Podcasts about CDN

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  • 660PODCASTS
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  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about CDN

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Latest podcast episodes about CDN

Companion Chapel Podcast
Revelation Ch 2 v8-11 The word META in the Bible. The Church of Smyrna.

Companion Chapel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 20:44


Listen to the end to avoid misunderstanding. Or watch on YouTube https://youtu.be/h4kZTa1t6so Watch to the end to avoid misunderstanding. In this video we cover the Church of Smyrna who knew the blasphemy of them which say they are Jews but are actually the assembly of Satan. The 7 Church's listed in Revelation chapter 2 & 3 cover every Church on planet earth today. Only 2 Church's pass. Smyrna and Philadelphia. Follow us together as members of the many membered body of Christ to make sure that you are not in 'META' with a pseudo Churchy Church. Please give a 'like' and subscribe if you have learned something. A lot of care and hard work goes into preparing and creating these podcast video's. Please visit Companionchapel.com . Your donations help glorify, magnify and broadcast God's saving word to our whole human family. Thank you for the donations so far enabling the Companion Chapel to have electricity. The Companion Chapel urgently needs shingles for the roof, cost $3000 CDN. Insulation $4500 CND. Every little bit helps and may God bless you and yours. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/companionchapelpodcast/message

DevOps Paradox
DOP 170: Running Containers at the Edge

DevOps Paradox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:33


#170: Containers are one of the quickest ways we can move away from a traditional server-centric architecture, as they allow us to host software "in the cloud" without over-provisioning resources or managing infrastructure like we did with virtual machines.   What do you think about when you hear edge computing? Is it CDN, serverless functions, or something else? All of these definitions can be heavily related to the concept of edge computing. The term itself is ambiguous and hard to grasp.   But what happens when you try to run containers at the edge? In this episode, we speak with Dan Bartholomew, Co-Founder & CTO at Section, about how running containers at the edge is much more than deciding what city to run your container in.   Dan's contact information: Twitter: https://twitter.com/dbartholomew LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniel-bartholomew-27baa625/   YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/devopsparadox/   Books and Courses: Catalog, Patterns, And Blueprints https://www.devopstoolkitseries.com/posts/catalog/   Review the podcast on Apple Podcasts: https://www.devopsparadox.com/review-podcast/   Slack: https://www.devopsparadox.com/slack/   Connect with us at: https://www.devopsparadox.com/contact/

DishWithDina
039. Dishing with Karen Bukolt, Registered Dietitian and Wellness Consultant

DishWithDina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 48:46


Dina and Karen share memories of holiday gatherings and discuss how to meet clients where they're at. Karen Bukolt, MS, RDN, CDN is an innovative and organized nutrition and wellness professional based out of New York City. Karen provides wellness coaching for individuals and groups who are looking to create harmony in their lives, whether it be their physical, emotional, or spiritual health. She also conducts virtual cooking demos and webinars that you can find on her YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/EpicureNutrition. Learn more about Karen at https://www.epicurenutrition.net/, on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/epicurenutrition/, and on Twitter at https://twitter.com/EpicureNutri. If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, leave a review, and share it with others! You can also submit listener feedback or request to be a guest on a future episode by completing this form: https://forms.gle/7UZ2kEPDHjBgLhRU9. Help support this podcast for as little as $0.99/month: https://anchor.fm/dishwithdina/support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dishwithdina/support

Life After Cheer
How to Improve Your Relationship With Food

Life After Cheer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 31:51


For this week's episode of Life After Cheer, I talk with Francesca Alfano – a former competitive dancer and cheerleader and certified Dietitian-Nutritionist! We discussed several important things when it comes to your relationship with food, but here are the biggest takeaways from today's episode:(7:02) Focus on health, not necessarily on weight(19:14) You want to feel satisfied and energized after eating, rather than simply stuffed full – eating should give you energy!(36:43) Look at food in terms of creating health – having a good relationship with food will leave you better off CONNECT WITH FRANCESCA:Francesca Alfano, MS, CDN, CNS, IFNCP, is a board-certified functional medicine Dietitian-Nutritionist. She holds a master's degree in Nutrition and Integrative Health, is a board-Certified Nutrition Specialist, and has received advanced training in functional nutrition from the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy. Francesca helps women struggling to lose weight implement simple, sustainable food and lifestyle habits to support a healthy metabolism, balance hormones, increase energy levels, improve fertility, and permanently lose weight without counting calories or following restrictive diets. Unlike traditional diets, Francesca uses individualized functional medicine and culinary nutrition to help clients build lifelong healthy habits so they can confidently nourish their bodies deliciously and satisfyingly. In her career, Francesca has helped thousands of clients reach their goals and adopt healthy eating habits leading to long-term weight loss and improved health outcomes. Website: https://francescaalfano.com/IG: https://www.instagram.com/francesca.alfano.nutrition/ LINKS: Apply now to get CHEERFIT Certified: cheerfittraining.com/getcertifiedNot part of the SQUAD yet? Join HERE: cheerfittraining.com/squadClick HERE and text us at (908) 388-9139 for weekly workout + motivation tips delivered straight to your phoneAll things CHEERFIT: www.cheerfittraining.com FOLLOW:CHEERFIT: instagram.com/cheerfittraining

SMAF-NewsBot
IBC Beach: Streamers Meetup - Sept 11th - Jetty Bar @ IBC

SMAF-NewsBot

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 1:45


Greening of Streaming, Streaming Video Technology Alliance, Women In Streaming Media and the CDN Alliance are celebrating the return of IBC with a . Greening of Streaming, Streaming Video Technology Alliance, Women In Streaming Media and the CDN Alliance are celebrating the return of IBC with a meet-up by the Beach at the Jetty Bar in the RAI from 5pm to 8pm on Sunday the 11th of September. This is a great opportunity for members to catchup face to face, and for those curious about what these key organisations in the streaming media industry to come to find out more. We encourage members to bring peers in the industry who you think will benefit from finding out more about the activities and initiatives that each of these groups leads. Its a paid-bar so each member can "sponsor" their own rounds! :-) There will be a short 5 min presentation from each organisation around 6pm. Greening of Streaming "Joining up thinking around energy efficiency in streaming" Streaming Video Technology Alliance "Solving critical challenges of delivering high quality video at scale" Women In Streaming Media "Increasing Diversity and visibility of Women in the streaming industry" CDN Alliance "Connecting, supporting and representing the CDN industry" To quote Fatboy Slim: "We've come a long long way together through the good times and the hard" ... let's celebrate the return to IBC and help raise the profile of streaming across the broadcast industry... The eventbrite registration helps us plan (and has more details), so please register if you can...

The Generalist
Helium: The Network of Networks

The Generalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 45:12


Nova Labs' Internet of Things network is one of crypto's greatest achievements. In its next chapter, it's pursuing an even more audacious goal: to provide the infrastructure for 5G, WiFi, VPN, CDN, and other networks. This piece is brought to you by Stytch. Want to boost conversion and drive growth? Stytch makes user authentication and onboarding seamless and secure. They offer customizable, out-of-the-box authentication with magic links, one tap social logins, biometrics, one-time passcodes, session management, and more. They're your all-in-one platform for authentication. With their API and SDKs, you can improve user conversion, retention, and security, while saving valuable engineering time. Current customers have seen a 60% increase in conversion after spending just one day on the integration. ‍Check out Stytch today. To find the original piece, published July 24, 2022, follow this link. Subscribe to this podcast, and to our newsletter at readthegeneralist.com. You can also follow @mariogabriele and @thegeneralistco on Twitter for updates.

Nourishing Women Podcast
381: Creating Safety in Your Body So You Can Work Towards Body Trust with Mia Donley RD/N

Nourishing Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 33:42


Today on the show we have guest, Mia Donley, who shares with us all how to work towards body trust by building safety in your body. Mia Donley, MPH, RD, CDN is a registered dietitian and consultant working in the field of eating disorders and public health. She originally pursued nutrition to bring culturally relevant nutrition education to the field, as she didn't find her own family's foods and practices reflected in dietetics. She's worked as a nutrition educator in schools, coordinated public health programs, and currently works for a group practice focused on eating disorders. Outside of counseling, she teaches classes on cultural nutrition and helps create spaces for Black dietitians and dietitians of color working in the field of eating disorders and nutrition.   In this episode we discuss: What inspired Mia's passion for the anti-diet sector of dietetics. How to build trust with food and body, PCOS, and GI issues, especially for WOC and queer folks of color. One tangible way those listening to work can work on building trust with their bodies. How Mia lives wellness without obsession.   Learn more about Mia on her website and on Instagram.   Thank you to BetterHelp for sponsoring today's episode. You can click here to learn more and begin your journey with BetterHelp today.   Announcements: Food & Body Peace Playbook will reopen in October, and you can apply now to reserve your spot! Our signature group coaching program will help YOU make peace with food, trust your body again and live wellness without obsession. We are currently booking for August, September and October for individual counseling at our virtual practice, Nourishing Minds Nutrition. If you're looking for intuitive eating and body image support and/or you're in need of anti-diet advice for HA, PCOS and IBS we would love to support you.    Resources for you: Join our FREE support group for like-minded women, the Nourishing Women Community for more community & support. If you struggle with HA and you're ready to regain your health and fertility, join Get Your Period Back Playbook. Take a look at our online shop, the Wellness Without Obsession Shop, which now includes a self paced online course to begin your intuitive eating journey, the Beginner's Guide to Food & Body Peace.   Let's hang out! Connect with Victoria and the staff at NMN: Victoria's Instagram Victoria's Website Nourishing Minds Nutrition Instagram Nourishing Minds Nutrition website

COMPRESSEDfm
72 | Working with Storybook

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 45:00


In this episode, Amy shares her experience with working with Storybook, the pros and cons, and how it's changed her developer workflow.SponsorsZEALZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit codingzeal.comVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 IntroductionEpisode 32 - Getting Started with TypeScript7:17 Quick Rant: Wired Headphones8:49 Design SystemsEpisode 46 - Everything You Ever Wanted to know about Design SystemsBootstrapZurb Foundation10:36 Supports Multiple Libraries and Frameworks12:28 Sponsor: ZEAL13:13 How do you enter all the information into Storybook?Frontend Masters: Design Systems with React & Storybook - Emma Bostian18:24 Storybook in the Wild: Building out Frontend Components for Backend DevelopersEpisode 54 - Why RedwoodJS is the App Framework for Startups with David Price Redwood.js with David Price22:17 Comparing Storybook to Testing25:31 Sponsor: Vercel26:39 Breaking Down a Component29:29 Add-Ons with Storybook31:28 Storybook and Figma Integration31:46 Sponsor: DatoCMS32:40 Do you use Storybook at work?33:39 Do you think Redwood is an option that you'll use more of going forward? Or, do you think Storybook is something that you implement outside of Redwood in some of your existing setups?35:05 Is Redwood something teams should be looking at for new projects?36:32 Grab Bag Questions39:16 Picks and Plugs39:26 James's Pick: Spike Ball41:07 James's Plug: TikTok42:25 Amy's Pick: PARA Method43:42 Amy's Plug: Everything Svelte

Kodsnack
Kodsnack 483 - System som passar oss, med Peter Gunnarsson

Kodsnack

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 47:22


Fredrik snackar med Peter Gunnarsson, CTO på Lyko. Peter berättar om vad Lyko gör och hur man tänker kring utveckling, inte minst varför man valt att äga och utveckla stora delar av sin teknikplattform själva istället för att köpa in färdiga system. Peter berättar också en hel del om hur man tänker kring att växa och bygga organisation utan att tappa bort något viktigt på vägen. Och om bredare sätt att tänka kring tillgänglighet och redundans - fler moln och CDN är inte alltid bättre, ibland vill man faktiskt ha sin egen maskin i sin egen byggnad också. Avsnittet sponsras av 46elks som bygger ett enkelt API för SMS och telefoni. Registrera dig på 46elks.se/kodsnack så får du en överraskning och utökade möjligheter att experimentera med deras tjänst. Skicka notiser per SMS, ring upp folk, ordna telefonväxlar, och mycket mer. Hur mycket kod krävs för att skicka ett meddelande? Här är ett Curl-exempel: curl https://api.46elks.com/a1/sms -u API_USERNAME:API_PASSWORD -d to=+46766861004 -d message="Hej kodsnacklyssnare! Testa att skicka ditt första SMS med Curl." -d from=Kodsnack API-dokumentationen hittar du på 46elks.se/docs. Ett stort tack till Cloudnet som sponsrar vår VPS! Har du kommentarer, frågor eller tips? Vi är @kodsnack, @tobiashieta, @oferlund, och @bjoreman på Twitter, har en sida på Facebook och epostas på info@kodsnack.se om du vill skriva längre. Vi läser allt som skickas. Gillar du Kodsnack får du hemskt gärna recensera oss i iTunes! Du kan också stödja podden genom att ge oss en kaffe (eller två!) på Ko-fi, eller handla något i vår butik. Länkar Lyko Peter Gunnarsson Lediga IT-jobb på Lyko Lyko social 46elks - veckans sponsor 46elks.se/kodsnack - registrera dig här för att få 200 kronor i krediter Curl Titlar Flytta hem och klippa mig och skaffa ett jobb Klippa sig och skaffa ett jobb Hela vägen till kunden Förfina hela processen System som passar oss Roboten ska lyda oss Jobba från ax till limpa Vår goto-komponent Om det tråkiga händer då? Inte enklare ju större man blir

The Dan Rayburn Podcast
Episode 28: Extending Video Delivery To Rural ISPs; Snap and Twitter See Declining Ad Growth; Verizon Cord Cutting Accelerates

The Dan Rayburn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 40:10


This week we discuss the latest advertising numbers from Twitter and Snap's Q2 earnings, which saw slowing demand for their platforms and had declining revenue. We also highlight the rate of Verizon's cord-cutting numbers, with the company losing 86,000 pay TV subscribers in Q2 and have now lost 8.1% of all their pay TV subs in the last 12-months.  Also discussed, Qwilt's deal with the NCTC to deploy CDN caches inside 100+ rural ISPs that combined, reach 34 million households.Companies, and services mentioned: Disney, ESPN+, Apple TV,  fuboTV, Verizon, Twitter, Snap, MLB, ESPN+, HBO Max, Amazon Prime Video, Qwilt, Vimeo.Questions or feedback? Contact: dan@danrayburn.com

The Unstoppable Ecommerce Podcast
How to Choose a Shopify 2.0 Theme

The Unstoppable Ecommerce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 12:31


I highly recommend Shopify as a great website platform. It's a great choice, especially when you're just starting out with your online store. However, when it comes to choosing a theme, it can be a little bit overwhelming. So in today's episode, I'm going to run you through what you should consider when choosing your Shopify theme. Episode Highlights: What exactly is a CDN (content delivery network)? [2:05] Shopify provides this robust platform where you don't have to worry about anything. It will do the work for you. [2:44] Karyn shares some things that you should look out for when picking your theme. [6:10]  Make sure that your site looks amazing on all screen sizes. [6:33] Look out for the example site. [7:42] Find out what the theme's support is like. [8:14] Make a list of all the features you want your theme to have. [9:18]   Click here for all links mentioned in this episode.   Binge all episodes of The Unstoppable eCommerce Podcast here!   We hope you enjoyed this episode! Please subscribe, rate, and share the show - it would mean the world to me. There's more to come and we're looking forward to sharing how to sell more on your online store in our podcast.     See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Everyday Driver Car Debate
718: Some Guys In Robes, Pepsi Poured Into Coke Cans, Ferrari Doesn't Know You

Everyday Driver Car Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 53:56 Very Popular


Announcing Cars Of The Past film #2 – East Coast! The guys talk a bit about their experience traveling to RADWood in Philly. They debate track cars for Stu in Alberta, CDN, and present options for Kyle in San Diego. Social media questions ask their thoughts on new EU anti-speeding laws, what's the point at which you should stop spending money on an old car, and is the Ferrari California a “real” Ferrari? Catch TV Season 11 on the Motor Trend cable channel from July – Sept. 2022. Please rate and review us on iTunes, and the TV show on IMDB and Amazon. Write to us with your Car Debates, Car Conclusions, and Topic Tuesdays at everydaydrivertv@gmail.com or everydaydriver.com. Share the podcast with your car enthusiast friends!

RD Real Talk - Registered Dietitians Keeping it Real
218: Spilling The Nutrition Tea with Shana Spence!

RD Real Talk - Registered Dietitians Keeping it Real

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 35:23


Shana Spence, MS, RDN, CDN is here to chat about what it's like on the other side of screen as a social media influencer, and how she runs a business while working a 9-5. Shana shares how she sets social media boundaries, goes through her content creating process and the future of The Nutrition Tea.  You probably know Shana from her Instagram account, @thenutritiontea where she bring you all the “tea” on nutrition. For those who don't know, Shana is a registered Dietitian Nutritionist based in New York and labels herself as an “eat anything” dietitian. She wanted to create a platform for open discussion on nutrition and wellness topics to help folks navigate all the information circulating.  Connect with Shana: The Nutrition Tea Website @thenutritiontea on IG @thenutritiontea on TikTok Your Host: Heather Caplan RD  @heatherdcRD heathercaplan.com  RD Real Talk Show Notes Link  @RDRealTalk on IG

Double Slash
Edge computing, le serverless à la sauce CDN

Double Slash

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 42:51


Dans cet épisode nous allons vous expliquer les grands principes du Edge Computing, son fonctionnement et son utilisation. Retrouvez la vidéo de l'enregistrement sur le Youtube de DoubleSlash Le serverless Un service serverless est un service que vous appelez, qui va exécuter le code qui lui est dédié (que vous avez écrit) et renvoyer une réponse. Vous le payez a l'utilisation, souvent en nombre de requête et durée de processing. Cela permet de ne pas posséder de serveur et de la gestion qui va avec. Cependant, lorsque vous créez une fonction serverless, vous sélectionnez une zone géographique. Si vous êtes en France, vous allez privilégier les lieux plus proches de vos internautes. Mais dans le cas, où votre site est international et qu'un visiteur se trouve loin de la France. Le temps de réponse s'allonge et la latence s'installe. Pour une poignée de fonction, cela peut éventuellement passer, mais si toute votre logique, voir votre site repose sur du serverless. Cela devient problématique pour les internautes loin de votre zone de serveur. Évidemment, il est possible de multiplier les serveurs pour servir en fonction du lieu géographique, mais cela ajoute une complexité que vous n'avez pas forcément envie de gérer. Les CDN Un serveur CDN (Content Delivery Network) fait partie d'un réseau réparti à travers la planète. Quand on utilise un CDN, c'est généralement pour des éléments statiques: Images, scripts, fichiers. Le réseau va automatiquement sélectionner le serveur le plus proche du visiteur pour réduire le temps de réponse. Pour une personne en Californie, les éléments statiques proviendront d'un serveur sur la cote Ouest des US. Pour une personne en Allemagne, c'est un serveur allemand qui répondra pour les éléments statiques. Cela marche parfaitement, mais uniquement pour des fichiers. Pas de logique, pas de traitement. Les edges functions Les edges functions, sont des services serverless qui agissent comme des serveurs CDN. Cela permet d'effectuer des traitements au plus proche des internautes. Il y a différent service disponible. Ils utilisent des runtimes différentes. C'est-à-dire que l'on ne retrouve pas forcément du Node.JS pour faire tourner JavaScript. Cloudflare, fait tourner le moteur V8 par exemple. Le même que Chrome ou Node.JS. Netlify a basé ses fonctions edge sur Deno. Cela permet d'avoir des temps de réponse plus rapide, car le cold start est ultra court par rapport à un serveur Node.JS. La suite Au-delà de faire des traitements quand on les appelle. Les edges functions sont capable de faire beaucoup plus. Les Frameworks sont en train d'évoluer et de s'adapter à cette nouvelle technologie. On peut citer, Nuxt 3 qui est capable de tourner sur des Cloudflare Workers. Oui vous avez bien lu, une application complète qui tourne sur un workers. Et donc, une application toujours générée au plus près du visiteur. Fresh, un nouveau Framework, est également pensé pour tourner sur du edge. Bref, le futur est en marche et il semble prometteur. Les liens Netlify Edge function Cloudflare Workers Bonne écoute ! Podcast présenté par : Alexandre Duval @xlanex6 Patrick Faramaz @PatrickFaramaz

The Colorful Kit Podcast Network
CDN - The Champs Are Back

The Colorful Kit Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 108:31


The CDN podcast is back and so are the defending LigaMX femenil champions! We start this episode by recapping Chivas' championship run last season, Blanca Felix's heroics, 'Licha's accomplishments, and Chivas' overall liguilla run. Then we move on to some Chivas statute controversy and a conversation about just how intertwined the men's and women's sides are. Lastly, we discuss Chivas femenil's season opener against Xolos and standout players from that game!

The Flourish Heights Podcast
How to Boost Fertility in Your 30's & 40's w/ Kendra

The Flourish Heights Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 46:39


DYK fertility goes far beyond just trying to get pregnant?! In fact, your fertility can tell you so much about your health....so, how well do you know your fertility? You deserve to know what's going on with your body so you can be empowered and make the best choices now and for the future. Whether you're in your 20s, 30's, or 40's, these practical nutrition and lifestyle tips by our special guest Kendra, can help you optimize your fertility no matter what your journey looks like...LISTEN UP!  P.S - if you live in the DC-metro, join us at our BLOOM SUMMIT on August 21st. Register here: https://bloomsummitdc.splashthat.com/ The Flourish Heights Podcast was made for women, by women. To be empowered in health starts with a true connection with your body. Join Valerie Agyeman, Women's Health Dietitian as she breaks through topics surrounding periods, women's nutrition, body awareness, and self-care.  About Kendra Tolbert Kendra Tolbert MS, RDN, CDN, LD, RYT, Cert AT is a registered dietitian nutritionist, registered yoga teacher, and certified aromatherapist specializing in PCOS, fertility, and PMS. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Sciences from Howard University and her Master of Science in Nutrition and Public Health from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2017, She was awarded the Emerging Professional Award from the Women's Health Dietetic Practice Group. Kendra has experience helping individuals, families, and communities make improvements to their wellbeing and quality of life by adopting healthier habits. Her areas of expertise include women's health, PCOS, fertility, mind-body practices, and community nutrition. Kendra has been featured on and written for a number of websites. Connect with Kendra: Website: https://www.livefertile.com/  YouTube Channel: youtube.com/livefertile Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/live.fertile   Stay Connected: Get BLOOM SUMMIT TICKETS - happening in Washington, DC! https://bloomsummitdc.splashthat.com/ (tell your girls!) USE "FLOURISH" for 5% off your tix! Let me help you thrive on your unique health journey! 1:1 Virtual Nutrition Counseling: www.flourishheights.com/nutrition-counseling Is there a topic you'd like covered on the podcast? Submit it to hello@flourishheights.com Say hello! Email us at hello@flourishheights.com Subscribe to our quarterly newsletters: Flourish Heights Newsletter Visit our website + nutrition blog: www.flourishheights.com Women's Nutrition Counseling: www.flourishheights.com/nutrition-counseling Follow us on social media: Instagram: @flourishheights Facebook: @flourishheights Twitter: @flourishheights Want to support this podcast? Leave a rating, write a review and share! Thank you!  

Alix Turoff Nutrition Podcast
Alix Turoff MS, RD, CDN, CPT | Let's Catch Up!

Alix Turoff Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 24:54


Episode 86: Alix Turoff MS, RD, CDN, CPT | Let's Catch Up! Show Notes:   On this episode of the Alix Turoff Nutrition podcast, Alix is solo for a catch up episode! She talks about her disillusionment with social media, the recent 5 Day Meal Planning challenge, the launch of the next round of her group coaching program, her Greece trip, Invisalign, and a little love fest for her podcast listeners. Hope you enjoy!   Check out all the details on my group coaching program here!   If you're interested in joining our next round of group coaching but have questions, feel free to email me at alix@alixturoffnutrition.com.   Resources: Submit your questions for upcoming podcast episodes Get the 5 week Flexible Nutrition Starter Kit Apply for Alix's 12 week small group coaching program Apply for Alix's 1:1 coaching program Follow Alix on Instagram  Join Alix's private Facebook group Download your FREE Happy Hour Survival Guide Buy Alix's book on Amazon Shop my favorite products on Amazon Contact Alix via email   Be sure you're subscribed to this podcast to automatically receive your episodes!!!    If you enjoyed today's episode, I'd love it if you would take a minute to leave a rating and review! Subscribe to The Alix Turoff Nutrition Podcast   Discount Codes: Built Bar: Use the code ALIX for 10% off your order Legion Athletics: Use the code Alix for 20% off your order

Sin Maquillaje, Altagracia Salazar
Cinco años de lucha, Sin Maquillaje julio 7, 2022

Sin Maquillaje, Altagracia Salazar

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 29:43


Pocas cosas han sido dolorosas para mi como el cierre de A Quien Madruga el programa que con mucho esfuerzo sostuve durante 14 años en la tv a través de Teleantillas. A quien madruga salió del aire en medio de un mar de presiones y suerte que no lloré porque de hacerlo me habrían faltado lágrimas para lo que sería mi año horribilis. Un año en el que perdí cuatro trabajos tres de ellos en siete meses. La angustia que me generó despertar un lunes por primera vez sin la obligación de madrugar me generó una ansiedad terrible. Todavía estaba en el programa de CDN pero pocos saben que estaba ahí de taponera y que llegué en sustitución de Maria Isabel Soldevilla que salía del país a estudiar por un período de tres meses. La angustia de haber perdido mi propia voz en los medios de comunicación en el momento más crítico de la democracia dominicana en muchos años hizo que prendiera mi celular y dijera aquí estoy yo Sin Maquillaje. Así nació este esfuerzo pidiendo que se suscribieran 5 mil personas para que youtube me permitiera transmitir en vivo. Creo que lo hicieron en un día. El esfuerzo parecía absurdo siendo que estaba en la televisión nacional en el programa de CDN que compartía con Febles y Nieves y en el programa vespertino de la Z. El tiempo le dio razón a mi terquedad. Porque en el año siguiente salió Jornada extra del aire y fui despedida de los otros dos trabajos. No me despidieron de un tercero fuera de los medios porque la persona a quien envió YANALAN Rodríguez no pudo lograr que me botar de donde no estaba nombrada. Esa persona está hoy encartada en la operación MEDUSA. Ese año de julio del 2017 a agosto del 2018 en que me quedé virtualmente sin medio de vida no me quedé sin voz gracias a Sin Maquillaje. Dios aprieta pero no ahorca dice el adagio pero a esta que está aquí la llevaron hasta la ultima rayita. Extrañamente no tuve tiempo de preocuparme por los problemas económicos porque estaba dedicada en cuerpo y alma a la Marcha Verde y a la necesidad de la movilización en contra de la corrupción y la impunidad que creo intuíamos sin saber de ninguna manera que la podredumbre alrededor de la administración de Danilo Medina sería del tamaño que resultó. Hubo mucha gente buena que me animó ese año, aunque no soy gente de quejarse porque trato siempre de ver el lado optimista de las cosas. Por eso cuando el bocinerío decía marchan y marchan y no pasa nada desde este modesto espacio decíamos no sé para dónde vamos pero vamos bien. Como todo movimiento social Marcha Verde cumplió su papel y dio paso a un proceso electoral definido por Danilo Medina como el más caro de la historia reciente con resultados conocidos. La movilización social impidió el desmadre nacional con el aborto de las elecciones municipales. Lo mejor de cualquier país que son los jóvenes tomó el relevo de la marcha y llenaron las plazas del país y de exterior. Ese movimiento igual que la marcha no fueron aislados por el control de los medios que tenía el PLD porque habían espacios como este, como el del compadre Marino y otros excluidos de los medios tradicionales. Este Sin Maquillaje es puro agradecimiento a todas y todos los que me permitieron superar el aislamiento al que fui condenada. Durante tres años nadie me ofreció trabajo en los medios y ustedes han hecho que ahora el medio sea yo misma. Eso me lo dijo Carolina Santana hace un tiempo y cuando veo algunas de las críticas que recibo ahora creo que Carola tiene razón. Gracias a ustedes el medio soy yo.

Search Engine Nerds
How Decentralized Web3 Is Changing Online Publishing & SEO with Jon Henshaw - EP 277

Search Engine Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 78:48


Could the web be owned and governed by its users? That's what Web 3.0 offers, a decentralized web where individuals have control over their own sections of this virtual landscape! In this episode, Jon Henshaw, SEO at Paramount+ and the founder of Raven Tools & CoyWolf, joined me to discuss his experience on Decentralized Web3. Jon has recently worked on many Web3-based CDN / publishing/blogging projects. Included in our discussion are insights into what this means for the future of content publishing and SEO. It's a place for me to test things around publishing and to get something to rank. So with that being said, I would say that one of the most interesting things that I've observed over the last year with what I've been doing is the ability to rank content really high without any outreach or link building.–Jon Henshaw, 18:47 I always write in a way that's very that's focused on disambiguation. When I write, I mention an entity that can confirm to Google that this is what this thing is about.–Jon Henshaw, 26:13 At SEJ, we don't do any link building. Our link building tool is our publish button. –Loren Baker, 1:04:29 [00:00]    - A little about Jon [06:23] - Is the increase in videos and images in search results relevant? [10:05] - How Coy Wolf started. [17:29] - What signals are becoming stronger over the last year? [18:50] - One interesting thing Jon has observed in the rankings. [24:16] - Coy Wolf's other experiments. [37:30] - A tactic for reputation management. [56:07] - Did search visibility for professional news & review sites increase? [1:01:42] - Can dot-com quality help? [1:07:00] - How Jon sets up his hosting.      Resources mentioned: https://www.coywolf.news/ https://coywolf.app/ https://coywolf.pro/ https://coywolf.reviews/ https://coywolf.surf/ I think the latest algorithm update probably hit on things that may have to do with how much time people spend on the content before they actually click back to the search result.–Jon Henshaw, 26:38 I definitely do the experiment and do things that many people within our field would consider not best practices. Never seen that before, or I certainly wouldn't advise doing that. But, I've learned from it that there are some things I now would suggest or recommend because it's not as bad as you thought they might be.–Jon Henshaw. 54:14 It reminds me of the Japanese concept of Kaizen. Every mountain starts with a speck of dust, right, so Kaizen's at the thousandth step. But you have to start with step one, and you just grow and grow slowly and slowly over time. –Loren Baker, 50:43   For more content like this, subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/searchenginejournal Are you looking to keep up with current and effective digital marketing today? Check out https://www.searchenginejournal.com for everything you need to know within the digital marketing space and improve your skills as an internet marketer.   Connect with Jon Henshaw: Jon brings an unmatched combination of experience and expertise to the world of digital marketing and web technologies. He founded Raven Tools, which became widely used in the industry after selling it to TapClicks in 2017. He's also no stranger to the big screen, having worked with Fortune 500 companies throughout his career. Currently, he is the Principal SEO analyst at Paramount, where you can find him directing and overseeing streaming services of Paramount+, Pluto TV, Showtime, and CBS. Also, as Editor-In-Chief of CoyWolf, he ensures that all stories are reported with rigorous journalistic integrity. Connect with Jon on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonhenshaw/ Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/henshaw Connect with Loren Baker, Founder of Search Engine Journal: Follow him on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/lorenbaker Connect with him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lorenbaker

Food Heaven Podcast
Yes, Most Bloating Is Normal…But Here's What To Do If It's Excessive

Food Heaven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 34:08 Very Popular


Bloating. Everybody has it. But it makes some people more uncomfortable than others. First, we are here to tell you that bloating is 100% normal and part of the complex digestion process. But if you are feeling like your bloating is excessive and causing distress, we want to provide some information and tools to help. In today's episode, we speak with the queen of digestion, Tamara Duker Freuman, MS, RD, CDN, @tamarafreuman a New York City-based registered dietitian, and trusted digestive nutrition expert. Tamara is the author of "The Bloated Belly Whisperer," and her next book, REGULAR, will be published in April 2023.    In This Episode We'll Cover: The common causes of bloating How to know when you need to seek professional help  IBS vs. Bloating How bloating can be treated  Functional Dyspepsia & MORE!    3 Ways You Can Support This Podcast: Rate Review Support our sponsors using our unique ‘HOOKUP' codes here: https://foodheavenmadeeasy.com/hookup/   For our resources and show notes, visit foodheavenmadeeasy.com/podcast   _______   Resources: Tamara's Book Tamara's Twitter Tamara's Instagram  Tamara's Facebook   Produced by Dear Media

COMPRESSEDfm
Secrets Things, Env Vars, How to Handle API Keys Correctly

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:11


In this episode, James shares common mistakes people make with their API Keys and explains the appropriate way to handle them.SponsorsVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comZEAL is hiring!ZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit softwareresidency.com/careersDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 IntroductionYouTube Video RE: Mistakes People Make with API Keys6:42 API Keys7:37 Where do API Keys come from?8:57 Mistakes People Make with API Keys9:10 Mistake #1: Hard Coding the API Key Value11:45 Sponsor: Vercel12:53 Mistake #2: Adding an API Key to the .env file, but still exposing the key16:20 Mistake #3: Committing Your Key to Source Control17:59 What should you do about a leaked API key?19:38 Using .gitignore21:20 The Best Way to Handle Secrets22:57 Serverless FunctionsEpisode 57 - Authentication and Authorization and other Buzz Words29:55 Sponsor: ZEAL30:41 Where would you put a Bearer Token?31:40 Server Side Rendering33:49 Public API Keys37:20 Sponsor: DatoCMS38:13 Grab Bag Questions38:24 What's the best way to share environmental variables across different machines?38:35 What are the pros and cons of system environmental variables vs a KMS (Key Management System)?40:34 Picks and Plugs40:44 James's Pick: Sketcher's Tennis Shoes from Costco44:54 James's Plug: YouTube Video - 10 Things JavaScript Developers Have Stopped Doing45:26 Amy's Picks: James Clear 3-2-1 NewsletterAtomic Habits, by James Clear46:14 Amy's Pick: Keystone.js on Level Up Tutorials

TechStuff
Tech News: Cloudflare Outage Disrupts the Internet

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 13:32


An outage in Cloudflare's content delivery network disrupts multiple services across the Internet. Plus, Meta shows off some mixed reality headset prototypes, former Tesla employees sue Tesla, and South Korea successfully puts a satellite into orbit. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dietitians in Nutrition Support: DNS Podcast
Cultural Sensitivities and the Nutrition Support Clinician featuring Sandra Arevalo, MPH, RDN, CDN, CDCES, FADA

Dietitians in Nutrition Support: DNS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 27:06


In this episode, we discuss cultural sensitivities as it relates to nutrition support clinicians with Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Sandra Arevalo, MPH, RDN, CDN, CDCES, FADA. Sandra currently serves as Diversity Liaison for the Latinos and Hispanics in Dietetics and Nutrition DPG and focuses her professional energy on providing culturally sensitive health care and education to the most underserved and diverse families. Tune in to hear Sandra's take on this important topic and her advice for nutrition support dietitians looking to improve their own level of expertise. Recorded 8/19/21, Length 27 minutes.

Book Club
The Whole Body Reset

Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


Host: John J. Russell, MD Guest: Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM For older adults, losing weight can be an almost impossible task…which then begs the question: have we been giving the wrong advice? And can stopping age-related weight gain and muscle loss be done in six simple steps? To find out, Dr. John Russell speaks with nutritionist and exercise physiologist Ms. Heidi Skolnik, co-author of The Whole Body Reset.

Digital Marketing with Bill Hartzer
Google Search Console, Google Business Profile, Twitter Nofollow Links, and CDN SEO

Digital Marketing with Bill Hartzer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 23:03


In this episode, Bill Hartzer talks about Google Search Console and new report data that they're providing, as well as Google Business Profile issues that have come up. Google's now showing a profile strength widget in the search results for business owners, and Twitter has remove the nofollow attribute on links in Tweets. We're seeing a drop in searches at DuckDuckGo, SEOJobs.com is a great resource for SEO Jobs. Does adding or using a CDN help search engine rankings? Google's John Mueller answers that question. Finally, some domain registrars are offering cyber liability insurance services. Keep in mind that may be good to have, but cyber liability insurance does not cover the loss or theft of domain names. So you may want to look into domain protection by DNProtect.com.

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing
[Ep112] - Google: Stop Putting Your Name In Image Alt Text

#TWIMshow - This Week in Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 13:33


1. Digital Avatars Now Available In TikTok - TikTok's Avatars, now available via the ‘Effects' panel in the camera view, enable users to create their own custom character depictions for use across the app. Per Tiktok:“Choose from an array of hairstyles, accessories, piercings and makeup, to create a TikTok Avatar that reflects your personal look and style. After your Avatar is ready, you can start recording videos. As you gesture and move, your Avatar will mimic your motion.”2. SEO Tool Yoast Is Adopting IndexNow Protocol - Yoast has reversed position and stated that they will now support Microsoft's open-source IndexNow search engine indexing protocol, which they previously dismissed.IndexNow is an indexing technology that allows search engines to index websites very instantly. It's an open-source project that helps websites notify search engines when they have new or updated material.3. Pin Posts on Your Instagram Profile - Instagram has now announced a new feature that allows you to pin posts to your profile, giving you another more way to customize your IG profile's appearance. A new 'Pin to Your Profile' option can be found in the three dots function menu at the upper right of any post.4. New Way To Announce Your Product On Twitter - Twitter's Product Drops is a new feature that allows brands to alert their followers when a new product is released. This is the first time a social media network has offered such a tool. Followers will notice a "Remind me" button at the bottom of a merchant's tweet when the merchant announces a future launch. To be reminded of the launch date, they'll merely tap that button.They'll get a notification in the app 15 minutes before and at the time of the drop on the product's debut day. They can shop for the product and (hopefully) get it in time by clicking the notification, which will take them to the merchant's website.5. LinkedIn Audio Events Now Available To All Creators - LinkedIn is broadening audio-only live events, which were first offered in a beta test in January, to all users with Creator Mode enabled.LinkedIn's response to the success of apps like Clubhouse and features like Twitter Spaces is audio-only live events.They were always free to listen to for all LinkedIn members, and now anyone who activates Creator Mode can host their own audio events.6. Promote Your LinkedIn Events Via Paid Ads - LinkedIn now allows you to amplify your event and increase attendance by boosting it for a fee. Last year, LinkedIn introduced the 'Boost' feature, which offered a simple and quick way to boost organic posts in the app. The function seeks to streamline ad spend, similar to Facebook's Boost approach, by allowing advertisers to leverage on early traction to expand their pitch.7. LinkedIn Launches New ‘Business Manager' - LinkedIn has announced a new Business Manager platform, which offers a centralized dashboard for managing 'people, accounts, and Pages,' as well as the marketing activities linked with them. People, Partners, Ad Accounts, and Company Pages, as well as Matched Audiences, are all managed separately on the new platform. It's effectively a stripped-down version of LinkedIn's paid Sales Navigator service, with the goal of getting more firms to sign up for a Sales Navigator membership by luring them with its basic brand management skills.But even in its most basic version, there are some useful options here, including the ability to manage all of your LinkedIn activity from a one location. Here's where you can learn more about the new Business Manager platform and its features.8. Google: No Added Benefit For Hosting Your Site On A CDN Unless.. - Is it true that placing a website behind a CDN boosts your ranking? When asked if hosting on a CDN, or content delivery network, has any SEO benefits, Google's John Mueller said the short answer is no; as long as your host is fast, you'll be OK; hosting on a CDN offers no further benefits.If your crawl activity is slow and you have millions of pages, John Mueller says that speeding up your host or employing a CDN will enhance crawling and indexing, which has an indirect impact on your rankings and SEO.But, according to John, "it doesn't matter in terms of SEO" if your server is already fast.9. Google: Stop Chasing SEO Metrics - Over the years, we've seen Googlers downplay, invalidate, and even parody some SEO data. They've done it with both third-party and internal tools. But why do Google employees detest SEO metrics?On Twitter, Google's John Mueller expressed his dissatisfaction with them, stating that many SEOs regard these SEO metrics as the ultimate SEO aim. Your SEO goals will be accomplished and you will be done whenever you reach a certain DA number, reduce your bad links by Y, or increase your keyword density by Z percent.John said "The part I struggle with (with our tools too) is the desire to treat them as a goal of their own, or as a checklist." He said he has "nothing against third party metrics like these - and I'm sure they're made by smart, honest, & well-meaning folks." But he added "Simplifying them to a checklist ("fix toxic links") is misdirected work, selling them as such (which imo you don't do) is unfair towards everyone involved.Instead focus on creating good quality content that answers your customers questions.10. Google: Stop Putting Your Name In Image Alt Text - The majority of websites leave their image alt text blank. Some people want to save time by having their company name autofill any blank alt text. Google's John Mueller answered by saying that doing so "doesn't make sense" and would be a waste of effort.By definition, alt text for an image is supposed to convey what the image is - it should describe the image for people who are unable to see it. Unless it is your corporate logo, simply typing in your company name does not describe the image.

Powerful and Passionate Healthcare Professionals Podcast
4 influential nutritional factors providers must demonstrate to ensure disease prevention

Powerful and Passionate Healthcare Professionals Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 35:51


Nutrition is health. This medical specialty is based on the complex analysis of the food we consume as human beings. In this episode, we discuss 4 influential factors that highlight the importance of nutrition education to motivate people to lead a healthy life and prevent diseases by obtaining the best resources according to the needs of each patient. You can make changes to teach healthy eating.  Start now to take the first step to help improve the lives of many people with your professional practice. Our feature guest today is Kelly Springer MS, RD, CDN, a professional nutritionist founder, and owner of Kelly's Choice, a comprehensive nutrition and health company offering private nutritional counseling, workplace wellness, educational webinars, media appearances, and brand partnerships. She shared the importance of staying current on the latest research in biochemistry and nutrition to teach patients in an easy and understandable way how to eat healthy to promote health and wellness. Subscribe

This is Type 1: Real-Life Type 1 Diabetes
Ep. 147: From Fintech to T1D Nonprofit, with Molly Johannes

This is Type 1: Real-Life Type 1 Diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 50:56


Molly Johannes, our first repeat guest (!), joins us to talk about her transition from fintech to a T1D non-profit, specifically the College Diabetes Network! We could talk with Molly all day, and had a blast with this conversation. Read the show notes and find all the links discussed in the episodeGo straight to our podcast page to find all the episode show notes & relevant T1D links and resourcesWant to learn more about Type 1 Confidence, the coaching program designed for you to take back control of your life from type 1 diabetes? Watch the free video here.Ready to say "Bye Felicia" to the emotional ups and downs of T1D? Join the summer bootcamp at https://www.inspiredforward.com/bootcamp for a 4-week intensive to learn just that.Support the show

Blunt Talk
1469. Refused to train... Cdn. Soccer.

Blunt Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 21:35


Episode 1469. Refused to train... Cdn. Soccer. Visit on Instagram to watch the video. Blunt Talk Podcast is guaranteed TO LIFT. X Fitness is committed to lifting in body, mind, and soul. There is enough depressing news. We won't add to it. Good Inspirational News Only. Free, permanently-archived downloads compliments of X Fitness. Blessings & all good things. #peace

That's my JAMstack
S3E5 - Facundo Giuliani on end-user experiences, NextJS, and Storyblok

That's my JAMstack

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 28:42


Quick show notes Our Guest: Facundo Giuliani (Twitter) What he'd like for you to see: His musical Jam: The Meters Transcript Bryan Robinson 0:15 Welcome back to yet another episode of That's My Jamstack, the podcast where we ask the ever important question, what is your jam in the Jamstack? I'm your host, Bryan Robinson. And this week we had the amazing Facundo Giuliani. Facundo do is a developer relations engineer at story block, and an avid presenter and author about all things Jamstack. Bryan Robinson 0:46 All right, Facundo. Well, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. Facundo Giuliani 0:49 Thank you. Thank you very much for the invitation and the opportunity. Awesome. So Bryan Robinson 0:53 tell us a little bit about yourself. What do you do for work? And what do you do for fun? Facundo Giuliani 0:57 Cool. So Well, I started working as a developer when I was 18. While I was studying at college, because I finished high school on on a school that had a career that was like programming oriented, let's say so I, I learned how to program during the high school, I started to work with all programming languages that people don't know what they are about, like Visual Basic six, or those things that are like, I mean, I talk to people that this 20 years old, and they look at me, like what are you talking about? Right. Bryan Robinson 1:38 But luckily, I at least dabbled in those super early on. So I'm with you. That's fine. Facundo Giuliani 1:43 Okay, okay. So, um, yeah, I mean, I started working with Visual Basic seats. After that, while I was studying, I was also working as a developer, it was like, almost 1414 years, probably that I worked as a developer. And during the last couple of years, after working on on different companies on different positions, but all of them mainly related to the development, like, full stack back and, and etc. I started to, to be more involved with the community started to generate content to share starting to talk to other people and and meet other people. And I really enjoyed doing doing that. I did that during my free time. During these last couple of years, like after work, I started to generate content, engage with the community, like being involved in a Ambassadors Program in in different organizations and companies. And this opening a new door for me, because I started to learn about developer relations, developer advocacy, developer experience, some terms that probably I've read in the past, but I didn't know what they were about. And, and I started to get interested on that, like I, I mean, I felt like I was enjoying more the fact of generating content, or sharing content with the community, or communicating with the community, I really like to talk to other people. And I enjoy talking. And I felt like I was enjoying more doing that, instead of doing my daily job of developer, let's say, I mean, it's not that I don't like to, to develop, but I was enjoying more generating content, sharing content with the community engaging with other people. And well, I took like this, I made a decision, I started to read about developer relations and etc. I saw this opportunity on serverless, that they were looking for a developer relations engineer, I applied for the, for the job, and I was selected. I mean, I had a portfolio because in the past, I presented some talks, or events or conferences, I had some articles that I wrote before applying for the for the job, working with different technologies, and etc. So that was my, my presentation letter, let's say, and well, I had the chance to apply and to be and to be accepted for the position, let's say. And since June, I'm working as a developer relations engineer at serverless, my first developer relations position and experience, and I'm really enjoying it. So that's a little bit about me. Bryan Robinson 4:38 Sure, yeah. So So you're a developer relations engineer at storyblocks. So you're doing all that kind of content creation, education, talking with community there. Are you still doing that in your spare time? Are you actually able to like branch out and do other things now that you don't have to do that yet to your day job? Facundo Giuliani 4:56 Well, that's a good point. Because I mean, I did it Probably, I'm doing it but just a little bit like not so much. Because the cool part about being a developer relations engineer is that I found that that it was possible to do what I wanted to do or what I was enjoying, while doing it on my on working time, right, I mean, during the day, instead of using my free time to generate the content to do that, probably use my free time to set my mind free, right? That I mean, I'm not complaining, because I really enjoy doing that. And I enjoyed that at that moment when I was doing it after work. But I felt like it was it was cool to to enter to a company and start doing this during I mean, like, my, the tasks that I'm doing in my position are related to that. So I can use my free time on that on other things. So I enjoy doing that. But yeah, I'm trying to take the free time for other projects, probably not related to to developer relations or engaging with the community. I'm probably not even related to programming developer or technology Bryan Robinson 6:15 at all. What's your favorite thing to spend time on outside of development? Facundo Giuliani 6:19 Well, I really like I mean, I was I mean spending more time outside, I moved to a house, I was living in an apartment and I have a house with a backyard. So I'm trying to spend time there or I don't know walking around the neighborhood, I live in more than a situs Argentina, in the suburbs of the city, not in the city center. And the place where I live is like a calm neighborhood with a lot of trees and etc. So like when I, when I finished my, my, my day after working, I like to go and walk around the neighborhood and etc. but also talking with friends. So there are other projects like personal project related to, to their staff playing, playing sports with friends. I'm trying to do several activities, like to get out of my house. I mean, I enjoy being on my house with Mr. Gary Burger, and etc. But I also enjoy seeing other people spending time with other people. And these last couple of years were like We spent a lot of time inside our houses. So spending time like, I don't know, keep grabbing some fresh air and talking to other people is something that I enjoy doing. And I try to do as possible. Bryan Robinson 7:33 Awesome. I think there's something that we all do a little bit more of, especially in the past couple of years. Yeah. So. So moving on to talk about the Jamstack a little bit. You have a history in kind of full stack development, back end development, what was your entry point into the Jamstack, and static sites and that sort of thing. Cool. Facundo Giuliani 7:52 So Well, in my previous job, I mean, my last job before being a developer relations engineer, I was working mostly as a back end developer, I was working with Microsoft technologies like ASP, dotnet, dotnet, core and etc. But I, I mean, I felt like I was missing the the opportunity of learning about probably newer products or different products, let's say related to the front end. And when I started to read about the static site generators, the headless CMS is that I mean, for the products that we did in my previous job, I was not able to apply these technologies on them. So I was like, not super aware of all this new approach of creating study sites. And I started to read about the Jamstack different articles, watching different talks, or Devens, at conferences, and etc. And I started to learn about that and to learn about the approach. I really enjoyed that because at a certain point, as I said, I am I mean, I'm working as a developer for since I was 18. But before that, I was creating websites at home when I was even younger, with with products that again, they don't exist anymore, like Microsoft front page, or Macromedia Dreamweaver. And what you did in the past with Microsoft from page was like creating your own website. And when I was said, I mean, when I was a teenager, or probably even younger, I really enjoyed doing that. Because at that time, internet was not what it is now, right? I mean, at the beginning of this of the 2000 years, or the or the or the end of the 90s Probably, internet was like the super new things and being able to create your own web page was like, Man, this is NASA technology, right? So I tried to create like websites related to anything related to my friends related to us. Searching a football club or related to I don't know, my different interested interest is that I had in that moment. And and what I was doing at that moment were static sites. I mean, they had movement. They have awful MIDI sounds in the background, because that was so yeah, I mean, that was like any any site at that moment, that sound. So that is terrible, I think now about that. And he's like, Man, why do you need to listen to music while we're browsing? A web page was terrible. But well, it's what we did. Yes, exactly, exactly. So I enjoyed doing that. But the thing is that they had dynamism, let's say, or movement, or etc. But they were static. So while when, when I started to read about the new approach of having studied websites, I felt like, I mean, the Navy sidebar, but we are again, doing the same that what that what I did was when I was a young teenager, or probably pretty teenager, I don't know, how is it called the the concert when you are 12 years old, or 13 years old pro. But, I mean, I started to feel to feel like excited with this concept. And I started to read about different study site generators, like neck JS Gods B, I started to read about React, probably get more involved with React, and etc. And on the other hand, all the concepts that you have avoidable to generate the content at build time, ahead of the people visiting your website, I mean, the process of generating static assets, but not manually, right, not using Microsoft front page like we did at that time. So I mean, I felt that that was super fun. Because using new technologies, you were able to do something that probably reminded me to what I used to do when I started creating web pages. So I think that that was the first step that I took to to enter to the Jamstack work, let's say, Bryan Robinson 12:07 I like that concept of like, this is kind of how we did things in the late 90s. And now we do it. We have a similar output. But it's so much easier to like it just Yes, I'm not I'm not writing and copying and pasting 15 different HTML pages. I just, it generates for me, it's an amazing feeling to kind of see that come out. Yeah, exactly. Facundo Giuliani 12:28 I'm not only that, I mean, when you are using a study site generator, when you like, start a new project with the boilerplate that they offer you, you have a site up and running, and you run just like three comments in the console, or probably less. And that's all I mean, that's awesome. For me, the web development is evolving in, like, in all directions to make the work easier for the developers and to have the products up and running as fast as possible. And that's something that for me, it's awesome. Bryan Robinson 13:01 Yeah, and let's, let's try a whole bunch of stuff and like work closely with clients and with stakeholders and all that to, like, realize what they're looking for. And then we can make it better. Like we can do something simple and then add to it and add to it and add to it. I think that's a really powerful pattern that we get to have. Facundo Giuliani 13:18 Yes, yes, I agree. I mean, a lot of technologies appear during the last year, some being able to use these technologies, but also offering a great experience to the final users or the content editors. It's something pretty, pretty cool. I mean, I see that all the pieces are, like joining to offer a good experience, not only to the developers, but also to the people that is using your product on beseeching the websites that you create, right, Bryan Robinson 13:46 exactly. Yeah. Theoretically, if we can do things easier and simpler, we can pass on a whole bunch of really positive things to those end users. Facundo Giuliani 13:55 Yes, yes, I agree. Totally agree. So. Bryan Robinson 13:58 So you're at story block now. So how are you using? I mean, sorry, block is a headless CMS. So it's a very Jamstack company, how are you using Jamstack philosophies and kind of your day to day at story block. Facundo Giuliani 14:10 So what we were we tried to offer to the, to the customers to the users is that having a headless CMS is a way of generating faster websites, using cool technologies and cool frameworks, probably, but also offering a good experience not only to the end user, but also to the content editors, the Jamstack, we see that we have a lot of products available to create static sites, or offer great experiences and having like, sites up I mean, up and running that are working great. But the thing is what happens when we need to generate the content that is going to be exposed in our static sites, right? So story block has this real time visual editor, which I think it's probably the best feature that serverless is offering. Because there is this bridge that connects the the admin panel that Starbuck offers to generate the content with the front end of your application. And well, you can use it with environments that are already deployed, like your testing environment, or staging or production. But you can also connect that to your local host. And using like the preview mode of the different static site generators, you can also offer an experience to the content editors to see how the content is going to look like before it's deployed or published. So in that case, connecting the story blog application or the server admin panel to the front end of your application using the storybook bridge, you're offering the possibility of creating an experience very similar to a page builder, but not being tied to the styles or the components or their structure that the Page Builder probably feeds or probably sets for the developers that are going to use it. So you are able to create the front end and the code and the logic that you prefer for your application connecting to a headless CMS that is allowing the users to see that page and to like, create a unexperienced very similar to editing that page on the fly, and see how the content is going to look like. So I think that we are focused on on different technologies, frameworks, and tools, probably I will I work more with Node js, and react. And what we try to do is to get advantage of the static site generation process of these frameworks to generate static assets, but also work with a preview mode of these frameworks to connect to the headless CMS and offer the content editor the possibility of exactly creating the continent scene, the content that is going to be Publish when the build process run and generate the static Bryan Robinson 17:14 assets. Exactly. And that build process sometimes can be a minute or two. And so like if you're trying to iterate on content, and you're having to save, wait for the build, preview it and then preview it live, like snap previewing more, it's just a view that can really slow you down. Oh, no, I wrote one word too long. It's gonna break onto a line at the screen sizes. Like no, just use the Preview mode, use that visual editor to make sure it's exactly what you want it to be. It's kind of it's the best of both worlds kind of solution. Right? Facundo Giuliani 17:42 Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And not only that, I mean, talking about Nigeria, in particular, the framework offers cool features like incremental static regeneration, where you don't really need to generate the the run a build process for the complete site to generate probably only one page or two, apply the changes to only one page in your website, we can discuss about if using incremental study regeneration is really Jamstack or not, because you are breaking the atomic bill and etc. But you have the possibilities there, you can use it or not take it or leave it. Bryan Robinson 18:19 I actually like that that like thought process of I might not be Jamstack anymore. But it I mean, at the core, even though you lose the atomic deploy, you're still hosting the majority of it from the CDN, it's still much the majority of it's still pre built HTML, and you're updating pieces. It's a rehydration thing, which I I would say arguably, is still plenty within the idea of the Jamstack. I think it's it's a big umbrella. We can fit everyone underneath it, I think. Facundo Giuliani 18:46 Yeah, totally. I in fact, I think that, well, probably the concept of the Jamstack was originated by JavaScript API's and markup. But the thing is, I feel like the idea is always trying to generate the more static content that we can as possible at build time. And not, I mean, not having dynamic content to be generated whenever a user visits our website, right? Why are we Why will we generate content, that will be the same for probably all the users that will visit our web application or a lot of them, if we can do that ahead of time, and offering a better and faster experience to the user right there. Exactly. Bryan Robinson 19:27 And then just augmenting, augmenting is always the best way to go adding little bits of extras for for when you have the ability to do it. And it matters like what what, what pieces of content actually have to be dynamic. And let's make sure those are dynamic and keep everything else quick and secure, you know, as static as possible. Exactly. So we've talked about story block we've talked about next. Jas, we've talked a little bit about incremental static regeneration and whether or not that's Jamstack or not, what would you say is kind of your jam in the Jamstack? What's your fate? Have a product maybe story block or or framework or philosophy, what makes you love the Jamstack. So? Facundo Giuliani 20:06 Well before joining storybook, I was a user of a storybook, I've used terbuka and other headless CMS. So I mean, probably I'm biased on my feature now is like, but I really think that cerebral is a great product to generate content, probably. I mean, we as developers are used to work with things that are not super how to say that friendly for the users, or were used to work with code and etc. But having the possibility of giving the people that there is not super full into the technology, the possibility of creating the content and and exposing the content that they want to share. I think it's very, very cool. And having a visual editor to do that. I think he's pretty cool, too. So I think that sort of look is very, very good. I'm kind of like, I use NET Jas a lot. And I feel like when the the new versions that they released, I mean, version after version, I see that they create really cool things. So I will say that I really enjoy using Node js with with Node js 12. And all the announcement that they did was like, the possibilities that are appearing with these new features. And with these new products is really, really cool. I mean, enjoying, like the edge functions or the support for React 18 with the React server components, different features, like I think that are opening new doors or new windows for other possibilities to, again, what I think I mean, what I think it's important from the Jamstack, that is offering not only a good developer experience, which they are with the product, but also offering a great experience to the final user. So if I can offer a website that is working faster and better for the final user, I'm getting the advantages. So I will take it. Bryan Robinson 22:08 And the great thing on like next and again, like the the big surge of next Jas, in the past year and a half, two years. They're bringing so many new things to table. I mean, next next 12 is great. But we've talked about ISR, like that was pioneered in next and like all these different patterns that are coming out, are coming from the next open source team, the Vercel. Team, the community all around that. I think it's it's moving the ecosystem at a much faster pace than it did previously. I love to see that. Facundo Giuliani 22:40 Yeah, I agree. I totally agree. I mean, the the opportunities that are appearing, and yes, as you said, like an starting point, or a pioneer point of saying, hey, why don't we take a look at this possibility and discussing it and offering that to the developers. Bryan Robinson 23:00 I think it's also interesting, you know, we talked about ISR, maybe not being Jamstack. And I think the cool thing with next is the next doesn't care. Like they they look at it, and they say, Well, you can be completely Jamstack and just use, you know, static props and all that good stuff and render HTML and and send that down for the CDN. But you can use these other things, too. And whether or not that's Jamstack. It's still a nice website. And it's still like meeting all the user needs. So let's not even talk about it. Let's just have these features built in. Facundo Giuliani 23:30 Yeah, that's true. That's, I mean, I love the Jamstack. I like the approach. I enjoyed using it. Sometimes we have to think what's better for the users and for the developers, and probably not stick to too much to the theory like, Oh, I'm moving from the Jamstack. Like, what I was going to say millimeter but if the United State people is listening to me, they probably won't get what measure unit I'm using. But what I mean is that barely moving from the borders of the Jamstack, or the bounds of the Jamstack is not that bad. I mean, the final idea or the final goal is to offer a great experience not only to the final user, but also to the developer. So you have to think about that Bryan Robinson 24:15 make a good app or a good website with the best developer experience possible. Facundo Giuliani 24:20 Exactly. Bryan Robinson 24:21 All right. Well, let's let's do a kind of a hard pivot here and ask maybe the toughest question on the show, which is what's your actual jam right now? What what are you listening to what musician or album is really getting you going right now? Facundo Giuliani 24:33 I mean, I really enjoy listening to music. I'm listening to music all the time. Like, what I found out lately was that if I listen to music that they have like a singer and they are singing a lyric. I can't focus on the work that I'm doing. I don't know if that happened to me in the last time or not. I really don't understand because I really enjoy listening to music and I Listen, a lot of music of different genres, so of different types and etc. So while I was working or probably probably because with this developer relations engineer position, I need to focus more on writing, or I don't know speaking or generating content, I'm probably not doing some automatic thing, things, let's say, I need to focus more on the work and not not too much on the on the lyrics that I'm listening to. So what I what I was listening this last time was probably more like Lo Fi setlist in the background, I live Lo Fi music, and I enjoy listening to that while I'm working. But I also was listening to the meters, which is a band from I don't know, if they are from New Orleans, I really don't remember. But they did in the in the 70s. Music like it was it is funk music, but without singing, or at least, not all of the of the songs have had lyrics. I mean, the most of them are music only. And I enjoy that because they have this groove and this kind of music that I really like. And with the headphones with the, with the boost of the bass there is like it's a good experience while working. So I'm really enjoying that. Bryan Robinson 26:22 Awesome. Yeah, I totally like Lo Fi is definitely something that I usually have on in the background while I'm doing some writing or working through a hard code problem. So I get that. And I hadn't heard the beaters, which is surprising. So I'm going to check them out. And I could I could use some fun in my ears as well. Yeah, sure, sure. All right. So anything that you're doing that you would like to promote out to the Jamstack community as a whole, Unknown Speaker 26:45 no, I encourage the people to if they didn't try the Jamstack to take this step and to see I mean, probably it's a good experience. And it's very fun. I enjoy doing that. So I recommend that. But if if any person wants to talk about the Jamstack, front end development or anything, they will find me on Twitter, I'm while I'm FacundoGiuliani, my my Twitter handle is @facundozurdo. With so you can talk to me and we can discuss about the topic that you prefer. I am constantly like presenting talks at events or conferences. Well, I mean, all of them virtual now but but I will I have the hope that I will be in person in in in person, probably local meetup or conference soon. So we can probably meet in person in any country, some with with the people. But yeah, I mean, if you go to Twitter, and you talk to me, you will see I have my personal website where I announced the the events where I will be part of and I will be speaking Bryan Robinson 27:53 amazing. All right, cool. Well, thank you so much for being on the show with us today. I hope you keep doing amazing things at storyblocks and beyond. Facundo Giuliani 27:59 Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you for the invitation again. Bryan Robinson 28:03 We'll see you around. Thanks again to our guest and thanks to everyone out there listening to each new episode. If you enjoyed the podcast, be sure to leave a review, rating, Star heart favorite, whatever it is, and your podcast app of choice. Until next time, keep doing amazing things on the web. And remember, keep things jammy Transcribed by https://otter.ai Intro/outtro music by bensound.com Support That's my JAMstack by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/thats-my-jamstack

Remote Ruby
Live(ish) Podcast Panel from Railsconf 2022!

Remote Ruby

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 42:20


[00:00:00] Jemma Issroff: Live from Portland at rails comp 2020. We're recording a podcast panel crossover episode. I'm Gemma is off one of the co-hosts of the Ruby on rails podcast. I'll be moderating this panel. We have five podcasts represented here across eight panelists. We're going to go around to start and hear what all everyone is excited about.For rails comp. First up, we have Brittany Martin from the Ruby on rails podcast. Brittany, what talker workshop are you most looking forward to? [00:00:29] Brittany Martin: I have to admit I'm going to go with a meta answer and it's going to be this panel, but also as well to make a switch track, which I ended up curating. We already saw Joel Hawksley gave a fantastic talk as well as David Hill.And I'm just excited for that track to continue. [00:00:44] Jemma Issroff: Sounds great. Looking forward to hearing the rest. Next up, we have Robbie Russell of maintainable software podcast. [00:00:51] Robby Russell: Hello, I'm enjoying so far. The, uh, what does it talk to me like I'm five or I forgot the way it's titled, but yeah, the tracks there have been really great in terms of getting down to some of the basics and such.And so. Kind of mandating most of my teams at, and those ones in particular, if they can do which ones have you been to so far? I just sat in the rails console one and I learned a few things that I didn't know about or I'd forgotten about like using jobs in rails console is pretty fun having sub-processes and there was one earlier on maintaining rails applications.I really enjoyed that one. Next up [00:01:26] Jemma Issroff: Andrew Culver from framework friends. [00:01:28] Andrew Culver: Yeah. So for me, conferences are about people. And so I'm kind of notorious for hanging out in the hallway, track, all attend a few talks, but mostly like for the limited time that I'm here, I come in late. I leave real early. Cause I got kids that I got to get back to back home.But for the time that I'm here, I just try to have as much face time with, you know, everybody like who's in the room right now. [00:01:50] Jemma Issroff: Nick swatter, Ruby on rails pod. [00:01:53] Andrew Culver: I'll do [00:01:53] Nick Schwaderer: two things. One, I like trails con for me, his bag. I'm just so hyped for it. I'll call out. Hi, joined the Ruby community in first week of March, 2014 and never been to rails comp.I've like followed the content for eight. So it's such a treat to be here by will to honor your question, pick a specific thing. I'm excited to see the remote group began talking about a pocket while I won't spoil anything. I love our community, but seeing people not just carving out their niche, but like helping to grow more of things in the community to make it sustainable, to make it more welcoming and open to more people.And so I'm absolutely, as you're saying, the UK buzzing to see, and I agree began, [00:02:31] Robby Russell: and there's a whole [00:02:32] Jemma Issroff: community content. Speaking of remote Ruby, Andrew Mason. [00:02:36] Andrew Mason: Yeah, what's up everybody. I was excited for Joel Hawksley's talk, which is great. Joel, again, Joe's in the audience for anyone listening. I'm excited for Schwan's talk because Schwab always gives amazing talks.I'm always excited for Brittany's talk and Britney's not giving a talk this month. So that's why I'm excited to hear her [00:02:54] Jemma Issroff: here. Uh, next up [00:02:56] Andrew Culver: Jason. Tarryn's. [00:02:59] Nick Schwaderer: Hello? [00:03:01] Jason Charnes: Well, I feel like any answer I have now would just be cheating. I too very much like the hallway track and the people, I very much enjoy Joel sock.Dave, Copeland's giving one. I'm really looking forward to the one I'm least looking forward to is the remote Ruby [00:03:13] Nick Schwaderer: talk. [00:03:15] Robby Russell: Oh. And [00:03:16] Jason Charnes: I'm excited that Aaron Francis is here so we can talk about Laravel this whole [00:03:18] Andrew Culver: time. [00:03:21] Jemma Issroff: Also have remote with me. We have Chris Oliver next. [00:03:24] Chris Oliver: I'm just so excited to like put faces to Twitter, avatars and discord and everything had conversations with so many people.And then finally getting to meet them in person is the best. That's what I'm looking forward to the most. [00:03:37] Jemma Issroff: And we have Colleen Chandler from the software social [00:03:40] Colleen Schnettler: podcast. I am super excited about my workshop, which is coming up in 45 minutes, filling an advanced query builder with active record. And there's actually quite a few active record talks here this week.So I'm super pumped for those. I'm really looking forward [00:03:56] Jemma Issroff: to it. So next question I have is why podcast, and maybe we can get into the community content track a little, or, or what's going on. [00:04:04] Brittany Martin: Yep, Brittany. So I love its ability to be a time capsule. And it's so cool to have a timeline of my own career, but it's even cooler to watch my co-hosts career.Nick's first episode was September, 2018. He was a regular guest, and then he became official cohost in 2021. And then Gemma's first episode was in March, 2021 and then became a cohost also in 2021. And each have had like a really unique path to Shopify and establishing themselves more in the community.And. I feel really grateful that I have an opportunity to talk to [00:04:36] Jemma Issroff: them regularly about it. We feel grateful for the same remote Ruby. I know you're doing a whole talk on podcasting. Do you want to give us a little preview? [00:04:46] Andrew Culver: All are they intrude? If the preview? [00:04:48] Andrew Mason: Yeah, I mean, I think podcasting is a great way to kind of reach a very large audience without as much overhead as producing videos.So our talk is basically on how to start a podcast and it's tailored towards Ruby, but it's going to be about kind of our journey to starting one kind of the lessons that we've learned, because I've, at this point I've been on three. Jason. And Chris started remote Ravi men. Then I joined them later. So I think we have individually a lot to share with the community to help them not fall into the same traps that we did.So that's our goal is to like help encourage people to start their own podcast and do it in a way that they can avoid some of the huge mistakes that we've made over the years. [00:05:29] Jemma Issroff: What are some of the mistakes? [00:05:31] Andrew Mason: It takes a team. In my opinion, to produce a great podcast from editors, from doing marketing, doing show notes, you know, there's so many aspects of it and having cohos.And if you only have two co-hosts one person doesn't show up, what do you do then you skip a week. I think consistency is really important and it's kind of back to us about having a team. And when you don't have that team in place, it can really produce a lot of heartache and headache. And a lot of after hours work on the podcast, which is not the goal.And it really detracts from the. Colleen, [00:06:02] Jemma Issroff: do you have a similar view on podcasting? So [00:06:05] Colleen Schnettler: one of the things I love about podcasting is this concept of luck, surface area. And it's this concept that the more visible you are, the more opportunities come your way. I'm a self-taught developer. And when I got into software, everyone's like, you should blog.You should blog. I could not get into blogging. I just could not get into a good routine. I didn't like it. And then I started podcast. Random people on the internet, listen to the podcast and then people recognize you and then they know you. And I have found for me like professionally, first of all, I love it.Cause I do a podcast with someone who I'm already friends with, but professionally like opportunities start coming your way as you become more visible. And I think it's a very low friction way to become more visible [00:06:53] Jemma Issroff: Andrew yet. Do you have similar thoughts? [00:06:54] Andrew Culver: Yeah. So for me. We were already having conversations.So Aaron and I were already chatting. And so by just hitting record, they gave us this opportunity to kind of like share that. I kind of had a sense, like, yeah, people might find this interesting what you can't. If for anybody that's listening, there are so many podcasts. You have friends like Justin Jackson and like his whole life, his podcasts, because there's so many of them.And so anybody that thinks that they have a unique take on something, if you're thinking about starting a podcast, start a podcast, just do it because what you can't know. Before you do it before you start publishing, before you start sharing your ideas is who's going to come out of the woodwork. And yeah, we got like feedback from people that we knew, but we also met tons of people that we've never heard of before that reach out and say like, Hey, I love that.And people that come up to you at conferences and say, Hey, you know that conversation that you had, I really identified with that. That really captured something that I had been thinking about. And until you start publishing stuff, you can't know if that's going to happen. And it's so low friction, like unlike blogging, which it takes a ton of time.We were already having the conversation. So you just hit record and you publish it. And then I think the other piece of it as well, which for folks who have guests on their podcast, it's amazing. To think that you can provide infrastructure for super smart people, people that are way smarter than me, you can get them on.We had a guy say this to us recently where he didn't want to reach out to people and be like, Hey, can I come on your podcast? But he said, but reach out every six months because I might have something to say. And so the idea that you can get an audio. And then you can share with that audience, the incredible thinking of people that may only want to do a podcast a couple times a year.That's another thing that I love about the medium. [00:08:51] Jemma Issroff: So the ability to enable others or to push others forward. Yeah. You mentioned feedback a few times hearing from your listeners. I know that something that it's tough to do as a podcast host, it's tough to figure out where your listeners are and how they talk to you.Does anyone have thoughts on that? [00:09:09] Andrew Culver: Twitter is the best thing ever. I live on Twitter. And so when you open your DMS, make it easy for people to send you messages. Yeah. Just open that sucker right up. Robbie, have you [00:09:20] Jemma Issroff: had similar experiences? [00:09:22] Robby Russell: You know, Twitter is helpful. So I do encourage people to email me as well.Mike format doing more of like interview style and fairly. Topics, but just a broad range of different people. So, but the angle that I, you know, if it's terms of communication, it's also, but it's going to be lonely as a podcast or not. You don't hear often, sometimes we'll post stuff on Twitter and hopefully the guests will reshare that and their network, or we'll help interact with that.But there's other areas I've found like some interaction over like Reddit. Sometimes I'll post the links there as well, and try to use some controversial title for the episode, just to kind of provoke people a little. That tends to help a little bit as well. Those are some areas, but I do get a lot of emails and occasional DMS and stuff from people.[00:10:06] Andrew Culver: Banana thought. [00:10:07] Brittany Martin: Yeah, for me, I used to have a very loyal listener who would tell me about how terrible my audio was. And I so appreciated them for it because I was learning. And then as I tweak things, I would have sessions with them. And then eventually when we hired a professional editor, he reached out to me and told me how proud he was of me.And then he would just really believed in the podcast. He held on for all that time that I was learning, but I will say too, the greatest joy for me, I will echo Andrew is when I'm on Twitter and someone will tweet an inside joke from an episode and bring it back. Like we get jokes about goo. We get jokes about treading water.It's really fun for me to share those jokes with those lists of. I [00:10:47] Andrew Mason: think you can be the source of your own feedback as well. I say time and time again, like I'm the only one who listens every single week when our podcast listens, I listened to it and that is a way for me to find errors in the way I speak things that I do when I speak like arm, like, and, uh, and things like that also is if you solicit.Kind of going back to what Robbie was saying, that's another great way to get it. And I've also said that when you get that feedback, it may not always be positive and it may not mean that you need to change anything. Not all negative feedback means that, oh, I should adjust this because this one person doesn't like the way we do.[00:11:23] Robby Russell: I was just going to say on the, like, asking for people to do reviews, I've found that if I kind of repeat that over and over, it's kind of becomes an echo chamber of nothing. It's hard to get reviews on apple podcasts and other places. I don't even know where else people were telling me, but go anywhere is stitch.You're still thinking. Do you know, sometimes I'll just kind of go a little off script and then I'll be like, or write something and some chalk on the sidewalk. And then someone sent me a photo that they did that they were like, oh cool. I got a nice review on some sidewalk in someone's neighborhood. So thank you.Whoever that was. [00:11:54] Nick Schwaderer: And feedback is definitely a gift. It's taken me a long time for me to learn that in like most areas. Like, y'all listen to podcasts. I listen to podcasts. It's quite a big commitment to carve out a half hour, 20, 30 minutes, 60 minutes of your day, especially in a remote world where you don't commute.So we don't have that cheat code as often anymore. And so most people, if they're unhappy, what do you do? You just switch off? So like how much does somebody care to? Actually, even if it comes off as quite terse with feedback, sometimes it can either be, well, if it's true, why are you offended? And if it's not true, then hire you.Because not true. I'd always things for me. Any feedback on anything? This is not even just in podcast, but if you can try and wrap a Colonel out of it and make something positive, it's might be one of the nicest things you hear. [00:12:37] Jemma Issroff: Switching gears a little bit. Chris Oliver, what do you love about the Ruby ecosystem?[00:12:42] Chris Oliver: A lot, probably the people the most beside from that, there's something about the Ruby ecosystem that started in entrepreneurship and. The language itself has kinda like designed around humans first, which is unique and rare. So it's all kind of around people and stuff. Hey, [00:13:02] Jemma Issroff: what else have thoughts here?Andrew Kovar. [00:13:05] Andrew Culver: So I think the thing that attracted me to the Ruby ecosystem like 10, 12 years ago now it was tooling. And I think that comes back to what Chris is talking about. That it's a human. Maths is nice. So we are nice, like the whole Mina Swan thing. And then the way that, that bubbles up, I think into rails, since we're at rails comp, as a framework is the developer experience.It's like a framework that was developed with empathy for the way that you would interact with it. And that was different than a lot of what existed at the time. And I think other frameworks have taken inspiration from that. And we certainly don't have a monopoly on developer experience. I think we can look to other frameworks for inspiration.There is. But the focus on tooling, you know, it, it's interesting. There's a white quote. I'm probably going to butcher it a little bit, but I think there's actually like a lesson to be learned from it. So one of the things that Y said toward the end of his tenure was software. So unrewarding to write something and then a year later it gets replaced by something better.And then a few more years go by and it doesn't run at all. It doesn't run at all. There's an inverse way. Of looking at that quote. And that is that our stuff's always getting better. There isn't a monopoly on anything and you can always propose a new, a better way. And we're the beneficiaries of that. And because there's that focus on developer experience that keeps driving us forward rails continues to compete.It continues to be like, I think it is still to this day, the best way to launch SAS applications specifically. And so that's one of the things that I love about rails and love about the community. It's that focus on people [00:14:50] Jemma Issroff: what's missing. And we have a foremost why expert, I think probably in the world next to you, who is nodding along.So I think we can say that quote was all good. What's missing that next year or the next year or the next year we might see in the community. Jason. [00:15:04] Jason Charnes: So they talked about Ruby cough, but Andrew is talking about. But like tooling, it's kind of stagnated. It feels like. And the Ruby community, Ruby ecosystem, and like they were talking about Ruby three's focuses on developer experience.There are times I've considered not writing Ruby. I watched these other people work in languages and they can do amazing things like amazing refactorings and then even things like suggestions. And I'm like, I'm still writing the same Ruby code I'm writing five years ago. So I think that's something we can improve on for sure.And I think they're trying, so that's [00:15:36] Nick Schwaderer: encouraging, I think this will lead into another white quote from it's the similar time which was, and I think that's applies for our community. If you don't create, you become defined by your tastes and your tastes can only alienate other people. So create. And I think that that's something that we can, we have a mature ecosystem.Now we can really be lazy if we want. And I think the railway is awesome. Like the Ruby way is awesome, but I think we can now put the manta on our shoulders and create, even if it's just fantastic, interesting new jams, be the content we want to see in the world. And that goes with podcasting. It goes with open source.I really feel Jason saying. And I think that part of that solution would be to continue to create new and innovative things. I think there's definitely a lot of room for that. We could definitely stagnate and make awesome SAS apps, crowed SAS apps all the time with rails, but I think there's a lot more innovation [00:16:26] Andrew Culver: and fun to be had.I think that's a call to action. I think that's what for anybody that's listening to that if that resonates with you, I think we're just scratching the surface. Of what we can do to make it easier for people to develop software. It's such a lucrative opportunity. I have like a physical product business as well, and the margins are terrible.It's so awful. And like when I sold my first SAS business, the margins, when we went through due diligence for like 95%, we operated at a 95% profit margin. That is an opportunity that we should be trying to get in. And we haven't even scratched the surface of all the SAS software that can be written with rails.You can find a mission in it in creating better tooling, higher levels of abstraction, greater developer experience and usability so that we can give these tools the best set of tools to a greater set of people so they can improve their economic situation. A single person building a SAS app can change their life.And I think we've got the best tool to give to people for that. [00:17:33] Jemma Issroff: Yeah. Or even I would argue, uh, enable people to build their own tools that can lift them up. Robbie, do you have thought there, [00:17:40] Robby Russell: I'm going, go ahead down a little bit of lemon here and say that I disagree with everybody. To an extent I'm actually more interested in maintainable software, but thinking about as new tooling is coming out, I think it's great.We keep building new tools, but it actually becomes. For all of us software engineers, wherever we're like, well, we need to upgrade to this new thing because that's the new thing that everybody's talking about. And there's not enough emphasis on like, how do I help take care of this stuff that was already working, that our apps are already reliably working with, you know, our customers or our clients have already invested time and money into like everybody chasing the next shiny new thing.And I'm like, what about the thing that's already working? How can we refactor that? How can we iterate on that? How can we make sure that those gems are getting more support? Maintainers I maintain. And I created an open source project. It's exhausting to take care of projects for a long time. And so I think we need more in the Ruby ecosystem, less new gems, more emphasis on helping participate in helping take over projects or just helping those maintainers push things forward or help offer to volunteer and things like that.Teaching people how to like migrate these things, how to handle upgrades. So that's the next new shiny object. Isn't the thing that we're trying to compete with? I think the 0.1 of my comrades over here, I was saying here was just, we're trying to make the developer experience great. And we can be a little lazy and we are being lazy as a community at times.And I think we owe it to ourselves and to our future. To take care of the stuff that we've already invested a lot of time and energy and [00:19:08] Andrew Culver: Brittany, [00:19:09] Brittany Martin: I think that's a really interesting take Robbie and it kind of makes me question, you know, in order to grow out the Ruby community, we have to do one of two things.We either need to introduce new people into the community who haven't been here before. Or we need to try to re-acquire the community members who have left for other languages and frameworks. And so the question is if we make the software more maintainable, are we going to be able to coax back the members that we've lost in the past?Like, is it our job to educate how things are better and really are things about. [00:19:39] Jemma Issroff: Nick the Y quote, you pointed to brought up, tastes as being exclusionary. I wonder if anyone has thoughts, in what ways are we as a Ruby community being [00:19:48] Andrew Culver: exclusionary? [00:19:49] Jason Charnes: This is maybe a crappy take, but rails being the only web framework in Ruby sometimes feels a bit exclusionary.I like there a NAMI there Sinatra, but people associate Ruby with rails and that's fine. Through accent. Like I very much love rails and obviously, but I do think there's value to be had from like having alternatives and being able to learn from other people and different ideas. I wasn't around for Merv rails, merger, the murderer.But I think I would have liked to have been because they were like competing ideas that became one, and I think that would help push Ruby [00:20:30] Andrew Culver: forward. [00:20:32] Colleen Schnettler: So I think it's simpler than that. I do these weekly mentorship calls with junior developers. And I usually get like 15 to 20 and a call and none of them are rails developers.And I think because we need more junior level rails jobs, people are going to go where the money is. We all need to make money. If you look, I mean, even as us as we've hired people, we don't hire junior developers. We don't, especially in rails. I mean, I know I'm being real specific, but I think part of that is because these applications are.A little more legacy, a little bit older, you need to have more context. And so I feel like the problem is solvable at the basic level and that's, we need to hire people [00:21:16] Andrew Mason: better than. And to add onto that. Here's a call to action. Everyone listening, you and your company are in a position to argue for and to promote and to do whatever you want to call it, to get more junior engineers into your company.And it's kind of. Management and the senior developers who create and prove that you can have an ecosystem where juniors can thrive. They can learn the way you do rails. They can do all these things, but it really comes down to the people who are already in those positions to bring people into them, to throw the rope down, back after you're done using it and pull up people behind you.And I really think we can say, oh, well, these companies need to change. But at the end of the day, it's the engineers in those companies who can facilitate this change and we need. [00:22:03] Nick Schwaderer: Yeah. And like, plus plus, plus, plus I want to give credit and I won't call out people unless they want to talk about, but people at this table collectively have done so much to lift up juniors and give juniors opportunities.And to give them a voice, I'd say, if you are listening to this, and if you're listening to this five years from now, randomly in a car, if you're just an engineer, you can give a voice to this in your company. I was hired. A self-taught Ruby list. And I got into the game in 2014 and it was the most isolating and difficult and painful time going from nobody's paying me to code to somebody, paying me anything to code, and it did difficult job.And if you are able to facilitate even just one person every two years, you're making a huge impact in the universe. And this is something like, if there's anything, like, if you want me to just give you a shout out on Twitter, if you do this for the good of the community, Just an altruistic or there's something that we definitely believe in, and it's great for the community.And thank you to all of you and everything that y'all have done for juniors over the years, Schwab [00:23:01] Jason Charnes: he'll pay a hundred dollars per junior [00:23:03] Nick Schwaderer: hire. Yeah, I will actually, yeah, I will. I will pay your company a hundred [00:23:07] Robby Russell: dollars and for those listening as well, another thing, if, if you're nervous about the idea of even bring out your first junior developer, bring in interns, do it once a quarter, building your team cycle, keeping them there for six, eight weeks time box it.So. You know, there's an end period. Tell them that you're not hiring them at the end of that. It's like a period that you're going to pay them for six to eight weeks. That way you're not on the hook for that awkward conversation. When they say, do you want to keep me? Because you got to build in that kind of like that muscle of, because what ends up happening is you might hire that person.Then you think I won't have time for the next person. So I'm actually a big advocate for having a regular internship cycles. So. It gets in the habit of having people come and go, because it also helps you improve your onboarding experience for new developers to your projects and build up that resilience amongst your team, that this is an expectation of the job.Not something that we're going to think later down the road. So building internships first, serving in your junior developers, you can do that in parallel as well, but your junior developers have people to mentor immediately when you bring interns in. And so they're part of the process as well. And so that just levels.So [00:24:05] Brittany Martin: at Texas, we'll be hiring two junior backend developers this summer and juniors work well for us because we only hire seniors that are excited to mentor. I can't tell you how many times I have interviewed seniors that have been very technically savvy, but have clearly no interest in mentoring. And unfortunately that just won't work for us.And so I think that's important that you have to establish that as a norm within your organization. [00:24:29] Jemma Issroff: So Chris Winslet, a long-term rails developer is asking, where is the front end going? What's happening to that in the future? Yeah, Andrew [00:24:37] Andrew Culver: Culver. I'm sure everybody up here has like an opinion about this and it's very relevant.I think we're on the right track. I don't think that that excludes react view any of those other toolings, but I think if you go back to that original blog post about stimulus, this isn't exclusive to stimulus. It's a philosophy. What DHH articulated in that blog post, I think is one of the most significant things written in the 15 years that I've been doing software development.It's more than that now, but in that I think there was a fork in the road where a lot of people started going too far to the front end, too much running in the client. The answer to that isn't react is bad. View is bad. Backbone was bad. Angular was. I think of, uh, somebody that I know military vet saw an opportunity in government for a piece of software that needed to be built and he built it.It was really scrappy and it had angular. And then at some point there was a new feature. And so we used backbone for that. And then he used Ember and then he used react because each of those was the best tool for the job of the thing that he needed to build. But it was like bolted on top of a traditional rails model.And so I think the world that we're in right now, sort of canonically in rails with like Hotwire or stimulus, reflex, and cable. Ready, those get you, I think 80%, 90% of the way there. And then if you still need, I work on apps with react bolted on top. I don't do that work, but I think that philosophy pulling out the heavy machinery is the quote from the blog post.I think it's a solid answer [00:26:23] Andrew Mason: web company. That's where the front end is going. In my opinion. Why, why? Because having this entire framework to do maybe this smaller thing, It's kind of going out of style, but what I think is coming more into style is this idea of atomic things that you can put anywhere.And they work the same. I feel like that's the goal of just normal react components or something. It's like, oh, I can build this react component and I can use it everywhere, but that doesn't work in practice. Really. It's the same thing with like a rails partial. So I feel like we are trending more and more towards this idea of being able to like package the whole thing.And ship it and then wherever it shipped to, it has the ability to be configured to work in that environment. [00:27:07] Brittany Martin: So I'm curious on Andrew, do you feel that all rails developers should be full [00:27:10] Andrew Mason: stack? Yes, [00:27:11] Nick Schwaderer: I do. I don't have a stiff opinion on this, but I think that something that in wherever it goes, it needs to think of, I won't call anyone out.I'll say people like me, people like me, who in the eyes of the law are full-stack people like me who run from CSS and JS, but we. And our happiest and the pure Rubin about blah, blah, blah. But we like that rails can help us from the beginning, build a thing. I need to concern myself with my business logic and the problem and the user and what I need to solve for them.I need as little friction in the way. I'm glad that rails has moved, not just convention over configuration, but like having the support for all the ways that people want to build things. So they figured a friend who is an expert in a thing. They can build the thing on top, but we always need to make sure we support the ability to just build.I mean, I'm very interested in the new tooling that's coming out, but maybe there's some front end whizzes in here who disagree with me. But as long as we think of the people who are full-stack, but not really, but want to be one person builders, as long as we keep servicing that community, then I think we got, it's [00:28:15] Jason Charnes: going to sound like I'm sucking up because it's on the front row.But view components are kind of a big piece for us, like at podia of moving forward. The thing I like five very fascinating about it is I actually. I'm going to be burned alive at the end of this, I actually kind of like react, but I don't like the JavaScript part of it, but I like the idea of components.Sorry, sorry. I liked components, I guess it was on trying to say. And so I like the view component because things like sidecar assets where you can like attach JavaScript functionality, Sal sheets, it's kind of isolated. You can test it. I'm not saying like build your app with a full design system beginning as we've learned how to use them.Like at podia, it's been very valuable because. Now people like me who are like Schwartz that in the eyes of the law considered full stack developers, like we can ship consistent interfaces and we're not as worried about how they look every time we're just rendering out components. And I really, I think that's a good way we're moving as well.[00:29:15] Andrew Culver: One thing I'll say on that with the few components, I've also found. That there's anybody that that's out there looked at it and they're like, ah, I don't think view components are for me. I think partials also answer some great questions. Like you can go very far just with partials, so you don't have to go to some crazy front end framework.We've got a lot of tools on the backend, but it all falls under that umbrella of like HTML over the wire. I do think that that's a good place to be. Joe [00:29:45] Jemma Issroff: is asking how can we as open source developers or maintainers? Invite more folks, especially those who are underrepresented to contribute to the open-source community.Yeah, [00:29:56] Brittany Martin: Brittany, I think it is inviting those guests onto the show. My first episode that I ever recorded with Nick was his first poll request into rails. And we just dug into what that meant and how like he navigated it and discussing with their contributor. And just really trying to lower the bar and make it clear that it's accessible to everybody, but also making it clear to you, invite guests on that work on smaller projects.They don't have to be these large, big public projects and then encouraging them as well. Like after you wrap up that episode, Hey, have you considered, you know, supplying this Ruby weekly, they're always looking for content. So get your name out. The other [00:30:33] Chris Oliver: thing, another thing is like, you know, as a maintainer, there's a lot of things that are easy for you to fix that are quick, just like intentionally not do them and label it as a good contribution for somebody new and kind of work the process.If somebody is not sure how the flow goes, like have a whole kind of script of star here, work through it, write it down, like all the edge cases that you need to think of and leave those opportunities open, even though like you could fix it in five minutes yourself. It's nice to be able to have. Some of those, you know, left open on purpose.[00:31:11] Andrew Culver: I think we need to do more with all of our employers campaign, hard to donate substantially more amounts of money to the open-source projects that you use. I'm not talking 500 bucks. I'm not talking 500 bucks a month. I'm talking like we're going to dedicate 50 grand to this project that we get substantial economic value.I work on such a project, right? So I have an open source framework that people use on top of rails and we have substantial financial backing on the source side. And that doesn't all go to me that goes out to like seven or eight developers that help me on a regular basis. One of them it's the first professional Ruby he's ever written in his life.He's a English teacher in Japan. And so that comes from. And so I look at the projects when that was a commercial framework. And I look at the libraries that we use to support. And at 500 bucks a month to some of those projects that we were supporting, we were the highest pain contributor. That's ridiculous.We have to have a serious conversation. If we want to talk about getting juniors into open source contributions, we need to make a disconnect between open source being unpaid. We have so much money in the businesses that we're in. We're raising so much venture capital. We have so high margins let's donate more money to open source projects.Now, just to put [00:32:40] Robby Russell: in a little bit, a couple [00:32:41] Nick Schwaderer: of thoughts, number one, just write this down. If you're not already aware code triaged.com and then just go and look at it later. But if you're going to mentor a junior without it, it allows you to pick a couple of repository. And act settings and just like one polar request a week, I'll just get sent to your inbox.You can look at it and maybe it's somebody who has been ignored for years and you can like dig into that and learn a bit more. But it's passive first. You have to get that passive contributor experience going down, but what's the goal. Where am I trying to get with this as a junior or senior or an intermediate while I like this term.And I use a lot privately become an open source civilian. We're not all going to be full-time. Paid to maintain a thing, or some people very luckily are heavily in that, but I feel like we all have a duty as to be an open source civilian, and it's more than just like, oh, I found a bug it's like that passive work.And maybe just pick a couple of things to participate in. Now the final, I think directly to your point, what can we as casters, besides me just saying. What can we, as podcasters do to further that? I think we need to normalize that. I think we need to make sure that we do what we think people should do.And then we talk about it because I had listened to podcasts for many years before I ever was on, on, I lived in the country. I didn't talk to Rubius. So I really influenced how I thought about things. Like I remember listening to Derek Pryor and Sage Griffin years and years ago on bike shed and what they talked about.Their opinions and how they acted in their life. Really informed how I thought I ought to talk and act and we can do the same to say, oh yeah, yeah, that was just on blah, blah, blah repository. And I have to look at this PR firm a couple of years ago that got him from code triaged. She said that a couple of times people will be doing the same.It lowers the barrier. It makes it just a few hours a month and it becomes a good thing you can do, but like mowing your yard. [00:34:26] Robby Russell: I was going to say that one other strategy. I created this thing called once upon a time. There's been a couple thousand people that have contributed to the main project. I don't know how that's managed to happen, but there's a lot, but a lot of participation from people.And I think that project makes it easier for people to participate for. Sometimes it's quite often their first open-source project that they've contributed to. I didn't do anything intentionally. I don't have to feel like I have the secrets. At all there. But one thing that I have seen work effectively for me and other people that are helping maintain the project is we've had universities reach out to us.We've had small groups reach out to us. And so when they're like, Hey, we have this idea. We want to participate in, help, get involved in open source project. Can we help contribute to and inquire about this? And we'll be like, all right, well, cool. We're, we're gonna end up working with like three to five people.We can work on like a project. Maybe there's some ideas we've had for a while. It's sitting in the backlog. We haven't got to go through and review those things yet, or work on some new things. Your gut, some features when we do it in that sort of way, that's made it easier for us to kind of wrap our head around it.Cause we're not then. So just to saying like, I think it's really important to try to help the individuals that reach out to you and want to contribute. But if you're listening and you're like, I want to contribute, try to maybe find a few people that you'd want to contribute together with, and then you can approach a project and be like, Hey, we're a little more organized.We've got three of us. Someone's going to be a point of contact. This is what we're hoping to accomplish. This is our. What can we work on? How can we help your project move forward? That makes it way easier for me as a project maintainer, to figure out how I'm gonna wrap my head around what the goal is.And again, this is like a timebox to it. They're going to get something further collectively, and then they're going to work amongst themselves as well. So they're, you know, they're, they're able to help themselves. And that has been a helpful way for me to bring in people outside of the people that is individually.[00:36:07] Jemma Issroff: We're going to take one more question. Before we wrap up, John Manel is asking, how can we make our development environment mimic our production environment, especially if it's quite. [00:36:18] Andrew Culver: If somebody says, Docker, I'm outta here, Docker, you can use Docker, but your battery will last [00:36:23] Brittany Martin: for four hours. It's true. And I think we've always said that, you know, I've done episodes on this, where we talk about having something like the deployment, where it's just baked into the framework.And I truly don't believe that we're anywhere near that. It is a really good question. I feel your frustration, John, like it's really difficult to solve a bug when it's only something that's going to be present in the ecosystem that you've built in production. And let's not joke around. You might have read is going Alaska, search a CDN.There's just a lot of stuff. And to try to clone that locally as really [00:36:53] Robby Russell: difficult, I got to take the position that I don't think rails should solve that. I feel like if you're building out a SAS, there's like patterns you can follow. And I don't feel like that should be baked into rails. We've had Capistrano.We saw projects that we deployed with Capistrano. It works great for those projects. And, but we have a lot of ones that I'm like, I don't understand what happens when we push this stuff to a branch. Some magic happens, someone else made that stuff work and they don't understand the pipelines. That's okay.I'm not answering your question, but I don't feel like that should be a rails thing because I don't think we should have a strong opinion about where it gets deployed, but it gets back to the point around the development environment. Those are trade offs that each of those organizations, especially larger organizations.If you got an engineering team of 50 to a hundred people. We just wrapped up doing our biannual Ruby on rails survey, community survey, and the growing is like 11% or something. I don't remember the exact number. Our company had, 11% of teams are like 50 plus engineers right now. Or maybe it's like 14% or something like that.That's a lot of people, a lot of systems are probably in place. And so it's not going to be like, oh, this is really great. When there was like three of us on a team and we could all get everything up and running in like five minutes on our machines. No. How do we connect all these differences? We have serverless stuff.What is serverless even mean? But, um, so there's a lot of challenges there. I think that those are trade offs that each company is going to need to make in terms of infrastructure. And I don't know that developers should be always be the ones that are making long-term hosting solutions necessarily either kinda make decisions for the organization.[00:38:12] Andrew Mason: It's funny that Bernie said active deployment because in one of my first podcasts, in like 2018, maybe 2019, we had a guest who. Specifically named it active deployment. I'm pretty sure. So it's funny that we're still having this conversation, even though I feel like the ecosystem is getting better and better, there's more and more services to deploy your app.Like hatch box, fly render. I mean, you can keep going and going and going and going. So I don't feel like deployments getting harder. I feel like developers are complicating their setups more than they need to. And I feel like that's part of the problem. [00:38:45] Andrew Culver: Also, my dig at Docker was a joke. I don't love it. I use it every.Because of some of the complicated infrastructure stuff. So [00:38:53] Jemma Issroff: Chris Oliver, any thoughts there, it's [00:38:55] Chris Oliver: one of those things where, as a developer, you don't want to have to worry about the operation sides of things. You know, if you could get away without Docker and just have everything running and you have your dependencies and all that, that would be awesome.But yeah. At some point somebody's going, gonna kind of come up with a, an alternative to Docker that can probably mimic that a bit better. They're still solving a lot of problems on Docker itself. And I think eventually we'll see it, it probably won't come out of the rails ecosystem itself. It's kind of more of a DevOpsy area to work in.And so I feel like we're oftentimes just consumers of that activity that's going on instead of. Creating those things ourselves and the community. So part of me just feels like, you know, waiting for changes to happen and stuff like that. [00:39:46] Andrew Culver: One thing I want to point out, it's not directly related to what you're saying, but I think it's really exciting.And Chris didn't mention it because it isn't directly related. But I think when you look at hatch box, how many infrastructure companies can you think of all of those companies that are doing interesting infrastructure, things that are boots. The only ones I can think of are layer of L forge and you've got hatch box and that baby was grown in the rails ecosystem.And I don't think he's done yet. So I think there are exciting things happening in infrastructure, and I think that they can happen in the rails ecosystem. And I think that can be a call to action to anybody that's listening to this. So [00:40:26] Jemma Issroff: we have very many calls to action and that's a full cap. I just want to say thank you so much to all of our listeners, always, and especially the ones who are present today, watching this panel and thank you to everyone on the panel for being a part of it. .

The Josh Hall Web Design Show
191 - Understanding Cloud Hosting with Robert Jacobi of Cloudways

The Josh Hall Web Design Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 81:59


Director of WordPress at Cloudways Hosting, Robert Jacobi, shares a basic understanding of cloud hosting, how it differs from shared hosting along with the basics of CDN's, site speed and more.In This Episode00:00 - Introduction03:33 - Greeting to Robert08:32 - Joomla to WP10:48 - WP owns 50% internet13:01 - Retrofit hosting15:54 - What is cloud hosting19:50 - Apartment complex23:54 - Where is the “Cloud”26:25 - Hosting on steroids28:43 - Portable containers31:56 - Redundant data globally33:31 - What is CDN36:51 - Cloudway's purpose40:47 - Making pizza43:41 - Saving time or money47:56 - What are panels53:57 - Generic panels57:52 - Cloudways over Siteground1:02:23 - Meet distinct needs1:05:50 - Next five years1:09:40 - Offload what you don't do1:13:07 - Slightly geekier clients1:17:37 - Caching pays off1:19:45 - Final thoughtsGet all links, resources and show notes at:https://joshhall.co/191

En sol majeur
Voyage au pays de prénom avec Tünde Deak

En sol majeur

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 48:30


De l'importance du prénom. De l'importance de s'appeler Tünde en terre de France. Et de la patience qu'il faut pour corriger le prénom écorché. Une identité flottante dont notre invitée Tünde Deak, dramaturge et metteur en scène, fait un spectacle légèrement souriant, entre documentaire et fiction, intitulé (allez, devinez) Tünde, créé récemment à la Comédie itinérante du CDN de Valence, en France. Avant que cette autrice, membre de l'Ensemble artistique de la Comédie de Valence, ne s'envole au Festival d'Avignon pour une nouvelle création, rencontre ESM avec un prénom multipliant les identités, qui nous emmènera en Hongrie, mais peut-être aussi au Bénin, en Finlande ou en Turquie, dans tous ces pays où la première question inévitable reste… Comment tu t'appelles ? Les choix musicaux de Tünde Deak Léopoldine HH Je t'ai vu Chassol Two Lines

Fit Cookie Nutrition Podcast
Triathlon & Ironman Nutrition with Stevie Smith MS, RDN, CSSD, CDN

Fit Cookie Nutrition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 64:06 Very Popular


In today's episode I chat with fellow dietitian Stevie Lyn Smith MS, RDN, CSSD, CDN about all things triathlon & Ironman nutrition. While many endurance sports nutrition principles carry over from the running world into the tri world, there are a lot of logistical differences when it comes to actually applying the information over the course of 3 disciplines! Thank you InsideTracker for sponsoring today's episode. For 20% off your InsideTracker order, visit https://www.insidetracker.com/fitcookie (or use code FITCOOKIENUTRITION at checkout). To check out my Runner Roadmap Course, visit https://www.fitcookienutrition.com/roadmap while it is open for enrollment!

linkmeup. Подкаст про IT и про людей
telecom № 111. Телевидение

linkmeup. Подкаст про IT и про людей

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022


Итак, этот выпуск случился, несмотря на все незвгоды! В 111-м выпуске говорим про телевидение в широком смысле этого слова со smotreshka.tv и Яндексом. Про что: Виды Телевидения. Разница, преимущества. Эволюция телевидения - от видеомагнитофона до Интерактивного ТВ и онлайн-кинотеатров. От стационарного кинотеатра до смартфона. Почему так происходит? Что будет дальше? Какую телеметрию и как собираем. Такие уж ли новые - новые протоколы трансляций? Почему чёрный цвет не чёрный. Зачем на канале Пятница был звук тонового набора Телесмотрение. От чего зависит? Сейчас популярность телесмотрения в разных сервисах зависит не от инфраструктур сетей связи, как раньше, а от слаженной работы команд разработчиков, контентщиков и продвиженцев. Особенности модели работы с операторами связи. Как отличается от регионов? Как операторы работают с собственным КТВ, собственными телевизионными решениями? Зачем им телевидение? Нужен ли CDN? Какое оно - телевидение будущего? Что ждать операторам? Что ждать зрителям? При чём тут Unreal Engine? Интерактивное телевидение Эффект присутствия 4K? 8K? HDR! Сообщение telecom № 111. Телевидение появились сначала на linkmeup.

Python Bytes
#285 Where we talk about UIs and Python

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 50:54


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored: RedHat: Compiler Podcast Special guests Mark Little Ben Cosby Michael #1: libgravatar A library that provides a Python 3 interface to the Gravatar APIs. If you have users and want to show some sort of an image, Gravatar is OK PyPI uses this for example (gravatar, not necessarily this lib) Usage: >>> g = Gravatar('myemailaddress@example.com') >>> g.get_image() 'https://www.gravatar.com/avatar/0bc83cb571cd1c50ba6f3e8a78ef1346' Brian #2: JSON to Pydantic Converter Suggested by Chun Ly, “this awesome JSON to @samuel_colvin's pydantic is so useful. It literally saved me days of work with a complex nested JSON schema.“ “JSON to Pydantic is a tool that lets you convert JSON objects into Pydantic models.” It's a live site, where you can plop JSON on one the left, and Pydantic models show up on the right. There's a couple options: Specify every field as Optional Alias camelCase fields as snake_case It's also an open source project, built with FastAPI, Create React App, and a project called datamodel-code-generator. Mark #3: tailwindcss, tailwindui Not python, but helpful for web UI and open source business model example tailwindcss generates CSS Used on the Lexchart app Benefits of tailwindcss and tailwindui: Just-in-Time makes it fast. Output includes only classes used for the project. Stand on shoulders of design thinking from Steve Schoger and Adam Wathan. See also refactoingui.com. Use in current projects without CSS conflicts. Custom namespace with prefix in tailwind.config.js. Bonus: custom namespace prefixes work with the tailwind plug-ins for VS Code and PyCharm. Works well with template engines like, Chameleon. We use tailwind for our app UI. Toolbar template example. Another example of docs and tutorials being a strategic business asset. Resources tailwindcss.com tailwindlabs on YouTube, great tutorials from Simon at Tailwind Beginner friendly tutorials: Thirus, example of tailwind install methods Michael #4: PEP 690 – Lazy Imports From Itamar Discussion at https://discuss.python.org/t/pep-690-lazy-imports/15474 PEP proposes a feature to transparently defer the execution of imported modules until the moment when an imported object is used. PEP 8 says imports go a the top, that means you pay the full price of importing code This means that importing the main module of a program typically results in an immediate cascade of imports of most or all of the modules that may ever be needed by the program. Lazy imports also mostly eliminate the risk of import cycles or crashes. The implementation in this PEP has already demonstrated startup time improvements up to 70% and memory-use reductions up to 40% on real-world Python CLIs. Brian #5: Two small items pytest-rich Suggested by Brian Skinn Created by Bruno Oliveira as a proof of concept pytest + rich, what's not to love? Now we just need a maintainer or two or three…. Embedding images in GitHub README Suggested by Henrik Finsberg Video by Anthony Sottile This is WITHOUT putting the image in the repo. Upload or drop an image to an issue comment. Don't save the comment, just wait for GitHub to upload it to their CDN. GH will add a markdown link in the comment text box with a link to the now uploaded image. Now you can use that image in a README file. You can do the same while editing the README in the online editor. Ben #6: pyotp A library for generating and verifying one-time passwords (OTP). Helpful for implementing multi-factor authentication (MFA) in web applications. Supports HMAC-based one-time passwords (HOTP) and time-based one-time passwords (TOTP). While HOTP delivered via SMS text messages is a common approach to implementing MFA, SMS is not really secure. TOTP using an authenticator app on the user's device such as Google Authenticator or Microsoft Authenticator is more secure, fairly easy to implement, and free (no SMS messaging fees and multiple free authenticator apps available for users). TOTP works best by making a QR code available to simplify the setup for the user in their authenticator app. Lots of easy to implement QR code generators to choose from (qrcode is a popular one if you use javascript on the front end). TOTP quick reference: import pyotp def generate_shared_secret(): # securely store this shared secret with user account data return pyotp.random_base32() def generate_provisioning_uri(secret, email): # generate uri for a QR code from the user's shared secret and email address return pyotp.totp.TOTP(secret).provisioning_uri(name=email, issuer_name='YourApp') def verify_otp(secret, otp): # verify user's one-time password entry with their shared secret totp = pyotp.TOTP(secret) return totp.verify(otp) Extras Brian: PyConUS 2022 videos now up A few more Python related extensions for VSCode black, pylint, isort, and Jupyter PowerToys Work has begun on a pytest course Saying this in public to inspire me to finish it. No ETA yet Sad Python Girls Club podcast Michael: PyTorch M1 Mission Encodable PWAs and pyscript Michael's now released pyscript PWA YouTube video cal.com (open source calendly) Supabase (open source Firebase) Joke: Beginner problems

In My Heart with Heather Thomson

Joy Bauer, MS, RDN, CDN, is one of the nation's leading health authorities. She is the nutrition and healthy lifestyle expert for the TODAY show and the host of NBC's Health + Happiness. She recently launched her own Amazon Live weekly show, Health, Happiness, Joy, where she answers viewers' questions in real-time and cooks up mouthwatering recipes. Joy is a #1 New York Times bestselling author with 14 bestsellers to her credit. Her latest book, Joy Bauer's Superfood! 150 Recipes For Eternal Youth, features delicious dishes to enhance health, boost energy and increase longevity. In the earlier part of her career, Joy was the Director of Nutrition and Fitness for the Department of Pediatric Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, as well as the clinical dietitian for their neurosurgical team. One of Joy's most rewarding experiences was creating and implementing “Heart Smart Kids,” a health program for underprivileged children living in Harlem. Beyond Fresh: Go to www.BeyondFresh.com Use code: Heart for 20% off your order. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gut Show
The Overlap of Disordered Eating, Eating Disorders & IBS

The Gut Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 55:47


There is a complex relationship between disordered eating, eating disorders and digestive disorders. It is important that these conversations happen in the GI space, and as health care providers we need to be cautious of how we are helping patients who are navigating care in this space, to prevent disordered eating patterns that can harm them further.    In today's episode we have special guest Beth Rosen, a non diet registered dietitian specializing in GI nutrition and disordered eating.    During our conversation Beth shares how her own experience with IBS inspired her to get into the field of GI and dietetics. She talks about how ED are actually a spectrum, how restrictive eating habits can present as digestive disorders or exacerbate them further and why seeking a community who understands you is the best way to support many patients who struggle with gut issues and diet.    In this episode, we cover: Beth shares how she got into dietetics  Working with patients who deal with ED and why it's a spectrum  How ED patterns can present as a digestive disorder  Tools and resources that can help  Why diversifying your food intake doesn't help your gut overnight  It's important to treat the ED first  Shifting from the restrictive eating mindset due to GI issues    What if you could develop skills to help manage IBS symptoms in only 10 minutes per day? Today's episode is sponsored by Mahana Therapeutics, who has made cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) more accessible through their app, Mahana IBS. This is a new app that offers evidence-based CBT to reduce the severity of IBS symptoms - until the end of June 2022 this is available at no-cost for eligible patients. Get started now and download the app at mahanatx.com/TheGutShow.   About our guest:   Beth Rosen, MS, RD, CDN is a non-diet Registered Dietitian specializing in GI nutrition and disordered eating based in Connecticut. She has been working in the field of nutrition for over 25 years. Beth helps clients find relief from digestive disorders such as Irritable Bowel Disease (IBS) and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), Gastroparesis, Colitis, and GERD, as well as shares her knowledge with other health professionals via webinars, seminars, and peer mentoring.  Beth is currently the vice-chairperson of the Dietitians in Gluten and Gastrointestinal Diseases (DIGID) subgroup of Dietitians in Medical Nutrition Therapy dietetics practics group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  She is also the Director of Dietary and Nutrition Services for GI OnDEMAND, a partnership between Gastro Girl and the American College of Gastroenterology to provide integrative GI virtual care and support to patients. She has also designed techniques and programs to empower chronic dieters, disordered eaters, and those in eating disorder recovery to mend their relationship with food and their bodies.  She has written for major online and print media, such as HuffingtonPost and FabUPlus Magazine, and has appeared as a recurring guest on the Fox 61 Morning Show in Hartford, CT.  To learn more about Beth, her work, her online courses, and her philosophy, go to her website at www.BethRosenRD.com.     Connect with Beth:   IG, Twitter & Facebook: @BethRosenRD Download her free Own Your IBS Organizer: https://bethrosenrd.com/its-time-you-owned-your-ibs/     Join The GUT Community: The Facebook group for those with IBS and digestive health conditions to connect, encourage one another, and dive deeper into the topics we cover on The Gut Show.  Join here: facebook.com/groups/thegutcommunity   Connect with Erin & the Gutivate team IG: @erinjudge.rd or @gutivate Website: www.gutivate.com Schedule a consult: bit.ly/jnwconsultcall   FREE: IBS Fundamentals Mini Course https://www.ibsmastermethod.com/ibs-fundamentals-sign-up   Start taking control of your IBS with the MASTER Method Foundations Course bit.ly/mmfoundations   Track your symptoms & understand your body better My Gut Journal is a 90 day gut tracker to build awareness in your mind & body. Get yours at www.gutivate.com/store/mygutjournal 

Talk Commerce
Fast Images Equals Fast Websites with Andrew Barkan

Talk Commerce

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 8:38


Accelerate Site Speed With Automatic Image Optimization: Improve page load times by optimizing images tailored to the end user's device with our device-aware image CDN. Start your 30-day free trial, no credit card is required. See how easy it is to integrate your website with ImageEngine. Try their Image Speed test https://imageengine.io/developers/image-speed-test/

Conversations with Anne Elizabeth
#254 - Brooke Rosenfeld, MS, RDN, CDN, CPT, Pn1

Conversations with Anne Elizabeth

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 52:16


Conversation 254: The Story, Journey and Passion of Brooke Rosenfeld, MS, RDN, CDN, CPT, Pn1 Today's conversation is with Brooke Rosenfeld, a registered dietitian that started out interested in studying history but went back to her childhood roots where focusing on health and activity was a priority. After working in clinical dietetics during a pandemic, she realized this was not where she wanted to practice for the rest of her career. She has found the job she loves and ignites her dietitian passion as the Senior Registered Dietitian for NBS. Please enjoy my conversation with Brooke. Connect with Brooke: Instagram: @wellbalancedwithbrooke and @foodiewithoutacause www.anneelizabethrd.com Copyright © 2022 AEHC & OPI Song: One Of These Days Artist: The Gemini www.thegeminimusic.com Music used by permission. All rights received. © ASCAP OrtmanMusic --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/anneelizabethrd/message

COMPRESSEDfm
69 | Speaking at Conferences

COMPRESSEDfm

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 66:05


In this episode, James explains how to apply to speak at conferences, how to properly prepare for a speaking engagement, and how to get started.SponsorsVercelVercel combines the best developer experience with an obsessive focus on end-user performance. Their platform enables frontend teams to do their best work. It is the best place to deploy any frontend app. Start by deploying with zero configuration to their global edge network. Scale dynamically to millions of pages without breaking a sweat.For more information, visit Vercel.comZEAL is hiring!ZEAL is a computer software agency that delivers “the world's most zealous” and custom solutions. The company plans and develops web and mobile applications that consistently help clients draw in customers, foster engagement, scale technologies, and ensure delivery.ZEAL believes that a business is “only as strong as” its team and cares about culture, values, a transparent process, leveling up, giving back, and providing excellent equipment. The company has staffers distributed throughout the United States, and as it continues to grow, ZEAL looks for collaborative, object-oriented, and organized individuals to apply for open roles.For more information visit softwareresidency.com/careersDatoCMSDatoCMS is a complete and performant headless CMS built to offer the best developer experience and user-friendliness in the market. It features a rich, CDN-powered GraphQL API (with realtime updates!), a super-flexible way to handle dynamic layouts and structured content, and best-in-class image/video support, with progressive/LQIP image loading out-of-the-box."For more information, visit datocms.comShow Notes0:00 Introduction5:06 Why speak at conferences?9:12 Sponsor: Vercel10:19 How would you recommend getting started?15:41 How do you Apply to Speak at a Conference?25:56 Sponsor: DatoCMS27:03 PreppingNancy Duarte SlideologyNancy Duarte - ResonateNancy Duarte34:47 Tip: Ask for Feedback35:28 Tip: Make It Interactive38:39 Tip: Don't sell a Product40:00 Tip: Present your Niche at an "Unrelated Conference"41:07 Tip: Confidently say "I'm a Content Creator."42:12 Tip: Create Other Content out of your Conference Talk42:44 Tip: Network as much as Possible47:32 Sponsor: ZEAL48:18 What Other Benefits are there from Speaking?51:04 Grab Bag Questions51:13 Question #1: What was your path to speaking at your first conference? How did you know you were ready? How do you go about picking a topic? What lessons have you learned?54:24 Question #2: What about your defining your audience makes speaking at Tech Conferences challenging?55:59 Question #3: What do you consider when preparing for a CFP and how do you make your proposal stand out from all the other ones? How do you overcome anxiety before speaking? Would it be OK to have a script or a cheat sheet ready?58:17 Question #4: What would you do as a conference attendee and speaker like to see more or less of?1:00:00 Picks and Plugs1:00:32 Amy's Pick: HyperVolt Massage Gun1:02:52 Amy's Plug: Learn Build Teach Discord1:03:12 James's Pick: Dog Training Clicker1:05:19 James's Plug: James on YouTube

Purple Patch Podcast
216 Fueling and Nutrition for the Female Athlete - Part 2- with Kyla Channell and Stevie Lyn Smith

Purple Patch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 63:32 Very Popular


Matt welcomes back Kyla Channell and Stevie Lyn Smith, for Part 2 of a discussion around nutrition for female athletes and fitness enthusiasts. Part 1 is HERE. Both Stevie and Kyla bring with them a wealth of expertise, passion, and decades of experience in this particular area of fueling for the female. Stevie Lyn Smith, MS, RDN, CSSD, CDN, is one of the lead dieticians with our partner, InsideTracker. She's an experienced Registered Dietitian, board-certified in Sports Nutrition, with a history of working with both individuals and groups in clinical settings. She is wonderfully skilled in sports nutrition, weight management, and, through her work at InsideTracker, brings a great backbone of understanding biomarkers as a tool to help people focus and hone in their nutrition needs. Kyla Channell, MS Nutrition & Human Performance, is also the owner and founder of Nutritional Revolution, where she specializes in elite athlete fueling for each unique sport and sex differences between athletes. She is a longtime nutrition partner of Purple Patch and has worked with countless athletes of all levels from beginner to pro. Episode Timestamps 0:00-012:30 Introduction and Matt's Personal Picks Purple Patch Blog -How to Turn Stress into an Advantage Purple Patch Podcast - Stress is not a Dirty Word Hop on the Interest List for our Upcoming Fall Training Camps, including St. George - email: info@purplepatchfitness.com Purple Patch Website and Newsletter 12:40- The Meat and Potatoes - Fueling for the Female Athlete and Fitness Enthusiast, Part 2 Matt, Kyla, and Stevie provide guidance on: Definitions and distinctions between oligomenorrhea and amenorrhea Are these symptoms exclusive to women with eating disorders, or is it more broad than that? "Many times, we'll see the loss of a menstrual cycle or just irregular cycles in our endurance athletes because there is an energy deficit to some extent, and that could be unintentional, meaning maybe they're in a bigger training block and they're pushing out a ton of calories to hit longer sessions, harder efforts, etc. But they're not matching the the energy intake." The (unintended) difficulties women often feel with not fueling enough based on training load and intensities Why these are often red flags and symptoms of greater problems "Anytime we're getting irregular cycles or losing the cycle for a period of time, it does result in low estrogen and that's a big player in our bone health, of course, among many other physiological functioning things we need going on in the body." What biomarkers or blood test results can be used to identify potential red flags in overall female health and performance? "I've never seen an athlete with overtraining and overreaching, who doesn't have elevated cortisol levels." Consequences of low energy availability on both health and performance "Our strength might decline, we might hit the wall a little bit faster, because again, we don't have those carbs on board. So glycogen stores are inadequate. This increases our risk for injury, you might notice more things like depression or lack of motivation to train, and you might feel a little bit more irritable." Actions for an athlete if they are experiencing elevated stress and biomarker levels? How to help female athletes who have a fear of carbohydrates and clean-eating obsession "Starting small, getting those wins, making the person feel comfortable, and working on helping them trust their bodies a little bit more." Ways to provide validation and proof of success when eating for performance Impacts of birth control on female athletic performance "We might have a harder time recovering from training sessions. We might have a decreased drive to hydrate, right? Being dehydrated absolutely can impact our performance. Some people notice more regular sleep disturbances, or even slight weight gain water retention." Why there is such a negative connotation around perimenopause and menopause and advice on working with this life change. How to vet a reliable coach or nutritionist in your quest for health and performance improvement Purple Patch and Episode Resources This episode is sponsored by our collaboration with INSIDE TRACKER. Inside Tracker and Purple Patch- Receive 20% off their services with code: PURPLEPATCHPRO20 Ask Matt Anything - Leave a voicemail question for Matt Learn more about Purple Patch Squad High-Performance Training Program Join Bike Squad - Don't just exercise and work out; learn to train with our structured online cycling program Join Run Squad - Increase your running performance through our progressive, multi-sport approach to running Learn more about Purple Patch Fully Customized 1:1 Coaching Learn more about Purple Patch Strength Programming Purple Patch Swim Analysis Stay Up-to-Date with Purple Patch News and Events Purple Patch Upcoming Webinars and Events

Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.
Come Join Shira Fruchter and I - On a Journey of Intuitive Eating Through the Lens of Internal Family Systems (IFS)

Get INTUIT with Gila- a podcast about Intuitive Eating and Personal Growth.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 22:30


I don't know about you- but Holidays, like Passover, bring up A LOT of stuff! I have heard this from every single client before, during and after Pesach. I know for myself, as well, so many things come up with family dynamics, food feelings and body image issues. Shira and I decided to do a live workshop, next Wednesday, May 4th at 12:00pm EST/8pm Israel Time. The cost of this course is $50.  Come join us as we explore what IFS is and any food related parts! I have taken Shira's class and it is amazing to watch someone go through the IFS journey. If you are interested - please reach out to me via Email at gilaglassberg18@gmail.com or DM me on Instagram @gila.glassberg.intuitiveRD or reach out to Shira  via whats app at 3472553514 or email at shifruchie@gmail.com I am so excited to have you on this course and I look forward to sharing as well as learning! Shira Fruchter , MSW, maintains a private practice in Jerusalem where she lives with her husband and children. For 15 years, Shira has been treating women and couples. Shira specializes in the Internal Family Systems modality and has all three levels of IFS training. Shira is an IFS supervisor and a trainer on the IFS international training courses. In addition, she gives Workshops on IFS for personal growth and development both in person and on zoom.  If you have gained from this episode or any of my content, please leave a rating and review and share it with those who can benefit. This is how the podcast moves up on Apple Podcast and more people can hear this information. Feel free to reach out with comments, questions and any feedback at gilaglassberg18@gmail.com. Have a great day and thank you for being here! -Gila Glassberg, MS, RDN, CDN, Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor If you are ready to make peace with food and never say diet again, check out my website www.gilaglassberg.com and apply for a free 20 minute clarity call. I look forward to hearing from you! https://gilaglassberg.com/scheduling/ If you'd like to learn more about what I do, follow me on Instagram @gila.glassberg.intuitiveRD.