Podcasts about Ransomware

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Malicious software used in ransom demands

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Best podcasts about Ransomware

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Latest podcast episodes about Ransomware

The CyberWire
Lithuania warns of DDoS. Some limited Russian success in cyber phases of its hybrid war. Spyware infestations in Italy and Kazakstan. Tabletop exercises. Ransomware as misdirection

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 29:06


Lithuania's NKSC warns of increased DDoS threat. Limited Russian success in the cyber phases of its hybrid war. Another warning of spyware in use against targets in Italy and Kazakhstan. Hey, critical infrastructure operators: CISA's got tabletop exercises for you. Kevin Magee from Microsoft has advice for recent grads. A look back the year since Colonial Pipeline with Padraic O'Reilly of CyberSaint. And sometimes ransomware is just a spy's way of saying, “nothing up my sleeve…” For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/121 Selected reading. Lithuania warns of rise in DDoS attacks against government sites (BleepingComputer)  Defending Ukraine: Early Lessons from the Cyber War (Microsoft)  Why think tanks are such juicy targets for cyberspies (The Record by Recorded Future) The war in Ukraine is showing the limits of cyberattacks (Tech Monitor) Spyware vendor targets users in Italy and Kazakhstan (Google Threat Analysis Group) BRONZE STARLIGHT Ransomware Operations Use HUI Loader (SecureWorks) CISA Tabletop Exercises Packages (CTEP) (CISA) CISA Tabletop Exercise Package (CTEP) Workshop (Government Technology)

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Ransomware Decoy, Quantum .LNK Builder, Mitel VoIP Zero-Day, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 2:57


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 24 June, 2022Episode 252 - 24 June 2022Ransomware Decoy- https://www.theregister.com/2022/06/24/ransomware_as_espionage_distraction/ Quantum .LNK Builder - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/malicious-windows-lnk-attacks-made-easy-with-new-quantum-builder/Python Backdoor- https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/multiple-backdoored-python-libraries.htmlHermit Spies Android and iOS - https://www.securityweek.com/sma-technologies-patches-critical-security-issue-workload-automation-solutionMitel VoIP Zero-Day - https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/hackers-exploit-mitel-voip-zero-day-bug.htmlHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Friday June 24th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From TheRegister.comA state-sponsored Chinese threat group that Secureworks has named Bronze Starlight, has a ransomware campaign that is targeting pharmaceutical companies, electronic component designers and manufacturers, US law firms, and aerospace and defense companies. The thing is, the ransomware is just a decoy. Researchers believe the true aim is cyber espionage, which explains why these specific types of companies are being targeted. Link to that research in the article. From BleepingComputer.com:Researchers have noticed a new tool they call Quantum that helps cybercriminals build malicious .LNK files to deliver payloads. These are especially popular in phishing campaigns, currently being used by Emotet, Bumblebee, Qbot, and IcedID. Quantum features a graphical interface and hundreds of icon and extension spoofing options, and you can rent it starting at less than 200 Euros a month. A link to the Cyble research in the article. From The HackerNews.com:Researchers have discovered a number of malicious Python packages in the official third-party software repository that are engineered to exfiltrate AWS credentials and environment variables to a publicly exposed endpoint. What's not for certain is if this is the result of an attack, or some sort of pen-test situation. This would be at least the third such example of a pen tester making a point in the last month or so. From ThreatPost.com:Google is warning that the Hermit spyware by RCS Labs out of Italy, is being deployed against Android and iOS users. The campaign is targeting victims in Kazakhstan and Italy. Last week it was learned that the Kazak government was using this same spyware against its own citizens. Google says the fake apps containing the spyware are not in the Google Play or Apple stores and are only downloaded from third party websites. And last today, from TheHackerNews.comA suspected ransomware intrusion against an unnamed target is leveraging a Linux based Mitel VoIP appliance as an entry point. CrowdStrike says the threat actor is exploiting a 9.8 severity bug that Mitel had patched back in April and are utilizing a couple of anti-forensic measures to erase traces of their actions. Details and links in the article. That's all for me today. Have a great weekend. Like and subscribe, and until next week, be safe out there.

Cyber Security Today
Cyber Security Today, June 24, 2022 -Unpatched VMware applications are still being exploited, ransomware used as a decoy, and a COVID text scam

Cyber Security Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 4:51


This episode reports on successful attacks exploiting the Log4Shell  hold in two unpatched VMware applications, and more 

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Russian Bears, Auto Supplier Hosed, Parse Bug No Game, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 3:09


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 23 June, 2022Episode 251 - 23 June 2022Russian Bears- https://threatpost.com/fancy-bear-nuke-threat-lure/180056/ Auto Supplier Hosed - https://www.reuters.com/technology/japanese-automotive-hose-maker-nichirin-hit-by-ransomware-attack-2022-06-22/NIMble Trooper- https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/chinese-hackers-distributing-sms-bomber.htmlSMA UNIX Root - https://www.securityweek.com/sma-technologies-patches-critical-security-issue-workload-automation-solutionParse Bug No Game - https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/severe-parse-server-bug-impacts-apple-game-centerHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Thursday June 23rd, 2022, and from Chicago‘s O'Hare airport, this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From ThreatPost.comRussian APT group Fancy Bear is targeting Ukranians with a phishing campaign that uses the threat of nuclear war to exploit the Microsoft Follina vulnerability. The goal is to deliver a .Net stealer that can nab credentials from the Chrome, Firefox and Edge browsers. The group is strongly believed to be working at the behest of Russian Intelligence. From Reuters.com:Japanese automotive hose maker Nichirin said that a U.S. subsidiary had been hit by a ransomware attack that has forced it to entirely shut down its computerized production controls. The company has switched to manual production and shipping in order to keep parts flowing to customers. No word on the threat actor or malware strain. From The HackerNews.com:A threat cluster out of China with ties to a hacking group called Tropic Trooper has been spotted using a previously undocumented malware coded in Nim language. The novel loader, dubbed Nimbda, is bundled with a Chinese language 'SMS Bomber' tool that is most likely illegally distributed in the Chinese-speaking web. The Nim loader has the same executable icon as the SMS Bomber, so the entire bundle works as a trojanized binary. More details in the article. From SecurityWeek.com:A critical vulnerability in the SMA Technologies OpCon UNIX agent results in the same SSH key being deployed with all installations. The installation files also include a corresponding, unencrypted private key named “sma_id_rsa.” An attacker with access to that key can gain SSH access as root on affected systems. The key even remains on the system after the OpCon software has been removed. Details and a link to the advisory in the article. And last today, from PortSwigger.netA vulnerability in Parse Server software has led to the discovery of an authentication bypass impacting Apple Game Center. Exploitation of this 8.6 severity bug could result in authentication being bypassed by making a fake certificate accessible via certain Apple domains and providing the URL to that certificate in an authData object. Attack complexity is considered low and no privileges are required. A fix has been issued, so get your patch on kids. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Yodel Sings the Blues, Chrome Release, Raccoon Out - Dridex In, and more

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 3:00


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 22 June, 2022Episode 250 - 22 June 2022Yodel Sings the Blues- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/yodel-parcel-company-confirms-cyberattack-is-disrupting-delivery/ Chrome Release - https://www.securityweek.com/google-patches-14-vulnerabilities-release-chrome-103Acrobat Blocks PFD Checks- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/adobe-acrobat-may-block-antivirus-tools-from-monitoring-pdf-files/Apple Removes the Stop Signs - https://www.zdnet.com/article/apples-ios-16-will-give-you-an-alternative-to-irritating-captcha-tests/Racoon Out - Dridex In - https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/rig-exploit-kit-now-infects-victims-pcs.htmlHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Wednesday June 22nd, 2022, and once again from Chicago this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.comYodel delivery service company out of the UK says they have been disrupted due to a cyberattack. Deliveries were delayed and package tracking was down, but the company says that customer payment information has not been compromised. No word on the threat actor or specific malware used, but it is assumed to be a ransomware attack. From SecurityWeek.com:Google announced the release of Chrome 103 with patches for a total of 14 vulnerabilities, including nine reported by external researchers. The most severe of these bugs is a critical-severity use-after-free issue in Base. The company paid out $44,000 in bug bounties for this batch of fixes and said they have seen no indication that any of them have been exploited in the wild. From BleepingComputer.com:Adobe Acrobat is blocking security software from having visibility into the PDF files it opens, creating a security risk for users. These security tools work by injecting DLLs into software products being launched on a machine. Acrobat is actively checking if components from 30 security products are loaded into its processes and blocks them, essentially denying them from doing their job. Adobe says they are currently working with these vendors to address the issue. Details on the article. From ZDNet.com:In a move that will break absolutely nobody's heart, when Apple rolls out iOS 16 and MacOS Ventura, it will be the first to utilize Private Access Tokens instead of CAPTCHA challenges. Cloudflare estimates that up to 500 man-years are wasted each day looking for those grainy stop signs. No word from Google on when they will introduce this for Android, but they have been in the working group with Apple shaping the authentication standard. And last today, from TheHackerNews.comThe group behind the Raccoon Stealer malware have temporarily shuttered operations after the death of one of their team members. So the operators behind the Rig Exploit Kit have swapped the Raccoon out for the Dridex financial trojan. This little nasty has the capability to download additional payloads, steal customer login information from banking websites, capture screenshots, log keystrokes, and more. You can find additional details in the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

Make The Connection With Melanie Borden
Episode 14 : Make the Connection with Cyber Security

Make The Connection With Melanie Borden

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 23:09


Join us on our new episode as Dominic and I tackle cyber security today and debunk some of the common cybersecurity myths. What is cyber risk mean to a business? Ransomware and where does that stem from Common cybersecurity myths How to put these controls in place for your business Protect all of your data from theft and damage. Have a better understanding of what's happening with cyber security today and in 2022. Connect with Melanie Borden LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/melanieborden Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/melaniebordenllc/ Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/c/MelanieBorden Twitter - https://twitter.com/mbordenllc Email me at melanieborden@melanieborden.com Connect with our guest Dominic Vogel Facebook: Cyber SC - Home | Facebook Twitter (personal): @domvogel Twitter (company): @cyberdotsc LinkedIn (personal): Dominic Vogel - Founder & Chief Strategist - Cyber.sc | LinkedIn LinkedIn (company): Cyber.SC | LinkedIn Instagram (company): Cyber SC (@cyberdotsc) • Instagram photos and videos

APNow
Ransomware Attack Explained: Insights from A Former FBI Agent

APNow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 22:50


Ransomware explained; what ransomware is, it how ransomware works and how to protect against a ransomware attack. That's what we're here to discuss. The topis is of such broad interest that John Oliver discussed ransomware on Last Week Tonite a number of months ago. A #ransomewareattack can do serious financial damage to an organization. A ransomware attack is a form of #fraud and as such steps need to be taken to protect the organization. #ransomwaretips What is ransomware is a question frequently asked by those who have heard the term ransomware but aren't exactly sure what it means. The want to know how ransomware works, and more importantly, how you can protect against a ransomware attack. That is why it is so important that everyone understand and why we offer this tutorial on ransomware explained, as well as a ransomware attack explained.  Most importantly, the guest offers ransomware protection advice including what to do if your organization is a victim of a ransomware attack as well as what steps everyone can take to protect themselves. What ransomware is, how ransomware works and how to protect against a ransomware attack are all covered in this broadcast. The guest on this session is Vic Hartman, retired FBI agent and author of The Honest Truth about Fraud Link to YT video on The Honest Truth about Fraud https://youtu.be/NUIxIc4ZXY8 Information about/purchase book: The Honest Truth about Fraud (https://hartmanfirm.com/author/) Guest: Vic Hartman (https://hartmanfirm.com/ ) Host: Mary Schaeffer (www.ap-now.com )

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Ransomware Minute. Shoprite Group, Windows & Linux Systems. Scott Schober, WCYB Digital Radio.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 2:12


The Ransomware Minute is a rundown of the latest ransomware attacks & news, brought to you by CyberArk. Listen to the podcast weekly and read it daily at ransomwareminute.com • CyberArk is the global leader in Identity Security. Centered on privileged access management, CyberArk provides the most comprehensive security offering for any identity – human or machine. To learn more about our sponsor CyberArk, visit https://cyberark.com

Black Hills Information Security
Talkin' About Infosec News – 5/23/2022

Black Hills Information Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 56:11


ORIGINALLY AIRED ON MAY 23, 2022 Articles discussed in this episode: 00:00 – BHIS – Talkin' Bout [infosec] News 2022-05-23 02:38 – Story # 1 – National bank trolls hackers with dick pics – https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/national-bank-hit-by-ransomware-trolls-hackers-with-dick-pics/ 06:59 – Story # 2 – Ransomware attack exposes data of 500,000 Chicago students – https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/ransomware-attack-exposes-data-of-500-000-chicago-students/ 14:09 – Story # […] The post Talkin' About Infosec News – 5/23/2022 appeared first on Black Hills Information Security.

Capability-Centric GRC & Cyber Security Podcast
GRC Past, Present and Future

Capability-Centric GRC & Cyber Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 43:03


Join Nick Rafferty, Matthew Davies and Yang Zheng from SureCloud, who will be discussing the development of GRC solutions from their origins over two decades ago. They also consider market trends, common challenges and shortfalls, and how the technology will evolve in years to come.

Tech Gumbo
Ransomware shutters a college, Farewell iPod, Apple Passkey, Internet Explorer ended, More subscription $$ than you think, Regulating Crypto, HDMI & Bluetooth getting upgrades

Tech Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 20:41


News & Updates: Ransomware attack brought an end to a college Apple is no longer making the iPod Passkeys could be the end passwords Internet Explorer has officially ended, Edge, Chrome, Firefox will pick up the slack Consumers spend approx. $130 more per month than they think US Senators want to regulate cryptocurrency HDMI Cable will deliver power Bluetooth will connect to multiple devices

The Ransomware Files

Ransomware struck global currency exchange and remittance company Travelex on New Year's Eve 2019. Security Architect Don Gibson was DJing at a friend's place when the first alerts came in. That night kicked off turbulent period for Don that lasted throughout the rest of the year. His name became publicly linked with the Travelex incident, and the attention was completely undesired. His story is one of how social media, a frantic incident response and stress contributed to a nearly tragic health outcome. He went from IR, or incident response, to the ER – the hospital's emergency room. Speakers: Don Gibson, former Security Architect, Travelex; Jeremy Kirk, Executive Editor, Information Security Media Group. Sources and transcript for this episode are here. Production Coordinator: Rashmi Ramesh. The Ransomware Files theme song by Chris Gilbert/©Ordinary Weirdos Records. Music by Uppbeat and Podcastmusic.com. Follow The Ransomware Files on Twitter: @ransomwarefiles Follow The Ransomware Files on Instagram: @theransomwarefiles

Pacific Beat
Pacific countries increasingly vulnerable to cyber security attacks, experts say

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 9:03


As the Pacific becomes more connected to the internet cyber security experts say it's increasing their vulnerability to attacks.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Private is Crypto? What About WhatsApp and Signal?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 82:20


How Private is Crypto? What About WhatsApp and Signal? Cryptocurrencies were thought to be like the gold standard of security, of having your information stay private. Maybe you don't want to use regular currency and transactions. It's all changed. [Automated transcript follows.] [00:00:14] We have had such volatility over the years when it comes to what are called cryptocurrencies. [00:00:21] Now I get a lot of questions about cryptocurrencies. First of all, let me say, I have never owned any cryptocurrencies and I do not own any crypto assets at all. Most people look at crypto currencies and think of a couple of things. First of all, an investment. An investment is something that you can use or sell, right? [00:00:42] Typically investments you don't really use. It's like a house. Is it an investment? Not so much. It's more of a liability, but people look at it and say listen, it went from what was a 10,000. Bitcoins to buy a pizza to, it went up to $50,000 per Bitcoin. There's a pretty big jump there. [00:01:03] And yeah, it was pretty big. And of course, it's gone way down and it's gone back up and it's gone down. It's gone back up. But the idea of any kind of currency is can you do anything with the currency? You can take a dollar bill and go and try and buy a cup of coffee. Okay. A $10 bill and buy a cup of coffee in most places anyways. [00:01:26] That sounds like a good idea. I could probably use a cup of coffee right now and get a tickle on my throat. I hate that. But if you have something like Bitcoin, where can you spend it? You might remember Elon Musk was saying, yeah, you can use Bitcoin to buy a Tesla. Also Wikipedia would accept donations. [00:01:45] Via Bitcoin, there were a number of places online that you could use. Bitcoin. In fact, there's a country right now in south central America that has Bitcoin as its currency. That's cool too. When you think about it, what is, so what are you gonna do? Latin American country? I'm trying to remember what it is. [00:02:05] Oh yeah. It's all Salvador. The first country in the world to adopt Bitcoin is an official legal tender. Now there's a number of reasons they're doing that and he can do it basically. If you got a dictator, you can do almost anything you want to. So in El Salvador, they've got apps that you can use and you can go and buy a tree taco using Bitcoin using their app. [00:02:31] So there you go. If you have Bitcoin, you can go to El Salvador and you can buy all of the tacos and other basic stuff you might wanna buy. But in general, No you can't just go and take any of these cryptocurrencies and use them anywhere. So what good are they as a currency? we already established that they haven't been good as an investment unless you're paying a lot of attention and you're every day buying and selling based on what the movement is. [00:02:59] I know a guy that does exactly that it's, he's a day trader basically in some of these cryptocurrencies, good for. But in reality, is that something that makes sense in a long term? Is that going to help him long term? I don't know. I really don't because again, there's no intrinsic value. [00:03:18] So some of the cryptocurrencies have decided let's have some sort of intrinsic value. And what they've done is they've created what are generally known as stable coins. And a stable coin is a type of cryptocurrency that behind it has the ability to be tied to something that's stable. So for instance, one that really hit the news recently is a stable coin that is tied to the us dollar. [00:03:46] And yet, even though it is tied to the us dollar and the coin is a dollar and the dollar is a coin. They managed to get down into the few pennies worth of value, kinda like penny. so what good was that, it has since come back up, some are tied to other types of assets. Some of them say we have gold behind us. [00:04:09] Kinda like what the United States used to do back when we were on the gold standard. And we became the petrol dollar where countries were using our currency are us dollars, no matter which country it was to buy and sell oil. Things have changed obviously. And we're not gonna talk about. The whole Petro dollar thing right now. [00:04:30] So forget about that. Second benefit. Third benefit is while it's crypto, which means it's encrypted, which means we're safe from anybody's spine on us, anybody stealing it. And of course that's been proven to be false too. We've seen the cryptocurrencies stolen by the billions of dollars. We've seen these cryptocurrencies lost by the billions of dollars as well. [00:04:58] That's pretty substantial. We get right down to it, lost by the billions because people had them in their crypto wallets, lost the password for the crypto wallet. And all of a sudden, now they are completely out of luck. Does that make sense to you? So the basic. Idea behind currency is to make it easier to use the currency than to say, I'll trade you a chicken for five pounds of nail. [00:05:25] Does that make sense to you? So you use a currency. So you say the chicken is worth five bucks. Actually chicken is nowadays is about $30. If it's a LA hen and those five pounds of nails are probably worth about $30. So we just exchanged dollars back and forth. I think that makes a lot of sense. One of the things that has driven up the value of cryptocurrencies, particularly Bitcoin has been criminal marketplaces. [00:05:53] As you look at some of the stats of ransoms that are occurring, where people's computers are taken over via ransomware, and then that person then pays a ransom. And what happens when they pay that ransom while they have to go find an exchange. Pay us dollars to buy cryptocurrency Bitcoin usually. And then they have the Bitcoin and they have to transfer to another wallet, whether or not the bad guys can use the money. [00:06:25] Is a, again, a separate discussion. They certainly can than they do because some of these countries like Russia are going ahead and just exchanging the critical currencies for rubs, which again, makes sense if you're Russia. Now we have a lot of criminals that have been using the Bitcoin for ransoms businesses. [00:06:49] Publicly traded businesses have been buying Bitcoin by the tens of millions of dollars so that they have it as an asset. In case they get ransom. Things have changed. There's a great article in NBC news, by Kevin Collier. And Kevin's talking about this California man who was scammed out of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of cryptocurrency. [00:07:15] Now this was a fake romance scam, which is a fairly common one. It. It tends to target older people who are lonely and a romance starts online and they go ahead and talk and kind of fall in love. And it turns out she or he has this really almost terminal disease. If only they had an extra, a hundred thousand dollars to pay for the surgery. [00:07:45] You, you know the story, so he was conned out of the money. What's interesting to me is how the investigation and investigative ability has changed over the years. Probably about five years ago, I sat through a briefing by the secret service and. In that briefing, they explained how they had gone and very, quite cleverly tracked the money that was being sent to and used by this dark web operator who ran a site known as a silk road. [00:08:22] And that site was selling illegal things online. Oh, and the currency that they were tracking was Bitcoin. Yes, indeed. So much for cryptocurrency being secure it, five years ago, the secret service was able to do it. The FBI was able to do it and they couldn't do a whole lot about it. But part of the problem is all of your transactions are a matter of public record. [00:08:52] So if someone sends you a fraction of a Bitcoin. That is now in a ledger and that ledger now can be used because when you then spend. Fraction of a Bitcoin somewhere else, it can be tracked. It is tracked is a hundred percent guaranteed to be tracked. And once it's tracked government can get in. [00:09:15] Now, in this case, a deputy district attorney in Santa Clara county, California, was able to track the movement of the cryptocurrency. Yeah. So this district attorney, okay. Deputy district attorney, not the FBI, not the secret service, not the national security agency, a local district attorney in Santa Clara county, California, not a particularly huge county, but. [00:09:44] She was able to track it. And she said that she thinks that the scammer lives in a country where they can't easily extradite them. And so they're unlikely to be arrested at any time soon. So that includes countries like Russia that do not extradite criminals to the United States. Now getting into the details. [00:10:03] There's a great quote from her in this NBC news article, our bread and butter these days really is tracing cryptocurrency and trying to seize it and trying to get there faster than the bad guys are moving it elsewhere, where we can't. Grab it. So she said the team tracked the victim's money as it bounced from one digital wallet to another, till it ended up at a major cryptocurrency exchange where it appeared the scammer was planning to launder the money or cash out, they sent a warrant to the exchange. [00:10:35] Froze the money and she plans to return it to the victim. That is a dramatic reversal from just a few years back when cryptocurrencies were seen as a boon for criminals. Amazing. Isn't it? Stick around. We get a lot more to talk about here and of course, sign up online Craig peterson.com and get my free newsletter. [00:11:01] There have been a lot of efforts by many companies, Microsoft, apple, Google, to try and get rid of passwords. How can you do that? What is a password and what are these new technologies? Apple thinks they have the answer. [00:11:17] Passwords have been the bane of existence for a long while. And if you'd like, I have a special report on passwords, where I talk about password managers, things you can do, things you should do in order to help keep your information safe, online things like. [00:11:34] Bank accounts, et cetera. Just email me, Craig peterson.com and ask for the password special report and I'll get it to you. Believe me it's self-contained it's not trying to get you to buy something. Nothing. It is entirely about passwords and what you can do again, just email me, me@craigpeterson.com and we'll get right back with you. [00:11:56] Give us a couple of days, passwords are a problem. And over the years, the standards for passwords have changed. I remember way back when some of the passwords might be 2, 3, 4 characters long. and back then, those were hard to crack. Then Unix came along. I started using Unix and when was that? [00:12:16] Probably about 81. And as I was messing around with Unix, I. They used to had a couple of changes in how they did passwords. They added assault to it. They used basically the same cipher that the Germans used in world war II, that enigma cipher, which again was okay for the times today, we have much more powerful ciphers and the biggest concern right now, amongst real cybersecurity people. [00:12:43] Government agencies is okay. So what are we going to do when these new quantum computers come along with their artificial intelligence and other things, that's going to be a bit of a problem because quantum computers are able to solve problems in fractions of a second. Even that traditional computers cannot solve it. [00:13:10] It's a whole different thing. I want you to think. Something here. I, if you have a handful of spaghetti now we're talking about hard spaghetti, not cooked spaghetti and they all dried out and they are a varying links. How could you sort those into the smallest to largest, if you will, how could you find which ones were the longest, perhaps? [00:13:37] Which ones were the shortest? There's an analog way of doing that and there's a digital way of doing that. So the digital way for the computer would be. To measure them all and compare the measurements and then identify how long the longest one was. And then maybe you'd have to go back and try and find that. [00:13:55] So you can imagine that would take some time, the analog way of doing that. Cuz there still are analog computers out there and they do an amazing job in certain tasks, but the analog way of doing that is okay. So you take that bundle of various length spaghetti and you slam it on the table. What's gonna happen while those pieces of dried spaghetti are going to self align, right? [00:14:22] The shortest ones are going to be down at the bottom and the tallest one's gonna be sticking out from the top. So there you go. There's your tallest, your longest pieces of spaghetti, and it's done. Instantly. So that's just an idea here, quantum, computing's not the same thing, but that's a comparison really of digital and analog computers, but it's the same type of thing. [00:14:45] Some of these problems that would take thousands of years for digital computer. To work out, can just take a fraction of a second. It's absolutely amazing. So when we're looking at today's algorithms, today's programs for encrypting things like military information, secret telegrams, if you will going back and forth in inside the secretary of state embasies worldwide. [00:15:10] Today they're considered to be quite secure, but with quantum computing what's gonna happen. So there are a lot of people out there right now who are working on trying to figure out how can we come up with an algorithm that works today with our digital computers and can be easily solved by quantum computer. [00:15:34] We have a pretty good idea of how quantum computers are going to work in the future, how they work right now, but this really gets us to the next level, which is cool. Franklin. That's a little bit here about cybersecurity. How about you and your password? How does this all tie in? [00:15:51] There are a few standards out there that people have been trying to pass is it's no longer the four character password you might remember. Oh, it needs to be eight to 10 characters, random mix of upper lowercase, special digits, character numbers. You remember those? And you should change it every 30 days. [00:16:09] And those recommendations changed about three or four years ago when the national Institute of standards and technology said, Hey guys pass phrase is much better than the, what we've been doing because people are gonna remember it and it can be longer. So if you are using I have some past phrases I use that are 30 characters or more. [00:16:33] And I mix up the case and I mix up mix ins on special characters and some numbers, but it's a phrase that I can remember and I have different phrases for different websites. Cause I use a password manager right now. I have about 3,100 entries in my password manager. That's a lot. And I bet you have a lot more passwords or at least a lot more websites and accounts than you realize. [00:17:03] And so that gets to be a real problem. How do you make all of this work and make it easy for people? One of the ways that that. They're looking at using is something called the Fido alliances technique. And the idea behind Fido is actually similar to what I do right now. Cause I use one password.com. [00:17:24] I have an app on my phone and the phone goes ahead and gives me the password. In fact, it'll. Put it in. I have plugins in my browsers. It'll put it right into the password form on the website. And then it'll ask me on my phone. Hey, is that really you? And I'll say yes, using duo and TA I'm logged in it's really quite cool. [00:17:48] Fido is a little different than that, but the same, the whole idea behind Fido is you registered a website and the website will send a request to the Fido app. That's on your phone. So now on your phone, you'll use biometrics or maybe one time pass key, those six digit keys that change every 30 seconds. [00:18:13] And so now you on your phone, you say yeah. That's me. That's good. That's me. Yeah. Okay. And then the app will exchange with the website using public key cryptography. A public key and it's gonna be unique public key for that website. So it'll generate a private key and a public key for that website. [00:18:35] And now TA a, the website does not have your password and cannot get your password. And anytime you log in, it's going to ask you on your smartphone. Is this. And there's ways beyond smartphones. And if you wanna find out more about passwords, I've got, again, that free, special report, just Craig peterson.com. [00:18:59] Email me, just email me@craigpeterson.com and I'll make sure we send that off to you and explains a lot about passwords and current technology. So Fido is one way of doing this and a few different companies have gone ahead and have invested some. Into final registration, because it requires changes on the websites as well in order to. [00:19:25] With Fido. Now you might use a pin, you might use the biometrics, et cetera, but apple has decided they've come up with something even better. Now there's still a lot of questions about what apple is doing, but they are rolling it into the next release of iOS and also of Mac operating system. And you'll be able to use that to secure. [00:19:48] Log into websites. I think Apple's gonna get a lot of traction on this and I think it's gonna be better for all of us involved here. We'll see. There's still a lot of UN unanswered questions, but I'll keep you up to date on this whole password technology stick around. [00:20:08] There are ways for us to communicate nowadays easy ways, but are the easy ways, the best ways, the question here, frankly. And part of this answer has to do with WhatsApp and we'll talk right now. [00:20:23] Many people have asked me about secure messaging. You probably know by now that sending text messages is not secure. [00:20:34] In fact, it could be illegal if you have any personal information about. Patients or maybe employees, you just can't send those over open channels. So what apple has done for instance is they've got their messaging app and if the message is green, it's just reminding you that this is a text message. Now they stuck with green because that was the industry's standard. [00:21:01] Green does not mean safe in the apple world when it comes to iMessage. Blue does. So they've got end to end encryption. So if the message is blue, that means the encryptions in place from side to side, there are on the other end of the spectrum. There are apps like telegram, which are not. Particularly safe. [00:21:22] Now, telegram has pulled up it socks a little bit here, but in order to have end to end encryption and telegram, you have to manually turn it on. It is not on by default. I also personally don't trust telegram because of their background, things that they've done in the past. Avoid that. [00:21:43] WhatsApp is something I've been asked about. I had a family member of a service member who was overseas, ask if WhatsApp was safe for them to communicate on cuz they didn't want third parties picking. Private messages, things you say and do online with friends and family are not necessarily things there are for public consumption. [00:22:06] So the answer that I gave was yeah, you might remember Facebook getting WhatsApp. They bought it and deciding they were going to make some changes to the privacy settings in. now that was really a big mistake. They said we're gonna add advertisements. How are you going to effectively advertise? [00:22:27] If you don't know what we're talking about, have you noticed advertising platforms? If you look up something or someone else in your house looks up something, if your neighbors are looking up, they assume that you might be interested in it as well. So what do they do? They go ahead and show you ads for that brand new pair of socks that you never really cared about, but because the algorithms in the background figured yeah, that's what you've been talking about. [00:22:55] Let's pass out your pair of socks. So if Facebook is going to. Add into WhatsApp, what's going to happen. Are they going to be monitoring what you're saying? And then sending you some of these messages, right? These ads, because of that, a lot of people started looking for a more secure. Platform and that's frankly, where Moxi Marlin spike comes in a fun name, the bloom in this case, but he started a company called signal. [00:23:30] He didn't just start it. He wrote the code for it, the server code, everything. And the whole idea behind signal was to have a guaranteed safe end to end way to communicate. A third party with a friend, a relative, et cetera. So signal is something that I've used in the past. And I used from time to time now, as well, depending on who I'm talking to. [00:23:56] And it does allow you to send messages. It does allow you to talk. You can do all kinds of stuff with it. So now there's an issue with signal. It's disappointing. Moxi has stepped down from running signal. There's a company behind it in January, 2022. And he said, the company's begin off. They can run themselves. [00:24:19] He's still on the board of direct. And the guy who's currently the head of signal is also a very privacy focused guy, which is really good too signal by the way is free. And you can get it for pretty much any platform you would care to have it for a very nice piece of software. I like what they've done. [00:24:38] Now the problem is that some of those people at signal have decided that they should have a way of making payments inside signal. So a few months ago, they went ahead and added into signal, a piece of software that allows you to send. Payments online. Now this is a little concerning and the let's talk about some of the reasons for the concern. [00:25:09] Basically what we're seeing is a cryptocurrency that Moxi himself helped to put in place now, I guess that's good cuz he understands it. It's supposedly a cryptocurrency that is privacy. Focused. And that's a good thing. What type of crypto is it? That's privacy focused. And how good is it going to be? [00:25:34] Those are all good questions, but here's the biggest problem. I think that comes from this. We've got our friends at Facebook, again, trying to add crypto payments to their various messenger and other products. We're seeing that from a lot of these communication systems, cuz they can skim a little off the top legally, charge you a fee and then make their money that way. But. What happens when you put it into an encrypted messaging app? Bottom line, a lot of bad things can happen here because now all of a sudden you come under financial regulations, right? Because you are performing a financial. Function. So now potentially here, there could be criminal misuse of the app because you could have ransomware and they say, reach us on signal. [00:26:33] Here's our signal account. And go ahead and send us crypto. it's called mobile coin by the way, this particular cryptocurrency. So now all of a sudden you are opening up the possibility of all kinds of bad things happening and your app signal, which was originally great for messaging now being used nefariously. [00:26:57] I think that's a real problem. Now, when it comes to money transfer functions with cryptocurrencies to say that they're anonymous, I think is a hundred percent a misnomer because it's really pseudo anonymous. It's never completely anonymous. So now you've increased the legal attack surface here. So now the various regulators and countries around the world can say, Hey. [00:27:26] This is no longer just a messaging app. You are using it to send money. We wanna track all money transactions. And so what does that mean? That means now we need to be able to break the encryption or need to shut down your app, or you need to stop the ability to send money. So the concern right now with signal is we really could have some legal problems with signal. [00:27:53] And we could potentially cause some real life harm. On the other side of, this is what Moi Marlin spike has been really driving with signal over the years, which is we don't want anyone to be able to break into signal. So there's a particularly one Israeli based company that sells tools that you can buy that allow you to break into smartphone. [00:28:20] And they're used by everybody from criminals. You can even buy some of these things on eBay. And they're used also by law enforcement agencies. So he found that there was a bug in one of the libraries that's used by this Israeli soft. To where that causes it to crash. And so he puts some code into signal, at least he threatened to that would cause any of the scanning software that tries to break into your smartphone to fail to crash. [00:28:53] Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Greg Peterson here, online Craig peterson.com and really you are not alone. [00:29:09] I got some good news about ransomware and some bad news about B E C business email compromise. In fact, I got a call just this just this week from someone who had in fact again, had their operating account emptied. [00:29:27] Ransomware is a real problem, but it's interesting to watch it as it's evolved over the years. [00:29:36] We're now seeing crackdowns driving down ransomware profits. Yes, indeed. Ransomware's ROI is dropping the return on investment. And so what we're starting to see is a drive towards more. Business email compromise attack. So we'll talk about those, what those are. And I have a couple of clients now that became clients because of the business email compromises that happened to them. [00:30:10] A great article that was in this week's newsletter. You should have received it Tuesday morning from me. If you are signed up for the free newsletter. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You'll get these usually Tuesday morning. It's my insider show notes. So you can get up to speed on some of the articles I'm talking about during the week that I talk about on the radio. [00:30:38] And of course talk about here on the radio show and podcast and everything else as well. So what we're seeing here, according to dark readings, editor, Becky Bracken is some major changes, a pivot by the bad guys, because at the RSA conference, they're saying that law enforcement crackdowns try cryptocurrency regulations. [00:31:05] We've been talking about that today and ransomware as a service operator. Downs are driving the return on investment for ransomware operations across the world all the way across the globe. So what is ransomware as a service? I think that's a good place to start because that has really been an Albert Cross around our next for a long time. [00:31:30] The idea with ransomware is they get you to download some software, run some software that you really should not be running. That makes sense to you. So you get this software on your computer, it exfil trades files. So in other words, it takes files that you have sends them. Off to the bad guys. And then once it's done that, so it'll send like any word files, it finds Excel, other files. [00:32:00] It might find interesting once it's done that, then it goes ahead and encrypts those files. So you no longer have access to them and it doesn't just do them on your computer. If you share a drive, let's say you've got a Gdrive or something else on your computer that is being mounted from either another computer or maybe a server. [00:32:24] It will go ahead and do the same thing. With those files. And remember it, isn't just encrypting because if you have a good backup and by the way, most businesses that I've come into do not have a good backup, which is a real problem because their backups fail. They haven't run. I had one case where we helped the business out and it had been a year and a half since they had a successful backup and they had no. [00:32:52] They were dutifully carrying home. These USB drives every day, plug in a new one in, and the backups were not running. Absolutely amazing. So anyhow, ransomware is a service then. So they've encrypted your files. They've exfiltrated. In other words, they've taken your files and then they demand a ran. [00:33:14] So usually it's like this red screen that comes up and says, Hey all your files are belong to us and you need to contact us. So they have people who help you buy Bitcoin or whatever they're looking for. Usually it's Bitcoin and send the Bitcoin to them. And then they'll give you what's hopefully a decryption. [00:33:38] Now what's particularly interesting about these decryption keys is they work about half of the time. So in other words, about half of the time, you'll get all your data back about half the time. You will not, it's just not good. So if you are a small operator, if you are just a small, bad guy and it's you and maybe somebody else helping you, you got your nephew there helping you out. [00:34:03] How are you going to. Help these people that you're ransoming by the cryptocurrency. How are you going to threaten them with release of their documents online? Unless you have a staff of people to really help you out here? That's where ransomware's a service comes in. The whole idea behind RA is. [00:34:25] You can just be a one man shop. And all you have to do is get someone to open this file. So you go ahead and register with the ransomware service provider and they give you the software and you embed your little key in there, so they know it's you. And then you send it off in an email. You might try and mess with those people to get them to do something they shouldn't do. [00:34:49] And. That's all you have to do because once somebody opens up that file that you sent them, it's in the hand of these service guys and ransomwares the service guys. So the, these ransomwares of service people will do all of the tech support. They'll help people buy the Bitcoin. They'll help them pay the ransom. [00:35:11] They'll help them recover files, to a certain extent. Does this make sense to you? Yeah, it's kinda crazy. Now I wanna offer you, I've got this document about the new rules for backup and again, it's free. You can get it. No problem. Just go ahead and email me, me@craigpeterson.com m@craigpeterson.com because the backups are so important and. [00:35:38] Just like password rules have changed. The rules have changed for backups as well. So just drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com and ask for it and we'll make sure we send it off to you and is not trying to sell you more stuff. Okay. It's really is explaining the whole thing for you. I'm not holding anything back. [00:35:54] These ransoms, the service operators, then get the payment from you and then pay a percentage anywhere from 80% to 50%, sometimes even lower to the person who ransom due. Isn't that just wonderful. So our law enforcement people, as well as in other countries have been going after the ransomware as a service providers, because if they can shut down. [00:36:21] These RAs guys just shutting. One of them down can shut down thousands of small ransomware people. Isn't that cool works really well. So they have been shut down. Many of them there's one that just popped its head back up again. After about six months, we'll see how far they get, but it is a very big. [00:36:46] Blow to the whole industry, ransomware really because of these O as a service operators has become a centralized business. So there's a small number of operators responsible for the majority of these thousands of hundreds of thousands of attacks. Really. It's probably worse than. So couple of dis big groups are left the KTI group and lock bit, and they've got more than 50% of the share of ransomware attacks in the first half of 2022. [00:37:18] But now they're going after them. The feds. And I think that makes a whole lot of sense, because who do you go for while you go for the people who are causing the most harm and that's certainly them. So I expect they'll be shut down sometimes soon, too. Ransomware had its moment over the last couple of years, still a lot of ransomware out there, still a lot of problems, but now we're seeing B C business, email compromise tactics, and I did a. [00:37:50] At television appearance, where I was working with the the newsmaker or whatever they call them, talking heads on that TV show and explaining what was happening. And the most standard tactic right now is the gift card swindle. I should put together a little video on this one, but it was all, it's all about tricking employees into buying bogus gift cards. [00:38:18] So this good old fashioned Grif is still working. And what happened in our case is it was actually one of the newscasters who got an email, supposedly from someone else saying, Hey we wanna celebrate everybody. And in order to do that, I wanna give 'em all gift cards. So can you go out and buy gift cards? [00:38:42] And so we messed around with them. It was really fun and said, okay what denomination, how many do you think we need? Who do you think we should give them to? And of course we knew what we were doing. Their English grammar was not very good. And it was really obvious that this was not. [00:38:59] The person they were pretending to be. So that happens and it happens a lot. They got into a business email account, the email account of that newscaster. So they were able to go through their email, figure out who else was in the business, who was a trusted source inside of the business. So they could pretend that that they were that newscaster and send emails to this trusted source. [00:39:31] And today these business email compromise attacks are aimed at the financial supply chain. And once these threat actors are inside, they look for opportunities to spoof vendor emails, to send payments to controlled accounts. And the worst case I know of this is a company that sent $45 million. To a scammer. [00:39:57] And what happened here is the, this woman pretended to be the CEO who was out of the country at the time and got the CFO to wire the money to her. An interesting story. We'll have to tell it to you sometime, but it's a real problem. And we just had another one. We've had them in school districts, look, 'em up online, do a duck dot, go search for them and you'll find them right. [00:40:24] Left and center because social engineering works. And frankly, business email compromise is a clear threat to businesses everywhere. I, as I mentioned, we had one listens to the show, contact us just last week. Again, $40,000 taken out of the operating account. We had another one that had a, I think it was $120,000 taken out of the operating account. [00:40:53] And another one that had about $80,000 taken outta the operating account. Make sure you're on my newsletter. even the free one. I do weekly free trainings. Craig peterson.com. Make sure you subscribe now. [00:41:10] Facebook's about 18 years old coming on 20 Facebook has a lot of data. How much stuff have you given Facebook? Did you fall victim for that? Hey, upload your contacts. We'll find your friends. They don't know where your data is. [00:41:26] It's going to be a great time today because man. This whole thing with Facebook has exploded here lately. [00:41:35] There is an article that had appeared on a line from our friends over at, I think it was, yeah. Let me see here. Yeah. Yeah. Motherboard. I was right. And motherboards reporting that Facebook doesn't know what it does with your data or. It goes now, there's always a lot of rumors about different companies and particularly when they're big company and the news headlines are grabbing your attention. [00:42:08] And certainly Facebook can be one of those companies. So where did motherboard get this opinion about Facebook? Just being completely clueless about your personal data? It came from a leaked document. Yeah, exactly. So I, we find out a lot of stuff like that. I used to follow a website about companies that were going to go under and they posted internal memos. [00:42:38] It basically got sued out of existence, but there's no way that Facebook is gonna be able to Sue this one out of existence because they are describing this as. Internally as a tsunami of privacy regulations all over the world. So of course, if you're older, we used to call those TIAL waves, but think of what the implication there is of a tsunami coming in and just overwhelming everything. [00:43:08] So Facebook internally, they, their engineers are trying to figure out, okay, so how do we deal? People's personal data. It's not categorized in ways that regulators want to control it. Now there's a huge problem right there. You've got third party data. You've got first party data. You've got sensitive categories, data. [00:43:31] They might know what religion you are, what your persuasions are in various different ways. There's a lot of things they might know about you. How are they all CATA categorized? Now we've got the European union. With their gen general data protection regulation. The GDPR we talked about when it came into effect back in 2018, and I've helped a few companies to comply with that. [00:43:56] That's not my specialty. My specialty is the cybersecurity side. But in article five, this European law mandates that personal data must be collected for specified explicit and legitimate purposes and not further processed in a manner that is incompatible with those purposes. So what that means is that every piece of data, like where you are using Facebook or your religious orientation, Can only be collected and used for a specific purpose and not reused for another purpose. [00:44:34] So there's an example here that vice is giving in past Facebook, took the phone number that users provided to protect their accounts with two factor authentication and fed it to its people, feature as well as. Advertisers. Yeah. Interesting. Eh, so Gizmoto with the help of academic researchers caught Facebook doing this, and eventually the company had to stop the practice. [00:45:01] Cuz this goes back to the earlier days where Facebook would say, Hey, find out if your friends are on Facebook, upload your contacts right now. And most people. What did you know back then about trying to keep your data private, to try and stop the proliferation of information about you online and nothing. [00:45:21] I think I probably even uploaded it back then thinking that'd be nice to see if I got friends here. We can start chatting, et cetera. According to legal experts that were interviewed by motherboard who wrote this article and has a copy of the internal me memo, this European regulation specifically prohibits that kind of repurposing of your phone number of trying to put together the social graph and the leak document shows that Facebook may not even have the ability to limit. [00:45:53] how it handles users data. Now I was on a number of radio stations this week, talking about this and the example I gave, I is just look at an average business from the time it start, Facebook started how right. You scrape in pictures of young women off of Harvard universities. Main catalog, contact page, and then asking people what do you think of this rate? This person rate that person and off they go, trying to rate them. Yeah. All that matters to a woman, at least according to mark Zuckerberg or all that matters about a woman is how she looks. Do I think she's pretty or not ridiculous what he was doing? [00:46:35] I, it just, oh, that's Zuckerberg, right? That's. Who he is not a great guy anyways. So you go from stealing pictures of young ladies asking people to rate them, putting together some class information and stuff there at Harvard, and then moving on to other universities and then opening up even wider and wider. [00:47:00] And of course, that also created demand cuz you can't get on. If you're not at one of the universities that we have set it up for. And then you continue to grow. You're adding these universities, certain you're starting to collect data and you're making more money than God. So what do you do? You don't have to worry about inefficiencies. [00:47:20] I'll tell you that. One thing you don't have to do is worry about, oh, GE we've got a lot of redundant work going on here. We've got a lot of teams working on basically the same thing. No, you've got more money than you can possibly shake a stick at. So now you go ahead and send that money to this group or that group. [00:47:41] And they put together all of the basic information, that, that they want. They are. Pulling it out of this database and that database, and they're doing some correlation writing some really cool sequel queries with some incredible joins and everything else. And now that becomes part of the main code for Facebook. [00:48:02] And then Facebook goes on to the next little project and they do the same thing. Then the next project, then the next project. And then someone comes along and says Hey, we. This feature, that feature for advertisers and then in that goes, and then along comes candidate Obama. And they, one of the groups inside Facebook says yeah here we go. [00:48:25] Here's all of the information we have about everybody and it's free. Don't worry about it. And then when Trump actually bought it and hired a company to try and process some of that information he got in trouble. No but the Obama. The whole campaign could get access to anything they wanted to, again, because the data wasn't controlled, they had no idea who was doing what with the data. [00:48:50] And according to this internal memo, they still don't know. They don't even know if they can possibly comply with these regulations, not just in Europe, but we have regulations in pretty much all of the 50 states in the us Canada of course, has their own Australia, New Zealand think about all the places. [00:49:12] Facebook makes a lot of money. So here's a quote from that we build systems with open borders. The result of these open systems and open culture is well described with an analogy. Imagine you hold a bottle of ink in your hand, the bottle of ink is a mixture of all kinds of user data. You pour that ink into a lake of water. [00:49:34] Okay. And it flows every. The document red. So how do you put that ink back in the bottle, in the right bottle? How do you organize it again? So that it only flows to the allowed places in the lake? They're totally right about that. Where did they collect it from it? Apparently they don't even know where they got some of this information. [00:49:58] This data from reminds me of the no fly list. You don't know you're on it and you can't get yourself off of it. It is crazy. So this document that we're talking about was written last year by. Privacy engineers on the ad and business product team, whose mission is to make meaningful connections between people and businesses and which quote sits at the center of a monetization strategy. [00:50:22] And is the engine that powers Facebook's growth. Interesting problems. And I see this being a problem well into the future for more and more of these companies, look at Twitter as an example that we've all heard about a lot lately. And I've talked about as well along comes Elon Musk and he says wait a minute now. [00:50:41] Now I can make Twitter way more profitable. We're gonna get rid of however many people it's well over a thousand, and then we are going to hire more people. We're gonna start charging. We're gonna be more efficient. You can bet all of these redundancies that are in Facebook are also there on Twitter. and Twitter also has to comply with all of these regulations that Facebook is freaking out about. [00:51:09] It, for really a very good reason. So this document is available to anybody who wants to look at it. I'm looking at it right now, talking about regulatory landscape and the fundamental problems Facebook's data lake. And this is a problem that most companies have not. As bad as Facebook does, but most companies, you grow. I have yet to walk into a business that needs help with cybersecurity and find everything in place as it should be, because it grew organically. You started out with a little consumer firewall, router and wifi, and then you added to it and you put a switch here and you added another switch behind that and move things around. [00:51:54] This is normal. This is not total incompetence on the part of the management, but my gosh, I don't know. Maybe they need an Elon Musk. Just straighten them out as well. Hey, stick around. I'll be right back and sign up online@craigpeterson.com. [00:52:13] Apparently looting is one of the benefits of being a Russian soldier. And according to the reports coming out of Ukraine, they've been doing it a lot, but there's a tech angle on here that is really turning the tables on these Russian looters. [00:52:30] This is really something, we know in wars, there are people that loot and typically the various militaries try and make sure, at least recently that looting is kept to an absolute minimum. [00:52:45] Certainly the Americans, the British, even the Nazis during world war II the the socialists they're in. Germany they tried to stop some of the looting that was going on. I think that's probably a very good thing, because what you end up with is just all of these locals that are just totally upset with you. [00:53:10] I found a great article on the guardian and there's a village. Had been occupied for about a month by Russian troops and the people came back, they are just shocked to see what happened. They're giving a few examples of different towns. They found that alcohol was stolen and they left empty bottles behind food rappers, cigarette butts, thrown all over the place in apartments and homes. [00:53:39] Piles of feces blocking the toilets, family photographs torn, thrown around the house. They took away all of the clothes. This is a code from one of the people, literally everything, male and female coats, boots, shirts, jackets, even my dresses and lingerie. This is really something. It, the Soviets didn't do this, but now Russian. [00:54:02] Military apparently does. So over the past couple of weeks, there've been reporting from numerous places where Russian troops had occupied Ukrainian territory and the guardian, which is this UK newspaper collected evidences suggests looting by Russian forces was not merely a case of a few way, word soldiers, but a systematic part of Russian military behavior across multiple towns. [00:54:29] And villages. That's absolutely amazing. Another quote here, people saw the Russian soldiers loading everything onto Euro trucks, everything they could get their hands on a dozen houses on the villages. Main street had been looted as well as the shops. Other villagers reported losing washing machines, food laptops, even as sofa, air conditioners. [00:54:53] Being shipped back, just you might use ups here, they have their equivalent over there. A lady here who was the head teacher in the school. She came back in, of course, found her home Lood and in the head teacher's office. she found an open pair of scissors that had been jammed into a plasma screen that was left behind because if they can't steal it, they're gonna destroy it. [00:55:19] They don't only leave anything behind. They found the Russians had taken most of the computers, the projectors and other electronic equipment. It's incredible. So let's talk about the turnaround here. A little. You might have heard stories about some of these bad guys that have smashed and grabbed their way into apple stores. [00:55:38] So they get into the apple store. They grab laptops on iPads, no longer iPods, cuz they don't make those anymore. And I phones. And they take them and they run with them. Nowadays there's not a whole lot of use for those. Now what they have been doing, some of these bad guys is they take some parts and use them in stolen equipment. [00:56:03] They sell them on the used market, et cetera. But when you're talking about something specific, like an iPhone that needs specific activation. Completely different problem arises for these guys because that iPhone needs to have a SIM card in order to get onto the cell network. And it also has built in serial numbers. [00:56:26] So what happens in those cases while apple goes ahead and disables them. So as soon as they connect to the internet, let's say they put 'em on wifi. They don't get a SIM card. They don't. service from T-Mobile or Verizon or whoever it might be. So now they disconnect to the wifi and it calls home, cuz it's gonna get updates. [00:56:45] So on download stuff from the app store and they find that it's been bricked. Now you can do that with a lot of mobile device managers that are available for. All kinds of equipment nowadays, but certainly apple equipment where if a phone is lost or stolen or a laptop or other pieces of equipment, you can get on the MDM and disable it, have it remotely erased, et cetera. [00:57:11] Now, police have had some interesting problems with that. Because a bad guy might go ahead and erase a smartphone. That's in the evidence locker at the police station. So they're doing things like putting them into Fairday cages or static bags or other things to try and stop that. So I think we've established here that the higher tech equipment is pretty well protected. [00:57:36] You steal it. It's not gonna do you much. Good. So one of the things the Russian stole when they were in it's called I think you pronounce it. Mela me pole which is again, a Erian city is they stole all of the equipment from a farm equipment dealership and shipped it to Chenia. Now that's according to a source in a businessman in the area that CNN is reporting on. [00:58:06] So they shipped this equipment. We're talking about combines harvesters worth 300 grand a piece. They shipped it 700 miles. and the thieves were ultimately unable to use the equipment, cuz it had been locked remotely. So think about agriculture equipment that John Deere, in this case, these pieces of equipment, they, they drive themselves. [00:58:33] It's autonomous. It goes up and down the fields. Goes any pattern that you want to it'll bring itself within a foot or an inch of your boundaries, of your property being very efficient the whole time, whether it's planting or harvesting, et cetera. And that's just a phenomenal thing because it saves so much time for the farmer makes it easier to do the companies like John Deere. [00:58:58] Want to sell as many pieces of this equipment as they possibly can. And farming is known to be a, what not terribly profitable business. It certainly isn't like Facebook. So how can they get this expensive equipment into the hands of a lot of farmers? What they do is they lease it. So you can lease the equipment through leasing company or maybe directly from the manufacturer and now you're off and running. [00:59:26] But what happens if the lease isn't paid now? It's one thing. If you don't pay your lease on a $2,000 laptop, right? They're probably not gonna come hunting for you, but when you're talking about a $300,000 harvester, they're more interested. So the leasing company. Has titled to the equipment and the leasing company can shut it off remotely. [00:59:51] You see where I'm going with this so that they can get their equipment in the hands of more farmers cuz the farmers can lease it. It costs them less. They don't have to have a big cash payment. You see how this all works. So when the Russian forces stole this equipment, that's valued. Total value here is about $5 million. [01:00:11] They were able to shut it all. And obviously, if you can't start the engine, because it's all shut off and it's all run by computers nowadays, and there's pros and cons to that. I think there's a lot of cons, but what are you gonna do? How's that gonna work for you? It. Isn't going to work for you. [01:00:32] And they were able to track it. It had GPS trackers find out exactly where it was. That's how they know it was taken to Chenia and could be controlled remotely. And in this case, how'd they control it. They completely. Shut it off. Even if they sell the harvesters for spare parts, they'll learn some money, but they sure can be able to sell 'em for the 300 grand that they were actually worth. [01:00:57] Hey, stick around. We'll be right back and visit me online@craigpeterson.com. If you sign up there, you'll be able to get my insider show note. And every week I have a quick five. Training right there in your emails, Craig Peter san.com. That's S O N in case you're wondering. [01:01:22] If you've been worried about ransomware, you are right to worry. It's up. It's costly. And we're gonna talk about that right now. What are the stats? What can you do? What happens if you do get hacked? Interesting world. [01:01:38] Ransomware has been a very long running problem. I remember a client of ours, a car dealership who we had gone in. [01:01:49] We had improved all of their systems and their security and one of their. People who was actually a senior manager, ended up downloading a piece of ransomware, one of these encrypted ones and opened it up and his machine, all of a sudden TA, guess what it had ransomware on it. One of those big reds. [01:02:12] Greens that say pay up is send us this much Bitcoin. And here's our address. All of that sort of stuff. And he called us up and said, what's going on here? What happened? First of all, don't bring your own machine into the office. Secondly, don't open up particularly encrypted files using the password that they gave. [01:02:33] and thirdly, we stopped it automatically. It did not spread. We were able to completely restore his computer. Now let's consider here at the consequences of what happened. So he obviously was scared. And within a matter of a couple of hours, we actually had him back to where he was and it didn't spread. [01:02:59] So the consequences there they weren't that bad. But how about if it had gotten worse? How about if they ransomware. Also before it started holding his computer ransom, went out and found all of the data about their customers. Would, do you think an auto dealership would love to hear that all of their customer data was stolen and released all of the personal data of all of their customers? [01:03:25] Obviously not. So there's a potential cost there. And then how long do you think it would take a normal company? That thinks they have backups to get back online. I can tell you it'll take quite a while because the biggest problem is most backups don't work. We have yet to go into a business that was actually doing backups that would work to help restore them. [01:03:52] And if you're interested, I can send you, I've got something. I wrote up. Be glad to email it back to you. Obviously as usual, no charge. and you'll be able to go into that and figure out what you should do. Cause I, I break it down into the different types of backups and why you might want to use them or why you might not want to use them, but ransomware. [01:04:15] Is a kind of a pernicious nasty little thing, particularly nowadays, because it's two, two factor, first is they've encrypted your data. You can't get to it. And then the second side of that is okay I can't get to my data and now they're threatening to hold my data ransom or they'll release. So they'll put it out there. [01:04:38] And of course, if you're in a regulated industry, which actually car dealers are because they deal with financial transactions, leases, loans, that sort of thing you can lose your license for your business. You can U lose your ability to go ahead and frankly make loans and work with financial companies and financial instruments. [01:05:00] It could be a very big deal. so there are a lot of potential things that can happen all the way from losing your reputation as a business or an individual losing all of the money in your operating account. And we, again, we've got a client that we picked up afterwards. That yes, indeed. They lost all of the money in their operating account. [01:05:24] And then how do you make payroll? How do you do things? There's a new study that came out from checkpoint. Checkpoint is one of the original firewall companies and they had a look at ransomware. What are the costs of ransomware? Now bottom line, I'm looking at some stats here on a couple of different sites. [01:05:44] One is by the way, KTI, which is a big ransomware gang that also got hacked after they said we are going to attack anyone that. That doesn't defend Vlad's invasion of Ukraine, and then they got hacked and their information was released, but here's ransomware statistics. This is from cloud words. First of all, the largest ransom demand is $50 million. [01:06:11] And that was in 2021 to Acer big computer company. Now 37% of businesses were hit by ransomware. In 2021. This is amazing. They're expecting by 2031. So in about a decade, ransomware is gonna be costing about $265 billion a year. Now on average Ransomware costs businesses. 1.8, 5 million to recover from an attack. [01:06:41] Now that's obviously not a one or two person place, but think of the car dealer again, how much money are they going to make over the year or over the life of the business? If you're a car dealer, you have a to print money, right? You're selling car model or cars from manufacturer X. And now you have the right to do that and they can remove that. [01:07:03] How many tens, hundreds of millions of dollars might that end up costing you? Yeah. Big deal. Total cost of ransomware last year, 20 billion. Now these are the interesting statistics here right now. So pay closer attention to this 32% of ransomware victims paid a ransom demand. So about her third paid ransom demand. [01:07:27] Last. It's actually down. Cuz my recollection is it used to be about 50% would pay a ransom. Now on average that one third of victims that paid a ransom only recovered 65% of their data. Now that differs from a number I've been using from the FBI. That's a little bit older that was saying it's little better than 50%, but 65% of pain victims recovered their data. [01:07:55] Now isn't that absolutely amazing. Now 57% of companies are able to recover the data using a cloud backup. Now think about the different types of backup cloud backup is something that can work pretty well if you're a home user, but how long did it take for your system to get backed? Probably took weeks, right? [01:08:19] For a regular computer over a regular internet line. Now restoring from backup's gonna be faster because your down link is usually faster than your uplink. That's not true for businesses that have real internet service ours. It's the same bandwidth up as it is down. But it can take again, days or weeks to try and recover your machine. [01:08:39] So it's very expensive. And I wish I had more time to go into this, but looking at the costs here and the fact that insurance companies are no longer paying out for a lot of these ransomware attacks, it could be incredibly expensive for you incredibly. So here you. The number one business types by industry for ransomware tax retail. [01:09:13] That makes sense. Doesn't it. Real estate. Electrical contractors, law firms and wholesale building materials. Isn't that interesting? And that's probably because none of these people are really aware, conscious of doing what, of keeping their data secure of having a good it team, a good it department. So there's your bottom line. [01:09:40] Those are the guys that are getting hit. The most, the numbers are increasing dramatically and your costs are not just in the money. You might pay as a ransom. And as it turns out in pretty much every case prevention. Is less expensive and much better than the cure of trying to pay ransom or trying to restore from backups. [01:10:06] Hey, you're listening to Craig Peterson. You can get my weekly show notes by just going to Craig peterson.com. And I'll also send you my special report on how to do passwords stick around will be right back. [01:10:24] You and I have talked about passwords before the way to generate them and how important they are. And we'll go over that again a little bit in just a second, but there is a new standard out there that will eliminate the need for passwords. [01:10:40] I remember, I think the only system I've ever really used that did not require passwords was the IBM 360. [01:10:49] Yeah, 360, you punch up the cards, all of the JCL you feed the card deck in and off it goes. And does this little thing that was a different day, a different era. When I started in college in university, we. We had remote systems, timeshare systems that we could log into. And there weren't much in the line of password requirements in, but you had a username. [01:11:18] You had a simple password. And I remember one of our instructors, his name was Robert, Andrew Lang. And his password was always some sort of a combination of RA Lang. So it was always easy to guess what his password was. Today, it has gotten a lot worse today. We have devices with us all of the time. [01:11:40] You might be wearing a smart watch. That requires a password. You of course probably have a smart phone. That's also maybe requiring a password, certainly after boots nowadays they use fingerprints or facial recognition, which is handy, but has its own drawbacks. But how about the websites? You're going to the systems you're using when you're at work and logging in, they all require passwords. [01:12:10] And usernames of some sort or another well, apple, Google, and Microsoft have all committed to expanding their support for a standard. That's actually been out there for a few years. It's called the Fido standard. And the idea behind this is that you don't have to have a password in order to log. Now that's really an interesting thing, right? [01:12:37] Just looking at it because we're so used to having this password only authentic. And of course the thing to do there is make sure you have for your password, multiple words in the password, it should really be a pass phrase. And between the words put in special characters or numbers, maybe mix. [01:12:59] Upper lowercase a little bit. In those words, those are the best passwords, 20 characters, 30 characters long. And then if you have to have a pin, I typically use a 12 digit pin. And how do I remember all of these? Cuz I use a completely different password for every website and right now, Let me pull it up. [01:13:21] I'm using one password dot com's password manager. And my main password for that is about 25 characters long. And I have thirty one hundred and thirty five. Entries here in my password manager, 3,100. That is a whole lot of passwords, right? As well as software licenses and a few other things in there. [01:13:48] That's how we remember them is using a password manager. One password.com is my favorite. Now, obviously I don't make any money by referring you there. I really do like that. Some others that I've liked in the past include last pass, but they really messed. With some of their cybersecurity last year and I lost my faith in it. [01:14:08] So now what they're trying to do is make these websites that we go to as well as some apps to have a consistent, secure, and passwordless sign in. and they're gonna make it available to consumers across all kinds of devices and platforms. That's why you've got apple, Google, and Microsoft all committing to it. [01:14:32] And you can bet everybody else is going to follow along because there's hundreds of other companies that have decided they're gonna work with the Fido Alliance and they're gonna create this passwordless future. Which I like this idea. So how does this work? Basically you need to have a smartphone. [01:14:50] This is, I'm just gonna go with the most standard way that this is going to work here in the future. And you can then have a, a. Pass key. This is like a multifactor authentication or two factor authentication. So for instance, right now, when I sign into a website online, I'm giving a username, I'm giving a password and then it comes up and it asks me for a code. [01:15:14] So I enter an a six digit code and that code changes every 30 seconds. And again, I use my password manager from one password dot. In order to generate that code. So that's how I log into Microsoft sites and Google sites and all kinds of sites out there. So it's a similar thing here now for the sites for my company, because we do cyber security for businesses, including regulated businesses. [01:15:41] We have biometrics tied in as. so to log into our systems, I have to have a username. I have to have a password. I then am sent to a single sign on page where I have to have a message sent to my smart device. That then has a special app that uses biometrics either a face ID or a fingerprint to verify who I am. [01:16:06] Yeah, there's a lot there, but I have to protect my customer's data. Something that very few it's crazy. Actual managed security services providers do, but it's important, right? By the way, if you want my password. Special report, just go to Craig peterson.com. Sign up for my email list. [01:16:29] I'll send that to you. That's what we're sending out right now for anyone who signs up new@craigpeterson.com. And if you'd like a copy of it and you're already on the list, just go ahead and email me M E. At Craig peterson.com and ask for the password special report where I go through a

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Office 365 Attack, Wallet Recovery Flaw, WordPress Ninja vuln, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 3:13


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 17 June, 2022Episode 247 - 17 June 2022Office 365 Attack- https://thehackernews.com/2022/06/a-microsoft-office-365-feature-could.htmlWallet Recovery Flaw - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/metamask-phantom-warn-of-flaw-that-could-steal-your-crypto-wallets/Naked Phishing- https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/nakedpages-phishing-toolkit/QNAP DeadBolted - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/qnap-thoroughly-investigating-new-deadbolt-ransomware-attacks/WordPress Ninja vuln - https://www.securityweek.com/exploited-vulnerability-patched-wordpress-plugin-over-1-million-installationsHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Friday June 17th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From HackerNews.comA potentially dangerous piece of functionality has been discovered in the Microsoft 365 suite that could help threat actors encrypt files stored on SharePoint and OneDrive. The attack hinges on the AutoSave feature, which allows a number of older file versions after users make edits. As the number is reached, the oldest file version gets deleted as the newest is saved. So attackers can either encrypt that available number plus 1, or reduce the number available to something smaller, like 1. Details and a link to the Proofpoint research in the article. From BleepingComputer.com:MetaMask and Phantom are warning of a new vulnerability called Demonic, that could expose a crypto wallet's seed phrase and allow attackers to steal any NFTs and crypto stored there. It is caused by how web browsers save contents of non-password fields as part of a standard “restore session”. Browser wallet extensions, such as Metamask, Phantom, and Brave, use an input field that is not designated as a password field, so the recovery phrase is saved in plain text form. MetaMask and Phantom have both patched the flaw, however, no word yet from Brave. From Infosecurity-Magazine.com:Researchers at CloudSEK have spotted a new phishing toolkit for sale across the various cybercrime forums. The “NakedPages,” toolkit is designed to run on Linux machines, runs JavaScript, is fully automated, and comes preloaded with more than 50 phishing templates and site projects. A link to the CloudSEK advisory in the article. From BleepingComputer.com:QNAP is warning customers to secure their devices against a new campaign of attacks pushing the DeadBolt ransomware. The company is urging users to update their Network Attached Storage devices to the latest firmware version and ensure they're not exposed to remote access over the Internet. The campaign appears to target QNAP NAS devices running QTS 4.x. And last today, from SecurityWeek.comThe WordPress Ninja Forms plugin, which helps administrators add customizable forms to their WordPress sites, has a vulnerability that appears to have been exploited in the wild. The flaw was identified in the Merge Tag functionality of the plugin, and carries a severity rating of 9.8. The Ninja Forms plugin has over a million installations. WordPress performed a forced update to fix the issue, but administrators are urged to confirm they are using the fixed version. That's all for me this week. Have a great weekend. Like and subscribe, and until Monday, be safe out there.

TrustedSec Security Podcast
5.5 - Outspending the Ransomware Gangs

TrustedSec Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 23:49


Welcome to the Trusted Security Podcast – a podcast dedicated to bringing the latest news on information security and the industry. This episode features the following members: Geoff Walton, Justin Bollinger, Travis Kaun, and David Boyd.   Stories Title: Most Security Product Byers Aren't Getting Promised Results URL: https://www.esecurityplanet.com/trends/most-security-product-buyers-arent-getting-promised-results/ Author: Paul Shread   Title: NSA: Ransomware Gangs Are Getting Rich Enough to Buy Zero-Day Exploits URL: https://www.pcmag.com/news/nsa-ransomware-gangs-are-getting-rich-enough-to-buy-zero-day-exploits Author: Michael Kan   Interview Guest: Travis Kaun Subject: PWNton Pack! Links: https://www.trustedsec.com/blog/pwnton-pack-an-unlicensed-802-11-particle-accelerator/

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1216 - Data Shows It Does Not Pay To Pay Ransomware

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 6:49


Ransomware is nasty and can lock a business down for days. Victims have two options, pay the ransom to get their files back or not and try to recover. Data shows that companies that pay a ransom actually open the door to getting hit again. This episode goes into the details. Be aware, be safe. Get ExpressVPN, Secure Your Privacy And Support The Show Become A Patron! Patreon Page *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five —————— Where you can find Security In Five —————— Security In Five Reddit Channel r/SecurityInFive Binary Blogger Website Security In Five Website Security In Five Podcast Page - Podcast RSS Twitter @securityinfive iTunes, YouTube, TuneIn, iHeartRadio,

Cyber Security Today
Cyber Security Today, June 17, 2022 - Ransomware could hit Microsoft 365 files, a warning to web developers and more.

Cyber Security Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 4:07


This episode reports on a way ransomware could hit Microsoft 365 files in SharePoint and OneDrive, and a warning to web developers  using the Telerik UI platform 

Brakeing Down Security Podcast
jon-dimaggio-part2-threat intel-hacking back-analyzing malware

Brakeing Down Security Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 37:07


Author of the #noStarch book "The Art of Cyberwarfare" (https://nostarch.com/art-cyberwarfare)  Topics: discusses his book,  threat intel as a service,  why people enjoy malware analysis? Should people 'hack back' and what legal issues are around that? How do you soften the messaging if you have an insider threat team? www.infoseccampout.com for more information about our 2022 conference in Seattle, WA on 26-28 August 2022! Our full 90 minute stream with Jon, including 30 minutes of audio you won't get on the audio podcast is available at the $5 USD Patreon level, or via our VOD at our Twitch Broadcast site (https://twitch.tv/brakesec) Twitch VOD Link: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/1308277609 Thank you to our Patreon and Twitch supporters for their generous donations and subs and bits!

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Cisco Email Patch, Android Malibot, Zimbra Zinger, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 3:02


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 16 June, 2022Episode 246 - 16 June 2022Cisco Email Patch- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/cisco-secure-email-bug-can-let-attackers-bypass-authentication/Android Malibot - https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-new-android-malware-bypasses-multi-factor-authentication-to-steal-your-passwords/PrintNightmare Still Exposed- https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/new-printnightmare-patch-bypassed/Shoprite Compromised - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/extortion-gang-ransoms-shoprite-largest-supermarket-chain-in-africa/Zimbra Zinger - https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/business-email-platform-zimbra-patches-memcached-injection-flaw-that-imperils-user-credentialsHi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Thursday June 16th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.comCisco is warning customers to patch a critical vulnerability that could allow attackers to login into the web management interface of Cisco Email Security Appliance (ESA) and Cisco Secure Email and Web Manager appliances. The flaw is due to improper authentication checks on affected devices using Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) for external authentication. From ZDNet.com:A new Android malware called Malibot steals passwords, bank details and crypto wallets, and bypasses multi-factor authentication. Oh, it can also access text messages, steal browser cookies and take screenshots. It is distributed through smishing and fake websites, one of which spoofs a legit crypto tracker that has more than a million downloads on the Play Store. Current targets are customers of Spanish and Italian banks. From Infosecurity-Magazine.com:On Tuesday, Microsoft released a partial patch for the PrintNightmare zero-day. On Wednesday they pushed an out of band patch for the remaining affected products. Later Wednesday, researchers found a way around the new patch to still exploit the original vulnerability. The ongoing flaw relates to the Point and Print function, which microsoft says is not directly related to the flaw, but has a weak security posture which makes exploitation possible. From BleepingComputer.com:Africa's largest supermarket chain, Shoprite, has been hit by a ransomware attack. The company, which operates almost three thousand stores across twelve countries in the continent, warned customers Eswatini, Namibia and Zambia that their personal information may have been compromised. A threat group called RansomHouse has claimed responsibility for the attack. There has been no mention of any business disruptions or operational issues, so this may be a straight data theft with no files encrypted. And last today, from ZPortSwigger.net Business webmail platform Zimbra has patched a memcached injection vulnerability that could allow attackers to steal login credentials without user interaction. It would steal cleartext credentials from the Zimbra instance, when the mail client connects to the server to check their mail. Details and a link to the Sonar research in the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

Federal Newscast
Coast Guard cyber expert says ransomware attack on federal agency is more than likely

Federal Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:54


In today's Federal Newscast, the Coast Guard's Cyber Red and Blue Team Branch chief says that a ransomware attack is probably coming to a federal agency soon.

The CyberHub Podcast
Citrix Critical Bug, Splunk, SharePoint & OneDrive Ransomware, Data Privacy & More

The CyberHub Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 9:36


Citrix Critical Bug, Splunk, SharePoint & OneDrive Ransomware, Data Privacy & More Cybersecurity News CyberHub Podcast June 16th, 2022 Today's Headlines and the latest #cybernews from the desk of the #CISO: Citrix warns critical bug can let attackers reset admin passwords Critical Code Execution Vulnerability Patched in Splunk EnterpriseResearchers Discover Way to Attack SharePoint and OneDrive Files With Ransomware Sophisticated Android Spyware 'Hermit' Used by Governments Why a bipartisan data privacy proposal faces an uphill battle Interpol seizes $50 million, arrests 2000 social engineers Story Links: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/citrix-warns-critical-bug-can-let-attackers-reset-admin-passwords/ https://www.securityweek.com/critical-code-execution-vulnerability-patched-splunk-enterprise https://www.securityweek.com/researchers-discover-way-attack-sharepoint-and-onedrive-files-ransomware https://www.securityweek.com/sophisticated-android-spyware-hermit-used-governments https://thehill.com/policy/technology/3522026-why-a-bipartisan-data-privacy-proposal-faces-an-uphill-battle/?email=aa661f0d5e3092f9fdab8de369cee653e31d1d6e&emaila=ce2c54dbf817aa3d26da12effcb54911&emailb=ac9d1fe7ac37ced86b5cfe508a5e4440ed8f9a29dca161471643fea109569321&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=06.14.22%20EM%20The%20Hill%20-%20Hillicon%20Valley&utm_term=Hillicon%20Valley https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/interpol-seizes-50-million-arrests-2000-social-engineers/ “The Microsoft Doctrine” by James Azar now on Substack https://jamesazar.substack.com/p/the-microsoft-doctrine The Practitioner Brief is sponsored by: Your BRAND here - Contact us for opportunities today! ****** Find James Azar Host of CyberHub Podcast, CISO Talk, Goodbye Privacy, Digital Debate, and Other Side of Cyber James on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-azar-a1655316/ Telegram: CyberHub Podcast ****** Sign up for our newsletter with the best of CyberHub Podcast delivered to your inbox once a month: http://bit.ly/cyberhubengage-newsletter ****** Website: https://www.cyberhubpodcast.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheCyberHubPodcast Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-1353861 s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CyberHubpodcast/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cyberhubpodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cyberhubpodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cyberhubpodcast Listen here: https://linktr.ee/cyberhubpodcast The Hub of the Infosec Community. Our mission is to provide substantive and quality content that's more than headlines or sales pitches. We want to be a valuable source to assist those cybersecurity practitioners in their mission to keep their organizations secure. Thank you for watching and Please Don't forget to Like this video and Subscribe to my Channel! #cybernews #infosec #cybersecurity #cyberhubpodcast #practitionerbrief #cisotalk #ciso #infosecnews #infosec #infosecurity #cybersecuritytips #podcast #technews #tinkertribe #givingback #securitytribe #securitygang #informationsecurity

Die Presse 18'48''
Cybersecurity: Wie schützen sich Banken vor Angriffen aus dem Netz?

Die Presse 18'48''

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 21:34


Im Interview zum Thema Cybersecurity erzählt Manuel Schwarzinger, Bereichsleiter Digitalisierung und Informationsmanagement bei der Raiffeisenlandesbank Oberösterreich, welche Sicherheitslücken in Unternehmen oft übersehen werden und worauf Banken wie die RLB OÖ achten, um nicht Opfer eines virtuellen Angriffs zu werden.

Nothing About You Says Computer Technology
95. We Don't Believe You: Ransomware, Federal Privacy, and Jay-z Lyrics

Nothing About You Says Computer Technology

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:13


Today we will be talking about cybersecurity in the news and we also have some “Protect ya Neck” news.  Next, we will discuss the proposed bipartisan federal privacy law. Then finally, we will be handing out a cybersecurity award.   You can visit the show's website at www.nothingaboutyou.com

Tech Babblin' with Tech Gee
Ransomware Gang Creates Site for Victims to Search for Their Stolen Data

Tech Babblin' with Tech Gee

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 9:54


The ALPHV ransomware gang, aka BlackCat, has brought extortion to a new level by creating a dedicated website that allows the customers and employees of their victim to check if their data was stolen in an attack. **Study Notes** https://www.TechnologyGee.com/it-certification-study-materials/ **Discounted CompTIA Exam Vouchers** https://www.TechnologyGee.com/discounted-comptia-exam-vouchers/ **CompTIA Virtual Simulation Labs** https://www.TechnologyGee.com/comptia-virtual-labs/ **Equipment I Use for Making Videos** https://www.TechnologyGee.com/podcast-youtube-equipment/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tech-gee/support

The CyberWire
Hertzbleed, a troublesome feature of processors. Cyberespionage and hybrid war. Patch Tuesday notes. Software bills of materials. Wannabe cybercrooks and criminal publicity stunts.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 29:50


The Hertzbleed side-channel issue affects Intel and AMD processors. An Iranian spearphishing campaign prospected former Israeli officials. Patch Tuesday notes. A look at software bills of materials. Russia routes occupied Ukraine's Internet traffic through Russia. Intercepts in the hybrid war: the odd and the ugly. Deepen Desai from ZScaler joins us with the latest numbers on ransomware. Rob Boyce from Accenture Security looks at cyber invisibility. And, finally, criminal wannabes and criminal publicity stunts. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/115 Selected reading. A new vulnerability in Intel and AMD CPUs lets hackers steal encryption keys (Ars Technica)  Iranian Spear-Phishing Operation Targets Former Israeli and US High-Ranking Officials (Check Point Research) Microsoft June 2022 Patch Tuesday fixes 1 zero-day, 55 flaws (BleepingComputer)  Microsoft Releases June 2022 Security Updates (CISA)  Windows Updates Patch Actively Exploited 'Follina' Vulnerability (SecurityWeek)  Adobe Plugs 46 Security Flaws on Patch Tuesday (SecurityWeek) Citrix Releases Security Updates for Application Delivery Management (CISA) SAP Releases June 2022 Security Updates (CISA)  So long, Internet Explorer. The browser retires today (AP NEWS) SBOM in Action: finding vulnerabilities with a Software Bill of Materials (Google Online Security Blog) Russia Is Taking Over Ukraine's Internet (Wired) Belarusian hacktivist group releases purported Belarusian wiretapped audio of Russian embassy (CyberScoop)  Intercepted call: Russian plan to send PoWs out into minefields (The Telegraph)  Hacker Advertises ‘Crappy' Ransomware on Instagram (Vice)  LockBit Ransomware Compromise of Mandiant Not Supported by Any Evidence, May Be a PR Move by Cybercrime Gang (CPO Magazine)

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Follina's Tuesday Patch, Hertzbleed Attack, Mighty Bot, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 3:27


Follina's Tuesday Patch, Hertzbleed Attack, Mighty Bot, and more.A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 15 June, 2022Episode 245 - 15 June 2022Follina's Tuesday PAtch- https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-june-2022-patch-tuesday-55-fixes-remote-code-execution-in-abundance/Hertzbleed Attack - https://www.securityweek.com/new-hertzbleed-remote-side-channel-attack-affects-intel-amd-processorsTravis Exposed Tokens- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/thousands-of-github-aws-docker-tokens-exposed-in-travis-ci-logs/Citrix ADM Error - https://www.securityweek.com/attackers-can-exploit-critical-citrix-adm-vulnerability-reset-admin-passwordsLinux Panchan Bot - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/new-go-botnet-panchan-spreading-rapidly-in-education-networks/Mighty Bot - https://www.zdnet.com/article/a-tiny-botnet-launched-the-largest-ddos-attack-on-record/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Wednesday June 15th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From ZDNet.comJune Patch Tuesday is a popular one with everyone from Siemens to Schneider to Adobe to SAP rolling out updates. In fact, 141 updates just from those four. The one I am going to call out is Microsoft. Redmond rolled out 55 fixes, That's down from 74 last month, and only three of which are critical, but one of those is a fix for the Follina zero-day. At long last. Get your patch on kids. From SecurityWeek.com:Researchers have identified a new side-channel attack that can allow hackers to remotely extract sensitive information from a targeted system through a CPU timing attack they are calling Hertzbleed. This impacts devices powered by Intel and AMD and possibly others. Details on the article. From BleepingComputer.com:The Travis CI platform, which is used for software development and testing, has exposed user data containing tens of thousands of authentication tokens for GitHub, AWS, and Docker Hub. Aqua Security, who discovered the flaw, shared their findings with Travis hoping for a fix, but they were told that the issue was “by design” and left the data exposed. From SecurityWeek.com:Citrix has warned of a critical vulnerability in their Citrix Application Delivery Management that could essentially allow an attacker to trigger an administrator password reset at the next reboot. The vulnerabilities impact all supported versions of Citrix ADM server and Citrix ADM agent. Customers will need to update the server as well as all associated agents. The company says it has already taken care of the ADM cloud service and no additional action is required there. From BleepingComputer.comA new peer-to-peer botnet named Panchan has popped up targeting Linux servers in the education sector to mine crypto. It is empowered with SSH worm functions to move laterally within the compromised network, and has powerful detection avoidance capabilities, such as using memory-mapped miners and dynamically detecting process monitoring to pause the mining module. And last today, from ZDNet.comSpeaking of botnets, Cloudflare says it mitigated a DDoS attack that peaked at 26 million requests per second, and was caused by a botnet of only just over 5,000 devices. Rather than being based in IoT devices, this botnet was hiding in cloud service providers. For this particular attack, each device was averaging 5,200 requests per second, which is about 4,000 times more than a typical IoT botnet can generate. Details on the article. That's all for me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

Kurz informiert – die IT-News des Tages von heise online
Ransomware, Schweiz, Cybercrime, Twitch | Kurz informiert vom 15.06.2022 by heise online

Kurz informiert – die IT-News des Tages von heise online

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022


Heute mit: Ransomware, Schweiz, Cybercrime, Twitch ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS*** Dieser Podcast ist gesponsert von Dell Technologies. Rufen Sie uns an unter 0800-000 4569 oder besuchen Sie uns online unter: www.Dell.de/KMU-Beratung ***SPONSOR-HINWEIS ENDE***

Cyber Security Today
Cyber Security Today, June 15, 2022 - BlackCat ransomware hits again, a huge DDoS attack and security updates issued

Cyber Security Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 5:26


This episode reports on the latest attacks using the BlackCat /AlphV ransomware strain, a huge DDoS attack and security updates issued from Microsoft and others

ICT Pulse Podcast
ICTP 208: 2022 Expert Insights update on cyber threats and security in the Caribbean, with David Gittens, of ISSA Barbados Chapter

ICT Pulse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 57:13


In our third Expert Insights update for 2022, Cybersecurity Consultant, David Gittens shares his thoughts on, among other things: key trends in the current threat landscape; the Conti ransomware and what Caribbean countries can learn from the Costa Rican experience; what does Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS) mean; and the top three things businesses should be doing in 2022 to improve their network/IT security.    The episode, show notes and links to some of the things mentioned during the episode can be found at ICT Pulse Podcast Page (www.ict-pulse.com/category/podcast/)  Do subscribe and leave us a review!     Music credit: The Last Word (Oui Ma Chérie), by Andy Narrell Podcast editing support: Mayra Bonilla Lopez

GLT's Sound Ideas
A month after Lincoln College closed its doors, one employee says she wants to counter the COVID-19 and ransomware narrative

GLT's Sound Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 8:16


Becky White says she was a nine-year employee, working at the college as an adjunct professor and tutor.

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología
Por un puñado de Robux

mixxio — podcast diario de tecnología

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 15:33


Ransomware que pide Robux / Un castor rompe Internet en Canadá / Triple futuro de los coches eléctricos: ¿carga inalámbrica, solares, o batería doble? / Adiós a Google Talk e Internet Explorer / Atlas galáctico con Gaia Patrocinador: El 21 de julio vuelve el Sorteo del Oro de Cruz Roja, y comprando un boleto ya sabes que estás apoyando toda su importante labor. Harás que Cruz Roja pueda ayudar cada día a más personas que necesitan compañía, acogida, socorro o un futuro laboral. — Cruz Roja te recuerda que juegues con responsabilidad y sólo si eres mayor de edad.  Ransomware que pide Robux / Un castor rompe Internet en Canadá / Triple futuro de los coches eléctricos: ¿carga inalámbrica, solares, o batería doble? / Adiós a Google Talk e Internet Explorer / Atlas galáctico con Gaia ☠️ Encuentran un ransomware que pide que le pagues en moneda de Roblox para recuperar tus datos. En vez de usar los ya tradicionales métodos de criptomonedas, el atacante usa una copia cutre de Chaos solicita que compres un producto digital de 1700 robux, unos 20 euros. — Roblox le ha desactivado la cuenta.

The 443 - Security Simplified
Robux Ransomware

The 443 - Security Simplified

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 39:27


This week on the podcast we cover the latest and most bizarre ransomware extortion demand we've seen in recent memory. Before that though, we cover the latest updates on nation state hacking activity including threats of escalating attacks leading to physical retaliation.

Security In Five Podcast
Episode 1213 - A Common Ransomware Has Been Decrypted From Poor Coding Errors

Security In Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 5:06


Ransomware is a nasty piece of malware that attempts to encrypt all your files and hold them ransom to get them back. The key to the success is the encryption process remains secret. Recently a common ransomware has been reverse engineered and a decrypted has been released. This episode talks about how the decrypter was built. Source - https://decoded.avast.io/threatresearch/decrypted-tarrak-ransomware/ Be aware, be safe. Get ExpressVPN, Secure Your Privacy And Support The Show Become A Patron! Patreon Page *** Support the podcast with a cup of coffee *** - Ko-Fi Security In Five —————— Where you can find Security In Five —————— Security In Five Reddit Channel r/SecurityInFive Binary Blogger Website Security In Five Website Security In Five Podcast Page - Podcast RSS Twitter @securityinfive iTunes, YouTube, TuneIn, iHeartRadio,

Random but Memorable
Delete Message Security Questions

Random but Memorable

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 28:28


On today's show we react to WWDC, discuss everything new with iOS 16, and what Passkeys will mean for passwords. Plus we offer up an extended-edition of Watchtower Weekly and kick-off a brand new game! Who will stumble and be lost for words in our Security Question Generation Game?❓

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Ransomware Minute. Tenafly Public Schools, Costa Rica. Scott Schober, WCYB Digital Radio.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 2:08


The Ransomware Minute is a rundown of the latest ransomware attacks & news, brought to you by CyberArk. Listen to the podcast weekly and read it daily at ransomwareminute.com • CyberArk is the global leader in Identity Security. Centered on privileged access management, CyberArk provides the most comprehensive security offering for any identity – human or machine. To learn more about our sponsor CyberArk, visit https://cyberark.com

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Hello XD upgrades, Conti targets Intel, Sentient AI?, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 3:42


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 13 June, 2022Episode 243 - 13 June 2022Hello XD upgrades- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/hello-xd-ransomware-now-drops-a-backdoor-while-encrypting/Conti targets Intel - https://www.cpomagazine.com/cyber-security/conti-ransomware-develops-proof-of-concept-code-for-firmware-attacks/WannaFriendMe out of the Blox- https://www.techradar.com/news/this-ransomware-can-only-be-decrypted-by-going-to-the-roblox-storeWeb3 Wallet seed stealer - https://www.securityweek.com/chinese-hackers-adding-backdoor-ios-android-web3-wallets-seaflower-campaignBluetooth fingerprint - https://threatpost.com/bluetooth-signals-track-smartphones/179937/Sentient AI? - https://www.theregister.com/2022/06/13/google_lamda_sentient_claims/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Monday June 13th, 2022, and this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.comResearchers report increased activity of the Hello XD ransomware, which is based on the leaked source code of Babuk, with two significant notes. One is that the operators are now deploying an upgraded sample featuring stronger encryption that includes custom packing for detection avoidance and encryption algorithm changes. And two, they are now including an open-source backdoor named MicroBackdoor. Lots of details in the article. From CPOMagazine.comm:An analysis of leaked chats from the Conti ransomware group have found two items of note. Evidently the cybercrime group was planning firmware attacks targeting the Intel Management Engine. Such a compromise would allow threat actors to introduce a backdoor on Intel devices and execute commands without detection by OS-based security tools. The other interesting piece is that the chat logs seem to confirm a link between the Conti group and the Russian Foreign Services Bureau. Color me not surprised. From TechRadar.com:A new ransomware group called WannaFriendMe, is targeting gamers with the Chaos ransomware, which tries to pass itself off as Ryuk. The strange thing is, the decryptor is so easy, my kid can get it. I only say that because to get the decryptor, you need to log into a Roblox account and buy a specific game pass. Costs about $20. From SecurityWeek.com:Cybercriminals likely operating out of China are distributing backdoored versions of iOS and Android Web3 wallets in an effort to steal users' seed phrase. This previously unreported campaign, dubbed SeaFlower, has been described as one of the most technically sophisticated threats targeting users of Web3 wallets ever seen. Details in the article. From ThreatPost.comResearchers warn Bluetooth signals can be used to track device owners via a unique fingerprinting of the radio signal. Their paper suggests that minor manufacturing imperfections in hardware are unique to each device, and cause measurable distortions which can be used as a basically a fingerprint to track a specific device. Details and a link to the research in the article. And last today, from The Register.comYou ever see the movie Her? Well, since 2021, Google's Responsible AI team, has been tasked with talking to LaMDA, or Language Model for Dialogue Applications. This project was built by fine-tuning a family of Transformer-based neural language models specialized for dialog, with up to 137 billion model parameters. Someone on that team has recently been placed on paid administrative leave for violating Google's confidentiality policies. This person has gone on record stating that they believe the application has exhibited self-awareness and is now a sentient being. That is quite enough from me today. Have a great rest of your day. Like and subscribe, and until tomorrow, be safe out there.

Cyber Security Today
Cyber Security Today, June 13, 2022 - Serious bugs found in a building access control system, ransomware news and more

Cyber Security Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 5:33


This episode reports on vulnerabilities in a web-connected physical security system, new Linux ransomware and wireless security advice

PEBCAK Podcast: Information Security News by Some All Around Good People
Episode 64 - RSA 2022 Recap, Syria Cuts Off Internet During School Testing, Cici's Pizza Ransomware'd, Microsoft Eliminates Non-Compete Agreements, Scary Movies That Aren't Scary Movies

PEBCAK Podcast: Information Security News by Some All Around Good People

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


Welcome to this week's episode of the PEBCAK Podcast! We've got four amazing stories this week so sit back, relax, and keep being awesome! Be sure to stick around for our Dad Joke of the Week. (DJOW) Follow us on Instagram @pebcakpodcast PEBCAK - Acronym of “problem exists between chair and keyboard.”

Cyber Security Headlines
June 13, 2022

Cyber Security Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 7:35


Amazon's chat app has a child sex abuse problem Ransomware decryptors now for sale on gaming platform China's biggest online influencers go dark Thanks to today's episode sponsor, Datadog Watch Datadog's on-demand webinar for a 30-minute discussion on driving DevSecOps best practices in the enterprise with CTO Cormac Brady. Over the course of his 20+ year career at Thomson Reuters, Cormac consistently built bridges between technical teams—and in the process helped teams achieve superior results and earned himself senior leadership positions. Cormac shares stories and leadership lessons that are applicable to any enterprise technical leader looking to help their firm build and operate services in an increasingly competitive and treacherous digital economy. Watch now at datadoghq.com/ciso/ For the stories behind the headlines, head to CISOseries.com

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News
Massive Messenger Mess, Fujitsu Flaws, Aoqin Dragon Rears, and more.

InfoSec Overnights - Daily Security News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 2:53


A daily look at the relevant information security news from overnight - 10 June, 2022Episode 242 - 10 June 2022Massive Messenger Mess- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/massive-facebook-messenger-phishing-operation-generates-millions/Fujitsu Flaws - https://portswigger.net/daily-swig/separate-fujitsu-cloud-storage-vulnerabilities-could-enable-attackers-to-destroy-virtual-backupsPalermo popped- https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/vice-society-ransomware-claims-attack-on-italian-city-of-palermo/HID Switched Can't Hide - https://www.securityweek.com/vulnerabilities-hid-mercury-access-controllers-allow-hackers-unlock-doorsAoqin Dragon Rears - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/chinese-hacking-group-aoqin-dragon-quietly-spied-orgs-for-a-decade/Hi, I'm Paul Torgersen. It's Friday June 10th, 2022, and once again from Chicago, this is a look at the information security news from overnight. From BleepingComputer.comA massive phishing operation is abusing Facebook and Messenger to lure millions of users and tricking them into entering their account credentials and seeing advertisements. The campaign operators then use these stolen accounts to send further phishing messages to their friends, generating a significant revenue via online advertising commissions. The activity peaked in April and May of this year, but has been going on since at least September of last year. From PortSwigger.net:Two flaws in the web interface of a Fujitsu cloud storage system could allow remote code execution, and ultimately be exploited to read, write, and destroy backed up files. The vulnerabilities impact the enterprise-grade Fujitsu Eternus CS8000 Control Center version 8.1. Details in the article. From BleepingComputer.com:The city of Palermo, Italy, has taken all systems offline in response to a ransomware attack, impacting 1.3 million residents and tens of thousands of tourists visiting the city. The Vice Society ransomware group has claimed responsibility for the attack via an entry on their dark web data leak site. From SecurityWeek.com:Access control products using HID Mercury controllers are affected by critical vulnerabilities that can be exploited to remotely unlock doors. The issues were found in products from LenelS2, a subsidiary of Carrier, but HID Global said that all OEM partners that use these hardware controllers are affected. A total of eight vulnerabilities were found, seven of which were rated high or critical severity. Either upgrade to the latest firmware, or make sure those babies are behind a firewall. And last today, from BleepingComputer.comA previously unknown Chinese-speaking threat actor has been discovered and named Aoqin Dragon. Researchers were able to link it to malicious activity going as far back as 2013. This hacking group is focused on cyber-espionage, targeting government, education, and telecommunication organizations based in Singapore, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Australia. Details, including a link to the research, in the article. That's all for me this week. Have a great weekend. And until next week, be safe out there.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Cyber Safety. The Rise In Ransomware. Scott Schober, Author & CEO, Berkeley Varitronics.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 5:30


In this episode of Cyber Safety, Scott Schober, CEO of Berkeley Varitronics, joins host Zack Hack to discuss the growing concern of ransomware. To learn more about ransomware and more about cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com

Security Now (MP3)
SN 874: Passkeys, Take 2 - ServiceNSW Responds, Follina, Windows Search URL, UNISOC Chip Vulnerability

Security Now (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 107:36


Picture of the Week. ServiceNSW Responds. ExpressVPN pulls the plug in India. And speaking of pulling the plug. "Follina" under active exploitation. And a Windows Search URL schema can be abused, too. "Critical UNISOC Chip Vulnerability Affects Millions of Android Smartphones". Ransomware sanctions are causing trouble. Conti spotted compromising motherboard firmware. Errata. Closing the Loop. Passkeys, Take 2. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-874-Notes.pdf   Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: itpro.tv/securitynow promo code SN30 cloud.jumpcloud.com/securitynow bitwarden.com/twit

Security Now (Video HI)
SN 874: Passkeys, Take 2 - ServiceNSW Responds, Follina, Windows Search URL, UNISOC Chip Vulnerability

Security Now (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 108:07


Picture of the Week. ServiceNSW Responds. ExpressVPN pulls the plug in India. And speaking of pulling the plug. "Follina" under active exploitation. And a Windows Search URL schema can be abused, too. "Critical UNISOC Chip Vulnerability Affects Millions of Android Smartphones". Ransomware sanctions are causing trouble. Conti spotted compromising motherboard firmware. Errata. Closing the Loop. Passkeys, Take 2. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-874-Notes.pdf   Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: itpro.tv/securitynow promo code SN30 cloud.jumpcloud.com/securitynow bitwarden.com/twit

Security Now (Video HD)
SN 874: Passkeys, Take 2 - ServiceNSW Responds, Follina, Windows Search URL, UNISOC Chip Vulnerability

Security Now (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 108:07


Picture of the Week. ServiceNSW Responds. ExpressVPN pulls the plug in India. And speaking of pulling the plug. "Follina" under active exploitation. And a Windows Search URL schema can be abused, too. "Critical UNISOC Chip Vulnerability Affects Millions of Android Smartphones". Ransomware sanctions are causing trouble. Conti spotted compromising motherboard firmware. Errata. Closing the Loop. Passkeys, Take 2. We invite you to read our show notes at https://www.grc.com/sn/SN-874-Notes.pdf   Hosts: Steve Gibson and Leo Laporte Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/security-now. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can submit a question to Security Now! at the GRC Feedback Page. For 16kbps versions, transcripts, and notes (including fixes), visit Steve's site: grc.com, also the home of the best disk maintenance and recovery utility ever written Spinrite 6. Sponsors: itpro.tv/securitynow promo code SN30 cloud.jumpcloud.com/securitynow bitwarden.com/twit