco shopping space, right from the sidewalk. So businesses again are returning to pre pandemic levels and he, this guy is available in the store by appointment only he's loving it. [00:39:37] And he says that customers have been so satisfied with this QR code window shopping contract. That he wrote a guidebook. You can get it@scantshopsolution.com or excuse me, scan, just shop solution.com. I misread that. So any retailers who want to use this method, if you don't know what QR codes are, or you don't know how to code it into a website, et cetera, she's got webinars she's taught on it and she's got the guide book. [00:40:05] I think this is great. Right? So she's now making some money on. Explain to other people, how she did this. It's phenomenal across industries. Epic times is saying the staffing shortages could be temporary, but as firms are further embracing, embracing automation and all of its benefits, some of these jobs that people just don't want anymore may actually be going away. [00:40:33] And I think this is ultimately a problem. We had, uh, you know, again, I'm older generation, right? Us baby boomers. We had opportunities when we were younger. I had newspaper routes. I had the biggest drought in the area. I can't remember. It was like 120 homes. It was huge. It took me hours to do, but I made money. [00:40:56] I learned how to interact with people. I knew, I learned how to do bill collection, how important it was not to let customers get too far behind on their bills. Although I have been slack on that one, I'm afraid, but it helped me out a lot. So, what are kids going to do that need to learn a work ethic that need to be able to have a job, make the mistakes, maybe get fired a once or twice or, or three times maybe learn how to interact with customers. [00:41:27] Everyone, I think can benefit from some retail experience. Get that when you're young and if these jobs don't exist, then. Or the younger generations here, are they just going to be trying to find jobs they can do with Instagram? Right? They're all I know. A few kids who have said, well, I'm a social media influencer and you look them up and okay. [00:41:50] So they got a thousand people following them. I have far more than that, but you know, it, that's not a job. It's not going to last. Your looks are only going to last so long. Right now you start having a family and you start working hard outdoors, et cetera. There's a lot of things that make that all go away. [00:42:09] So I think many businesses now we're going to continue to accelerate our plans program out and. A lot of weld pain positions, as well as these entry-level positions in the next five or 10 years. Really? I don't even know if it's going to be 10 years retool retrain our workforce, or everyone's going to be in for a world of hurt. [00:42:33] Hey, make sure you subscribe. So you're not in a world of hurt. Get my latest in news, especially tech news and cybersecurity. Craig peterson.com. [00:42:46] In this day and age, if you don't have a burner identity, you are really risking things from having your identities stolen through these business, email compromises. It's really crazy. That's what we're going to talk about. [00:43:03] An important part of keeping ourselves safe in this day and age really is con to confuse the hackers. The hackers are out there. They're trying to do some things. For instance, like business, email compromise. It is one of the biggest crimes out there today. You know, you hear about ransomware and. It hits the news legitimately. [00:43:26] It's very scary. It can really destroy your business and it can hurt you badly. If you're an individual you don't want ransomware. Well, how about those emails that come in? I just got an email in fact, from a listener this week and they got a phone call. His wife answered and it was Amazon on the phone and Amazon said, Hey, listen, your account's been hacked. [00:43:54] We need to clear it up so that your identity doesn't get stolen. And there's a fee for this. It's a $500 fee. And what you have to do is just go to amazon.com. Buy a gift card and we'll then take that gift card number from you. And we'll use that as the fee to help recover your stolen information. So she went ahead and did it. [00:44:20] She went ahead and did all of the things that the hackers wanted and now they had a gift card. Thank you very much. We'll follow up on this and. Now she told her husband, and of course this isn't a sex specific thing, right. It could have happened to either one. My dad fell for one of these scams as well. [00:44:44] So she told her husband or her husband looked at what had happened and said, oh my gosh, I don't think this is right. Let me tell you, first of all, Amazon, your bank, various credit card companies are not going to call you on the phone. They'll send you a message right. From their app, which is usually how I get notified about something. [00:45:10] Or they will send an email to the registered to email that. Uh, that you set up on that account. So that email address then is used by them to contact you right. Pretty simple. Or they might send you a text message. If you've registered a phone for notifications, that's how they contact you. It's like the IRS. [00:45:35] I was at a trade show and I was on the floor. We were exhausted. And I got no less than six phone calls from a lady claiming to be from the IRS and I needed to pay right away. And if I didn't pay right away, they were going to seize everything. And so all I had to do. Buy a gift card, a visa gift card, give her the number and she would use that to pay the taxes it and this lady had a, an American accent to one that you would recognize. [00:46:10] I'm sure. And it's not something that they do now. They do send emails, as I said. So the part of the problem with sending emails is, is it really them? Are they sending a legitimate email to a legitimate email address? Always a good question. Well, here's the answer. Yeah, they'll do that. But how do you know that it isn't a hacker sending you the email? [00:46:42] It can get pretty complicated. Looking into the email headers, trying to track. Where did this come from? Which email servers did it go through? Was it authenticated? Did we accept? Did the, uh, the provider use proper records in their DNS, the SPIF, et cetera, to make sure that it's legitimate. Right? How do you follow up on that? [00:47:07] That's what we do for our clients. And it gets pretty complicated looking at DKMS and everything else to verify that it was legitimate, making sure that the email came from a registered MX server from the, the real center. There is a way around this. And this has to do with the identities, having these fake burner identities. [00:47:33] I've been doing this for decades myself, but now it's easy enough for anybody to be able to do. There are some services out there. And one of the more recommended ones. And this is even the New York times, they have an article about this. They prefer something called simple log-in. You can find them online. [00:47:57] You can go to simple login dot I O. To get started now it's pretty darn cool. Cause they're using, what's called open source software it's software. Anybody can examine to figure out is this legitimate or not? And of course it is legitimate, but, uh, they it's, it's all out there for the whole world to see. [00:48:17] And that means it's less likely in some ways to be hacked. There are people who argue that having open source software means even more. In some ways you are, but most ways you're not, anyways, it doesn't matter. Simple login.io. Now, why would you consider doing this? Uh, something like simple login? Well, simple login is nice because it allows you to create dozens and dozens of different email address. [00:48:51] And the idea is with simple log-in it will forward the email to you at your real email address. So let's say you're doing some online shopping. You can go ahead and set up an email address for, you know, whatever it is, shopping company.com, uh, that you're going to use a shopping company.com. So you'd go there. [00:49:13] You put in two simple log-in, uh, I want to create a new identity and you tag what it's for, and then you then go to some, um, you know, shopping company.com and use the email address that was generated for you by simple login. Now you're a simple login again. Is it going to be tied into your real email account, wherever that might be if using proton mail, which is a very secure email system, or if using outlook or heaven forbid Gmail or one of these others, the email will be forwarded to you. [00:49:52] You will be able to see that indeed that email was sent to your. Shopping company.com email address or your bank of America, email address, et cetera, et cetera, that makes it much easier for you to be able to tell, was this a legitimate email? In other words, if your bank's really trying to get ahold of you, and they're going to send you an email, they're going to send you an email to an address that you use exclusive. [00:50:22] For bank of America. In reality, you only have the one email box that is over there on wherever proton, mail, outlook, Gmail, your business. You only have that one box you have to look at, but the email is sent to simple login. Does that make sense? You guys, so you can create a, these alias email boxes. It will go ahead and forward. [00:50:49] Any emails sent to them, to you, and you'll be able to tell if this was indeed from the company, because that's the only place that you use that email address. That makes it simple, but you don't have to maintain dozens or hundreds of email accounts. You only have the one email account. And by the way, you can respond to the email using that special aliased email address that you created for the shopping company or bank of America or TD or whomever. [00:51:22] It might be, you can send from that address as well. So check it out online, simple log-in dot IO. I really liked this idea. It has been used by a lot of people over, out there. Now here's one other thing that it does for you, and this is important as well. Not using the same email address. Everywhere means that when the hackers get your email address from shopping company.com or wherever, right. [00:51:56] pets.com, you name it. They can not take that and put it together with other information and use that for business, email compromise. Does that make sense? It's it makes it pretty simple, pretty straightforward. Don't get caught in the whole business email compromise thing. It can really, really hurt you. [00:52:19] And it has, it's one of the worst things out there right now, dollar for dollar it's right up there. It, by the way is one of the ways they get ransomware into your systems. So be very careful about that. Always use a different email address for every. Website you sign up for. Oh, and they do have paid plans like a $30 a year plan over at simple IO will get you unlimited aliases, unlimited mailboxes, even your own domain name. [00:52:50] So it makes it pretty simple, pretty handy. There's other things you might want to do for instance, use virtual credit cards. And we'll talk about those a little bit. As well, because I, I think this is very important. Hey, I want to remind everybody that I have started putting together some trainings. [00:53:12] You're going to get a little training at least once a week, and we're going to put all of that into. We have been calling our newsletter. I think we might change the name of it a little bit, but you'll be getting those every week. And the only way to get those is to be on that email list. Go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:53:35] Please do that right. I am not going to harass you. I'm not going to be one of those. And I've never been one of those internet. Marketers is sending you multiple dozens of emails a day, but I do want to keep you up to date. So stick around, we will be back here in just a couple of minutes. And of course you're listening to Craig Peterson. [00:53:59] And again, the website, Craig peterson.com stick around because we'll be right back. [00:54:05] One of the best ways to preserve your security on line is by using what we're calling burner identities, something that I've been doing for more than 30 years. We're going to talk more about how to do that right. [00:54:20] We've talked about email and how important that is. I want to talk now about fake identities. Now, a lot of people get worried about it. It sounds like it's something that might be kind of sketchy, but it is not to use fake identities in order to confuse the hackers in order to make it. So they really can't do the things that they. [00:54:46] To do they can't send you fishing ear emails, particularly spear phishing emails. That'll catch you off guard because you're using a fake. How do you do that? Well, I mentioned to you before that I have a thousands of fake identities that I created using census data. And I'm going to tell you how you can do it as well. [00:55:13] Right? There's a website out there called fake name a generator. You'll find it online@fakenamegenerator.com. I'm on that page right now. And I'm looking at a randomly generated identity. It has the option right on this page to specify the sex. And it says random by default, the name set, I chose American the country United States. [00:55:44] So it is applying both American and Hispanic names to this creative. And now remember it's doing the creation based on census data and some other public data, but it is not giving you one identity of any real. I think that's important to remember, and you're not going to use these identities for illegal purposes. [00:56:11] And that includes, obviously when you set up a bank account, you have to use your real name. However, you don't have to use your. If you will real email address, you can use things like simple login that will forward the email to you, but we'll let you know who was sent to. And if you only use that one email address for the bank, then you know that it came from the bank or the email address was stolen from the bank. [00:56:40] Right. All of that stuff. We've talked about that already. So in this case, The name has come up with for me is Maurice D St. George in Jacksonville, Florida even gives an address, uh, in this case it's 36 54 Willis avenue in Jacksonville, Florida. So if I go right now, Uh, two, I'm going to do use Google maps and I am going to put in that address. [00:57:11] Here we go. Jacksonville willows avenue, all the guests. What there is a Willis avenue in Jacksonville, and it's showing hoes from Google street view. Let me pull that up even bigger. And there it is. So ta-da, it looks like it gave me. Fairly real address. Now the address it gave me was 36 54, which does not exist. [00:57:40] There is a 365, but anyways, so it is a fake street address. So that's good to know some, if I were to use this, then I'm going to get my. Uh, my mail saying why about I pass? So, uh, Maurissa tells you what Maurice means, which is kind of neat. It'll give you a mother's maiden name. Gremillion is what a gave me here, a social security number. [00:58:06] So it creates one that passes what's called a check sum test. So that if you put it into a computer system, it's going to do a real quick check and say, yeah, it looks. To me. So it's was not just the right number of digits. It also passes the check, some tasks. Well-known how to do a check sum on their social security numbers. [00:58:27] So again, it's no big deal. And remember, you're not going to use this to defraud anyone. You're going to use this for websites that don't really need to know, kind of give me a break. Why do you need all this information? It gives me a phone number with the right area code. Uh, and so I'm going to go ahead and look up this phone number right now. [00:58:50] Remember, use duck, duck go. Some people will use Google search and it says the phone number gave me is a robo call. As I slide down, there's some complaints on that. Uh, so there you go. So they giving us a phone number that is not a real person's phone number, country code, of course one, cause I said United state birth date. [00:59:13] Oh, I was born October 7th, year, 2000. I'm 20 years old. And that means I'm a Libra. Hey, look at all this stuff. So it's giving me an email address, which is a real email address that you can click to activate or right there. Again, I mentioned the simple login.io earlier, but you can do a right here and it's got a username and created for me a password, which is actually a pretty deep. [00:59:41] The password. It's a random one, a website for me, my browser user agent, a MasterCard, a fake MasterCard number with an expiration and a CVC to code all of this stuff. My height is five six on kind of short for. Uh, my weight is 186 pounds own negative blood type ups tracking number Western union number MoneyGram number. [01:00:11] My favorite color is blue and I drive a 2004 Kia Sorento and it also has a unique ID. And, uh, you can use that wherever you want. So the reason I brought this up again, it's called fake name generator.com is when you are going to a website where there is no legal responsibility for you to tell them the true. [01:00:39] You can use this. And so I've, I've used it all over the place. For instance, get hub where you have, uh, it's a site that allows you to have software projects as you're developing software. So you can put stuff in, get hub. Well, they don't know to know, need to know who I really am. Now they have a credit card number for me. [01:01:01] Because I'm on a paid plan. I pay every month, but guess what? It isn't my real credit card number. It isn't the number that I got from fake name generator. My credit card company allows me to generate either a single use credit card numbers, or in this case, a credit card. Number four, get hub doc. So just as an example, that's how I use it. [01:01:24] So if get hub gets hacked, the hackers have an email address and a name that tipped me off right away, where this is coming from. And if the email didn't come from GitHub by no, they either sold my information to a marketing company, or this is a hacker. Trying to manipulate me through some form of his fishing scheme. [01:01:47] So I know you guys are the breasts and best and brightest. A lot of you understand what I'm talking about and I'm talking about how you can create a burner identity. And let me tell you, it is more important today to create a burner identity. Then it has ever been at any point in the past because frankly burner identities are one of the ways that you can really mess up some of the marketing firms out there that are trying to put the information together, these data aggregator companies, and also the hackers. [01:02:24] And it's really the hackers that were off up against here. And we're trying to prevent them from. Getting all of this information. So when we come back, I want to talk about the next step, which is which credit cards can you get? These single use card numbers from? Should you consider using PayPal when my Google voice be a really good alternative for you? [01:02:52] So we're going to get into all of that stuff. Stick around in the meantime, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my newsletter. All of this. Is in there. It makes it simple. It's a simple thing to do. Craig peterson.com. And if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:03:20] Having your credit card stolen can be a real problem for any one of us. It gives the bad guys, a lot of options to spend a lot of money very quickly. We're going to talk right now about virtual credit cards. What are they, what does it mean? [01:03:37] Virtual credit cards come in two basic forms. [01:03:41] One is a single use credit card, which was quite popular back when these things first came out and another one is a virtual credit card that has either a specific life. In other words, it's only good for 30 days or that can be used until you cancel it. If you have a credit card, a visa, MasterCard, American express discover all of the major card issuers will give you the ability to reverse any charges that might come onto your cards. [01:04:19] If your card is stolen or missing. Now that makes it quite easy. Doesn't it? I want to point out that if you're using a debit card, as opposed to a credit card, there's not much challenging you can do with the credit card. You can say, I am not going to make my pain. And, uh, because of this, that, and the other thing, this was stolen, et cetera, they can file it as a disputed charge. [01:04:46] They can do an investigation find out. Yeah. I'm you probably were not at a bus terminal down in Mexico city, which happened to me. 'cause I was up here in New Hampshire, quite a ways down to Mexico city. And so they just reversed it out. That money never came out of my bank account because it was on a credit card. [01:05:08] If I were using a debit card. That money would have come right out of my account. Now, mind you, a bus ticket in Mexico city is not very expensive, but many people have had charges of many thousands of dollars. And if you need that money in your checking account, and you're using a debit card, you got a problem because your check for, well, if you ever have to pay rent again, red check is going. [01:05:38] Bound because they just empty it out to your bank account. So now you have to fight with the bank, get the money back. They will, they will eventually refund it, but it could make some of you. Transactions that you might've written a check or something, it'll make them bounce. And that could be a real problem. [01:05:57] These, it could make them bounce. So using a credit card is typically less of a hassle online. So why would you want to use a virtual card or also known as a master credit card? Masked and may S K E D? Well, the main reason behind this is to allow you. Control payment. I've used them. In fact, I use them exclusively on every website online. [01:06:29] And I'm going to tell you the names of some of them here in just a couple of minutes, but I use them all of the time. And part of the reason is let's say, I want to camp. Uh, service. Have you ever tried to cancel a service before and you have to call them many times, right. And so you're, you're arguing with somebody overseas somewhere who doesn't want you to close the account. [01:06:53] And of course the. Bump you up to the next level person who also doesn't want you to close the account. And so you have to fuss fuss, fuss, fuss. Have you ever had that experience and I'm sure you have. It just happens all the time. So with using the virtual credit card, Well, the advantage to me is, Hey, if you are going to try and fight with me, I don't care because I'm just going to cancel that credit card number. [01:07:24] So I don't have to cancel my credit card. I don't have to have the company reissue credit card for me. I don't have to do any of this sort of thing that makes my life pretty easy. Doesn't it? And so, because of that, I am now I think in a much better. Place, because it just, I don't have to fight with people anymore. [01:07:43] So that's one of the reasons I used it. The other big reason is if it gets stolen, they can cause less harm. Some of these credit card it's virtual credit cards are set up in such a way that you can limit the amount that's charged on them. Do you like that? So if you are using it on a site that maybe is charging you $50 a month, no problem. [01:08:09] $50 a month comes off of the credit card. And if someone tries to charge more bounces and then hopefully you find out, wait a minute, it just bounced on me right now. Then next step up is okay. It bounced and. Uh, I am just going to cancel the card and then you issue a new credit card number for that website. [01:08:32] So an example. In my case has get hub.com. We keep software up there and they charge me every month if get hub were to get hacked and that credit card number stolen I'm I really don't care because there's almost nothing that can happen. And if good hub doesn't properly cancel. My account, I can just cancel the credit card and, you know, let them come after me. [01:08:57] Right. This isn't going to happen. So then it's also called a master credit card number because it's a little safer than using your real credit card details. I also want to point out something about debit card. I went for years with no credit cards at all. Nowadays, many of my vendors will take a credit card for payment. [01:09:20] And in fact, give me a bit of a better deal. And then with the credit card, I can get 2% cash back, which I use to pay down the credit card. Right. It couldn't get any better than that, but when you're using a debit card, what I always. Is I had two accounts that I could transfer money between at the bank. [01:09:42] So I had one checking account. That was my main operating, if you will account. And then I had another checking account where I would be. Just moving money out of it. Or you could even do it with a savings account, but some banks, they only let you do so many transactions a month on a savings account. So the idea is I know that I have this much in credit card obligate while debit card obligations for this month, that money is going to be coming out. [01:10:11] So I make sure that. In the debit card account to cover the legitimate transactions I know are coming up and then I keep everything else in the other account. And then I manually transferred over every month. So that's how I dealt with the whole debit card thing. And it worked really well for me. Bottom line. [01:10:30] I think it's a really great. So there you go, who are the companies that you can use to do this? I've used some of these before all of them have worked really well. If you have a capital one credit card, they have something called Eno, E N O, and it's available to all capital one card. You know, even has an extension for your web browsers. [01:10:59] So if it notices you're on a webpage, it's asking for credit card number, it'll pop up and say, do you want me to create a credit card number or a virtual one for this websites you can make your payment. Does it get much easier than that? Citibank has something they call a virtual credit cards available to all Citibank card holders, master pass by MasterCard. [01:11:23] That's available to any MasterCard visa, American express discover Diner's club card holders, credit, debit, and prepaid cards by their way. So you might want to check that one out. Uh, yeah, so that's the only one I see on my list here. That will do it for debit cards, Masterpass by MasterCard American express checkouts, available to all American express card holders. [01:11:51] Chase pay available to all chase card holders, Wells Fargo, wallet, uh, visa checkouts, available to all visa, MasterCard, and American express and discover color card holders, credit and debit cards. Plus. Prepaid cards. Okay. So it does do the debit cards as well. Final that's all owned by Goldman Sachs and is not accepting any new applicants and entro pay. [01:12:19] Also not accepting new applicants. There's a couple online. You might also want to check out our Pyne. Premium Al buying. I'm buying a, B I N E blur premium. You might want to check that out as well. All right, everybody make sure you check me out. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [01:12:43] We're going to wrap up how you should be using these burner identities of few more tips and tricks that are going to help keep you safe from the hackers that are out there. So here we go. [01:12:58] There are a lot of hackers out there. [01:13:01] The numbers are just astounding. The cost of these hackers coming in and stealing our information is just unbelievable. And it goes all the way from big corporations, from things like the colonial pipeline, the U S government all the way on down through you and me. I want to tell you a little story about a friend of mine. [01:13:28] He is about 75 years old and he supplements his income by driving for Uber eats and one other company. And so what he'll do is someone puts in an order for food somewhere. He'll go pick it up and then he'll drive it to where whoever wanted wanted, whoever ordered it. Now, there are. Pricing number of scams with this. [01:13:55] So he's very careful about some of that orders, a cookie, for instance, because it's usually a bit of a scam anyways, we won't get into those, but I'll tell you what happened to him. His information was stolen online as it was probably yours. Mine I know was as well. So it's all stolen. What do you do? While in his case, what ended up happening is they managed to get into his email account. [01:14:27] Once they're in his email account, they now had access to the emails he was getting from one of these companies. Now it wasn't the Uber eats guy. He was, there was another company. So let's just explain this a little bit. Uber eats sends him a request for him to go ahead and do a double. So, you know, go to the restaurant, pick it up and take it to this client's house. [01:14:54] And in order for him to register, he had to register an email address. Now, of course, he uses the same email address for everything, all of the. Now, personally, that drives me a little bit insane, but that's what he does. And he has just a few passwords. Now. He writes them down a little book and heaven forbid he ever lose the book so that he can remember them. [01:15:24] He just wants to keep his life simple. Right. He's 75. He's not technophobic, but you know, he's not up on all of this stuff. What he found was a paycheck didn't show. And it was an $800 paycheck. We're talking about real money that he should have had in his. It didn't show up. So he calls up the company and says what happened to my paycheck and their record show? [01:15:53] Yes, indeed. It had been paid. We paid you, we deposited right into your account. Just like you asked. Yeah. You know, ACH into the account. Great. Wonderful. What had happened is bad guys had gone, gained control of his email address and use that now. Because they figured, well, I see some emails in his account from this food delivery service, so, well, let's try and see if this email address that we're looking at right now. [01:16:26] All of his emails let's look and see. Okay. Yeah. Same. Email address and same password as a used ad at this email address. Yeah, it worked. Okay. Great. So now we have access to this guys food delivery account. So they changed. The bank account number now, easy enough to confirm, right. They change it and send you an email. [01:16:54] Hey, I want to make sure that it was you until the bad guys, the hackers click out, yada yada. Yeah, it was me and then delete the email. So he doesn't see it. And now his $800 paycheck. In fact, I think there were a couple of different checks is deposited directly into the bad guy's bank account and. The money of course is transferred out pretty quickly. [01:17:18] Now the, that guys, these hackers are using what are called mules. You might be familiar with that in the drug trade. They'll have a third party deliver the drugs just to mule. They don't know what all is going on. They probably know the delivering drugs in this case, most of the meals are useful idiots of which there are many in this country. [01:17:43] Unfortunate. Uh, political and otherwise. And these people are convinced that all they need to do is transfer the money into this account so that the hackers can then pull it out. And you know, now they're going to take care of their grandmother who is stuck in the hospital and they have no way to pay for it. [01:18:07] And they can't transfer the money out of the country during. That's one of the stories they use for people. And in many cases, these meals know what they're doing. The FBI earlier this year arrested a whole group of mules out in California that were purposefully transferring the money. They knew what they were doing. [01:18:28] So his money was now out of the country. No way to get it. And this food delivery company was not about to pay him. So it, isn't just the big guys it's you and me as well. So what I want to talk about right now is multi-factor authentication. Now. You guys are the best and brightest. I hope you understand this. [01:18:54] If you have questions, please reach out to me. I am more than

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 635: I Too Like Music Band - Earnings galore, Pixel 6 Pro review highlights, Android 12L, smart TV wars

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 154:22


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 635: I Too Like Music Band - Earnings galore, Pixel 6 Pro review highlights, Android 12L, smart TV wars

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 153:39


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 153:39


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

All TWiT.tv Shows (Video LO)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 154:22


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Radio Leo (Video HD)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Radio Leo (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 154:22


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 153:39


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Total Ant (Audio)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Total Ant (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 153:39


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Total Ant (Video)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Total Ant (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 154:22


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Total Jason (Audio)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Total Jason (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 153:39


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

Total Jason (Video)
This Week in Google 635: I Too Like Music Band

Total Jason (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 154:22


Google results: profit doubles. Facebook results: Profits jump 17%. Twitter Gains 5 Million Users in Q3, Grows Revenue 37% Despite Apple's iPhone Privacy Change. Microsoft beats revenue expectations, reporting 22% growth. Apple's ad changes wiped $142 billion off Snap, Facebook, and other online ad giants. Facebook says it's refocusing the company on 'serving young adults'. British MP's death intensifies calls for an end to online anonymity. Eight Things We Learned From the Facebook Papers. FB's cringey Open Enrollment video. Pixel 6 Pro reviews are in. Google Built the Pixel 6 Camera to Better Portray People With Darker Skin Tones. Does It? Android 12 is so last week: Meet Android 12L, now in developer preview. Android 12L could vastly improve mobile apps on Chromebooks. Will it? Surface Duo 2 Bumper review: Stupidly expensive, but also way better. Google sought fellow tech giants' help in stalling kids' privacy protections, states allege. Google Takes Up to 42% From Ads, States Claim in Lawsuit. Richmond Bridge proves Jarvis is not insane to be bridge-phobic! Google's Stadia Pivots To Being Some White Label Game Streaming Platform For Others To Use. Google TV is reportedly 'a top priority' w/ higher partner payments than Roku offers, new ad push. Leaked email allegedly shows that Google did ask Roku for special search treatment for YouTube. Comcast introduces its own smart TV with its own OS. Amazon Fire Smart TVs Now For Sale; Soon to Include Apple AirPlay. Exclusive: Billionaires back new media firm to combat disinformation. Google Chrome is working on combining tab groups and bookmarks, and we don't like it one bit. Google adds an 'app drawer' to the Nest Hub, proving once again that smart displays are just fancy tablets. Google is now accepting requests to remove images of minors from Search results. Various upgrades to Gmail. Google expands Pixel's Call Screen feature to these 7 countries, rolling out now. Picks: Jeff - Moderation scale numbers Jeff - 20 years of the iPod Jeff - Indexing the creator economy Ant - Wonder Years Reboot. Ant - He Didn't Get the Record Ant - How to Make Money While You are Sleeping: A Photographer's Guide to Passive Income – And Other Savvy Business Strategies by Rick Sammon Mathew - For the Price of a Tesla Model S, You Can Buy a Flying Car That Doesn't Require a License Jason - Google defends the Android 12 'Internet' QS panel, details future Pixel Feature Drop tweak Jason - Jason's first Movember Hosts: Jason Howell, Jeff Jarvis, and Ant Pruitt Guest: Mathew Ingram Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: UserWay.org/twit CrowdStrike.com/twit Codecademy.com promo code TWIG

SANS Internet Stormcenter Daily Network/Cyber Security and Information Security Stormcast

Thanks to Covid 19: New Types of Documents are Lost in the Wild https://isc.sans.edu/forums/diary/Thanks+to+COVID19+New+Types+of+Documents+are+Lost+in+The+Wild/27952/ Google Chrome 95 Released https://chromestatus.com/roadmap Squirrel VM Bug https://thehackernews.com/2021/10/squirrel-engine-bug-could-let-attackers.html BlackByte Decryptor Released https://www.trustwave.com/en-us/resources/blogs/spiderlabs-blog/blackbyte-ransomware-pt-1-in-depth-analysis/ https://github.com/SpiderLabs/BlackByteDecryptor

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
Earth's Solid Inner Core Could be Mushy

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 18:20


To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify.The Astronomy, Technology, and Space Science News Podcast.SpaceTime Series 24 Episode 119*Earth's solid inner core could be mushyA new study suggests that the Earth's inner core might be mushy rather than solid. Data based on seismic readings going back to the 1950s indicates the planet's core comprises a molten iron and nickel metal outer core surrounding a solid metallic inner core located some 5150 kilometres beneath the surface.*Space Rider to fly in 2023The European Space Agency's proposed Space RIDER orbital space plane is now expected to undertake its maiden flight in late 2023.*Mars Ingenuity helicopter sees the road aheadNASA's Mars Ingenuity helicopter has identified a potential interesting path forward for the missions Perseverance Rover.*The Science Report4 in every 10 heat-related deaths around the world can be attributed to climate change.Pollution leaving many vulnerable and endangered turtles at greater risk of disease.Archaeologists have uncovered a 2700 year old toilet at a dig site in Jerusalem.Alex on Tech: New security patches for Apple products, Google Chrome, and Windows 11.For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen too. Thank you…Sponsor Details:This episode is brought to you with the support of NameCheap…cheap domain names is just the beginning of your own online presence. We use them and we love them. Get our special deal…just visit: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/namecheap and help support the show.

TecWord
Como usar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome no celular

TecWord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:45


Como usar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome no celular Confira com utilizar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome no celular, para você manter o acesso a sites mais fácil. Artigo: https://bit.ly/2YZjUTY ========================================================== Siga o TecWord nas Redes Sociais Siga no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tecword.com.br Siga no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tecword.com.br Siga no LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tecwordcombr Siga no twitter: https://twitter.com/tecwordcombr Siga no PInterest: https://br.pinterest.com/tecwordcombr Siga no YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TecWordtecwordcombr Siga no Dailymotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/tecwordcombr Grupo no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TecWord ========================================================== Email de contato: contato@tecword.com.br ========================================================== #Google #GoogleChrome #googlechromelistadeleitura --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/support

TecWord
Como usar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome

TecWord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 2:57


Como usar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome Confira como utilizar a lista de leitura do Google Chrome, para você ter um melhor acesso aos sites que você mais acessa no navegador web do Google. Artigo: https://bit.ly/3ANJp81 ========================================================== Siga o TecWord nas Redes Sociais Siga no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tecword.com.br Siga no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tecword.com.br Siga no LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tecwordcombr Siga no twitter: https://twitter.com/tecwordcombr Siga no PInterest: https://br.pinterest.com/tecwordcombr Siga no YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TecWordtecwordcombr Siga no Dailymotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/tecwordcombr Grupo no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TecWord ========================================================== Email de contato: contato@tecword.com.br ========================================================== #Google #GoogleChrome #googlechromelistadeleitura --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/support

TecWord
Como usar os cartões personalizados no Google Chrome no celular

TecWord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:36


Como usar os cartões personalizados no Google Chrome no celular Confira como usar os cartões personalizados do Google Chrome mobile para compartilhar textos estilizados na internet, com o novo recurso do Chrome. Artigo: https://bit.ly/3auta5c ========================================================== Siga o TecWord nas Redes Sociais Siga no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tecword.com.br Siga no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tecword.com.br Siga no LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tecwordcombr Siga no twitter: https://twitter.com/tecwordcombr Siga no PInterest: https://br.pinterest.com/tecwordcombr Siga no YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TecWordtecwordcombr Siga no Dailymotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/tecwordcombr Grupo no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TecWord ========================================================== Email de contato: contato@tecword.com.br ========================================================== #Google #GoogleChrome #googlechromecartõespersonalizados #chrome --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/support

Screaming in the Cloud
Works Well with Others with Abby Kearns

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:53


About AbbyWith over twenty years in the tech world, Abby Kearns is a true veteran of the technology industry. Her lengthy career has spanned product marketing, product management and consulting across Fortune 500 companies and startups alike. At Puppet, she leads the vision and direction of the current and future enterprise product portfolio. Prior to joining Puppet, Abby was the CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation where she focused on driving the vision for the Foundation as well as  growing the open source project and ecosystem. Her background also includes product management at companies such as Pivotal and Verizon, as well as infrastructure operations spanning companies such as Totality, EDS, and Sabre.Links: Cloud Foundry Foundation: https://www.cloudfoundry.org Puppet: https://puppet.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ab415 TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Once upon a time, I was deep into the weeds of configuration management, which explains a lot, such as why it seems I don't know happiness in any meaningful sense. Then I wound up progressing into other areas of exploration, like the cloud, and now we know for a fact why happiness isn't a thing for me. My guest today is the former CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and today is the CTO over at a company called Puppet, which we've talked about here from time to time. Abby Kearns, thank you for joining me. I appreciate your taking the time out of your day to suffer my slings and arrows.Abby: Thank you for having me. I have been looking forward to this for weeks.Corey: My stars, it seems like things are slow over there, and I kind of envy you for that. So, help me understand something; you went from this world of cloud-native everything, which is the joy of working with Cloud Foundry, to now working with configuration management. How is that not effectively Benjamin Button-ing your career. It feels like the opposite direction that most quote-unquote, “Digital transformations” like to play with. But I have a sneaking suspicion, there's more to it than I might guess from just looking at the label on the tin.Abby: Beyond I just love enterprise infrastructure? I mean, come on, who doesn't?Corey: Oh, yeah. Everyone loves to talk about digital transformation, reading about books like a Head in the Cloud to my children used to be a fun nightly activity before it was formally classified as child abuse. So yeah, I hear you, but it turns out the rest of the world doesn't necessarily agree with us.Abby: I do not understand it. I have been in enterprise infrastructure my entire career, which has been a really, really long time, back when Unix and Sun machines were still a thing. And I'll be a little biased here; I think that enterprise infrastructure is actually the most fascinating part of technology right now. And why is that? Well, we're in the process of actively rewritten everything that got us here.And we talk about infrastructure and everyone's like, “Yeah, sure, whatever,” but at the end of the day, it's the foundation that everything that you think is cool about technology is built on. And for those of us that really enjoy this space, having a front-row seat at that evolution and the innovation that's happening is really, really exciting and it creates a lot of interesting conversation, debate, evolution of technologies, and innovation. And are they all going to be on the money five, ten years from now? Maybe not, but they're creating an interesting space and discussion and just the work ahead for all of us across the board. And I'm kind of bucketing this pretty broadly, intentionally so because I think at the end of the day, all of us play a role in a bigger piece of pie, and it's so interesting to see how these things start to fit together.Corey: One of the things that I've noticed is that the things that get attention on the keynote stage of, “This is this far future, serverless, machine-learning Kubernetes, dingus nonsense,” great is—Abby: You forgot blockchain. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah blockchain as well. Like, what other things can we wind up putting into the buzzword thing to wind up guaranteeing that your seed round is at least $200 million? Great. There's that.But when you look at the actual AWS bill—my specialty, of course—and seeing where the money is actually going, it doesn't really look that different, as far as percentages go—even though the numbers are higher—than it did ten years ago, at least in the enterprise world. You're still buying a bunch of EC2 instances, you're still potentially modernizing to some of the managed services like RDS—which is Amazon's reimagining of what a database could be if you still had to manage the finicky bits, but had no control over when and how they worked—and of course, data transfer and disk. These are the basic building blocks of everything in cloud. And despite how much we talk about the super neat stuff, what we're doing is not reflected on the conference stage. So, I tend to view the idea of aspirational architecture as its own little world.There are still seasoned companies out there that are migrating from where they are today into this idea of, well, virtualization, we've just finally got our heads around that. Now, let's talk about this cloud thing; seems like a fad—in 2021. And people take longer to get to where they think they're going or where they intend to go than they plan for, and they get stuck somewhere and instead of a cloud migration, they're now hybrid because they can redefine things and declare victory when they plant that flag, and here we are. I'm not here to make fun of these companies because they're doing important work and these are super hard problems. But increasingly, it seems that the technology is not the thing that's holding them back or even responsible for their outcome so much as it is people.The more I work with tech, the more I realized that everything that's hard becomes people issues. Curious to get your take on that, given your somewhat privileged perspective as having a foot standing very deeply in each world.Abby: Yeah, and that's a super great point. And I also realized I didn't fully answer the first question either. So, I'll tie those two things together.Corey: That's okay, we're going to keep circling around until you get there. It's fine.Abby: It's been a long week, and it's only Wednesday.Corey: All day long, as it turns out.Abby: I have a whole soapbox that I drag around behind me about people and process, and how that's your biggest problem, not technology, and if you don't solve for the people in the process, I don't care what technology you choose to use, isn't going to fix your problem. On the other hand, if you get your people and process right, you can borderline use crayons and paper and get [laugh] really close to what you need to solve for.Corey: I have it on good authority that's known as IBM Cloud. Please continue.Abby: [laugh]. And so I think people and process are at the heart of everything. They're our biggest accelerators with technology and they're our biggest limitation. And you can cloud-native serverless your way into it, but if you do not actually do continuous delivery, if you did not actually automate your responses, if you do not actually set up the cross-functional teams—or sometimes fondly referred to as two-pizza teams—if you don't have those things set up, there isn't any technology that's going to make you deliver software better, faster, cheaper. And so I think I care a lot about the focus on that because I do think it is so important, but it's also—the reason a lot of people don't like to talk about it and deal with it because it's also the hardest.People, culture change, digital transformation, whatever you want to call it, is hard work. There's a reason so many books are written around DevOps. And you mentioned Gene Kim earlier, there's a reason he wrote The Phoenix Project; it's the people-process part is the hardest. And I do think technology should be an enabler and an accelerator, but it really has to pair up nicely with the people part. And you asked your earlier question about my move to Puppet.One of the things that I've learned a lot in running the Cloud Foundry Foundation, running an open-source software foundation, is you could a real good crash course in how teams can collaborate effectively, how teams work together, how decisions get made, the need for that process and that practice. And there was a lot of great context because I had access to so much interesting information. I got to see what all of these large enterprises were doing across the board. And I got to have a literal seat at the table for how a lot of the decisions are getting made around not only the open-source technologies that are going into building the future of our enterprise infrastructure but how a lot of these companies are using and leveraging those technologies. And having that visibility was amazing and transformational for myself.It gave me so much richness and context, which is why I have firmly believed that the people and process part were so crucial for many years. And I decided to go to a company that sold products. [laugh]. You're like, “What? What is she talking about now? Where is this going?”And I say that because running an open-source software foundation is great and it gives you so much information and so much context, but you have no access to customers and no access to products. You have no influence over that. And so when I thought about what I wanted to do next, it's like, I really want to be close to customers, I really want to be close to product, and I really want to be part of something that's solving what I look at over the next five to ten years, our biggest problem area, which is that tweener phase that we're going to be in for many years, which we were just talking about, which is, “I have some stuff on-prem and I have some stuff in a cloud—usually more than one cloud—and I got to figure out how to manage all of that.” And that is a really, really, really hard problem. And so when I looked at what Puppet was trying to do, and the opportunity that existed with a lot of the fantastic work that Puppet has done over the last 12 years around Desired State Configuration management, I'm like, “Okay, there's something here.”Because clearly, that problem doesn't go away because I'm running some stuff in the cloud. So, how do we start to think about this more broadly and expansively across the hybrid estate that is all of these different environments? And who is the most well-positioned to actually drive an innovative product that addresses that? So, that's my long way of addressing both of those things.Corey: No, it's a fair question. Friend of the show, Matt Stratton, is famous for saying that, “You cannot buy DevOps, but I sure would like to sell it to you,” and if you're looking at it from that perspective, Puppet is not far from what that product store look like in some ways. My first encounter with Puppet was back around 2009, 2010 or so, and I was using it in an environment I was working within and thought, “Okay, this is terrible, and it's crap, and obviously, I know what I'm doing far better than this, and the problem is the Puppet's a bad product.” So, I was one of the early developers behind SaltStack, which was a terrific, great way of approaching the problem from a novel perspective, and it wasn't crap; it was awesome. Right up until I saw the first time a customer deployed it and looked at their environment, and it wasn't crap, it was worse because it turns out that you can build a super finely crafted precision instrument that makes a fairly bad hammer, but that's how customers are going to use it anyway.Abby: Well, I mean, [sigh] look, you actually hit something that I think we don't actually talk about, which is how hard all of this shit really is. Automation is hard. Automation for distributed systems at scale is super duper hard. There isn't an easy way to solve that problem. And I feel like I learned a lot working with Cloud Foundry.Cloud Foundry is a Platform as a Service and it sits a layer up, but it had the same challenges in that solving the ability to run cloud-native applications and cloud-native workloads at scale and have that ephemerality to it and that resilience to it, and the things everyone wants but don't recognize how difficult it is, actually, to do that well. And I think the same—you know, that really set me up for the way that I think about the problem, even the layer down which is, running and managing desired state, which at the end of the day is a really fancy way of saying, “Does your environment look like the way you think it should? And if it doesn't, what are you going to do about it?” And it seems like, in this year of—what year are we again? 2021, maybe? I don't know. It feels like the last two years of, sort of, munged together?Corey: Yeah, the passing of time is something it's very hard for me to wrap my head around.Abby: But it feels like, I know some people, particularly those of us that have been in tech a long time are probably like, “Why are we still talking about that? Why is that a thing?” But that is still an incredibly hard problem for most organizations, large and small. So, I tend to spend a lot of time thinking about large enterprises, but in the day, you've got more than 20 servers, you're probably sitting around thinking, “Does my environment actually look the way I think it does? There's a new CVE that just came out. Am I able to address that?”And I think at the end of the day, figuring out how you can solve for that on-prem has been one of the things that Puppet has worked for, and done really, really well the last 12 years. Now, I think the next challenge is okay, how do you extend that out across your now bananas complex estate that is—I got a huge data estate, maybe one or two data centers, I got some stuff in AWS, I got some stuff in GCP, oh yeah, got a little thing over here and Azure, and oh, some guy spun up something on OCI. So, we got a little bit of everything. And oh, my God, the SolarWinds breach happened. Are we impacted? I don't know. What does that mean? [laugh].And I think you start to unravel the little pieces of that and it gets more and more complex. And so I think the problems that I was solving in the early aughts with servers seems trite now because you're like, I can see all of my servers; there's eight of them. Things seem fine. To now, you've got hundreds of thousands of applications and workloads, and some of them are serverless, and they're all over the place. And who has what, and where does it sit?And does it look like the way that I think it needs to so that I can run my business effectively? And I think that's really the power of it, but it's also one of those things that I don't feel like a lot of people like to acknowledge the complexity and the hardness of that because it's not just the technology problem—going back to your other question, how do we work? How do we communicate? What are our processes around dealing with this? And I think there's so much wrapped up in that it becomes almost like, how do you eat an elephant story, right? Yes, one bite at a time, but when you first look at the elephant, you're like, “Holy shit. This is big. What do I need to do?” And that I think is not something we all collectively spend enough time talking about is how hard this stuff is.Corey: One of the biggest challenges I see across the board is this idea of conference-ware style architecture; the greatest lie you ever see is someone talking about their infrastructure in public because peel it back a little bit and everything's messy, everything's disastrous, and everything's a tire fire. And we have this cult in tech—Abby: [laugh].Corey: —it's almost a cult where we have this idea that anything that isn't rewritten completely within the last six months based upon whatever is the hot framework now that is designed to run only in Google Chrome running on the latest generation MacBook Pro on a gigabit internet connection is somehow less than. It's like, “So, what does that piece of crap do?” And the answer is, “Well, a few $100 million a quarter in revenue, so how about you watch your mouth?” Moving those things is delicate; moving those things is fraught, and there are a lot of different stakeholders to the point where one of the lessons I keep learning is, people love to ask me, “What is Amazon's opinion of you?” Turns out that there's no Ted Amazon who works over there who forms a single entity's opinion. It's a bunch of small teams. Some of them like me, some of them can't stand me, far and away the majority don't know who I am. And that is okay. In theory; in practice, I find it completely unforgivable because how dare you? But I understand it's—Abby: You write a memo, right now. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. Companies are people and people are messy, and for better or worse, it is impossible to patch them. So, you have to almost route around them. And that was something that I found that Puppet did very well, coming from the olden days of sysadmin work where we spend time doing management [bump 00:15:53] the systems by hand. Like, oh, I'm going to do a for loop. Once I learned how to script. Before that, I use Cluster SSH and inadvertently blew away a University's entire config file what starts up on boot across their entire FreeBSD server fleet.Abby: You only did it once, so it's fine.Corey: Oh, yeah. I'm never going to screw up again. Well, not like that. In other ways. Absolutely, but at least my errors will be novel.Abby: Yeah. It's learning. We all learn. If you haven't taken something down in production in real-time, you have not lived. And also you [laugh] haven't done tech. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah, you either haven't been allowed close enough to anything that's important enough to be able to take down, you're lying to me, or thirdly—and this is possible, too—you're not yet at a point in your career where you're allowed to have access to the breaky parts. And that's fine. I mean, my argument has always been about why I'd be a terrible employee at Google, for example, is if I went in maliciously on day one, I would be hard-pressed to take down google.com for one hour. If I can't have that much impact intentionally going in as a bad actor, it feels like there'd be how much possible upside, positive impact can I have what everyone's ostensibly aligned around the same thing?It's the challenge of big companies. It's gaining buy-in, it's gaining investment in the idea and the direction you're going in. Things always take longer, you have to wind up getting multiple stakeholders on board. My consulting practice is entirely around helping save money on the AWS bill. You'd think it would be the easiest thing in the world to sell, but talking to big companies means a series of different sales conversations with different folks, getting them all on the same page. What we do functionally isn't so much look at the computer parts as it is marriage counseling between engineering and finance. Different languages, different ways of thinking about things, ostensibly the same goals.Abby: I mean, I don't think that's a big company problem. I think that's an every company problem if you have more than, like, five people in your company.Corey: The first few years here, it was just me and I had none of those problems. I had very different problems, but you know—and then we started bringing other people in, it's like, “Oh, yeah, things were great until we hired people. Ugh, mistake. Never do that.” And yeah, it turns out that's not particularly sustainable.Abby: Stakeholder management is hard. And you mentioned something about routing around. Well, you can't actually route around people, unfortunately. You have to get people to buy in, you have to bring people along on the journey. And not everybody is at the same place in the way they think about the work you're doing.And that's true at any company, big or small. I think it just gets harder and more complex as the company gets bigger because it's harder to make the changes you need to make fast enough, but I'd say even at a company the size of Puppet, we have the exact same challenges. You know, are the teams aligned? Are we aligned on the right things? Are we focusing on the right things?Or, do we have the right priorities in our backlog? How are we doing the work that we do? And if you're trying to drive innovation, how fast are we innovating? Are we innovating fast enough? How tight are our feedback loops?It's one of those things where the conversations that you and I have had externally with customers are the same conversations I have internally all the time, too. Let's talk about innovators' dilemma. [laugh]. Let's talk about feedback loop. Let's talk about what does it mean to get tighter feedback loops from customers and the field?And how do you align those things to the priorities in your backlog? And it's one of those never-ending challenges that's messy and complicated. And technology can enable it, but the technology is also messy and hard. And I do love going to conferences and seeing how pretty and easy things could look, and it's definitely a great aspiration for us to all shoot for, but at the end of the day, I think we all have to recognize there's a ton of messiness that goes on behind to make that a reality and to make that really a product and a technology that we can sell and get behind, but also one that we buy in, too, and are able to use. So, I think we as a technology industry, and particularly those of us in the Bay Area, we do a disservice by talking about how easy things are and why—you know, I remember a conversation I had in 2014 where someone asked me if Docker was already passe because everybody was doing containerized applications, and I was like, “Are they? Really? Is that an everyone thing? Or is that just an ‘us' thing?” [laugh].Corey: Well, they talk about it on the conference stages an awful lot, but yeah. New problems that continue to arise. I mean, I look back at my early formative years as someone who could theoretically be brought out in public and it was through a consulting project, where I was a traveling trainer for Puppet back in 2014, 2015, and teaching people who hadn't had exposure before what Puppet was about. And there was a definite experience in some of the people attending class where they were very opposed to the idea. And dig down a little bit, it's not that they had a problem with the software, it's not that they had a problem with any of the technical bits.It's that they made the mistake that so many technologists made—I know I have, repeatedly—of identifying themselves with the technology that they work on. And well, in some cases, yeah, the answer was that they ran a particular script a bunch of times and if you can automate that through something like Puppet or something else, well, what does that mean for them? We see it much larger-scale now with people who are, okay, I'm in the data center working on the storage arrays. When that becomes just an API call or—let's be serious, despite what we see in conference stages—when it becomes clicking buttons in the AWS console, then what does that mean for the future of their career? The tide is rising.And I can't blame them too much for this; you've been doing this for 25 years, you don't necessarily want to throw all that away and start over with a whole new set of concepts and the rest because unlike what Twitter believes, there are a bunch of legitimate paths in this industry that do treat it as a job rather than an all-consuming passion. And I have no negative judgment toward folks who walk down that direction.Abby: Most people do. And I think we have to be realistic. It's not just some. A lot of people do. A lot of people, “This is my nine-to-five job, Monday through Friday, and I'm going to go home and I'm going to spend time with my family.”Or I'm going to dare I say—quietly—have a life outside of technology. You know, but this is my job. And I think we have done a disservice to a lot of those individuals who for better or for worse, they just want to go in and do a job. They want to get their job done to the best of their abilities, and don't necessarily have the time—or if you're a single parent, have the flexibility in your day to go home and spend another five, six hours learning the latest technology, the latest programming language, set up your own demo environment at home, play around with AWS, all of these things that you may not have the opportunity to do. And I think we as an industry have done a disservice to both those individuals, as well in putting up really imaginary gates on who can actually be a technologist, too.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Gatekeeping, on some level, is just—it's a horrible thing. Something I found relatively early on is that I didn't enjoy communities where that was a thing in a big way. In minor ways, sure, absolutely. I wound up gravitating toward Ubuntu rather than Debian because it turned out that being actively insulted when I asked how to do something wasn't exactly the most welcoming, constructive experience, where they, “Read the manual.” “Yeah, I did that and it was incomplete and contradictory, and that's why I'm here asking you that question, but please continue to be a condescending jackwagon. I appreciate that. It really just reminds me that I'm making good choices with my life.”Abby: Hashtag-RTFM. [laugh].Corey: Exactly. In my case, fine, its water off a duck's back. I can certainly take it given the way that I dish it out, but by the same token, not everyone has a quote-unquote, thick skin, and I further posit that not everyone should have to have one. You should not get used to personal attacks as a prerequisite for working in this space. And I'm very sensitive to the idea that people who are just now exploring the cloud somehow feel that they've missed out on their career, and that so there's somehow not appropriate for this field, or that it's not for them.And no, are you kidding me? You know that overwhelming sense of confusion you get when you look at the AWS console and try and understand what all those services do? Yeah, I had the same impression the first time I saw it and there were 12 services; there's over 200 now. Guess what? I've still got it.And if I am overwhelmed by it, I promise there's no shame in anyone else being overwhelmed by it, too. We're long since past the point where I can talk incredibly convincingly about AWS services that don't exist to AWS employees and not get called out on it because who in the world has that entire Rolodex of services shoved into their heads who isn't me?Abby: I'd say you should put out… a call for anyone that does because I certainly do not memorize the services that are available. I don't know that anyone does. And I think even more broadly, is, remember when the landscape diagram came out from the CNCF a couple of years ago, which it's now, like… it's like a NASCAR logo of every logo known to man—Corey: Oh today, there's over 400 icons on it the last time I saw—I saw that thing come out and I realized, “Wow, I thought I was going to shit-posting,” but no, this thing is incredible. It's, “This is great.” My personal favorite was zooming all the way in finding a couple of logos on in the same box three times, which is just… spot on. I was told later, it's like, “Oh, those represent different projects.” I'm like, “Oh, yeah, must have missed that in the legend somewhere.” [laugh]. It's this monstrous, overdone thing.Abby: But the whole point of it was just, if I am running an IT department, and I'm like, “Here you go. Here's a menu of things to choose,” you're just like, “What do I do with this information? Do I choose one of each? All the above? Where do I go? And then, frankly, how do I make them all work together in my environment?” Because they all serve very different problems and they're tackling different aspects of that problem.And I think I get really annoyed with myself as an industry—like, ourselves as an industry because it's like, “What are we doing here?” We're trying to make it harder for people, not only to use the technology, to be part of it. And I think any efforts we can make to make it easier and more simple or clear, we owe it to ourselves to be able to tell that story. Which now the flip side of that is describing cloud-native in the cloud, and infrastructure and automation is really, really hard to do [laugh] in a way that doesn't use any of those words. And I'm just as guilty of this, of describing things we do and using the same language, and all of a sudden you're looking at it this says the same thing is 7500 other websites. [laugh]. So.Corey: Yep. I joke at RSA's Expo Hall is basically about twelve companies selling different things. Sure, each one has a whole bunch of booths with different logos and different marketing copy, but it's the same fundamental product. Same challenge here. And this is, to me, the future of cloud, this is where it's going, where I want something that will—in my case, I built a custom URL shortener out of DynamoDB, API Gateway, Lambda, et cetera, and I built this thing largely as a proof of concept because I wanted to have experience playing with these tools.And that was great, not but if I'm doing something like that in production, I'm going with Bitly or one of the other services that provide this where someone is going to maintain it full time. Unless it is the core of what I'm doing, I don't want to build it myself from popsicle sticks. And moving up the stack to a world of folks who are trying to solve a business problem and they don't want to deal with the ten prerequisite services to understand the cloud, and then a whole bunch of other things tied together, and the billing, and the flow becomes incredibly problematic to understand—not to mention insecure: because we don't understand it, you don't know what your risk exposure is—people don't want that. They—Abby: Or to manage it.Corey: Yeah.Abby: Just the day-to-day management. Care and feeding, beyond security. [laugh].Corey: People's time is free. So, yeah. For example, do I write my own payroll system? Absolutely not. I have the good sense to pay a turnkey company to handle that for me because mistakes will show.I started my career running email systems. I pay for Google workspaces—or GSuite, or Gmail, or whatever the hell they're calling it this week—because it's not core and central to my business. I want a thing that winds up solving a business problem, and I will pay commensurately to the value that thing delivers, not the individual constituent costs of the components that build it together. Because until you're significantly scaled out and it is the core of what you do, you're spending more on people to run the monstrous thing than you are for the thing itself. That's always the way it works.So, put your innovation where it matters for your business. I posit the for an awful lot of the things we're building, in order to achieve those outcomes, this isn't it.Abby: Agreed. And I am a big believer in if I can use off-the-shelf software, I will because I don't believe in reinventing everything. Now, having said that, and coming off my soapbox for just a hot minute, I will say that a lot of what's happening, and going back to where I started around the enterprise infrastructure, we're reinventing so many things that there is a lot of new things coming up. We've talked about containers, we've talked about Kubernetes, around container scheduling, container orchestration, we haven't even mentioned service mesh, and sidecars, and all of the new ways we're approaching solving some of these older problems. So, there is the need for a broad proliferation of technology until the contraction phase, where it all starts to fundamentally clicks together.And that's really where the interesting parts happen, but it's also where the confusion happens because, “Okay, what do I use? How do I use it? How do these pieces fit together? What happens when this changes? What does this mean?”And by the way, if I'm an enterprise company, I'm a payroll company, what's the one thing I care about? My payroll software. [laugh]. And that's the problem I'm solving for. So, I take a little umbrage sometimes with the frame that every company is a software company because every company is not a software company.Every company can use technology in ways to further their business and more and more frequently, that is delivering their business value through software, but if I'm a payroll company, I care about delivering that payroll capabilities to my customer, and I want to do it as quickly as possible, and I want to leverage technology to help me do that. But my endgame is not that technology; my endgame is delivering value to my customers in real and meaningful ways. And I worry, sometimes, that those two things get conflated together. And one is an enabler of the other; the technology is not the outcome.Corey: And that is borderline heresy for an awful lot of folks out there in the space, I wish that people would wake up a little bit more and realize that you have to build a thing that solves customer pain, ideally, an expensive customer pain, and then they will basically rush to hurl money at you. Now, there are challenges and inflections as you go, and there's a whole bunch of nuances that can span entire fields of endeavor that I am hand-waving over here, and that's fine, but this is the direction I think we're going and this is the dawning awareness that I hope and trust we'll see start to take root in this industry.Abby: I mean, I hope so. I do take comfort in the fact that a lot of the industry leaders I'm starting to see, kind of, equate those two things more closely in the top [track 00:31:20]. Because it's a good forcing function for those of us that are technologists. At the end of the day, what am I doing? I am a product company, I am selling software to someone.So clearly, obviously, I have a vested interest in building the best software out there, but at the end of the day, for me, it's, “Okay, how do I make that truly impactful for customers, and how do I help them solve a problem?” And for me, I'm hyper-focused on automation because I honestly feel like that is the biggest challenge for most companies; it's the hardest thing to solve. It's like getting into your auto-driving car for the first time and letting go the steering wheel and praying to the software gods that that software is actually going to work. But it's the same thing with automation; it's like, “Okay, I have to trust that this is going to manage my environment and manage my infrastructure in a factual way and not put me on CNN because I just shut down entire customer environment,” or if I'm an airline and I've just had a really bad week because I've had technology problems. [laugh]. And so I think we have to really take into consideration that there are real customer problems on the other end of that we have to help solve for.Corey: My biggest problem is the failure mode of this is not when people watch the conference-ware presentations is that they're not going to sit there and think, “Oh, yeah, they're just talking about a nuanced thing that doesn't apply to our constraints, and they're hand-waving over a lot of stuff,” it's that, “Wow, we suck.” And that's not the takeaway anyone should ever have. Even Netflix doesn't operate the way that Netflix says that they do in their conference talks. It's always fun sitting next to someone from the company that's currently presenting and saying something to them, like, “Wow, I wish we did things that way.” And they said, “Yeah, I wish we did, too.”And it's always the case because it's very hard to get on stage and talk for 45 minutes about here's what we completely screwed up on, especially at the large publicly traded companies where it's, “Wait, why did our stock price just dive five perce—oh, my God, what did you say on stage?” People care [laugh] about those things, and I get it; there's a risk factor that I don't have to deal with here.Abby: I wish people would though. It would be so refreshing to hear someone like, “You know what? Ohh, we really messed this up, and let me walk you through what we did.” [laugh]. I think that would be nice.Corey: On some level, giving that talk in enough detail becomes indistinguishable from rage-quitting in public.Abby: [laugh].Corey: I mean, I'm there for it. Don't get me wrong. But I would love to see it.Abby: I don't think it has to be rage-quitting. One of the things that I talk to my team a lot about is the safety to fail. You can't take risk if you're too afraid to fail, right? And I think you can frame failure in a way of, “Hey, this didn't work, but let me walk you through all the amazing things we learned from this. And here's how we used that to take this and make this thing better.”And I think there's a positive way to frame it that's not rage-quitting, but I do think we as an industry gloss over those learnings that you absolutely have to do. You fail; everything does not work the first time perfectly. It is not brilliant out the gate. If you've done an MVP and it's perfect and every customer loves it, well then, you sat on that for way too long. [laugh]. And I think it's just really getting comfortable with this didn't work the first time or the fourth, but look, at time seven, this is where we got and this is what we've learned.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time out of your day to wind up speaking to me about things that in many cases are challenging to talk about because it's the things people don't talk about in the real world. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, who you are, et cetera, where can they find you?Abby: They can find me on the Twitters at @ab415. I think that's the best way to start, although I will say that I am not as prolific as you are on Twitter.Corey: That's a good thing.Abby: I'm a half-assed Tweeter. [laugh]. I will own it.Corey: Oh, I put my full ass into it every time, in every way.Abby: [laugh]. I do skim it a lot. I get a lot of my tech news from there. Like, “What are people mad about today?” And—Corey: The daily outrage. Oh, yeah.Abby: The daily outrage. “What's Corey ranting about today? Let's see.” [laugh].Corey: We will, of course, put a link to your Twitter profile in the [show notes 00:35:39]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Abby: Hey, it was my pleasure.Corey: Abby Kearns, CTO at Puppet. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me about the amazing podcast content you create, start to finish, at Netflix.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

MacVoices Audio
MacVoices #21197: MacVoices Live! - Google's iOS Apps, Malware Utilities, 2 Factor Authentication (2)

MacVoices Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 36:16


Our MacVoice Live! panel of David Ginsburg, Jim Rea, Patrice Brend'amour, Warren Sklar, Brittany Smith, and Kelly Guimont turn their attention to why Google is changing their position on embracing the native iOS interface elements. Then, we start a discussion of a number of different topics for Cybersecurity Awareness Month. Topics this time around include Mac software, why 2 factor authentication is one of the most basic steps you can take to protect yourself, and how authentication apps can improve that option. (Part 2)  MacVoices is supported by quip. Better oral health made simple. Get your first refill free at getquip.com/macvoices. Show Notes: Guests: Patrice Brend'amour is the creator, advocate and Product Manager of a global healthcare software initiative, which is not only pushing the industry to provide user-centered solutions using the latest advances in UX and technology, but also advancing the sharing of medical information between healthcare providers across the world. He is also an avid podcaster, mainly in the technology space, as well as a maintainer and contributor to a number of open source projects. Everything he does can be linked to from The Patrice, you can follow him on Twitter, and engage with him on the podcast, Foodie Flashback. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Warren Sklar helps host the Mac to The Future Group on Facebook, and is the co-host of In Touch With iOS with David Ginsburg. Brittany Smith is a cognitive neuroscientist who provides a variety of consulting services through her business, Devise and Conquer that includes ADD/ADHD coaching, technology coaching, productivity consulting, and more. She is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”, and holds a M.S. degree in Cognitive Neuroscience. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator. Check out her latest project, a YouTube channel of tech tips. Links: Google's Apps to Embrace iOS on iOS on Six Colors Malwarebytes Bitdefender Avast ClamXAV MacScan by SecureMac McAfee Anti-Virus Crowdstrike Bitwarden Authy   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

TecWord
Como instalar o navegação contínua no Google Chrome no celular

TecWord

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 3:56


Como instalar o navegação contínua no Google Chrome no celular Confira como habilitar o navegação contínua no Google Chrome no celular, para você melhorar a sua pesquisa no Google Chrome em seu aparelho celular. Artigo: https://bit.ly/3BrqLDZ ========================================================== Siga o TecWord nas Redes Sociais Siga no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tecword.com.br Siga no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tecword.com.br Siga no LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tecwordcombr Siga no twitter: https://twitter.com/tecwordcombr Siga no PInterest: https://br.pinterest.com/tecwordcombr Siga no YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TecWordtecwordcombr Siga no Dailymotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/tecwordcombr Grupo no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TecWord ========================================================== Email de contato: contato@tecword.com.br ========================================================== #Google #GoogleChrome #googlechromenavegaçãocontínua #chrome --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/support

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1074 - Google Chrome Has Its Twelfth Zero-Day This Year, Update Now

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 7:04


Google Chrome has recently announced a new zero-day vulnerability in the browser. This brings the total zero-day vulnerabilities in Chrome this year alone to twelve. This episode goes into the details and what you can do to keep your software safe. Be aware, be safe. Get ExpressVPN, Secure Your Privacy And Support The Show Become A Patron! Patreon Page *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five —————— Where you can find Security In Five —————— Security In Five Reddit Channel r/SecurityInFive Binary Blogger Website Security In Five Website Security In Five Podcast Page - Podcast RSS Twitter @securityinfive iTunes, YouTube, TuneIn, iHeartRadio,

Productivity Tip of the Day
93 | Install Nifty Browser Extensions

Productivity Tip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 4:38


Install Nifty Browser Extensions There are many nifty browser extensions you can use to add more ease into your workday. I use Google Chrome but many of these extensions can be used with any browser. One Tab Organize all your tabs into groups. ColorPick Eyedropper Click anywhere to get the color hex code information. Useful for matching brand colors. Loom Record your screen for easy sharing or presentation making. Last Pass Keep all your passwords safe. Share your passwords securely. Notion Create and capture notes, databases and tasks. Tube Buddy Optimize and track your YouTube videos. Google Drive Capture landing pages and useful web articles, save them directly to your drive. Honey Saves you money by tracking and applying coupon codes. Facebook Pixel Helper Tracks Facebook traffic for Facebook ads. Tag Assistant Legacy Tracks Google traffic for your web pages. For more productivity tips on tools like this, you'll want to check Workflow Wonder, my signature program on Maven. It's interactive, it's live and you walk away with implementing all of these productivity workflows into your daily routines. https://maven.com/workflowwonder/workflowwonder --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/productivitytip/message

Salty Language
Salty Language 530 - Crotchos

Salty Language

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 131:54


This week Bryan and Tony discuss life, doctor annoyances, apple pie, apple orchard, Cosmic Crisp and SweeTango apples, Squid Game(NO spoilers), What If?, comedy albums, The Pit movie, Google Chrome problems, nachos, our QoftheW, and more!    Salty Merch: https://www.teepublic.com/user/saltylanguagepods Our Patreon: Patreon.com/saltylanguage   Links: 1. The Pit https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086113/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0 2. Google Chrome issues https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoffman/2021/10/02/stop-using-google-chrome-on-windows-10-android-and-apple-iphones-ipads-and-macs/?sh=43df29702f30 3. Death-man https://www.writeups.org/death-man-batman-dc-comics-morrison/ QoftheW:  Bruce Wayne embraced his fear of bats and became ‘Batman'. In the same respect, what would your name be?   Subscribe / rate / review us on Apple Podcasts! Visit us at: saltylanguage.com Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/salty-language/id454587072?mt=2 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3GnINOQglJq1jedh36ZjGC iHeart Radio: http://www.iheart.com/show/263-Salty-Language/ Google Play Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Ixozhhniffkdkgfp33brnqolvte facebook.com/saltylanguage @salty_language / saltylanguage@gmail.com http://salty.libsyn.com/webpage  / http://www.youtube.com/user/SaltyLanguagePod Instagram: SaltyLanguage Reddit: r/saltylanguage Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/salty-language tangentboundnetwork.com Share with your friends!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 83:13


Could Using the Right Multi-Factor Authentication Save You? I had a good friend who, this week, had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his password. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. Let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most companies do so in some way; we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition. Some customers go away. So how do we keep them? We do what we can. How do we get new customers? For him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line you have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. The same thing's true. Google. And then, on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course, you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, about those already. And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookies are about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel that gets set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there are many people interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising. I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads related to that, which I've always said. It is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. It isn't like TV where it sometimes seems every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me. After all, I don't want those things. And it's also not only just annoying in money-wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically, the Facebook pixel gets to know you. All of the people who like you that might've bought from you. Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebook and their ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. So there's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account. Years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done precisely that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a terrible thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. So now there are really two or three problems here. We'll talk about one of them. Why was the bad guy going after him? He has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can go up almost immediately. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. So our bad guy can get an account like his that has years' worth of advertising credibility and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. Also, of course, very bad, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week, and I was out on a trip with just a vacation trip. It was absolutely fantastic. I never just do vacation. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on a trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGard program. So I had him reach out to my friend, and he helped them out, and they talked back and forth. So here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a perfect way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. And if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. So go ahead and drop me an email at me@craigpeterson.com if a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count and many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, email account, et cetera. And. He has people who manage his ads for him. Who operates his website for him, who put up some promotions, advertising, and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private property. And how does he do it, or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was going to haveIbeenpwned.com. I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most, and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five various sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. All bad. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said put in the password because have I been, pwned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredible of all of these known passwords. So he put in his password, and no, it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I'd love to get him. But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or vaults, or maybe all of your vaults. And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the US and people would work for me overseas, and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. If a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about the last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, Me@craigpeterson.com. That's ME at Craig Peterson dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on-off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think they agree One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Easily simply. When we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six-digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases, take control of your phone. Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile a T and Tone of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or passcode that you gave them. And once they have that passcode now, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really it may not make a huge difference. But I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? There are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the freeway to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. But you can tell it. And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authenticator. By the way. That's why I advise you to don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the sites, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. And then it asks for that code identification code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy-paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six-digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O N.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of the special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. There's a great article that came out in the Wall Street Journal. And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms.  Now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. So that is studies again, that looks like yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. Apparently, for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard, of course, of how this I don't know what it is. Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. I'm trying to remember, but of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. There's a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. And what an influencer is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. They have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. We've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire. I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. So you get a micro-influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. I'll look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together and people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the US each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. Facebook it's getting the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. And also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics. Quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate and win with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook. Another post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said Mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. He says they're proud of this research. I'm just summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. They have a paywall and I hate to use payroll articles, but this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. Give me a few days to respond. But me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your mac pro if you need four screens, it's really handy. No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paperback in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be, connects to the company's network. Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. So once they get in that front door where there's through a website and email that you clicked on or in a computer that you're bringing into the office, they can start to move around. Now it's not just your activity. And this is an interesting article from the verge by Monica chin. It's not just your activity that they can see on your laptop, but in many cases, they're also able to look at anything you're downloading any of your photographs or videos that you might've sinked up from your smart. Laura loading these types of things, your text messages on your work device for safekeeping, or just because it's your primary device might seem harmless, right? Cause you're just going to remove them before you hand it in. But some companies such as Apple won't allow you to wipe your device before handing it in regardless of how personal the contents are. And that makes sense too, because many times an employee leaves. And they don't give the company all of the information that they have, that they're obliged to give back to their employer. Things that they've been working on, customer information, et cetera. So Manalive, there are plenty of other devices out there. Hopefully if you leave your company with plenty of notice, moving a bunch of things off your work device in the last few days, uh, might raise some eyebrows at the. And I'm saying hopefully, because they should notice that sort of thing, because it could be malicious activity. It could be an insider risk that maybe they're not even aware of. There's so much you could go wrong here. So bottom line don't use the work laptop for home. So what should you use? You know, my personal recommendation. Almost always is get a Mac. They are safer to use the patches that they get are usually not destructive. You know, sometimes you can install a patch for windows and now your machine just won't work anymore. Right. You've had that happen. I know every last one of us out there that are tried to install Microsoft patches for a while have had that happen to them. All of a sudden the patch has completely messed up your computer and you are so out of luck, it's ridiculous. Right? So don't, you know, hopefully don't do that, but I like the max because they are basically safer than windows. And also because the patches just work on them, apple tends to get them out in plenty of time to try and protect us the next level. If he can't afford an apple and. Apple laptops really are not expensive when you consider how long they last and the quality that components, they are not expensive at all. But if you can't afford that, the next thing I would look at is getting a Chromebook. There are a lot of companies that make Chromebooks Chrome is an operating system from Google. It's similar to Android. Google keeps the Chromebooks up-to-date. They patch them quite regularly and make sure that there aren't nastiness is going on. You just have some of the same issues and Android has patches might take a while to get to you because it has to go through the vendor that made the Chromebook. You might have a Chromebook for Sam from Samsung, for instance, it's not Google's even though it's called a Google Chromebook. Now Chromebooks rely heavily on the cloud services that Google provides, but they can also run just locally. So with a Chromebook and you can get them for as little as 150 bucks, but remember you get what you pay for. Or as much as I've seen them in the $2,000 price range with fancy GPU's, local storage and other things, but at 150 bucks, it could be well worth it for you. It lets you do the regular word processing. Just think of what you can do with Google docs, spreadsheets against Google docs, spreadsheets, all of those types of things are built into it. You can. Cruz the web, obviously using Google Chrome on your Chromebook. And send and receive email, which is what most people do. That's really kind of all, most people do at home. So consider that as well. I also like iPad. They are quite safe again, but they tend to be more expensive and they can do pretty much everything. And now with Android support built right into Google Chromebooks, you can even run Android apps. So there you go. Keep safe and be safe out there. Right. Have a hack free life. Make sure you get my newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. The national cyber director, Chris Inglis said that we need cyber bullets, that cyber bullets are part of the war on hacks. And it makes sense on one level. But when you get into the reality, it's a much different story..  I had an interesting email this week from a listener. Actually he sent it about two weeks ago when I finally was able to get to it this week and responded, and he was pointing out how there are some things that I talk about on the show that I put into my newsletter that are really good. And. I'm paraphrasing here but theoretical to so many people, there's some things that you can figure out pretty easily yourself. Some things you can do yourselves and other things that are just different. To do still. And a lot of that has to do with the websites you go to in order to maintain your passwords. And he was complaining specifically about bank of America and how you can, according to what he has found here in the real world, you can come up with a. Password a 20 character long password that is going to keep everything nice and safe at trend to be generated. You're using one password and great. So you set your password up in bank of America's account, and then you try and log in later, and it doesn't work because it lets you put 20 character passwords and when you're creating it, yeah. But the login screen only takes the first 16. So of course they'd home match. You see it's things like that really are pushing us back, holding us back. But I'd say pushing us back from being secure as a country, there, there just aren't enough people paying enough attention to make sure this cyber security, even the basic stuff like passwords and two factor authentication are being done properly. So one of the things I wanted to make sure you guys were aware of is I need to know when you're having these problems, because what I want to do is put together some trainings to show you exactly how to do it. Because on some websites you were saying, it's pretty hard to use one password he's paying for it, but it's kinda difficult for him. And I think in some ways, a lack of understanding. Then, it can be difficult to spend a bunch of time trying to watch some training videos for some of the software. And so I want to hear when you're having problems so I can do what I did for him this week and spend a little time, write some stuff up, and I even am reaching out to some of this website. People like bank of America who are really messing up cyber security for people who are trying to do the right thing and writing them and saying, Hey, listen, I'm part of the FBI InfraGard program. I'm a member of it. I paid a lot of attention to cybersecurity. Heck I ran the training for the FBI InfraGard program for a couple of years, and there are some real things lacking. In the login anyways, and this one particular case of the cybersecurity, but I don't know all of this stuff. I'm not using all of these things and I have a disadvantage over you guys, and that is that I've been doing this for so long. I've forgotten what it's like to not know it. Does that make sense? So if you have something that I've talked about on the show, that's appeared in my newsletter and you're having some confusion over, let me know. Just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. What he did is he just hit reply to my newsletter. And of course, that goes to me and me@gregpeterson.com and it tracks it. So I know I need to reply, so I can sit down and go through and answer people's questions. I sent out a lot of the copies of my password, special report to people you guys had requested specifically some of the. People out there had requested a little bit of help. And I had sent out an email to most of the people that I could identify as being business people. I sent out a little thing saying, Hey, listen, if you could use half-hour my help, let me know myself or my team. And then, again, you can just send me an E Craig. So I answered a lot of those questions this week. And in fact, that's how I come up with much of what I cover here on the show. You guys ask the questions and that's how I know that it's a real problem. If I understand it, that's one thing. But for the people who don't do cybersecurity as their primary job or a strategy, I get it. I can get why you guys are confused. So make sure you get my weekly newsletter. So you can find out about all of the trainings, the free stuff, the paid courses, and. It's easy. Just go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. That's Craig Peterson, P E T E R S O N. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. And I'm more than glad. Add you to that list. And there are now thousands of people on that list to get my email pretty much every week. If you miss it one week, it's probably, cause I just got too busy, but I put out all my show notes. I put it all a little bit of training notes, all. The us government is supposedly getting ready to fire what they're calling cyber bullets in response to these significant hacking attacks. This is what they're calling a comprehensive strategy to dissuade. Adversaries. And this is all from the national cyber security director, Chris Inglis. This is from an article in American military news.com by Chris Strome. That was out this week. And of course I included that in my newsletter this week as well, coming out. Today or tomorrow, depends on how this all goes right with the weekend. I got to help a buddy out today, but president Joe Biden has been really talking about how do we use cyber weapons to retaliate. For instance, he gave a list of industries that Russia should not be. As though Putin himself is running all of these hacks or come out of Russia. Yeah, certainly there are some that are part of their military, but there many of them that are just bad guys that are trying to make some money, we should feel sorry for them. So Biden gives him this list and says, Hey, listen, if you attack any of these various industries or actually portions of our economy, We are going to retaliate. We have seen the us retaliate under President Trump and the retaliation. Of course he did all kinds of economic stuff to stop it. And much of which has been reversed by president Biden's administration, but also he attacked them directly in. Down some power systems there in the Moscow area, which I thought was really kinda cool. So kudos to President Trump for doing that and for president and Biden now to say, Hey, we are going to attack back. Of course. The biggest question is. What would we be attacking? How would we be attacking it? And for what reason, for instance, the red Chinese have gone after our office of personnel management, OPM records and got them all back in 2015. So they now know everything about everybody that had a secret security clearance or the took a paycheck from the federal government. All of those records, they would get their hands on them and get them on all of the records a lot. So Inglis was in front of the let's see here, the, yeah, he was a former director of the national security agency. He's the first to hold his Senate-confirmed position at the white house, this national cyber director position. And he says there is a sense that we can perhaps fire some cyber bullets and shoot our way out of this English set at the conference. It was hosted by the way, by the national security agency and a nonprofit group, he said that will be useful in certain circumstances. If you had a clear shot at a cyber aggressor and I can take them offline, I would advise that we do so as long as the collateral effects are acceptable. Yeah. What we have done here under president Biden administration is we have shut down some people who were operating illegally, we have shut down some cyber actors that were attacking us. So we've been doing that, but it isn't exactly. Wow. We just saw a muzzle flash over there. And so we are returning fire to the area of that muzzle flash, because as I've said many times before, we just don't know. Where in fact that bullet is coming from, it makes it a lot more difficult. English went on to say there's a larger set of initiatives that have to be undertaken. Not one of those elements is going to be sufficient to take this. Out let's see here, the us should make clear to Russia now their adversaries, what kinds of attacks would prompt a response, which is what president Biden did when he was talking with, of course, President Putin over there, red lines of both good and bad red lines are clear and crisp. Although I got to say many of our administrations have. Really done anything about it. It's the red line in the sand and Syria president Obama didn't do anything when they stepped over that red line. So yeah. And then with what we just finished doing in Afghanistan, where we drew a red line and said, we're going to protect all of you who helped us. And then we not only abandoned them, but we abandoned Americans behind there. I don't think a lot of people aren't going to believe us. So here's the last statement here. And again, this is an article in American military news from our cyber chief is the government actions. Aren't always going to be broadcast. In some cases, it's not helpful to broadcast those for all of mankind to see another one. We are doing some things behind the scenes. And I have certainly seen some of the results of those over the last few years. Stick around.  You're listening to Craig Peterson online@craigpeterson.com. You've got a smartphone and there are some new versions out, right? New hardware, new software, Android iOS. How long should you keep that device? How long can you stay safe with that older device? Apple has now done something. Different something they've never done before. One of the reasons that apple equipment tends to be safer than almost anything else out there is that they have, what's known as a closed ecosystem. There's arguments both directions here on whether that's safer or not. But the real advantage when it comes to cybersecurity is there are only. So many versions of the iPhone out there. What are we now in a couple of dozen versions of the hardware platform that makes it easier for apple to be able to support older versions of the software and multiple pieces of hardware, much easier than for, let's say Microsoft windows. It doesn't even have a single. Platform or Android, where there are hundreds of hardware platforms out there and tens of thousands of versions of the hardware, because one model phone can contain many. Changes different types of hardware to talk to the cell towers or the screen you name it. So it's very hard to keep up. Android has for quite a while now supported three versions of their operating system. Of course, we're talking about Google, but Android operating system. So they support the current release. Of Android and the Breviary release is two previous releases in fact of Android. Now that is frankly a pretty good thing to know, but there's over a billion Android devices out there that are no longer supported by security updates. We've got Android 10, nine, and eight that are fairly supported right now. We're actually up to Android 12. So here's how it works. If you've got Android version 10 out, if that's the main one, then you can continue to do. Eight and nine and get updates, security updates. But then here's the problem, everybody, those security updates are coming out of Google, but that does not mean that they are making it all the way to you. So there you go. It's one thing for Google to provide updates, but if you can't get them because your phone manufacturer is not supporting them, you've got trouble Samsung. Is probably the best company other than maybe Google and the Google Pixel phone. Samsung's the best company to go to. If you want some longer-term support. Many of these other companies just don't provide support past the current version. So keep that in mind as well. Android 12 was the 12th major version of Android announced by Google, February, 2021. And it is starting to roll out a Android. The 11th, 11 is the one that was out in February of last year. At least it was announced then. And we're, they're coming out, they're getting pushed out. So basically Google is saying the current version plus two prior versions. And that usually gives you about a four or maybe even a five year window. So if you're. An Android device from a major manufacturer, particularly Samsung on the Android side, your device is going to be good for at least four years, maybe five years now on the, and by the way, you don't necessarily have to upgrade the. You could be continuing to run an older release saw, as I mentioned earlier, if it version 11 is the current one that's out there being supported, which it is right. 12 is early still, but version 11, that means two prior versions still get security updates. You don't get featured. Dates, you don't get the new stuff, but you get security updates. So Android 11, the current one that means 10 and nine get security updates. So you don't, you're not being forced to do an upgrade. Most people don't upgrade their phones from an older major release to a newer major release. In other words, they don't try and go from Android eight to Android 11. Because in fact, most of the time, the hardware manufacturer doesn't support it. That's why there's over a billion Android devices out there right now that cannot get security updates. So have a look at your phone and your vendors. See what you're running. You probably want to do an update because most phones cannot get any support on the, in the apple side. Things are a lot different with Apple iOS, which is the operating system used on the iPhone and the I pad apple has always forced you to move to the next major version. No, they only force you to do that. If they support the hardware. And I've got to say kudos to them, they're still supporting the iPhone six S which came out quite a while. The iPhone success is something that my wife has been using and that I had as well. In fact, she got my old iPhone success, but that's a six-year-old. Phone came out in September of 2015. So it is still getting security updates, and we'll probably continue to get them. Not only is it getting security update this six-year-old iPhone success is getting the latest and our iOS operating system. It's getting iOS 15. Isn't that just amazing? Yeah, exactly. And so not just security updates, like you might get from some of the other vendors out there, Android vendors. So the apple keeps their arms around you for quite a while. Here's, what's changed now with Apple and iOS, the, for the first time ever in the iOS world, Apple is not forcing you to upgrade. So you're not being forced to upgrade to iOS 15. You can continue to run iOS 14. And that's how apples got around the security patches in the past, because what happens is you get the updates and installs them. Basically. There's no reason for you not to upgrade your phone. And so you do so apple never had to worry about releasing some of these fixes for really old versions of iOS. Although they have done that from time to time. In the Mac iOS side, Apple has done a couple of good things. The, where they always have supported basically three releases, what Google's doing with Android. So you now have a new feature. If you will, with iOS, here's a PSA for everyone. Public service announcement. You don't have to take the iOS 15 upgrade. Now I did. I put it on my iPhone and I seem to have some sort of a problem with messages where it's telling people that my phone has notifications turned off, which it does not. So I haven't figured that one out yet. I'll have to look into that a little bit more, but. This is nice because that means you're not going to have to upgrade your iPhone to iOS 15. You'll still get security updates for iOS 14, something Apple's never done before. We'll see if they continue this. We will see if they match Google going back. Three releases in Android. It just never been done before over on the iOS. So good news for them. Also course in the windows world and the Mac world, you really should upgrade the operating system as much as you can. Windows 11 though, man, windows 11. And I said this to my newsletter. I warned you guys is going to be a nightmare. For many people. You are not going to be able to do an automatic upgrade unless you have the newest of hardware, with the highest end of features, Craig peterson.com. One of the very big ransomware operations is back online. And now we have some inside information from one of the contractors working for this ransomware organization and oh yeah, there's an FBI tie, too.. This organization, ransomware gang, almost business, whatever you might want to describe them as is known as revolt. They have a few other names, but that's the really big one. And they are basically the 800 pound gorilla in the ransom. Business, you might be using cloud services right now. Maybe you use Microsoft's email service. Their Microsoft 360, I think, is what they call it now and use it for email and various other things pretty handy. It's mostly in the cloud. Computers you own or operate or have to maintain. I think that makes some sense too, but here's the bottom line it's software as a service right now, salesforce.com software as a service, Oracle has their accounting stuff. QuickBooks online, all software as a service. It isn't just those legitimate businesses that I just mentioned. That are using the cloud that are providing software as a service where you're paying monthly or however frequently. And you're getting this software as a service. That's what that means. Typically it means it's in the cloud and you don't have any real control over it. That's what this ransomware gang has been doing. This gang known as rebill. They all appear to be in. And there's some interesting stuff. That's come out. A transcript was released of an interview with one of their contractors. Now the original interview was in Russian. So I read through a translation of the Russian. I have no idea how good it is, but it is being quoted by a bank. Insider magazine that you might be familiar with bank info, security. That's one of the places that I follow. And there's a few interesting things that he talked about that I want to get into, but these are the people who have been behind things like the colonial pipeline attack and some of the other very large attacks, the way they work, their business model is. You can license their software, their ransomware software, and you go after a business or a government agency, whatever it might be, you get that ransomware software inside. And the reveal gang will take a percentage of the money that you have in rent. Now, how is that for a, an interesting business model, right? Taking something that the rest of the world has been using, and then take that model and put it into the legal side of the world. For three weeks, during this whole reveal ransomware attack, this summer turns out that the FBI secretly withheld the key that could have been used to decrypt. And computers that reveal had infected with ransomware and looks like kids up to maybe 1500 networks. Now those are networks, not just computers. That includes networks run by hospitals, schools, and businesses, including critical infrastructure businesses. The way the FBI got their hands on this decryption game. Is by penetrating reveal gangs servers. So they got into it. They were able to grab the keys and then the FBI waited before. Did anything with it. See, what they were trying to do is catch the people behind reveal. And so they didn't want to release information, get information out there to the press that might tip off those bad guys over there in Russia. And then shut down their operations. But as you might know, because I mentioned it here before the reveal gang went offline on July 13th, before the FBI could really track them down. And then the FBI didn't release the key until July 21st. And then I think it was Malwarebytes released a decryption tool. So if you had been hacked by the gang, you could. Now, remember it isn't reveal itself. That's doing most of them. Ransomware hacking if you will or a placement it's small guys. And that's why some people, including this contractor that apparently worked for the reveal gang itself says, people think that it's the Russian government, that it's Putin, that's doing this. He said, in fact, it's not it's small guys. And people like me are getting four or five hours a night. Because we're working so hard trying to make a whole of this work, come up with the new software approaches. We have to provide code tech support unquote to our affiliates, as well as tech support to the people who have had their computers and their data ransomed. So it a real interesting mix. Absolutely. Interesting mix. Now Christopher Ray here a couple of weeks ago, he's the FBI director told Congress that cool. We make these decisions as a group, not unilaterally. To the FBI and working with other government agencies, these are complex decisions designed to create maximum impact. And that takes time and going against adversaries, where we have to marshal resources, not just around the. But all over the world. So this Russian based gang first appeared in 2019, they've been around, they've been exporting large amounts of money from businesses for a very long time. One of the interest he'd things I think about all of this is that this reveal gang has their software as a service, and they provide it to quote affiliates, quote that, go ahead and then install the software, get you to install it on your computers in order to ransom you a double whammy ransom you, but there's now reports out there that there's a secret back door in the ransomwares code that allow. Rebill to go around their affiliates and steal the proceeds. How's that for hilarious, you've got a bad guy who goes in and gets the software from revolt, pays them a commission, and then reveal apparently has been jumping in on these customer support chats. In other words, you just got nailed and because you got nailed with ransomware, you have to go to. Chat room. And so you go in there and you're getting customer support on how to buy Bitcoin and how to transfer to their wallet. And apparently revival is getting right in the middle and is extorting money from these people directly instead of having the affiliates do it pretty amazing. So here's this part of this interview? It was aired on the Russian news outlet, London. And was trans translated by yeah. Flashpoint. Here are the guys that got the full transcript of the interview. He says in the normal world, I was called a contractor, doing some tasks for many ransomware collectives that journalists considered to be famous. Money is stolen or extorted with my hands, but I'm not ashamed of it. I do. And again, this goes into the thinking of many of these bad guys of Americans are all rich and they don't deserve what they have. He said, let's put it this way. This is a very time consuming job. And if you've earned enough, then you can quit the game. But chronic fatigue, burnout, deadline. All of these words from the life of ordinary office workers are also relevant for malware developers. So there you go. You should feel sorry for these malware developers who are developing software to steal millions from you and. Down our critical infrastructure. Hey, join me online. Craig peterson.com. And if you subscribe to my weekly newsletter right there on the site, I'll send you a few of my special reports. The most popular ones will come to you right there in your email box. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. We all pretty much have some form of insurance. And we're going to talk right now about the types of cyber insurance you may have. Now this might be through your homeowners policy or perhaps a rider on a business policy.  Many of our homeowners policies have started coming with cyber insurance. So we're going to talk about that. What is it? Businesses as well are also using cyber insurance and I'm sure you've heard of insurance basically called LifeLock and what that's all about. So let's kind of start. When we have a breach in a business, usually what happens is information about our customers is stolen. Look at some of the biggest breaches in history where we. Hundreds of millions of our personal records stolen Equifax breach is an example of a huge breach where we had all kinds of personal information that was stolen by the bad guys. Now, some of this information gets stale pretty quickly, but of course, other parts of it like our address, our social security number, they are probably not going to change for years. If for. No, of course our social security number will never change the social security administration. Just doesn't reissue them for very many reasons at all. And they do not reissue a social security number was stolen online because. Just about everybody's has, so what does a company like LifeLock do? They keep an eye on your credit report for you. And they're looking at what's going on new accounts that are open. They look at various other things, just related to that. And they, at that point say, wait a minute, something weird is happening. Now my credit cards, for instance, I have a credit card that if let's say I buy two of the same thing, one after the other and the, both the same price that credit card company pops a message right up on my phone saying, Hey, did you just buy two? Of these $15 things from and I can say yes or no, if I'm out on the road and I am purchasing gas, the credit card can pop up on my phone and it does and say, Hey, will you just trying to buy gas at this gas station? Because what'll happen as you use the credit card at the pump. And the pump says it was denied and then up at pops and yeah. Okay. No, that was me. And they said, okay, we'll try the transaction. Okay. And we'll approve it next time. And that's all automated. And that has nothing to do with LifeLock. LifeLock is there to more or less detect that something happened and if something happened and it was a bad guy and basically your identity was stolen. So they might be trying to buy a Ferrari in your name or maybe a 10 year old, four Ford focus, whatever it might be. And. They will help you try and clean it. That's what they do. So that's why it's cheap. And I don't know that it's terribly useful to you if you're really concerned. Go ahead and do that, but do keep an eye on your credit report. I do as well. My bank has free credit reporting for me, my credit card. Same thing. Free credit reporting that lets me know everything that's going on. So that's an easy way to tell WhatsApp. And there are different types of cyber insurance beyond this sort of thing, beyond the LifeLocks of the world. And many of us just get our cyber insurance through our homeowner's policy. It's a little rider. And businesses can buy cyber insurance as well. We have cyber insurance, that's underwritten by Lloyd's of London and we provide a $500,000 or million-dollar policy to our clients. As well, because that's what we do is cyber security, right? So the idea is if one of our clients gets hit, we have some insurance to back us up, but of course we go a lot further. It's almost like the LifeLock where if you do get hit by ransomware or something else, we will help you get back in business. We'll help restore your data. We'll help you with providing you. The information you need in order to do press releases, which agencies you need to contact, which of your customers you need to contact. And we've got scripts for all of that. So you can send it all out and just take care of it. So the idea is you don't want ransomware. So you hire us. We are extremely likely to keep ransomware out of your systems. And on top of that, if you are hit with ransomware, we restore everything. LifeLock does not do that. Obviously they all, I'll only do stuff after the fact and the cyber insurance you buy from an insurance agency is much the same, and there's a huge caveat with these policies that we're buying for our businesses and for our homes. And that is. They have a checklist at the insurance companies. Did you do this and this? And if you did, then they might payout if you did not, they may not payout. In fact, pay outs on cyber insurance policies are not known because. Bottom line. They really don't payout. Okay. I'm looking at some numbers right now and about paying ransoms and everything else. You may or may not. You got to have a look at it. Many of these policies are never paid out by the cyber insurance covers. They usually just regular insurance companies, but it's a special rider. And what they do is they say, Hey, listen, you did not follow the rules, so we're not going to payout. And there are many cases. If you go online and do a search, just use duck, go and say cyber insurance, payout. Lawsuits I'm doing that right now is. And it'll come up and show. Oh, okay. Does it cover lawsuits? Why are liability claims so costly? Yeah, exactly. A 2% payouts is talking about here. I'm invoicing, the most common cyber insurance claim denial. Yeah, it goes on and on. There are a lot is an act of war clause could nix cyber insurance payouts. That's another big one that they've tried to use. So the cyber insurance company will say, Hey, that was China attacking you. Therefore it was an act of. And you can bet if there is a big hack, they will use that. Think of what happens with the hurricanes coming onshore. How much do they push back on payouts? Especially with the real big one, it would bankrupt them. So we gotta be very careful. There are some different types of  cyber insurance. Policies do which have different types of coverages. You've got the first party lost loss, I should say. So that's you to covering you and your loss, your first-party expenses, third party liability. Each one of those has specific parameters. So sub-limit retention and others. First-party losses are usually including the loss of revenue due to business interruption. First party expenses would include all of the services and resources that you needed to use to recover from attack like forensic or system rebuilding services. These third-party liabilities. May cover expenses and legal fees related to potential damage caused by the incident to third parties like partners, customers, or employees whose sensitive information may have been compromised. So read them carefully. Be very careful. There are next-generation, cyber insurance policies are going even further and make these types of services. Prior to any incident to reduce exposures and prevent incidents in the first place. Now we don't provide insurance. We are not an insurance company, but that's basically what we're trying to do here. Not become an insurance company, but to make sure. The businesses have the right services so that the likelihood of anything happening or is extremely low. And then following up after the fact it's different obviously than insurers in and insurance, the guardians, Jessica Crispin had a great article about a couple of weeks ago that I've been hanging on. And it's talking about this tattle where that's been incorporated into the computers we're using at home. Now we're specifically talking about employers that are putting this. The software on computers, they belong to the companies. A lot of businesses are worried. If workers are at home or where we can't see them, how do we know that they're actually working, not watching Netflix or something else on. They have, of course, come up with software that can reassure your boss. It does things like take snapshots of what you're doing. Record your keystrokes grabs photos from. Picture from your camera. There's a new program called sneak, which makes your webcam take a photo of you about once a minute and makes available to the supervisor to prove you're not away from your desk. There's no warning in advance. It just takes that photograph catches your doom. Pretty much anything can be absolutely anything. Then, it's the type of thing you'd expect the national security agency to do. So there are some good reasons for this lack of trust because sometimes employees have not been doi

Nerds Amalgamated
Crazy Dr Who News, PC Affordability & New Solar Cells

Nerds Amalgamated

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 58:37


Rusty is coming back to Doctor Who. No, not that one. It's Russell T Davies, back to regenerate the greatest show on TV with his old production team. It remains to be seen whether he can recapture the magic, but the BBC must be desperate. Gaming PCs are incredibly rare, and they're likely to get even rarer. This means people will pay a massive premium, and that entry level parts don't really exist anymore. This makes us sad. Everyone should have the opportunity to build a PC and learn about electronics. Maybe in the post apocalyptic future there will be enough supply to meet demand. An Aussie team has created a significantly cheaper and easier to make solar panel that outperforms traditional panels. The sunniest place on Earth could really use some of those. They still need to scale up, but it's great to see Aussie scientists making huge strides. Doctor Who: A New Hope? - https://twitter.com/bbcdoctorwho/status/1441405833997217798 Affordable PCs are now a pipe dream- https://www.pcgamer.com/rip-cheap-graphics-cards/Tech Start Up makes new Solar Cell- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-21/australian-start-up-creates-world-s-most-efficient-solar-cell/100476152Other topics discussedBBC - 5 things the Doctor does in any worrying situation | @Doctor Who - BBC- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0ED6CGmjm4Russell T Davies (a Welsh screenwriter and television producer whose works include Queer as Folk, The Second Coming, Casanova, the 2005 revival of the BBC One science fiction franchise Doctor Who, Cucumber, Years and Years and It's a Sin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_T_DaviesTorchwood (a British science fiction television programme created by Russell T Davies. A spin-off of the 2005 revival of Doctor Who, it aired from 2006 to 2011.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TorchwoodBad Wolf (production company) (a British television production company founded by Julie Gardner and Jane Tranter in 2015, with its headquarters in Cardiff, Wales.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Wolf_(production_company)Olly Alexander set to be new Doctor Who as first gay actor to play Time Lord- https://www.thesun.co.uk/tv/15405348/olly-alexander-doctor-who-actor-gay/Ruth Clayton (a human identity assumed by the Fugitive Doctor, who hid on Earth using a Chameleon Arch.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Ruth_ClaytonJo Martin (Jo Martin played Ruth Clayton/Fugitive Doctor in the Doctor Who television stories Fugitive of the Judoon and The Timeless Children, alongside Jodie Whittaker's Thirteenth Doctor. She was the first non-white actor to be cast in the role of the Doctor in the DWU.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jo_MartinDoctor Who: actor Christopher Eccleston reveals he has anorexia- https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/49719101Christopher Eccleston is the Doctor!- https://www.bigfinish.com/news/v/christopher-eccleston-is-the-doctorMurray Gold (an English composer for stage, film, and television and a dramatist for both theatre and radio. He is best known as the musical director and composer of the music for Doctor Who from 2005, until he stepped down in 2018 after the tenth series aired in 2017. He has been nominated for five BAFTAs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_GoldDaleks and Cybermen- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCsXO7r6-z4Bob Baker (scriptwriter) (a British television and film writer. Baker and Martin devised for Doctor Who the robotic dog K-9 (created for The Invisible Enemy), the renegade Time Lord Omega (created for The Three Doctors, Doctor Who's 10th anniversary story) and the Axons. K-9 was originally intended to appear in one story only, but the BBC decided to make it a recurring character. )- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Baker_(scriptwriter)Elisabeth Sladen (an English actress. She became best known as Sarah Jane Smith in the British television series Doctor Who, appearing as a regular cast member from 1973 to 1976, alongside both Jon Pertwee and Tom Baker, and reprising the role many times in subsequent decades, both on Doctor Who and its spin-offs, K-9 and Company (1981) and The Sarah Jane Adventures (2007–2011).)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_SladenSarah Jane Smith (a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running BBC Television science fiction series Doctor Who and two of its spin-offs.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Jane_SmithThe Sarah Jane Adventures (In addition to Sladen, the first series of the programme stars Yasmin Paige as Maria Jackson, Sarah Jane's 13-year-old neighbour in Ealing, west London, and Tommy Knight as a boy named Luke, who is adopted by Sarah Jane at the conclusion of the introductory story.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sarah_Jane_Adventures#Cast_and_crewSadie Miller (an English actress and author. She is known for her portrayal of Natalie Redfern in the Sarah Jane Smith audio drama series by Big Finish, her novel, Moon Blink, from Candy Jar Books's series, Lethbridge-Stewart, as well as her association with the science fiction series, Doctor Who. She is the daughter of actors Brian Miller and Elisabeth Sladen.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadie_MillerSean Pertwee (the son of Jon Pertwee, who played the Third Doctor. He briefly appeared as himself in the 50th anniversary story The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Sean_PertweeJon Pertwee (played the Third Doctor from 1970 to 1974, beginning from Spearhead from Space to Planet of the Spiders.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Jon_PertweeGotham (TV series) (an American crime drama television series developed by Bruno Heller, produced by Warner Bros. Television and based on characters published by DC Comics and appearing in the Batman franchise, primarily those of James Gordon and Bruce Wayne.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotham_(TV_series)Showrunner Russell T. Davies wants a Doctor Who Cinematic Universe- https://winteriscoming.net/2021/01/25/doctor-who-cinematic-universe-russell-t-davies/The Day of the Doctor (a special episode of the British science fiction television programme Doctor Who, marking the programme's 50th anniversary.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_DoctorJourney's End (TV story) (Journey's End was the thirteenth and final episode of series 4 of Doctor Who. It was the final regular appearance of all the Tenth Doctor's companions, though they would all appear in cameos in The End of Time (barring Catherine Tate and Bernard Cribbins who prominently feature) to commemorate David Tennant's final story.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Journey%27s_End_(TV_story)Torchwood: Miracle Day (the fourth series of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, a spin-off from the long-running show Doctor Who.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Miracle_DayDay One (Torchwood) (the second episode of the first series of the British science fiction television series Torchwood. The episode centres on Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles) working her first case with the alien hunters Torchwood in Cardiff, when she lets loose a purple alien gas that survives on the energy of orgasms. Over the course of the episode, the team hunt for Carys before the gas kills her.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_One_(Torchwood)Everything Changes (Torchwood) (the first episode of the British science fiction television programme Torchwood, which was first broadcast on 22 October 2006. The story is told from the perspective of Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles), who comes across the Torchwood team through her job as a police officer with the South Wales Police, who are investigating a series of strange deaths in Cardiff.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everything_Changes_(Torchwood)Resurrection gauntlet (The resurrection gauntlet — also known as the resurrection glove or just the glove, and, jokingly, the risen mitten — was a metal gauntlet that had the ability to revive the dead for a limited time, though with unfortunate and usually deadly consequences.)- https://tardis.fandom.com/wiki/Resurrection_gauntletTorchwood: Children of Earth (Children of Earth is the banner title of the third series of the British television science fiction programme Torchwood, which broadcast for five episodes on BBC One from 6 to 10 July 2009.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torchwood:_Children_of_EarthRyzen (a brand of x86-64 microprocessors designed and marketed by Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) for desktop, mobile, server, and embedded platforms based on the Zen microarchitecture. It consists of central processing units (CPUs) marketed for mainstream, enthusiast, server, and workstation segments and accelerated processing units (APUs) marketed for mainstream and entry-level segments and embedded systems applications.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RyzenWhy is there a chip shortage?- https://www.bbc.com/news/business-58230388Nvidia sold $155 million in crypto mining chips last quarter, but PC gaming remains its biggest market- https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/26/nvidia-pc-gaming-still-more-important-than-crypto-for-revenue.htmlThe Life of a Miner - Crypto Mining Farm at Apartment | August 2021 Update- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB7NV7SR3bAChubbyemu - A Bitcoin Miner Heatstroked In His Sleep. This Is What Happened To His Organs.- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr8bp8a2QS4PCPartPicker - Asus Radeon RX 580 8 GB DUAL Video Card- https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/jkFXsY/asus-radeon-rx-580-8gb-dual-video-card-dual-rx580-o8g?history_days=730China's top regulators ban crypto trading and mining, sending bitcoin, rivals tumbling- https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-25/chinas-top-regulators-ban-crypto-trading-/100491122Chrome OS (a Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed by Google. It is derived from the free software Chromium OS and uses the Google Chrome web browser as its principal user interface. Unlike Chromium OS, Chrome OS is proprietary software.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrome_OSSolarCity (a publicly traded company headquartered in Fremont, California that sold and installed solar energy generation systems as well as other related products and services to residential, commercial and industrial customers.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SolarCityElon Musk's Battery Farm Has Been a Total Triumph. Here Comes the Sequel.- https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/green-tech/a34598095/elon-musk-battery-farm-sequel-australia-tesla-powerpack/Hornsdale Power Reserve (a 150MW/194MWh grid-connected energy storage system owned by Neoen co-located with the Hornsdale Wind Farm in the Mid North region of South Australia, also owned by Neoen. During 2017 Tesla, Inc. won the contract and built the Hornsdale Power Reserve, for a capital cost of A$90 million, leading to the colloquial Tesla big battery name.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_ReserveHornsdale Power Reserve (Elon Musk placed a wager that the battery would be completed within "100 days from contract signature", otherwise the battery would be free. Tesla had already begun construction, and some units were already operational by 29 September 2017, the time the grid contract was signed. The battery construction was completed and testing began on 25 November 2017. It was connected to the grid on 1 December 2017. The 63 days between grid contract and completion easily beat Musk's wager of "100 days from contract signature", which started when a grid connection agreement was signed with ElectraNet on 29 September 2017, 203 days after Musk's offer on 10 March (in Australia).- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsdale_Power_Reserve#ConstructionNorwich Games Festival - Ashens - Gallery of Shame - 1 June 2019- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFF9O73iwkoS.S. Antarctica (a battleship owned by the penguins of Antarctica.)- https://simpsonswiki.com/wiki/S.S._AntarcticaSS Penguin (a New Zealand inter-island ferry steamer that sank off Cape Terawhiti after striking a rock near the entrance to Wellington Harbour in poor weather on 12 February 1909.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_PenguinElden Ring (an upcoming action role-playing game developed by FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. The game is a collaborative effort between game director Hidetaka Miyazaki and fantasy novelist George R. R. Martin.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elden_RingBandai Namco Selects “My Dark Souls Story” Contest Winners- https://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2016/03/11/bandai-namco-selects-my-dark-souls-story-contest-winners.aspxNerdy, Inc. - My Dark Souls Story: Biography of the Chosen Undead - The Dark Souls Story- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbiLl-m0Ry4NASA's Mars Rover Curiosity Had Planetary Protection Slip-Up- https://www.space.com/13783-nasa-msl-curiosity-mars-rover-planetary-protection.htmlAmazon Women in the Mood (the first episode in season three of Futurama.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Women_in_the_MoodApocalypse Now (a 1979 American epic psychological war film directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne, Harrison Ford, and Dennis Hopper.)- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_NowCast Party: A Dungeons & Dragons Podcast (TNC podcast)- https://www.patreon.com/CastPartyShout Outs 20th September 2021 – Mick McGinty, Legendary Video Game Artist, passes away - https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2021/09/legendary_street_fighter_ii_artist_mick_mcginty_has_passed_away Mick McGinty, an artist that produced cover art for video games like Street Fighter II and Streets of Rage 2, has died. While many gamers might not know McGinty by name, those that grew up in the '90s will immediately recognize his art. The artist contributed some of the most iconic images in all of gaming, telling stories that immediately captivated players. McGinty was an immensely talented artist, as is evidenced by the impressive collection of work on his personal site, but for gamers of the '90s, his output will be almost synonymous with video game covers. He is perhaps most famous with Nintendo fans for creating the western cover artwork for the SNES version of Street Fighter II. While many people took issue with the 'westernisation' of the artwork at the time, it was very common practice for companies like Nintendo to commission entirely new artwork which was better suited to a particular region. McGinty's cover – which features Chun-Li fighting Blanka over the prone body of Ryu – has gone down as one of the most recognisable video game covers of all time. McGinty's association with Street Fighter would continue with Street Fighter II: Champion Edition on the Mega Drive / Genesis, Street Fighter II Turbo on the SNES and Super Street Fighter II.21st September 2021 – Endangered South African penguins killed by swarm of bees near Cape Town - https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58622482Sixty-three endangered African penguins have been killed by a swarm of bees in a rare occurrence near Cape Town, bird conservationists in South Africa say. The protected birds, from a colony in Simonstown, were found on the shore with multiple bee-stings. They had no other physical injuries. National parks officials told the BBC this was the first known attack at the world-famous Boulders Beach, which attracts up to 60,000 visitors a year. "Usually the penguins and bees co-exist," said Dr Alison Kock, a marine biologist with South Africa's national parks agency (SANParks). "The bees don't sting unless provoked - we are working on the assumption that a nest or hive in the area was disturbed and caused a mass of bees to flee the nest, swarm and became aggressive," she added. "Unfortunately the bees encountered a group of penguins on their flight path." Post-mortems found that the birds had been stung around the eyes and on their flippers. That is because "those are the parts that are not covered by feathers," Dr Katta Ludynia, from the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (Sanccob), told the BBC. Penguins have pink sweat glands around their eyes and "that area is particularly thin - similar to human fingers," explained Shanet Rutgers, senior penguin keeper at Cape Town's Two Oceans Aquarium. One of the penguins had been stung 27 times. African penguins are distinctive for their small size, and live on the coast and islands of South Africa and Namibia - though some have been spotted as far north as Gabon.Their populations are rapidly declining, the International Union for Conservation of Nature says. The national body said in a statement on Sunday that it was still conducting toxicity and disease checks on the birds, and would continue to monitor the situation.22nd September 2021 – 10th Anniversary of Dark Souls - https://www.glitched.online/landmark-rpg-dark-souls-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary-today/ Ten years ago to the day, Japanese video game developer From Software released the critically acclaimed dark fantasy action RPG, Dark Souls, which would go on to change the gaming landscape forever. Refining the formula already established in Demon's Souls while introducing a bevy of new mechanics that have been adopted and replicated by other titles, Dark Souls would spearhead an entirely new sub-genre of gaming. Today, Dark Souls officially celebrates its 10th anniversary. Dark Souls‘ history is relatively straightforward in comparison to many other success stories in gaming. From Software first dabbled in the dark fantasy setting with Demon's Souls, showcasing their ability to tell epic but narratively mysterious tales featuring fantastical beasts, ambiguous NPCs and deceptively challenging gameplay. The last part has remained the foundation of all From Software games since, increasing their difficulty in newer titles like Bloodborne and Sekiro while still retaining their creative power for captivating and immersive stories, worlds and characters. Dark Souls was well-received by fans, often cited as their favourite game of all time. It's success went on to spawn two sequels, Dark Souls II and Dark Souls III; two creative spiritual successors in Bloodborne and the upcoming Elden Ring; and a Tenchu-styled action title Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice that heavily borrowed elements from From Software's trademark style. Demon's Souls may have been the first, but it was really Dark Souls that put the Japanese studio on the map, leaving behind a legacy that has been the source of inspiration for a number of games like the Nioh series, The Surge, Lords of the Fallen, Mortal Shell, and numerous others. Dark Souls is not only remembered for its staple difficulty, but inspired world design, creative boss encounters, a plot that simply begged to be dissected and explored further, and a blueprint for a new style of game that bounced off the success of this defining RPG.24th September 2021 – 20th anniversary of Ico - https://www.nme.com/en_au/features/gaming-features/ico-minimalist-masterclass-in-cinematic-and-emotional-storytelling-3051674 Released between those two films in 2001 and 2002, Ico (pronounced ‘ee-ko' – but don't worry if you get it wrong, I did so too for a very long time) is a single-player action-adventure game developed by Sony's Japan Studio. This game kicked off the career of Fumito Ueda. It was the first in a series of games that featured similar themes, including beloved titles like Shadow of the Colossus and The Last Guardian. Ico is special in the way it handles abandonment and isolation. Devoid almost entirely of all dialogue, Ico essentially works like a silent film. There's a clear sense of loneliness that's present throughout the entire game. But there's also a feeling of hope. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. Ico's soundtrack is almost suffocating at times, though it also presents a number of beautiful pieces. “Heal,” for example, is one of the best save themes in any game. One of the game's fans is also Hidetaka Miyazaki of FROM Software. Miyazaki, the creator of Demon's Souls, and in turn the Souls series, is one of the biggest game industry figures of the last decade. Much in the way the game would inspire Straley and Druckmann, Miyazaki cites Ico as a game that showed him the different possibilities that video games as a medium had to offer.Remembrances21st September 1954 – Mikimoto Kōkichi - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikimoto_K%C5%8DkichiA Japanese entrepreneur who is credited with creating the first cultured pearl and subsequently starting the cultured pearl industry with the establishment of his luxury pearl company Mikimoto. He was inducted into the house of peers by imperial decree and posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure. On April 18, 1985, the Japan Patent Office selected him as one of Ten Japanese Great Inventors. The company was ranked as one of the world's most luxurious brands by Women's Wear Daily Magazine and Mikimoto was considered one of the best Japanese financial leaders of the 20th century by Nihon Keizai Shimbun. He is also known as the founder of Mikimoto Pharmaceuticals, a company specialising in beauty products containing pearl calcium. Mikimoto Pearl Island is named after him. In addition, the "Phoenix Mikimoto Crown" used by Miss Universe winners as well as the pageant crown used by Miss International is credited to his patented work. Mikimoto began his search of an alternative method to produce pearls as the chairman of the Shima Marine Products Improvement Association. At this point the demand for pearls had severely outweighed the supply, prompting the consideration of an effort to protect the oysters. In 1888, Mikimoto obtained a loan to start his first pearl oyster farm at the Shinmei inlet on Ago Bay in Mie prefecture with his wife and partner Ume. On 11 July 1893, after many failures and near bankruptcy, he was able to create the hemispherical cultured pearls. The pearls were made by seeding the oyster with a small amount of mother of pearl. In 1927, Mikimoto met with inventor, Thomas Edison, who was in awe of Mikimoto's cultured pearls as it was "supposed to be biologically impossible". He died at the age of 96 in Japan.Famous Birthdays21st September 1902 – Allen Lane - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_LaneA British publisher who together with his brothers Richard and John Lane founded Penguin Books in 1935, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market. In 1967 he started a hardback imprint under his own name, Allen Lane. He rose quickly at Bodley Head, becoming managing editor in 1925 following the death of his uncle. After conflict with the board of directors who were wary at first—for fear of being prosecuted—of publishing James Joyce's controversial book Ulysses, Lane, together with his brothers Richard and John, founded Penguin Books in 1935 as part of the Bodley Head. Penguin Books became a separate company the following year. The legend goes that on a train journey back from visiting Agatha Christie in 1934, Lane found himself on an Exeter station platform with nothing available worth reading. He conceived of paperback editions of literature of proven quality which would be cheap enough to be sold from a vending machine; the first was set up outside Henderson's in Charing Cross Road and dubbed the "Penguincubator". Lane was also well aware of the Hamburg publisher Albatross Books and adopted many of its innovations. Most booksellers and authors were against the idea of paperbacks. They believed that paperbacks would result in individuals spending less money on books. Lane was a person that was very stubborn when it came to his company. He operated mainly on intuition and imagination. "He thrived in an atmosphere of crisis and came most fully alive under the challenge of great dilemmas." He was a creative genius that once he had an idea he would not stop until it came to fruition. Once he decided on creating paperbacks he set about in deciding what the books should look like and finding a name. He had decided that the books would be reprints so he also needed to approach other publishers to see if they and their authors would be willing to sublease the rights of the books. He was quoted as saying, "I have never been able to understand why cheap books should not also be well designed, for good design is no more expensive than bad." He was born in Bristol.Events of Interest21th September 2003 – The Galileo spacecraft is terminated by sending it into Jupiter's atmosphere. - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_project#End_of_mission_and_deorbit When the exploration of Mars was being considered in the early 1960s, Carl Sagan and Sidney Coleman produced a paper concerning contamination of the red planet. In order that scientists could determine whether or not native life forms existed before the planet became contaminated by micro-organisms from Earth, they proposed that space missions should aim at a 99.9 percent chance that contamination should not occur. This figure was adopted by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unions in 1964, and was subsequently applied to all planetary probes. The danger was highlighted in 1969 when the Apollo 12 astronauts returned components of the Surveyor 3 spacecraft that had landed on the Moon three years before, and it was found that microbes were still viable even after three years in that harsh climate. An alternative was the Prime Directive, a philosophy of non-interference with alien life forms enunciated by the original Star Trek television series that prioritized the interests of the life forms over those of scientists. Given the (admittedly slim) prospect of life on Europa, scientists Richard Greenberg and Randall Tufts proposed that a new standard be set of no greater chance of contamination that that which might occur naturally by meteorites. Galileo had not been sterilized prior to launch and could have carried bacteria from Earth. Therefore, a plan was formulated to send the probe directly into Jupiter, in an intentional crash to eliminate the possibility of an impact with Jupiter's moons, particularly Europa, and prevent a forward contamination. On April 14, 2003, Galileo reached its greatest orbital distance from Jupiter for the entire mission since orbital insertion, 26 million km (16 million mi), before plunging back towards the gas giant for its final impact. At the completion of J35, its final orbit around the Jovian system, Galileo impacted Jupiter in darkness just south of the equator on September 21, 2003, at 18:57 UTC. Its impact speed was approximately 48.26 km/s (29.99 mi/s).21st September 1994 – Dinosaur Island premiered in Japan - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109627/ On this day in 1994 in Japan, Dinosaur Island enjoyed its premiere on home video. The Fantasy/Comedy feature starred Griffin Drew and Michelle Bauer, and here's the premise: "An army captain is flying three misfit deserters home for a court martial when the plane has engine trouble and they must land on an uncharted island. There they find a primitive society of cave women who routinely sacrifice virgins to appease The Great One, the top dog dinosaur on the the island. Mistaken for gods, the men must destroy The Great One or face death, but meanwhile they fall in love."The cavewomen's ranch was constructed on a remote portion of David Carradine's ranch.Shot in 12 days.Almost every day was extremely hot during the shooting of this film except one.A sequence with a stop-motion animation dinosaur attacking people on the beach was changed to a hand puppet dinosaur in post-production.The filmmakers paid an additional four thousand dollars for the poster art used to advertise this film.Antonia Dorian said she was nervous filming her first love scene in this film, especially since she was going to be topless. She'd danced topless in Vegas shows and in videos, but that wasn't the same as being on a small set surrounded by male actors and crew just a few feet away, all staring at her. Jim Wynorski gave her wine to calm her nerves. He also limited how many people would be on set. That and the wine helped her finally get through the scene.When the female warriors are chasing the dinosaur towards the ocean, you can see Malibu homes in the background hills.Wynorski said that Roger Corman asked he and Fred Olen Ray to make the film after Jurassic Park came out. "It wasn't so much a Jurassic Park rip off as a cavewoman movie", Wynorski said.Wynorski and Ray said they rewrote the script entirely. They knew who they were going to cast, employing actors they had worked with before, and tailored the script accordingly. They based the characters of the soldiers on characters in Stripes. Another influence was The War that Time Forgot, part of the Star Spangled War Stories comic book series.The movie was shot at Vasquez Rocks and David Carradine's ranch at Sun Valley over ten days. Wynorski says he and Ray made it "on a wing and a prayer".Wynorski later said, "I'd never co-directed a movie before, but it was smooth sailing all the way. When one of us got tired, the other would take over. I'd usually go back to the comfort of the air-conditioned motor home and hang out with the girls. You really can't beat that."Wynorski says he was at a party when he met Joe Pesci who told him he loved the film, saying "everytime I watch it I feel like I want to go there."IntroArtist – Goblins from MarsSong Title – Super Mario - Overworld Theme (GFM Trap Remix)Song Link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GNMe6kF0j0&index=4&list=PLHmTsVREU3Ar1AJWkimkl6Pux3R5PB-QJFollow us onFacebook- Page - https://www.facebook.com/NerdsAmalgamated/- Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/440485136816406/Twitter - https://twitter.com/NAmalgamatedSpotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/6Nux69rftdBeeEXwD8GXrSiTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/top-shelf-nerds/id1347661094Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/nerds_amalgamated/Email - Nerds.Amalgamated@gmail.comSupport via Podhero- https://podhero.com/podcast/449127/nerds-amalgamated See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

time tv women google australia new zealand japanese japan television events california american national shot earth war queer lords english doctors south africa las vegas mars star trek space moon british europa shadow hamburg batman dc comics nintendo demon galileo folk nature bbc fremont conservation harrison ford warner bros planet sony stripes african thomas edison francis ford coppola released fallen jurassic park software tesla henderson rage agatha christie souls futurama musk mood streets wales rusty antarctica davies rpg casanova spiders south australia malibu sin zen dennis hopper apollo aussie david tennant exeter miyazaki baftas shame james gordon dark souls bloodborne street fighter colossus bbc one sequels ulysses torchwood sarah jane smith sladen cybermen pc carl sagan welsh jupiter international union catherine tate heal marlon brando penguin books committee namibia roger corman richard greenberg cardiff snes spearhead bruce wayne jodie whittaker torchwood children ryu star spangled war stories cape town james joyce affordability fall in love ealing penguins robert duvall ico gotham tv street fighter ii blanka dark souls ii martin sheen solar cells laurence fishburne amazon women david carradine julie gardner tenth doctor russell t davies prime directive john lane brian miller miss universe doctors reboot time lord charing cross road carys npcs second coming sun valley big finish surge thirteenth doctor third doctor judoon elisabeth sladen bad wolf christopher eccleston tom baker jon pertwee sarah jane adventures sarah jane torchwood miracle day bernard cribbins time forgot lethbridge stewart fugitive ume bob baker cucumbers michelle bauer fred olen ray sekiro joe pesci jim wynorski utc google chrome international council great one chun li albert hall mistaken surveyor bruno heller axons miss international refining bbc television gabon vasquez rocks devoid neoen cpus chrome os mcginty jovian apus sekiro shadows die twice amalgamated nioh hidetaka miyazaki dinosaur island last guardian dark souls iii bandai namco entertainment fumito ueda three doctors fantasy comedy allen lane mega drive genesis olly alexander wynorski gaming pcs mid north tenchu gentoo linux elden ring george r super street fighter ii japan studio simonstown two oceans aquarium chromium os invisible enemy mortal shell podhero
TecWord
Como ativar o Tema Escuro na primeira tela do Google Chrome na web

TecWord

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 2:58


Como ativar o Tema Escuro na primeira tela do Google Chrome na web Confira como ativar o Tema Escuro na primeira página do Chrome, quando o navegador web do Google é aberto. Artigo: https://bit.ly/3ANrCia ========================================================== Siga o TecWord nas Redes Sociais Siga no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tecword.com.br Siga no Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tecword.com.br Siga no LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tecwordcombr Siga no twitter: https://twitter.com/tecwordcombr Siga no PInterest: https://br.pinterest.com/tecwordcombr Siga no YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/TecWordtecwordcombr Siga no Dailymotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/tecwordcombr Grupo no Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TecWord ========================================================== Email de contato: contato@tecword.com.br ========================================================== #Google #GoogleChrome #GoogleChromeTemaEscuro #GoogleChromeModoEscuro #ModoEscuro #TemaEscuro --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tecwordcombr/support

The Computer Tutor
How to do a Safety Check using Chrome

The Computer Tutor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 6:29


Did you know that Google Chrome can run a quick Safety Check on your computer? Here's how to do it.   Open Chrome, and click the 3 dots in the top right, and choose Settings. Then, scroll down to the Safety Check session and click on “Check now”. Chrome will take a few seconds and check for: Is Chrome up [...] Read more » The post How to do a Safety Check using Chrome first appeared on The Computer Tutor.Download Ashford for WordPress

The Full-Time FBA Show - Amazon Reseller Strategies & Stories
103 - Top Google Chome Extensions for Amazon Sellers

The Full-Time FBA Show - Amazon Reseller Strategies & Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 14:15


Google Chrome, in our opinion, is the best browser for doing online arbitrage or wholesale sourcing because extensions for Chrome are so widely available. Today on the show, we are going to be talking about the top Google Chrome extensions for Amazon sellers. These are going to be some amazing tools that you're going to want to check out and see if they could be helpful for you in your FBA business. Join us as we share some of our go-to Chrome extensions, including some that are free, some that are paid, and another that has a free and paid options. These are the Chrome extensions that have helped us most and can help you too!

WhatCulture Gaming
10 Rarest Video Game Endings NOBODY Unlocked - The Evil Within! Mass Effect 2! Hollow Knight! Google's Dinosaur Game?!

WhatCulture Gaming

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 11:22


From Silent Hill to Google Chrome and back again. Jess McDonell presents the 10 Rarest Video Game Endings NOBODY Unlocked... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Productivity Tip of the Day
91 | Manage Your Tabs with One-Tab

Productivity Tip of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 4:18


Manage your Tabs with One-Tab Use One-Tab to help manage and organize all your browser tabs. It works great for Google Chrome as well as many other browsers. Once you have downloaded the extension, click on the blue funnel symbol to capture all the open tabs. You can name, lock and reorganize each group of tabs as needed. This system works great when you need to continue a project or research from where you left off. For more productivity tips on tools like this, you'll want to check Workflow Wonder, my signature program on Maven linked below. It's interactive, it's live and you walk away with implementing all of these productivity workflows into your daily routines. https://maven.com/workflowwonder/workflowwonder --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/productivitytip/message

Views on Vue
Deep Dive into Nuxt with Mike Gallagher - VUE 164

Views on Vue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:27


Lindsay and Steve talk to Mike Gallagher, Software Architect at Hip eCommerce, about his blog post exploring server-side rendering and how Nuxt functions under the hood. They explore Mike's specific use case of needing to manage routing on the client, rather than the server, and how he was able to find a solution. They also discuss how Mike approaches difficult problems like this, and how he determines the next steps to find a solution. They explore some of the intricate details of Nuxt, including how Mike's company handles caching with Nuxt and other production use cases. Panel Lindsay Wardell Steve Edwards Guest Mike Gallagher Sponsors Dev Influencers Accelerator Level Up | Devchat.tv PodcastBootcamp.io Links Server-side rendering and the journey to the center of Nuxt.js GitHub | mikeapr4/vue-backbone Awesome Nuxt Modules  Plugins directory - NUXTJS Tracing or Debugging Vue.js Reactivity: The computed tree GitHub | GoogleChrome/rendertron GitHub | lindsaykwardell/nuxt-github-api Agility CMS Hip eCommerce Michael Gallagher - Medium LinkedIn: Michael Gallagher GitHub: Michael Gallagher ( mikeapr4 ) Picks Lindsay- GitHub | nuxt-community/module-template Lindsay- vitejs/awesome-vite Lindsay- Nuxt Nation Conference Mike- AST Explorer Steve- standup.trex - Instagram Steve- dadjokesallday - Instragram Steve- Failed Comedian Becomes Pastor Contact Lindsay: Twitter: Lindsay Wardell ( @lindsaykwardell ) Contact Steve: Twitter: Steve Edwards ( @wonder95 ) GitHub: Steve Edwards ( wonder95 ) LinkedIn: Steve Edwards

Views on Vue
Deep Dive into Nuxt with Mike Gallagher - VUE 164

Views on Vue

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 56:27


Lindsay and Steve talk to Mike Gallagher, Software Architect at Hip eCommerce, about his blog post exploring server-side rendering and how Nuxt functions under the hood. They explore Mike's specific use case of needing to manage routing on the client, rather than the server, and how he was able to find a solution. They also discuss how Mike approaches difficult problems like this, and how he determines the next steps to find a solution. They explore some of the intricate details of Nuxt, including how Mike's company handles caching with Nuxt and other production use cases. Panel Lindsay WardellSteve Edwards Guest Mike Gallagher Sponsors Dev Influencers AcceleratorLevel Up | Devchat.tvPodcastBootcamp.io Links Server-side rendering and the journey to the center of Nuxt.jsGitHub | mikeapr4/vue-backboneAwesome Nuxt Modules Plugins directory - NUXTJSTracing or Debugging Vue.js Reactivity: The computed treeGitHub | GoogleChrome/rendertronGitHub | lindsaykwardell/nuxt-github-apiAgility CMSHip eCommerceMichael Gallagher - MediumLinkedIn: Michael GallagherGitHub: Michael Gallagher ( mikeapr4 ) Picks Lindsay- GitHub | nuxt-community/module-templateLindsay- vitejs/awesome-viteLindsay- Nuxt Nation ConferenceMike- AST ExplorerSteve- standup.trex - InstagramSteve- dadjokesallday - InstragramSteve- Failed Comedian Becomes Pastor Contact Lindsay: Twitter: Lindsay Wardell ( @lindsaykwardell ) Contact Steve: Twitter: Steve Edwards ( @wonder95 )GitHub: Steve Edwards ( wonder95 )LinkedIn: Steve Edwards Special Guest: Mike Gallagher.

The CyberWire
A Google Chrome update that just didn't feel right. [Research Saturday]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 20:29


Guest Jon Hencinski from Expel joins Dave Bittner to discuss his team's recent work on "Expel SOC Stops Ransomware Attack Aimed at WordPress CMS via Drive-By Download Disguised as Google Chrome Update." In July, 2021, Expel's SOC stopped a ransomware attack at a large software and staffing company. The attackers compromised the company's WordPress CMS and used the SocGholish framework to trigger a drive-by download of a Remote Access Tool (RAT) disguised as a Google Chrome update. In total, four hosts downloaded a malicious Zipped JScript file that was configured to deploy a RAT, but we were able to stop the attack before ransomware deployment and help the organization remediate its WordPress CMS. Jons walk us through what happened, how they caught it, and provide recommendations on how to secure your WordPress CMS.  The research can be found here: Expel SOC Stops Ransomware Attack Aimed at WordPress CMS via Drive-By Download Disguised as Google Chrome Update

Research Saturday
A Google Chrome update that just didn't feel right.

Research Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 20:29


Guest Jon Hencinski from Expel joins Dave Bittner to discuss his team's recent work on "Expel SOC Stops Ransomware Attack Aimed at WordPress CMS via Drive-By Download Disguised as Google Chrome Update." In July, 2021, Expel's SOC stopped a ransomware attack at a large software and staffing company. The attackers compromised the company's WordPress CMS and used the SocGholish framework to trigger a drive-by download of a Remote Access Tool (RAT) disguised as a Google Chrome update. In total, four hosts downloaded a malicious Zipped JScript file that was configured to deploy a RAT, but we were able to stop the attack before ransomware deployment and help the organization remediate its WordPress CMS. Jon will walk us through what happened, how they caught it, and provide recommendations on how to secure your WordPress CMS.  The research can be found here: Expel SOC Stops Ransomware Attack Aimed at WordPress CMS via Drive-By Download Disguised as Google Chrome Update

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Do You Know How to Identify a Fake Web Page? - Whole Show

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 81:44


Do You Know How to Identify a Fake Web Page? The FBI's reporting that more than 70% of all business hacks are because of our employees. They're clicking on emails, they're going to websites, what can we do? How do we know if a website is legitimate or not? [Automated transcript] [00:00:19] There's a great little article that McAfee published now, McAfee is a company that's been in the cybersecurity business for quite a while. [00:00:28] I do not use their products. I use some competing products. I have not been impressed with their products. [00:00:35] Let me tell you this particular web post that they put up is fantastic and you'll see it in my newsletter this week. Make sure you get that. [00:00:45] Have you ever come across a website that didn't look quite right if you haven't, you haven't been on the internet very much because whether you're an individual at home or you are in a business environment, we are likely going to end up on websites that are not legitimate. Sometimes we'll see these things, that company logo might be wrong. There's not enough information on the page. You've been there before and this looks down page. The odds are that you were on a hack site, a site that's trying to get you to do something most of the time when you end up on these sites, they're trying to get you to put in your username and password. [00:01:31] Already that the bad guys have stolen your username and password from so many websites out there. So why would they try and do it this way? It's because if they're pretending to be your bank and you try and log in, They know this as your bank account, and many times they immediately try and get into your bank account or your phone account, whatever it might be. [00:01:56] This is a very long-standing tactic that's relied on by hackers everywhere. Usually it's a knockoff of a real page. They'll take it and they will recreate it. Then it's easy to do if you're in a web browser right now, when you go to your bank's website. You can just go to file, save as, and go ahead and save the entire webpage and you'll get everything. [00:02:23] You'll get all of the links that are on there. All of the graphics that are there, it'll pull it in for you all automatically. And that's all they do. That's what they use. Just a copy. How do they get in front of you in the first place? Typically the hackers will go ahead and send a phishing email. [00:02:43] They'll make the email sound legitimate. They'll make it look legitimate. They'll often even use a URL that looks a lot like it. B the real banks email. I've seen it before where the URL is bank of america.safe site.com. That sort of a thing. I'm not blaming safe site. They could be a great company. [00:03:04] I don't know. I just made it up as we're going, but that type of a URL where it's not really bank of america.com or it's a misspelling of bank of America, that's the sort of thing that gets to be pretty darn common and. Clicking on that link and then submitting your information. It hasn't been leading to credit card fraud, data extraction, wire transfers, identity theft, and a whole lot more. [00:03:34] Now with the COVID relief, that's been out there. All of these things from filing for unemployment claims through filing for PPP protection as a business, the whole. Industry has changed. I'm talking about the hacker industry here, because there are so many people who are falling for these scams and ransomware as well has gone up over 300%. [00:04:08] It's just absolutely amazing. Now, if you go online and you duck, duck, go. Fake login pages. And for those of you who don't know what I mean by that duck go is the search engine I've been recommending lately. It is a search engine that doesn't take politics into play like Google does. And it also does not track you. [00:04:31] And what you're looking at it is ad based. It gets its revenue from advertisement, but it's not selling your information just on the basic search. That you're doing. I think it's a very good alternative, but if you go ahead and your search for fake login pages, you're going to find thousands of guides on how to create websites. [00:04:53] And these bad guys can create these websites in absolutely no time at all. It just a minute or two in order to make one of them. Now it can be difficult nowadays to figure out if it's a fake site, because the, again, the hackers are constantly updating their techniques to be more sophisticated. So it's made it more difficult for consumers to really recognize when something's fraudulent. [00:05:22] Now I want to get it into a psychological term. In attentional, blindness. You've probably heard of this. I remember this from, I think it was college days for me, so a very long time ago, but there's a study that was done on inattentional blindness called the invisible gorilla test. If you go right now online and just search for invisible gorilla test, you'll see a bunch of these coming. [00:05:52] No, there's even a book called that the invisible gorilla test that came out about 11 years ago, 12 years ago, I think. But here's the bottom line on this? They tell you to do something in this study. What they did here is there's a video. People there's six people, three of them are dressed with white shirts and three of them have black shirts and they're passing basketballs back and forth. [00:06:20] The white shirts are only passing to the white shirts and the black shirts under the black shirts. And what they ask you to do is count the number of times the team in white past. Now, you're sitting there watching, knowing they're going to try and fool you, you're paying a whole lot of attention to it. [00:06:40] And then at the end, they ask you a question that may be not expecting the video. I just watched on this, that was called the monkey business. Illusion is the name of this. I counted and I counted carefully and I came up with 16 passes. So the monkey business, illusion, 16 times the people in the white shirts passed the basketball back and forth. [00:07:06] So I got that. But then they said did you notice the person in the gorilla costs? Who walked through the game. He didn't just walk through the game, walked in, beat on this chest and then walked out of the game. If you didn't know about this and okay. In chorus, all honesty, I always try and put everything upfront here. [00:07:29] I knew about it beforehand. I remember from college days. But eight, most people actually about 50% of people who did not know, there is a gorilla in the middle of this. Would not have noticed the gorilla walking through the game, but this monkey business illusion video, there's something else too. [00:07:52] And I've got to admit, I did not notice that. And that is the curtain color change. From red to gold, this curtain that was in the background of all of these players. And I didn't notice one other thing. I'm not going to tell you what that is. You'll have to watch the video of yourself too, to figure that out again, just go online and search for the monkey business illusion. [00:08:19] And I think you'll find it. So the reason I brought this up is because if you come across a well forged login page and you're not actively looking for signs of fraud, you're fairly likely to miss a cybercriminals gorilla. You're likely to miss that the logo's not quite right, or the placement isn't the same as I'm used to. [00:08:45] Because you're focused in, on doing what you're supposed to be doing. It's the whole concept as well of have tunnel vision. And I'm sure you're aware of that. We've all had that before, where we're really focused on this one little thing and we don't notice everything else going on. It particularly happens in high stress times. [00:09:08] So how do you steer clear of the fake login pages? We're going to talk about that when we get. But it's absolutely crucial for everyone, even if you've had phishing training and you are trying to be cautious, you could fall for this invisible gorilla and enter in your personal details, not something that you really want. [00:09:36] Hopefully you guys got my newsletter last weekend. I got a lot of comments on it. People are saving. In fact, that's the first thing I said in this email last week is don't lose this because it went through point by point on about 10 different things that you should be doing too. Yourself and your business safe during the holidays. [00:10:03] Now, of course we had labor day coming up. We're going to have more holidays, right? There's always more holidays in the future and less it's after the first of the year, then you got to wait a long time. Make sure you get it, make sure you dig it out. If he didn't notice it just search for me@craigpeterson.com. [00:10:23] That's where the email comes from and have a look at that. I have links on how to do all of those things. It's very important. FBI warning out just last week. [00:10:33] I just told you about one of the biggest problems we are facing right now, when it comes to hackers and then has to do with fishing and going to fake login pages. Now I'm going to tell you exactly what to do. [00:10:47] How do you steer clear of these fake log-in pages and how do you protect yourself in case you accidentally do provide the bad guys with the information that you shouldn't have? [00:11:01] If they've got your email address or your login name and they have your password, it's pretty easy for them to log in. In most cases right into your bank account. So first of all, don't fall for phishing, but as we just described because of this whole inattentional blindness that we have, it's easy enough to fall, pray for this. [00:11:28] Beat yourself up too bad if you followed, if you fell for some of that stuff, but there is a great little website the Google has that you might want to check out. And that website gives you a real quick quiz, is the best way to. And it shows you some emails and you get to determine whether or not you think it's fishing and then it tells you what the reality of it is. [00:11:59] So go to fishing quiz. Dot with google.com. If you miss that, you can always email me M e@craigpeterson.com and I'll send it off to, but phishing quiz dot with google.com. And of course, phishing is spelled P H I S H I N G fishing. Dot with google.com. So you can go there and right there on the screen, it says, take the quiz. [00:12:30] You can hit it and make up a name and an email address. So it doesn't have to be your real name or your real email address. Okay. It's not going to send you anything. It's not going to sign you up for stuff. It just wants to use it in. Phishing email examples. That's going to give you, so I put in a fake name and a fake email address and it is showing me an email. [00:13:00] So to me, from a Luke, John. And it says Luke Johnson shared a link to the following document, Tony 21 budget department dot doc. So if I click on that, I have now told them, Hey, I'm open to all that sort of stuff. It's so anyways, it's got the link and it's got the opening docs and you now up above say, is this phishing or is it. [00:13:27] Legitimate. Okay. So if we say fishing that says, correct, this is a phishing email. You might have spotted the look alike, you are out. And that is indeed exactly what it is cause it it wasn't legitimate. And remember when you mouse over a link, you can see down at the bottom. The URL that is going to open up for you. [00:13:51] So you can just go through this at your own speed at your own pace and figure it out again. If you didn't get that, you can always email me M E ed Craig peterson.com. And I'll be glad to get back to you. So that's a good way to learn about fishing. I want to con really warn, I should say businesses. If you are sending out phishing emails to your employees to see if they are opening fake phishing emails or not. [00:14:23] That's an okay. Practice. The problems really come in with the companies that are sending out phishing emails and are then following up in such a way that employee is punished in some places they are being punished by if you've opened three fake emails over the last year or whatever it might be. [00:14:47] But over the last year, you're. It's that bad. So we have to be careful. You're not going to increase the confidence of your employees by doing that. And what's, you're actually going to end up doing is slowing down the productivity of your employees. Because now they're going to be really worried about opening, any emails that look like they might be legitimate. [00:15:14] And so your business is going to slow right down. So having some more training about it. Okay. I can see that everyone makes mistakes and we've got to remember that as well, but watch free, man. But we really are trying to get you to move quickly, act fast, or I need this answer right away. Or one of the big ones is we've got this vendor and in fact, I'll, let me give you a real world example. [00:15:41] It's a manufacturing company and of course they. To buy product from vendors, as supplier. And then they use that product or whether it's copper or whatever it might be now to put it all together to make their products. And this one person, this one, hacker a lady again in Eastern Europe, she went and found out about this company. [00:16:08] Okay, great. Found on their website, who the CEO was, who the CFO was. Okay, great. And was able to find the CEO online on Facebook and on his Facebook account, he said, yeah, we're going to The Bahamas. Rear-ending a sailboat. We're going to be out there, the whole family for two weeks. This is going to be fantastic disconnected. [00:16:37] So she found all of that. Now what she had to do was she found out who it was. The CEO, what school he went to. So first she had to get around the restrictions. Cause he had said, don't share my posts with anyone other than friend. So she sent him a message because she found his LinkedIn profile. You see how easy this is to do. [00:16:59] She found his LinkedIn profile and that he went to Harvard and got his MBA. So she sent him. A little note saying, Hey, remember me Janie from X, Y, Z class at Harvard, and want to be friends catch up a little bit. And then he doesn't remember who she is, but the picture looks cute enough. I might as well say yes. [00:17:21] And now she had his contact information over on LinkedIn, send him a friend request over on Facebook as well. That's how she found out he was going to be gone for two weeks. And so now she knows when he's gone. And where he's going to be completely out of touch. So once he's gone about two or three days later, she sent an email off to the CFO inside the company and said, Hey. [00:17:49] We've got this new vendor they've been providing us with product for the last three months. We haven't paid them at all yet. I need you to wire. It was a little more than $40 million because she'd done her homework. She knew how much money the company made, what their expenses probably were. I need you to wire $40 million to this account, or they're going to stop. [00:18:17] All shipments to us. And instead of the CFO doing a little bit more homework into it and digging in and finding out because talking to the people in receiving that we've never received anything from that company. I don't know what you're talking about. And then talking with the guy on the manufacturing floor, the CFO didn't do any of that, just okay. This looks legit. And by the way, it is so easy for these hackers to also gain access to personal email accounts. And we're not going to spend time going into that right now. So he wired. Yes indeed. So there's an example of falling for fishing. A little bit of follow up on the part of the CFO would have shown him that this was not legitimate. [00:19:07] Even over on Shark Tank. Barbara Cochran. She fell prey to this, actually it was her assistant and who wired some $400,000 to a vendor that wasn't real. Now the good news is the assistant copied Barbara who saw the email right away and said, whoa, wait a minute. They called the bank and they put a stop on it.. [00:19:34] Doing a little training here on how to spot fake log-in pages. We just covered fishing and some real world examples of it, of some free quiz stuff that you can use to help with it. And now we're moving on to the next step. [00:19:50] The next thing to look for when it comes to the emails and these fake login pages is a spelling mistake or grammatical errors. [00:20:02] Most of the time, these emails that we get that are faking emails are, have really poor grammar in them. Many times, of course the commas are in the wrong place, et cetera, et cetera. But most of us weren't English majors. So we're not going to pick that up myself included. That's why I use Grammarly. [00:20:21] If you have to ever write anything or which includes anything from an email or a document you probably want to get Grammarly. There's a few out there, but that's the one I liked the best for making sure my grammar. So a tip, to the hackers out there, but the hackers will often use a URL that is very close to it. [00:20:45] Where are you want to go? So they might put a zero in place of an O in the domain, or they might make up some other domain. So it might be amazon-aws.com or a TD bank-account.com. Something like that. Sometimes the registrars they'll catch that sort of thing and kill it. Sometimes the business that they are trying to fake will catch it and let them know as well. [00:21:19] There's companies out there that watch for that sort of thing. But many times it takes a while and it's only fixed once enough people have reported it. So look at the URL. Make sure it's legitimate. I always advise that instead of clicking on the link in the email, try and go directly to the website. [00:21:41] It's like the old days you got a phone call and somebody saying, yo, I'm from the bank and I need your name and social security numbers. So I can validate the someone broke into your account. No, they don't. They don't just call you up like that nowadays. They'll send you a message in their app. [00:21:56] That's on your smart. But they're not going to call you. And the advice I've always given is look up their phone. And by the way, do it in the phone book, they remember those and then call them back. That's the safest way to do that sort of thing. And that's true for emails as well. If it's supposedly your bank and it's reporting something like someone has broken into your account, which is a pretty common technique for these fissures, these hackers that are out there, just type in the bank URL as it not what's in the email. [00:22:33] There will be a message there for you if it's legitimate, always. Okay. So before you click on any website, Email links, just try and go directly to the website. Now, if it's one of these deep links where it's taking new Jew, something specific within the site, the next trick you can play is to just mouse over the link. [00:22:58] So bring your mouse down to where the link is. And typically what'll happen is at the bottom left. Your screen or of the window. It'll give you the actual link. Now, if you look at some of them, for instance, the emails that I send out, I don't like to bother people. So if you have an open one of my emails in a while, I'll just automatically say, Hey, I have opened them in awhile, and then I will drop you off the list. [00:23:28] Plus if you hit reply to one of my newsletters, my show notes, newsletters. That's just fine, but it's not going to go to me@craigpeterson.com and some people you listeners being the best and brightest have noticed that what happens is it comes up and it's some really weird URL that's so I can track. [00:23:51] Who responded to me. And that way I can just sit down and say, okay, now let me go through who has responded? And I've got a, kind of a customer relationship management system that lets me keep track of all of that stuff so that I know that you responded. I know you're interacting, so I know I'm not bothering you. [00:24:11] And I know I need to respond. Much the same thing is true with some of these links. When I have a link in my newsletter and I say, Hey, I'm linking to MIT's article. It is not going to be an MIT. Because again, I want to know what are you guys interested in? So anytime you click on a link, I'll know, and I need to know that, so I know why, Hey, wait a minute. [00:24:36] Now, 50% of all of the people that opened the emails are interested in identifying fake login pages. So what do I do? I do something like I'm doing right now. I go into depth on fake logs. Pages. I wouldn't have known that if I wasn't able to track it. So just because the link doesn't absolutely look legit doesn't mean it isn't legit, but then again, if it's a bank of it involves financial transactions or some of these other things be more cautious. [00:25:11] So double check for misspellings or grammatical errors. Next thing to do is to check the certificate, the security certificate on the site. You're on this gets a little bit confusing. If you go to a website, you might notice up in the URL bar, the bar that has the universal resource locator, that's part of the internet. [00:25:38] You might've noticed a. And people might've told you do check for the lock. That lock does not mean that you are safe. All it means is there is a secure VPN from your computer to the computer on the other side. So if it's a hacker on the other side, you're sending your data securely to the hacker, right? [00:26:05] That's not really going to do you a whole lot of good. This is probably one of the least understood things in the whole computer security side, that connect. May be secure, but is this really who you think it is? So what you need to do is click on their certificate and the certificate will tell you more detail. [00:26:29] So double check their certificate and make sure it is for the site. You really. To go to, so when it's a bank site, it's going to say, the bank is going to have the bank information on it. That makes sense. But if you go for instance on now, I'm going to throw a monkey wrench into this whole thing. [00:26:48] If you go to Craig peterson.com, for instance, it's going to. Connection is secure. The certificate is valid, but if you look at their certificate and the trust in the details, it's going to be issued by some company, but it's going to just say Craig peterson.com. It's not going to give a business name like it would probably do for a bank. [00:27:14] So you know, a little bit of a twist to it, but that's an important thing. Don't just count on the lock, make sure that the certificate is for the place you want to contact. Last, but not least is multi-factor authentication. I can't say this enough. If the bad guys have your username or email address and your password for a site, if you're using multifactor authentication, they cannot get in. [00:27:53] So it's going to prevent credential stuffing tactics, or they'll use your email and password combinations that have already been stolen for mothers sites to try and hack in to your online profile. So very important to set up and I advise against using two factor authentication with your, just a cell phone, as in a text message SMS, it is not secure and it's being hacked all of the time. [00:28:23] Get an authorization. Like one password, for instance, and you shouldn't be using one password anyways, for all of your passwords. And then Google has a free one called Google authenticator. Use those instead of your phone number for authentication. [00:28:40] You're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist, and online@craigpeterson.com. [00:28:48] I've been warning about biometric databases. And I sat down with a friend of mine who is an attorney, and he's using this clear thing at the airport. I don't know if you've seen it, but it's a biometric database. What are the real world risks? [00:29:04] This clear company uses biometrics. [00:29:08] It's using your eye. Brent, if you will, it's using your Iris. Every one of us has a pretty darn unique Iris, and they're counting on that and they're using it to let you through TSA very quickly. And this attorney, friend of mine thinks it's the best thing since sliced bread, because he can just. On through, but the problem here is that we're talking about biometrics. [00:29:34] If your password gets stolen, you can change it. If your email account gets hacked, I have another friend who his account got hacked. You can get a new email account. If your Iris scan that's in this biometric database gets stolen. You cannot replace your eyes unless of course you're Tom cruise and you remember that movie, and it's impossible to replace your fingerprints. It's possible to replace your face print. I guess you could, to a degree or another, some fat injections or other things. Could be done to change your face sprint, but these Iris scans fingerprints and facial images are something I try not to provide any. [00:30:29] Apple has done a very good job with the security of their face print, as well as their fingerprint, because they do not send any of that information out directly to themselves or to any database at all. Period. They are stored only on the device itself. And they're in this wonderful little piece of electronics that can not be physically compromised. [00:30:59] And to date has not been electronically compromised either. They've done a very good job. Other vendors on other operating systems like Android, again, not so much, but there are also databases that are being kept out there by the federal government. I mentioned this clear database, which isn't the federal government, it's a private company, but the federal government obviously has its fingers into that thing. [00:31:29] The office of personnel. For the federal government, they had their entire database, at least pretty much the entire database. I think it was 50 million people stolen by the red, Chinese about six years ago. So the communists. Copies of all of the information that the officer personnel management had about people, including background checks and things. [00:31:55] You've probably heard me talk about that before. So having that information in a database is dangerous because it attracts the hackers. It attracts the cybercriminals. They want to get their hands on it. They'll do all kinds of things to try and get their hands. We now have completely quit Afghanistan. [00:32:20] We left in a hurry. We did some incredibly stupid things. I just, I can't believe our president of the United States would do what was done here. And now it's been coming out that president and Biden completely ignored. The advice that he was getting from various military intelligence and other agencies out there and just said, no, we're going to be out of there. [00:32:46] You have to limit your troops to this. And that's what causes them to close the air base battleground that we had for so many years. Apparently the Chinese are talking about taking it over now. Yeah. Isn't that nice. And whereas this wasn't an eternal war, right? We hadn't had anybody die in a year and a half. [00:33:05] It's crazy. We have troops in south Vietnam. We have troops in Germany. We have troops in countries all over the world, Japan, you name it so that we have a local forest that can keep things calm. And we were keeping things calm. It's just mind blowing. But anyhow, politics aside, we left behind a massive database of biometric database. [00:33:38] Of Afghanis that had been helping us over in Afghanistan, as well as a database that was built using us contractors of everyone in the Afghan military and the basically third genealogy. Who their parents were the grandparents blood type weight, height. I'm looking at it right now. All of the records in here, the sex ID nationality. [00:34:11] Date of exploration, hair color, favorite fruit, favorite vegetables, place of birth, uncle's name marker signature approval. Signature date, place of birth. Date of birth address, permanent address national ID number place of ISS. Date of ISS native language salary data salary, group of salary, police of salary education, father's name, graduation, date, weapon and service now. [00:34:41] These were all in place in Afghanistan. We put them in place because we were worried about ghost soldiers. A gold soldier was someone who we were paying the salary of taxpayers of the United States were paying the salaries of the Afghan military for quite some time. And we were thinking that about half of the. [00:35:06] Payroll checks. We were funding. We're actually not going to people who were in the military, but we're going to people who were high up within the Afghan government and military. So we put this in place to get rid of the ghost soldiers. Everybody had to have all of this stuff. In the database, 36 pieces of information, just for police recruitment. [00:35:39] Now this information we left behind and apparently this database is completely in the hand of the Taliban. Absolutely. So we were talking about Americans who helped construct Afghanistan and the military and the telephone. The looking for the networks of their Ponant supporters. This is just absolutely amazing. [00:36:07] So all of the data doesn't have clear use, like who cares about the favorite fruit or vegetable, but the rest of it does the genealogy. Does they now know who was in the police department, who was in the military, who their family is, what their permanent address is. Okay. You see the problem here and the biometrics as well in the biometrics are part of this us system that we were using called hide H I D E. [00:36:41] And this whole hide thing was a biometric reader. The military could keep with them. There were tens of thousands of these things out in the field. And when they had an encounter with someone, they would look up their biometrics, see if they were already in the database and in the database, it would say, yeah, they're friendly, they're an informant. [00:37:03] Or we found them in this area or w we're watching them. We have concern about them, et cetera, et cetera. All of their actions were in. Turns out that this database, which covered about 80% of all Afghans and these devices are now in the hands of the Taliban. Now, the good news with this is that a lot of this information cannot be easily extracted. [00:37:32] So you're not going to get some regular run of the mill Taliban guy to pick one of these up and start using. But the what's happening here is that we can really predict that one of these surrounding companies like Pakistan that has been very cooperative with the Taliban. In fact, they gave refuge to Saddam, not Saddam Hussein, but to a bin Ladin and also Iran and China and Russia. [00:38:04] Any of those countries should be able to get into that database. Okay. So I think that's really important to remember now, a defense department spokesperson quote here, Eric Fay on says the U S has taken prudent actions to ensure that sensitive data does not fall into the Tolo bonds. And this data is not at risk of misuse. [00:38:29] Misuse that's unfortunately about all I can say, but Thomas Johnson, a research professor at the Naval postgraduate school in Monterey, California says not so fast, the taller Bon may have used biometric information in the Coon dues. So instead of taking the data straight from the high devices, he told MIT technology review that it is possible that Tolo bond sympathizers in Kabul, provided them with databases of military personnel, against which they could verify prints. [00:39:07] In other words, even back in 2016, it may have been the databases rather than these high devices themselves pose the greatest risk. This is very concerning big article here in MIT technology review. I'm quoting from it a little bit here, but there are a number of databases. They are biometric. Many of these, they have geological information. [00:39:35] They have information that can be used to round up and track down. Now, I'm not going to mention world war two, and I'm not going to mention what happened with the government too, before Hitler took over, because to do that means you lose that government had registered firearms, that government had registered the civilians and the people and Afghanistan. [00:40:04] The government was also as part of our identification papers, registering your religion. If you're Christian, they're hunting you down. If you were working for the military, they're hunting you down. And this is scary. That's part of the reason I do not want biometric information and databases to be kept here in the U S Hey, make sure you get my show notes every week on time, along with free training, I try to help you guys out. [00:40:41] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the sun. [00:40:58] Solar storms are something that happens really all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:41:22] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. That if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:41:46] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the bow. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:42:08] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:42:41] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:43:10] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth long. [00:43:36] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. There's other things too, for instance. eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:44:01] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in this last year, we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:44:32] We also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:44:54] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very directional. So when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:45:21] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:45:51] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these solar flares, if you will, are very extreme, the CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:46:19] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this back hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:46:50] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:47:13] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cute. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the eclipse. [00:47:50] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:48:22] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:48:48] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here knocked out Quebec electric. Nine hour blackout of Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:49:27] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:49:52] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:50:20] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:50:45] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:51:12] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:51:42] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:51:52] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:52:09] Google's web browser. It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:52:42] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:53:04] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:53:35] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? It makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is a standard browser, which is a great. [00:53:55] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. There is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:54:17] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:54:42] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use it. The reality is that Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your data. [00:55:19] That's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:55:43] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you liked dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:56:12] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. It's the same thing. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket than to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:56:34] It's easier for them to not have to reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:56:59] It's really what's going on out there. They are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:57:19] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:57:41] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [00:58:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [00:58:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do logs. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [00:59:09] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, they are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy. [00:59:36] Their flagship browser is totally into it. It's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [00:59:56] I should say. The whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google is not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:00:20] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser. That's pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my shows weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:00:46] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:00:50] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers. [01:01:07] Now, the reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:01:17] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:01:45] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:02:11] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or windows or tablet, whatever. And you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:02:41] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that, not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:03:11] The verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you yeah. I'm I might've misspoken. Let me see, what does it say? It says users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:03:36] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that's exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customer's data. [01:04:12] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:04:46] Okay. I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, about our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. That's again, why I used to get so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:05:34] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:05:52] Can't be true. So how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. That's being used to track me. [01:06:18] Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not social. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:06:40] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, you missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:07:13] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:07:33] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that might be yeah. [01:07:57] Why. Why are we trusting these companies? If you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:08:24] Does that make sense to you? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:08:48] And maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found it. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through a, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:09:17] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time consumers are the people I help the most, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:09:38] Just email me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:09:44] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. There are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:10:00] Australia has. I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end that much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:10:11] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. You might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. It wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:10:38] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? Good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:11:03] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay here. I've always felt that I, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:11:26] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Doesn't that just make sense. They now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:11:42] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:12:07] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the, of course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:12:34] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you. They have pretty hefty fines. [01:12:54] What Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:13:32] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said, we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:13:59] Very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:14:27] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. It will go away. Just for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:14:47] So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:15:08] First of all, Russia is no longer. Country, they are. They aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:15:35] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. But definitely heavy on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. According to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:16:02] Okay. So basically what they're doing, I reverse that what they're doing is they're only allowing the kids three hours of gaming per week. In other words, they can play between eight and 9:00 PM, Friday, Saturday, and Sundays. I think that might overload some gaming servers. Cov gaming addiction has affected studies and normal lives. [01:16:23] And many parents have become miserable. That's China's press and public administration. Sedna state. Okay. There's going to be some relief during the school holidays. Children will be allowed 60 minutes per day for gaming hard to say how China plans didn't force it, but they have their ways, identity cards. By the way required for playing online. They've got a facial recognition system introduced in July by 10 cent. Remember all of the uproar around 10 cent and their apps and president Trump trying to get them blocked here in the U S yeah, there you go. Facial recognition bill right into the app, and it's proven effective at catching children pretending to be adults in order to get around government gaming curves. [01:17:12] So this goes on and on and Korea as well, South Korea has had some very big problems. You might remember it was headlines just a few years ago of some of these south Korean kids dying because they were playing video games four days straight with no sleep, no real food. Just taking all of these energy. [01:17:37] And we'll literally gaming themselves to death. So South Korea passed a law that prevented young people from playing online video games late at night. So that was introduced back in 2011 and it's targeted at players 16 or up. And south Korean miners were prevented from playing online PC games between midnight and six, 8:00 AM. [01:18:03] Now South Korea has scrapped that law. Interesting. So they're saying it's out of respect for younger citizens, right? They're going to abolish this law, replace it by. Permit system that allows players to request a permit per game and play during self-assigned hours that their parents will sign off on. [01:18:27] This is in an article from GameSpot, by the way, a gamespot.com. You might remember them too, the whole Robin hood scandal. But I think it's an interesting question. When my kids were young lo those many years ago I got this box that the, you took the TV wire, you ran it into the box and you could program. [01:18:51] So that each kid had their own code and you could specify how much time the kid could watch TV or how much time or when they could watch TV and how much time cumulative the kids could have. And it actually worked pretty well. And the kids certainly complained a lot about it. And a couple of them tried to work the way around it hard to when the plug is inside the box. [01:19:17] Yeah, ingenuity as they are. They were able to do that. They cut the wire off and put another power connector on the end of the TV wire. Anyhow Microsoft, we've been talking about them a lot. This show. I do not like Microsoft, that already the windows 11 is coming out and we talked about. [01:19:38] Before, because windows 11 is plying. Microsoft is planning on requiring you to have a very modern computer. You need to have a TPM in it, which is this special security module. You need to have a certain speed, et cetera, but the TPM is a big thing. That's going to make it. So most of your computers won't work. [01:20:04] Tons of pushback on that. I can see what Microsoft is trying to do it. They really would love to have a clean operating system that really wasn't getting hacked all the time. And this will help it won't solve their problem, but it will help. So that they're going to be doing now is they're going to over

The CPG Guys
Targeted Digital Advertising with Criteo's Sherry Smith

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 39:57


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB, are joined in this episode by Sherry Smith, Managing Director of Retail Media at Criteo, a global technology company that powers the world's marketers and media owners with trusted and impactful advertising through its world-leading Commerce Media Platform, a suite of products that activates the world's largest set of commerce data to drive better commerce outcomes. Follow Sherry Smith on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sherryd-smith/Follow Criteo online at: http://criteo.comSherry answers these questions:1) Looking at all of the brand presentations at the recent CAGNY conference, it was hard NOT to find a reference to retail media. What do you see as the driving forces behind a seismic shift in brand advertising into retail media?2) Retail media is my favorite topic and a hot trend in CPG & retail today, but before we get there take us through the journey of California state to Triad and now Criteo?3) What are the different services or new services Criteo offers brands and retailers that Triad did not? Why are these value-enhanced?4) Let's discuss what matters with SEM - does one have to be a PPC expert to be good at this? Which metrics matters the most - ROAS or CPC? Do they go hand in hand?5) Some retailers have built their own targeted retail media platform, others have connected to networks like Criteo. What is the value proposition you bring to retail partners?6) How do you advise brands to go about a partnership with Criteo - what retail platforms do they have access to influence with outcomes?7) Let's talk data & insights - what value added insights do you provide? How do you measure success for the work you do for brands? How does a partnership work on a given campaign? How far in advance do you have to plan it?8) Media - constantly evolving. Retail media vs google, facebook. Privacy changes in the recent software update of Apple iOS 14.5 and the postponed cookie tracking changes in Google Chrome are a risk for brands on personalized targeting. Is this a real challenge for now emphasizing retail media even more?Please provide the CPG Guys feedback at http://ratethispodcast.com/cpgguysCPG Guys Website: http://CPGGuys.comInstagram: http://Instagram.com/cpgguysDISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 626: Clowns, Mimes, and Robots - OnlyFans undoes porn ban, Fit Charge 5, Prop. 22 unconstitutional

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 108:59


Facebook says post that cast doubt on covid-19 vaccine was most popular on the platform from January through March. Zeynep Tufekci Joins The New York Times as an Opinion Columnist. OnlyFans no longer plans to ban porn, saying in abrupt U-turn that it wants to be a 'home for all creators'. Richard J. Meislin, Times Editor and Web Journalism Pioneer, Dies at 68. NYT crossword puzzle no longer works in third-party apps, crosses puzzle solvers. Mastercard to end magnetic strip on cards. Bear Makes Off With Amazon Package From Bristol Porch. Don't overthink it: Elon Musk's Tesla Bot is a joke. The First Step Toward Protecting Everyone Else From Teslas. Fitbit's New Charge 5 Has a Rounded Design and a Color Screen. Court: CA's Prop. 22 on Uber, Lyft drivers unconstitutional. The official Waymo blog: Welcoming our first riders in San Francisco. Google is shutting down Android Auto phone app. Google Meet now warns you when you're causing an echo. Android 12 Beta 4.1 rolling out with Pixel bug fixes, including for VPN & notifications. Google Chrome will let you save Tab Groups so you don't have to keep recreating them Google Pixel 5 and Pixel 4a 5G officially discontinued in lead-up to the Pixel 6 launch. YouTube says its Partner Program now has 2 million members. Google says geofence warrants make up one-quarter of all US demands. Picks: Stacey - Nest Cam with battery and Nest Doorbell with battery Jeff - Startups spend more on Airbnb than in office rent Leo - The end to 7-digit phone dialing is coming this October Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CrowdStrike.com/twit Compiler - TWIG

This Week in Google (Video HI)
TWiG 626: Clowns, Mimes, and Robots - OnlyFans undoes porn ban, Fit Charge 5, Prop. 22 unconstitutional

This Week in Google (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 109:30


Facebook says post that cast doubt on covid-19 vaccine was most popular on the platform from January through March. Zeynep Tufekci Joins The New York Times as an Opinion Columnist. OnlyFans no longer plans to ban porn, saying in abrupt U-turn that it wants to be a 'home for all creators'. Richard J. Meislin, Times Editor and Web Journalism Pioneer, Dies at 68. NYT crossword puzzle no longer works in third-party apps, crosses puzzle solvers. Mastercard to end magnetic strip on cards. Bear Makes Off With Amazon Package From Bristol Porch. Don't overthink it: Elon Musk's Tesla Bot is a joke. The First Step Toward Protecting Everyone Else From Teslas. Fitbit's New Charge 5 Has a Rounded Design and a Color Screen. Court: CA's Prop. 22 on Uber, Lyft drivers unconstitutional. The official Waymo blog: Welcoming our first riders in San Francisco. Google is shutting down Android Auto phone app. Google Meet now warns you when you're causing an echo. Android 12 Beta 4.1 rolling out with Pixel bug fixes, including for VPN & notifications. Google Chrome will let you save Tab Groups so you don't have to keep recreating them Google Pixel 5 and Pixel 4a 5G officially discontinued in lead-up to the Pixel 6 launch. YouTube says its Partner Program now has 2 million members. Google says geofence warrants make up one-quarter of all US demands. Picks: Stacey - Nest Cam with battery and Nest Doorbell with battery Jeff - Startups spend more on Airbnb than in office rent Leo - The end to 7-digit phone dialing is coming this October Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CrowdStrike.com/twit Compiler - TWIG

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 626: Clowns, Mimes, and Robots

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 108:59


Facebook says post that cast doubt on covid-19 vaccine was most popular on the platform from January through March. Zeynep Tufekci Joins The New York Times as an Opinion Columnist. OnlyFans no longer plans to ban porn, saying in abrupt U-turn that it wants to be a 'home for all creators'. Richard J. Meislin, Times Editor and Web Journalism Pioneer, Dies at 68. NYT crossword puzzle no longer works in third-party apps, crosses puzzle solvers. Mastercard to end magnetic strip on cards. Bear Makes Off With Amazon Package From Bristol Porch. Don't overthink it: Elon Musk's Tesla Bot is a joke. The First Step Toward Protecting Everyone Else From Teslas. Fitbit's New Charge 5 Has a Rounded Design and a Color Screen. Court: CA's Prop. 22 on Uber, Lyft drivers unconstitutional. The official Waymo blog: Welcoming our first riders in San Francisco. Google is shutting down Android Auto phone app. Google Meet now warns you when you're causing an echo. Android 12 Beta 4.1 rolling out with Pixel bug fixes, including for VPN & notifications. Google Chrome will let you save Tab Groups so you don't have to keep recreating them Google Pixel 5 and Pixel 4a 5G officially discontinued in lead-up to the Pixel 6 launch. YouTube says its Partner Program now has 2 million members. Google says geofence warrants make up one-quarter of all US demands. Picks: Stacey - Nest Cam with battery and Nest Doorbell with battery Jeff - Startups spend more on Airbnb than in office rent Leo - The end to 7-digit phone dialing is coming this October Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CrowdStrike.com/twit Compiler - TWIG

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 626: Clowns, Mimes, and Robots

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 108:59


Facebook says post that cast doubt on covid-19 vaccine was most popular on the platform from January through March. Zeynep Tufekci Joins The New York Times as an Opinion Columnist. OnlyFans no longer plans to ban porn, saying in abrupt U-turn that it wants to be a 'home for all creators'. Richard J. Meislin, Times Editor and Web Journalism Pioneer, Dies at 68. NYT crossword puzzle no longer works in third-party apps, crosses puzzle solvers. Mastercard to end magnetic strip on cards. Bear Makes Off With Amazon Package From Bristol Porch. Don't overthink it: Elon Musk's Tesla Bot is a joke. The First Step Toward Protecting Everyone Else From Teslas. Fitbit's New Charge 5 Has a Rounded Design and a Color Screen. Court: CA's Prop. 22 on Uber, Lyft drivers unconstitutional. The official Waymo blog: Welcoming our first riders in San Francisco. Google is shutting down Android Auto phone app. Google Meet now warns you when you're causing an echo. Android 12 Beta 4.1 rolling out with Pixel bug fixes, including for VPN & notifications. Google Chrome will let you save Tab Groups so you don't have to keep recreating them Google Pixel 5 and Pixel 4a 5G officially discontinued in lead-up to the Pixel 6 launch. YouTube says its Partner Program now has 2 million members. Google says geofence warrants make up one-quarter of all US demands. Picks: Stacey - Nest Cam with battery and Nest Doorbell with battery Jeff - Startups spend more on Airbnb than in office rent Leo - The end to 7-digit phone dialing is coming this October Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, and Stacey Higginbotham Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: CrowdStrike.com/twit Compiler - TWIG

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 625: You Can't Handle the Waffle! - T-Mobile hack, robots write code, YikYak is back, Matter delayed

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 139:41


T-Mobile Says Over 40 Million Customer Records Affected in Hack. 7 principles for regulation in the IoT era. OpenAI Codex demo of code writing code. Jason's review of the Pixel 5a from All About Android. The Google Pixel 6 won't ship with a charger. New U.S. Antitrust Bill Would Require Apple and Google to Allow Third-Party App Stores and Sideloading. Bad News, By Joseph Bernstein. CES 2022 to require proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Moderna Is About to Begin Trials for HIV Vaccine Based on COVID-19 Research. People Now Spend More at Amazon Than at Walmart. Remember Yik Yak? Well, it's back and still anonymous. Crypto platform hit by $600 million heist asks hacker to become its chief security advisor. Delightful Google ad imagines the Perseverance Mars rover using Google Photos. Twitter taps crypto leader Jay Graber to head Bluesky. Beijing Tightens Grip on ByteDance by Quietly Taking Stake, China Board Seat. BlackBerry resisted announcing major flaws in software powering cars, hospital equipment. Facebook is sharing data to prove it's not a political hellhole. Google-backed 'Matter' smart home standard, first gadgets delayed into next year. Google Fuchsia update is rolling out widely to 1st-gen Nest Hubs. Google Maps Just Dropped a Bunch of New App Features, Including Dark Mode. Google Calendar will soon let you share where you're working from. YouTube on iOS, Android tests instant comment translations for Premium subscribers. Android's latest accessibility feature lets you control your phone w/ facial expressions. Google Chrome is redesigning the Incognito tab, possibly in response to $5 billion lawsuit. Twitter's new font, Chirp, is apparently giving some users headaches Disney unveils Genie services to replace FastPass, MaxPass: The latest on global Disney parks. Picks: Stacey - This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race - by Nicole Perloth Jeff - Wendy's to open 700 ghost kitchens with Reef Technology Ant - This Is Pop Ant - Error. Fire Not Found Ant - Register for Wanderers Photo Workshop in NOLA Leo - Waffles and Mochi Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Modern Finance

Radio Leo (Audio)
This Week in Google 625: You Can't Handle the Waffle!

Radio Leo (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 139:41


T-Mobile Says Over 40 Million Customer Records Affected in Hack. 7 principles for regulation in the IoT era. OpenAI Codex demo of code writing code. Jason's review of the Pixel 5a from All About Android. The Google Pixel 6 won't ship with a charger. New U.S. Antitrust Bill Would Require Apple and Google to Allow Third-Party App Stores and Sideloading. Bad News, By Joseph Bernstein. CES 2022 to require proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Moderna Is About to Begin Trials for HIV Vaccine Based on COVID-19 Research. People Now Spend More at Amazon Than at Walmart. Remember Yik Yak? Well, it's back and still anonymous. Crypto platform hit by $600 million heist asks hacker to become its chief security advisor. Delightful Google ad imagines the Perseverance Mars rover using Google Photos. Twitter taps crypto leader Jay Graber to head Bluesky. Beijing Tightens Grip on ByteDance by Quietly Taking Stake, China Board Seat. BlackBerry resisted announcing major flaws in software powering cars, hospital equipment. Facebook is sharing data to prove it's not a political hellhole. Google-backed 'Matter' smart home standard, first gadgets delayed into next year. Google Fuchsia update is rolling out widely to 1st-gen Nest Hubs. Google Maps Just Dropped a Bunch of New App Features, Including Dark Mode. Google Calendar will soon let you share where you're working from. YouTube on iOS, Android tests instant comment translations for Premium subscribers. Android's latest accessibility feature lets you control your phone w/ facial expressions. Google Chrome is redesigning the Incognito tab, possibly in response to $5 billion lawsuit. Twitter's new font, Chirp, is apparently giving some users headaches Disney unveils Genie services to replace FastPass, MaxPass: The latest on global Disney parks. Picks: Stacey - This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyberweapons Arms Race - by Nicole Perloth Jeff - Wendy's to open 700 ghost kitchens with Reef Technology Ant - This Is Pop Ant - Error. Fire Not Found Ant - Register for Wanderers Photo Workshop in NOLA Leo - Waffles and Mochi Hosts: Leo Laporte, Jeff Jarvis, Stacey Higginbotham, and Ant Pruitt Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Modern Finance