Podcasts about Commodore

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Best podcasts about Commodore

Show all podcasts related to commodore

Latest podcast episodes about Commodore

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 10: Rob and Gooey Cube

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks as they chat with Rob: a freelance writer with GooeyCube! Gooey Cube produces a fantasy world and some of the most amazing, mysterious, and immersive adventures ever made for the 5th edition of the world's greatest role-playing game Recently Funded Kickstarter: http://ks.gooeycube.com/ Web: https://gooeycube.com/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/gooeycubeFB: https://www.facebook.com/gooeycube/FB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/80094... Gooey Game Master's Den of Enlightenment Get Gooey for the Holidays!! https://gooeycube.com/product/strange... Helping GMs run epic games is what we're all about! The driving motivation behind our work here at Gooey Cube is to create engaging adventures based in an expansive world with a rich history that comes alive every time it's played. We seek to help GMs craft epic tales that are compelling for players, and entertaining for the Game Master. Through masterful art in various styles, a dedication to story, and proofed GM strategies, we believe that every game run in Zyathé has the potential to become part of an unforgettable campaign!Audio Only Version Below

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 731, temporada 22: The Riftbreaker

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: The Riftbreaker (PC, Playstation 5, XBox Series). Cum Laude: Sir Clive Sinclair (parte 1). La sección de los oyentes: ¿Cuál es vuestro juego…

ARG Presents
Game.Com Handheld Console - Monopoly VS Indy 500 - ARG Presents 194

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 68:49


It's BIG ARG 194 this week, and the boys are looking at the NOTORIOUS Game.com handheld console! Is this thing as craptastic as we've been lead to believe?!? YOU'LL FIND OUT! AND, it's a VERSUS week, so the boys will RIGEROUSLY be defending their titles. THRILL to THE BRENT and his game MONOPOLY in savage combat with Amigo Aaron and INDY 500! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

ANTIC The Atari 8-bit Podcast
ANTIC Interview 429 - Jack Verson: Action Quest, Ghost Encounters, Journey to the Planets, Gyruss

ANTIC The Atari 8-bit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 31:10


Jack Verson was the founder of JV Software, where he programmed and published several games for the Atari 8-bit computers: Action Quest, Ghost Encounters, and Journey to the Planets. Roklan Software repackaged Action Quest and Ghost Encounters into a single game, titled Castle Hassle. As part of On-Time Software, Jack programmed the Atari versions of Gyruss, James Bond 007, and perhaps other games, published by Parker Brothers. He ported the Atari 8-bit version of Joust to the Commodore 64. As Applied Systems Engineering, he programmed Time Tunnel for Commodore 64. This interview took place on December 2, 2021. AtariMania's list of Jack's software James Bond 007 Gyruss Journey to the Planets version differences and bugs Larry Kalpan thanks Jack in the manual for 2600 Activision Bridge Time Tunnel for Commodore 64 Jack's company, CDOAN  Mark Benioff review of Action Quest Popeye "V1" for Commodore discovered Verson quoted in Compute! "How the Pros Write Computer Games"

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 166 - Repco Bathurst Daily: Thursday wrap at the Bathurst 1000

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 16:06


We're doing daily editions of the V8 Sleuth Podcast trackside at Mount Panorama this week during the Repco Bathurst 1000! V8 Sleuth's Aaron Noonan and Stefan Bartholomaeus run you though everything you need to know from the first day of Supercars running on Thursday on the Mountain.The Garage: https://www.repco.com.au/thegarage

The Mark White Show
Cody Markel with Turner's Heroes & Aubree Strong with #AubreesGoodDeedChallenge

The Mark White Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 41:03


November 29th marked three years since Vanderbilt University student-athlete Turner Cockrell passed away after his battle with pediatric cancer. During his battle, the Commodore family united and supported their teammate and friend throughout his cancer battle. Out of that journey, Turner's Heroes came to be. Here on TMWS, we continue to honor the legacy of Turner Cockrell and the impact Turner's Heroes has made when it comes to pediatric cancer. On tonight's show, I will once again have Turner's former Vanderbilt Athletics Football teammate and founder/executive director of Turner's Heroes, Cody Markel, to talk about this effort and what they are doing moving forward as they support pediatric cancer research in honor of Turner. After that, I'll have Aubree Strong to share about a good deed she did for Oxford Police Officer Kregg Hightower and her good deed challenge! I hope you will listen and share.

No Redeeming Qualities
Episode 214 - Interrogating The Commodore

No Redeeming Qualities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 62:14


This week NRQ talks about Spiderman: No Way Home, the ‘Highway of Death', and Carmen Sandiego. If you wanna be a part of the raffle in December, make sure to join the NRQ Facebook group! This episode is brought to you in part by Load Boost! Use the promo code NRQ10 and get your bottle today!

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast
Pixel Gaiden - Episode 71 - Boxes Of Broken Dreams + Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1)

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 217:13


We're back with Episode 71! In this episode Cody, Tim, and Eric catch up on what they've been playing and adding to their collections. Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1) Episode Guide ------------------- 3:02 - Quick Questions 16:54 - Patreons 21:07 - Tea Time With Tim X68000 52:12 - Game Show 1:05:02 - Catching Up 2:49:56 - Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1) Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon. Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, Mark Scott, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show. Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amigospodcast/message

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast
Episode 71 - Boxes Of Broken Dreams + Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1)

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 216:12


We're back with Episode 71!   In this episode Cody, Tim, and Eric catch up on what they've been playing and adding to their collections. Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1)   Episode Guide ------------------- 3:02 - Quick Questions 16:54 - Patreons 21:07 - Tea Time With Tim X68000 52:12 - Game Show 1:05:02 - Catching Up 2:49:56 - Battle Of The Systems Super Magnetic Neo (DC) vs. Crash Bandicoot (PS1)   Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon.  Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, Mark Scott, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show. Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order!

Scene World – The C64 NTSC/PAL Disk Magazine – Podcast
Podcast Episode #128 - Gunnar von Boehn (Apollo Team)

Scene World – The C64 NTSC/PAL Disk Magazine – Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


In our new episode we welcome Gunnar Vonn Boehn from the one and only Apollo Team. They are known for their stellar Vampire cards which are a must for every Amiga fan. Interview starts at 37:38 Minutes

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 730, temporada 22: Resident Evil Village

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Resident Evil Village (PC, Playstation 4, Playstation 5, XBox One, XBox Series, Stadia). Entrevista: Fernando Porta y Victoria Belver nos presentan el proyecto…

ARG Presents
Thanks-For-Giving 2021 Post Show - ARG Presents

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 7:24


Hello folks, your good pal Amigo Aaron here! it all went down on Friday, November 26, 2021....The Thanks-For-Giving 2021 Marathon! We left it all in the studio folks, and that video is up right now for your kind edification! With all that said, enjoy this quick post show, and prepare yourselves, for on December 5, we'll be looking at games on the notorious GAME.COM console! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

Geek Shock
Geek Shock #615 - Torpid Torgo‘s Tongue Twister

Geek Shock

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 123:46


This week MadMarton gets his Ko-fi's worth as we talk about Excalibur in Vegas, Hawkeye, Star Trek Prodigy, Khlit the Cossack, "Manos" the Hands of Fate, Cowboy Beebop, Pulp Novels, Commodore 64, The Amityville problem, Nintendo captures Bowser, MoviePass groans again, Blade Runner coming to TV, Star Wars find its Dark Horse, Waititi goes Incal, D&D gets a Critical Roll, Flight of the Navigator get a reboot, Atari 2600 to release new cartridges, LeVar Burton to hos Trivial Pursuit, and Jeff tries his voice on another of your requests. So turn up the color, it's time for a GeekShock!

Retro Asylum -  The UK’s No.1 Retro Gaming Podcast
Episode 269: December 2021 Game Club

Retro Asylum - The UK’s No.1 Retro Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 68:50


Matt, Chris and Mads whittle down the list of Amiga sequels you guys can vote for in the December game club vote. Thanks to all of our Patreon's who made this episode possible. James Dunn Hans Crombeen Roushimsx Guto Threadbare Chris Atwill Paul Bullard Harvey Watson Martyn Jones Ninjixel Tim TJ Walker Andy Hudson Ricardo Engel Adrian Nelson HeavyMetalDon James Bentley Tony Parkinson Gaz H Mal Woods Red-Crested Breegull Richard Rogers Cane and Rinse LamptonWorm Salvio Calabrese Mitsoyama Rhys Wynne Clint Humphrey Mark Bylund  Paul Ashton Chris Rowe Jon Sheppard Laurent Giroud Deadl0ck Aaron Maupin Jim-OrbitsIT Jon Veal Thomas scoffham Andy Marsh Patrick Fürst Laurens Andrew Gilmour Stephen Stuttard Matt Sullivan Magnus Esbjörner Darren Coles Garry Heather Edward Fitzpatrick Nick Lees Blake Brett Help support the Retro Asylum by becoming a patron: https://www.patreon.com/retroasylum Retro Asylum on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/retroasylum/ Retro Asylum YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfCC9rIvCKoW3mdbuCsB7Ag Retro Asylum on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_retro_asylum/ Retro Asylum on Twitch:https://www.twitch.tv/theretroasylum Twitter: @theretroasylum Retro Asylum Merchandise: https://retroasylumstore.myspreadshop.co.uk/

The History of Computing
An Abridged History of Free And Open Source Software

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:34


In the previous episodes, we looked at the rise of patents and software and their impact on the nascent computer industry. But a copyright is a right. And that right can be given to others in whole or in part. We have all benefited from software where the right to copy was waved and it's shaped the computing industry as much, if not more, than proprietary software. The term Free and Open Source Software (FOSS for short) is a blanket term to describe software that's free and/or whose source code is distributed for varying degrees of tinkeration. It's a movement and a choice. Programmers can commercialize our software. But we can also distribute it free of copy protections. And there are about as many licenses as there are opinions about what is unique, types of software, underlying components, etc. But given that many choose to commercialize their work products, how did a movement arise that specifically didn't? The early computers were custom-built to perform various tasks. Then computers and software were bought as a bundle and organizations could edit the source code. But as operating systems and languages evolved and businesses wanted their own custom logic, a cottage industry for software started to emerge. We see this in every industry - as an innovation becomes more mainstream, the expectations and needs of customers progress at an accelerated rate. That evolution took about 20 years to happen following World War II and by 1969, the software industry had evolved to the point that IBM faced antitrust charges for bundling software with hardware. And after that, the world of software would never be the same. The knock-on effect was that in the 1970s, Bell Labs pushed away from MULTICS and developed Unix, which AT&T then gave away as compiled code to researchers. And so proprietary software was a growing industry, which AT&T began charging for commercial licenses as the bushy hair and sideburns of the 70s were traded for the yuppy culture of the 80s. In the meantime, software had become copyrightable due to the findings of CONTU and the codifying of the Copyright Act of 1976. Bill Gates sent his infamous “Open Letter to Hobbyists” in 1976 as well, defending the right to charge for software in an exploding hobbyist market. And then Apple v Franklin led to the ability to copyright compiled code in 1983. There was a growing divide between those who'd been accustomed to being able to copy software freely and edit source code and those who in an up-market sense just needed supported software that worked - and were willing to pay for it, seeing the benefits that automation was having on the capabilities to scale an organization. And yet there were plenty who considered copyright software immoral. One of the best remembered is Richard Stallman, or RMS for short. Steven Levy described Stallman as “The Last of the True Hackers” in his epic book “Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution.” In the book, he describes the MIT Stallman joined where there weren't passwords and we didn't yet pay for software and then goes through the emergence of the LISP language and the divide that formed between Richard Greenblatt, who wanted to keep The Hacker Ethic alive and those who wanted to commercialize LISP. The Hacker Ethic was born from the young MIT students who freely shared information and ideas with one another and help push forward computing in an era they thought was purer in a way, as though it hadn't yet been commercialized. The schism saw the death of the hacker culture and two projects came out of Stallman's technical work: emacs, which is a text editor that is still included freely in most modern Unix variants and the GNU project. Here's the thing, MIT was sitting on patents for things like core memory and thrived in part due to the commercialization or weaponization of the technology they were producing. The industry was maturing and since the days when kings granted patents, maturing technology would be commercialized using that system. And so Stallman's nostalgia gave us the GNU project, born from an idea that the industry moved faster in the days when information was freely shared and that knowledge was meant to be set free. For example, he wanted the source code for a printer driver so he could fix it and was told it was protected by an NDAQ and so couldn't have it. A couple of years later he announced GNU, a recursive acronym for GNU's Not Unix. The next year he built a compiler called GCC and the next year released the GNU Manifesto, launching the Free Software Foundation, often considered the charter of the free and open source software movement. Over the next few years as he worked on GNU, he found emacs had a license, GCC had a license, and the rising tide of free software was all distributed with unique licenses. And so the GNU General Public License was born in 1989 - allowing organizations and individuals to copy, distribute, and modify software covered under the license but with a small change, that if someone modified the source, they had to release that with any binaries they distributed as well. The University of California, Berkley had benefited from a lot of research grants over the years and many of their works could be put into the public domain. They had brought Unix in from Bell Labs in the 70s and Sun cofounder and Java author Bill Joy worked under professor Fabry, who brought Unix in. After working on a Pascal compiler that Unix coauthor Ken Thompson left for Berkeley, Joy and others started working on what would become BSD, not exactly a clone of Unix but with interchangeable parts. They bolted on the OSI model to get networking and through the 80s as Joy left for Sun and DEC got ahold of that source code there were variants and derivatives like FreeBSD, NetBSD, Darwin, and others. The licensing was pretty permissive and simple to understand: Copyright (c) . All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by the . The name of the may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. By 1990 the Board of Regents at Berkley accepted a four clause BSD license that spawned a class of licenses. While it's matured into other formats like a 0 clause license it's one of my favorites as it is truest to the FOSS cause. And the 90s gave us the Apache License, from the Apache Group, loosely based on the BSD License and then in 2004 leaning away from that with the release of the Apache License 2 that was more compatible with the GPL license. Given the modding nature of Apache they didn't require derivative works to also be open sourced but did require leaving the license in place for unmodified parts of the original work. GNU never really caught on as an OS in the mainstream, although a collection of tools did. The main reason the OS didn't go far is probably because Linus Torvalds started releasing prototypes of his Linux operating system in 1991. Torvalds used The GNU General Public License v2, or GPLv2 to license his kernel, having been inspired by a talk given by Stallman. GPL 2 had been released in 1991 and something else was happening as we turned into the 1990s: the Internet. Suddenly the software projects being worked on weren't just distributed on paper tape or floppy disks; they could be downloaded. The rise of Linux and Apache coincided and so many a web server and site ran that LAMP stack with MySQL and PHP added in there. All open source in varying flavors of what open source was at the time. And collaboration in the industry was at an all-time high. We got the rise of teams of developers who would edit and contribute to projects. One of these was a tool for another aspect of the Internet, email. It was called popclient, Here Eric S Raymond, or ESR for short, picked it up and renamed it to fetchmail, releasing it as an open source project. Raymond presented on his work at the Linux Congress in 1997, expanded that work into an essay and then the essay into “The Cathedral and the Bazaar” where bazaar is meant to be like an open market. That inspired many to open source their own works, including the Netscape team, which resulted in Mozilla and so Firefox - and another book called “Freeing the Source: The Story of Mozilla” from O'Reilly. By then, Tim O'Reilly was a huge proponent of this free or source code available type of software as it was known. And companies like VA Linux were growing fast. And many wanted to congeal around some common themes. So in 1998, Christine Peterson came up with the term “open source” in a meeting with Raymond, Todd Anderson, Larry Augustin, Sam Ockman, and Jon “Maddog” Hall, author of the first book I read on Linux. Free software it may or may not be but open source as a term quickly proliferated throughout the lands. By 1998 there was this funny little company called Tivo that was doing a public beta of a little box with a Linux kernel running on it that bootstrapped a pretty GUI to record TV shows on a hard drive on the box and play them back. You remember when we had to wait for a TV show, right? Or back when some super-fancy VCRs could record a show at a specific time to VHS (but mostly failed for one reason or another)? Well, Tivo meant to fix that. We did an episode on them a couple of years ago but we skipped the term Tivoization and the impact they had on GPL. As the 90s came to a close, VA Linux and Red Hat went through great IPOs, bringing about an era where open source could mean big business. And true to the cause, they shared enough stock with Linus Torvalds to make him a millionaire as well. And IBM pumped a billion dollars into open source, with Sun moving to open source openoffice.org. Now, what really happened there might be that by then Microsoft had become too big for anyone to effectively compete with and so they all tried to pivot around to find a niche, but it still benefited the world and open source in general. By Y2K there was a rapidly growing number of vendors out there putting Linux kernels onto embedded devices. TiVo happened to be one of the most visible. Some in the Linux community felt like they were being taken advantage of because suddenly you had a vendor making changes to the kernel but their changes only worked on their hardware and they blocked users from modifying the software. So The Free Software Foundation updated GPL, bundling in some other minor changes and we got the GNU General Public License (Version 3) in 2006. There was a lot more in GPL 3, given that so many organizations were involved in open source software by then. Here, the full license text and original copyright notice had to be included along with a statement of significant changes and making source code available with binaries. And commercial Unix variants struggled with SGI going bankrupt in 2006 and use of AIX and HP-UX Many of these open source projects flourished because of version control systems and the web. SourceForge was created by VA Software in 1999 and is a free service that can be used to host open source projects. Concurrent Versions System, or CVS had been written by Dick Grune back in 1986 and quickly became a popular way to have multiple developers work on projects, merging diffs of code repositories. That gave way to git in the hearts of many a programmer after Linus Torvalds wrote a new versioning system called git in 2005. GitHub came along in 2008 and was bought by Microsoft in 2018 for 2018. Seeing a need for people to ask questions about coding, Stack Overflow was created by Jeff Atwood and Joel Spolsky in 2008. Now, we could trade projects on one of the versioning tools, get help with projects or find smaller snippets of sample code on Stack Overflow, or even Google random things (and often find answers on Stack Overflow). And so social coding became a large part of many a programmers day. As did dependency management, given how many tools are used to compile a modern web app or app. I often wonder how much of the code in many of our favorite tools is actually original. Another thought is that in an industry dominated by white males, it's no surprise that we often gloss over previous contributions. It was actually Grace Hopper's A-2 compiler that was the first software that was released freely with source for all the world to adapt. Sure, you needed a UNIVAC to run it, and so it might fall into the mainframe era and with the emergence of minicomputers we got Digital Equipment's DECUS for sharing software, leading in part to the PDP-inspired need for source that Stallman was so adamant about. General Motors developed SHARE Operating System for the IBM 701 and made it available through the IBM user group called SHARE. The ARPAnet was free if you could get to it. TeX from Donald Knuth was free. The BASIC distribution from Dartmouth was academic and yet Microsoft sold it for up to $100,000 a license (see Commodore ). So it's no surprise that people avoided paying upstarts like Microsoft for their software or that it took until the late 70s to get copyright legislation and common law. But Hopper's contributions were kinda' like open source v1, the work from RMS to Linux was kinda' like open source v2, and once the term was coined and we got the rise of a name and more social coding platforms from SourceForge to git, we moved into a third version of the FOSS movement. Today, some tools are free, some are open source, some are free as in beer (as you find in many a gist), some are proprietary. All are valid. Today there are also about as many licenses as there are programmers putting software out there. And here's the thing, they're all valid. You see, every creator has the right to restrict the ability to copy their software. After all, it's their intellectual property. Anyone who chooses to charge for their software is well within their rights. Anyone choosing to eschew commercialization also has that right. And every derivative in between. I wouldn't judge anyone based on any model those choose. Just as those who distribute proprietary software shouldn't be judged for retaining their rights to do so. Why not just post things we want to make free? Patents, copyrights, and trademarks are all a part of intellectual property - but as developers of tools we also need to limit our liability as we're probably not out there buying large errors and omissions insurance policies for every script or project we make freely available. Also, we might want to limit the abuse of our marks. For example, Linus Torvalds monitors the use of the Linux mark through the Linux Mark Institute. Apparently some William Dell Croce Jr tried to register the Linux trademark in 1995 and Torvalds had to sue to get it back. He provides use of the mark using a free and perpetual global sublicense. Given that his wife won the Finnish karate championship six times I wouldn't be messing with his trademarks. Thank you to all the creators out there. Thank you for your contributions. And thank you for tuning in to this episode of the History of Computing Podcast. Have a great day.

Greater Than Code
260: Fixing Broken Tech Interviews with Ian Douglas

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 64:32


01:01 - Ian's Superpower: Curiosity & Life-Long Learning * Discovering Computers * Sharing Knowledge 06:27 - Streaming and Mentorship: Becoming “The Career Development Guy” * The Turing School of Software and Design (https://turing.edu/) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * twitch.tv/iandouglas736 (https://www.twitch.tv/iandouglas736) 12:01 - Tech Interviews (Are Broken) * techinterview.guide (https://techinterview.guide/) * Daily Email Series (https://techinterview.guide/daily-email-series/) * Tech vs Behavior Questions 16:43 - How do I even get a first job in the tech industry? * Tech Careers = Like Choose Your Own Adventure Book * Highlight What You Have: YOU ARE * Apply Anyway 24:25 - Interview Processes Don't Align with Skills Needed * FAANG Company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Tech) Influence * LeetCode-Style Interviews (https://leetcode.com/explore/interview/card/top-interview-questions-medium/) * Dynamic Programing Problems (https://medium.com/techie-delight/top-10-dynamic-programming-problems-5da486eeb360) * People Can Learn 35:06 - Fixing Tech Interviews: Overhauling the Process * Idea: “Open Source Hiring Manifesto” Initiative * Analyzing Interviewing Experiences; Collect Antipatterns * Community/Candidate Input * Company Feedback (Stop Ghosting! Build Trust!) * Language Mapping Reflections: Mandy: Peoples' tech journeys are like a Choose Your Own Adventure book. Keep acquiring skills over life-long learning. Arty: The importance of 1-on-1 genuine connections. Real change happens in the context of a relationship. Ian: Having these discussions, collaborating, and saying, “what if?” This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: ARTY: Hi, everyone. Welcome to Episode 260 of Greater Than Code. I am Arty Starr and I'm here with my fabulous co-host, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Thank you, Arty. And I'm here with our guest today, Ian Douglas. Ian has been in the tech industry for over 25 years and suggested we cue the Jurassic Park theme song for his introduction. Much of his career has been spent in early startups planning out architecture and helping everywhere and anywhere like a “Swiss army knife” engineer. He's currently livestreaming twice a week around the topic of tech industry interview preparation, and loves being involved in developer education. Welcome to the show, Ian. IAN: Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. MANDY: Awesome. So we like to start the show with our famous question: what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? IAN: Probably curiosity. I've always been kind of a very curious mindset of wanting to know how things work. Even as a little kid, I would tear things apart just to see how something worked. My parents would be like, “Okay, great. Put it back together.” I'm like, “I don't know how to put it back together.” So [chuckles] they would come home and I would just have stuff disassembled all over the house and yeah, we threw a lot of stuff out that way. But it was just a curiosity of how things work around me and that led into computer programming, learning how computers worked and that just made the light bulb go off in my mind as a little kid of, I get to tell this computer how to do something, it's always going to do it. And that just led of course, into the tech industry where you sign up for a career in the tech industry, you're signing up for lifelong learning and there's no shortage of trying to satiate that curiosity. I think it's just a never-ending journey, which is fantastic. ARTY: When did you first discover computers? What was that experience like for you? IAN: I was 8 years old. I think it was summer, or fall of 1982. I believe my dad came home with a Commodore 64. My dad was always kind of a gadget nut. Anything new and interesting on the market, he would find an excuse to buy and so he, brought home this Commodore 64 thinking family computer, but once he plunked it down in front of me, it sort of became mine. I didn't want to share. I grew up in Northern Canada way, way up in the Northwest territories and in the wintertime, we had two things to do. We could go play hockey, or we'd stay indoors and not freeze. So I spent a lot of time indoors when I wasn't playing hockey—played a lot of hockey as a kid. But when I was home, I was basically on this Commodore 64 all the time, playing games and learning how the computer itself worked and learning how the programming language of it worked. Thankfully, the computer was something I had never took apart. Otherwise, it would have been a pile of junk, but just spending a lot of time just learning all the ins and outs. Back then, the idea was you could load the software and then you type a run command and it would actually execute the program. But if you type a list, it would actually show you all the source code of the program as well and that raised my curiosity, like what is all this symbols and what all these words mean? In the back of the Commodore 64 book, it had several chapters about the basic programming language. So I started picking apart all these games and trying to learn how they worked and then well, what would happen if I change this instruction to that and started learning how to sort of hack my games, usually break the game completely. But trying to hack it a little bit; what if I got like an extra ship, an extra level, or what if I change the health of my character, or something along those lines? And it kind of snowballed from there, honestly. It was just this fascination of, oh, cool, I get to look at this thing. I get to change it. I get to apply it. And then of course, back in the day, you would go to a bookstore and you'd have these magazines with just pages and pages and pages of source code and you'd go home and you type it all in expecting something really cool. At the end of it, you run it and it's something bland like, oh, you just made a spreadsheet application. It's like, “Oh, I wanted a game.” Like, “Shucks.” [laughter] But as a little kid, that kind of thing wasn't very enticing, but I'm sure as an adult, it's like, oh cool, now I have a spreadsheet to track budgeting, or whatever at home. It was this whole notion of open source and just sharing knowledge and that really stuck with me, too and so, as I would try to satiate this innate curiosity in myself and learn something, I would go teach it to a friend and it's like, “Hey, hey, let me show you what I just did. I learned how to play this thing on the piano,” or “I learned how to sing this song,” or “I learned how to use a magnifying glass to cook an ant on the sidewalk.” [chuckles] Whatever I learned, I always wanted to turn around and teach it to somebody else. I would get sometimes more excitement and joy out of watching somebody else do it because I taught them than the fact that I was able to learn that and do it myself. And so, after a while it was working on the computer became kind of a, oh yeah, okay, I can work on the computer, I can do the thing. But if I could turn around and show somebody else how to do that and then watch them explore and you watch that light bulb go off over their head, then it's like, oh, they're going to go do something cool with that. Just the anticipation of how are they going to go use that knowledge, that really stuck with me my whole life. In high school doing little bits of tutoring here and there. I was a paid tutor in college. Once I got out of college and got into the workplace, again, just learning on my own and then turning around and teaching others led into running my own web development business where I was teaching some friends how to do web development because I was taking on so much work that I had to subcontract it the somebody where I wasn't going to meet deadlines and so, I subcontracted them. That meant that I got to pay my friends to help me work this business. And so, that kind of kicked off and then I started learning well, how to servers work and how does the internet work and how do I run an email server on all this stuff? So just never-ending stream of knowledge going on in the internet and then just turning around and sharing that knowledge and keeping that community side of things building up over time. MANDY: Very cool. So in your bio, it said you're streaming now so I'm guessing that's a big part of what you do today with the streaming. So what are you streaming? IAN: So let's see, back in 2014, I started getting involved in mentorship with a local code school here in Denver called The Turing School of Software and Design. It's the 7-month code program and they were looking for someone that could help just mentor students. They were teaching Ruby on Rails at the time. So I got involved with them. I was working in Ruby at SendGrid at the time where I was working, who was later acquired by Twilio. And I'm like, “Yeah, I got some extra time. I can help some people out.” I like giving back and I like the idea of tutoring and teaching. I started that mentorship and it quickly turned into hey, do any of our mentors know anything about resumes and the hiring and interviewing and things like that. And by that point, I had been the lead engineer. I had done hiring. I hired several dozen engineers at SendGrid, or helped hire several dozen people at SendGrid. And I'm like, “Yeah, I've looked at hundreds and thousands of resumes.” Like, “What can I help with?” So I quickly became the career development guy to help them out and over time, the school started developing their career development curriculum and I like to think I had a hand in developing some of that. 3 years later, they're like, “You just want a job here? Like you're helping so many students, you just want to come on staff?” And so, I joined them as an instructor, taught the backend program, had a blast, did that for almost 4 full years. And then when I left Turing in June of 2021, I thought, “Well, I still want to be able to share this knowledge,” and so, I took all these notes that I had been writing and I basically put it all onto a website called techinterview.guide. When I finished teaching, I'm like, “Well, I still miss sharing that knowledge with people,” and I thought, “How else can I get that knowledge out there in a way that is scalable and manageable by one human being?” And I thought, “Well, I'll just kind of see what other people are doing.” Fumbled around on YouTube, watched some YouTube videos, watched people doing livestreaming on LinkedIn, livestreaming on Facebook, livestreaming on YouTube and trying to think could I do that? Nah, I don't know if I could do that. A friend of mine named Jonan Scheffler, he currently works at New Relic, he does a live stream. So I was hanging out on his stream one night and it was just so much fun seeing people interact and chat and how they engage the people in the chat and answering questions for them. I'm like, “I wonder if I could do that.” The curiosity took over from there and you can imagine where that went; went way down some rabbit holes on how to set up a streaming computer. Started streaming and found out that I wasn't very good at audio routing, [chuckles] recording things, and marketing, all that kind of stuff. But I kind of fumbled my way through it and Jonan was very generous with his time to help me straighten some things out and it kind of took off from there. So I thought, “Well, now I've got a platform where I can share this career development advice having been in the industry now for 25 years. Now, I've been director of engineering. I'm currently the director of engineering learning at a company. I've got an education background now as an instructor for several years. I've been doing tons of mentoring.” I love to give back and I love to help other people learn a thing that's going to help improve their life. I think of it like a ripple effect, like I'm not going to go out and change the world, but I can change your world and that ripple effect is going to change somebody else's world and that's going to change somebody else's world. So that's how I see my part in all of this play out. I'm not looking to be the biggest name in anything. I'm just one person with a voice and I'm happy to share my ideas and my perspectives, but I'm also happy to have people on my stream that can share their ideas and perspectives as well. I think it's important to hear a lot of perspectives, especially when it comes to things like job hunt, interview prep, and how to build a resume. You're going to see so much conflicting advice out there like, “This is the way you should do it,” and someone else will be like, “No, this is the way you should do it.” Meanwhile, I'm on the sidelines going, “You can do it all of that way.” Just listen to everybody's advice and figure out how you want to build your resume and then that's your resume. It doesn't have to look like the way I want it, or the way that someone else wants it; it can look how you want it to look. This is just our advice kind of collectively. So the livestream took off from there and I've got only a couple of hundred followers, or so on Twitch, but it's been a lot of fun just engaging with chat and people are submitting questions to me all the time. So I do a lot of Q&A sessions, like ask me anything sessions and it's just been a ton of fun. ARTY: That's awesome. I love the idea of focusing on one person and how you can make a difference in that one person's life and how those differences can ripple outward. That one-on-one connection, I feel like if we try and just broadcast and forget about the individuals, it's easy for the message and stuff to just get lost in ether waves and not actually make that connection with one person. Ultimately, it's all those ones that add up to the many. IAN: Definitely. Yeah. ARTY: So can you tell us a little bit more about the Tech Interview Guide and what your philosophy is regarding tech interviews? IAN: The tech interview process in – well, I mean, just the interview process in general in the tech industry is pretty broken. It lends itself very well to people who come from position and privilege that they can afford expensive universities and have oodles and oodles of free time to go study algorithms for months and months and months to go jump through a whole bunch of hoops for companies that want four, or five, six rounds of interviews to try to determine whether you're the right fit for the company and it's super broken. There are a lot of companies out there that are trying to change things a little bit and I applaud them. It's going to be a tough journey, for sure. Trying to convince companies like hey, this is not working out well for us as candidates trying to apply for jobs. As a company, though I understand because I've been a hiring manager that you need to be able to trust the people that you're hiring. You need to trust that they can actually do the job. Unfortunately, a lot of the tech interview process does not adequately mimic what the day-to-day responsibility of that job is going to be. So the whole philosophy of me doing the Tech Interview Guide is just an education of, “Hey, here's my perspective on what you're likely to face as a technical interview. These are the different stages that you'll typically see.” I have a lot of notes on there about how to build a resume, how to build a cover letter, thoughts on building a really big resume and then how to trim it down to one page to go apply for a particular job. How to write a cover letter that's customized to the business to really position yourself as the best candidate for that role. And then some chapters that I have yet to write are going to be things like how do you negotiate once you get an offer, like what are some negotiation tips. I've shared some of them live on the stream and I've shared a growing amount of information as I learn from other people as well, then I'll turn around and I'll share that on the stream. The content that's actually on the website right now is probably 3, 4 years old, some of it at least and so, I'm constantly going back in and I'm trying to revamp that material a little bit to kind of be as modern as possible. I used to want to go a self-publish route where I actually made a book. Several of my friends have actually gone through the process of actually making a book and getting it published. I'm like, “Oh, I want to do that, too. My friends are doing that. I could do that, too,” and I got looking into it. It's like, okay, it's an expensive, really time-consuming process and by the time I get that book on a shelf somewhere, a lot of the information is going to be out of date because a lot of things in the tech industry change all the time. So I decided I would just self-publish an online book where I can just go in and I can just constantly refresh the information and people can go find whatever my current perspective is by going to the website. And then as part of the website, I also have a daily email series that people can sign up for. I'm about to split it into four mailing lists. But right now, it's a single mailing list where I'm presenting technical questions and behavioral questions that you're likely to get asked as a web developer getting into the business. But I don't spend time in the email telling you how to answer the question; what I do instead is I share from the interviewer's perspective. This is why I'm asking you this question. This is what I hope to hear. This is what's important for me to hear in your answer. Because there's so many resources out there already that are trying to tell you how to craft the perfect answer, where I'm trying to explain this is why this question is important to us in the first place. So I'm taking a little bit different perspective on how I present that information and to date I've sent out, I don't know, something like 80,000 emails over a couple of years to folks that have signed up for that, which has been really tremendous to see. I get a lot of good feedback from that. But again, that information it doesn't always age well and interview processes change. I'm actually going through the process right now in the month of November to rewrite a lot of that information, but then also break out into multiple lists and so, where right now it's kind of a combination of a little bit of technical questions, a little bit of behavioral questions, a little bit of procedural, like what is an interview and so on. Now I'm actually going to break them out into separate lists of this list is all just technical questions and this list is all just behavioral questions and this list is going to be general process and then the process of going through the interview and how to do research and so on. And then the last one is just general questions and answers and a lot of that is stemmed from the questions that people have submitted to me that I answered on the live stream. So it all kind of packages up together. MANDY: That's really cool. I'd like to get into some of the meat of the material that you're putting out here. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: So as far as what are some of the biggest questions that you get on your street? IAN: Probably the most popular question I get—because a lot of the people that come by the stream and find the daily email list are new in the industry and they're trying to find that first job. And so by far, the number one question is, how do I even get a job in the industry right now? I have no experience. I've got some amount of education, whether it's an actual CS degree, or something similar to a CS degree, or they've gone through a bootcamp of some kind. How do I even get that first job? How do I position myself? How do I differentiate myself? How do I even get a phone call from a company? That's a lot of what's broken in the industry. Everybody in the industry right now wants people with experience, or they're saying like, “Oh, this is a “entry-level role,” but you must have 3 to 4 years' experience.” It's like, well, it's not entry level if you're asking for experience; it can't be both. All they're really doing is they're calling it an entry-level role so they don't have to pay you as much. But if they want 3-, or 4-years' experience, then you should be paying somebody who has 3-, or 4-years' experience. So the people writing these job posts are off their rocker a little bit, but that's by far, the number one question I get is how do I even get that first job. Once you get that first job and you get a year, year and a half, 2 years' experience, it's much easier to get that second job, or third job. It's not like oh, I'm going to quit my job today and have a new job tomorrow. But the time to get that next job is usually much, much shorter than getting this first job. I know people that have gone months and months, or nearly a year just constantly trying to apply, getting ghosted, like not getting any contact whatsoever from companies where they're sending in resumes and trying to apply for these jobs. Again, it's just a big indication of what's really broken in our industry that I think could be improved. I think that there's a lot of room for improvement there. MANDY: So what do you tell them? What's your answer for that? How do they get their first job? How do you get your first job? IAN: That's a [chuckles] good question. And I hate to fall back on the it depends answer. It really does depend on the kind of career that you want to have. I tell people often in my coaching that the tech industry is really a choose your own adventure kind of book. Like, once you get that job a little bit better, what you want your next job to be and so, you get to choose. If you get your first job as a QA developer, or you get that first job as a technical writer, or you get that first job doing software development, or you get that first job in dev ops and then decide, you don't want to do that anymore, that's fine. You can position yourself to go get a job doing some other kind of technical job that doesn't have to be what your previous job was. Now, once you have that experience, though recruiters are going to be calling you and saying, “Hey, you had a QA role. I've also got a QA role,” and you just have to stand firm and say, “No, that's not the direction I'm taking my career anymore. I want to head in this direction. So I'm going to apply for a company where they're looking for people with that kind of direction.” It really comes down to how do you show the company what you bring to the company and how you're going to make the company better, how are you going to make the team better, what skill, experience, and background are you bringing to that job. A lot of people, when they apply for the job, they talk about what they don't have. Like, “Oh, I'm an entry level developer,” or “I only went to a bootcamp,” or “I don't know very much about some aspect of development like I don't know, test driven development,” or “I don't really understand object-oriented programming,” or “I don't know anything about Docker, but I want to apply for this job.” Well, now you're highlighting what you don't have and to get that first job, you have to highlight what you do have. So I often tell people on your resume, on your LinkedIn, don't call yourself a junior developer. Don't call yourself an entry level. Don't say you're aspiring to be. You are. You are a developer. If you have studied software development, you can write software, you're a software developer. Make that your own title and let the company figure out what level you are. So just call yourself a developer and start applying for those jobs. The other advice that I tend to give people is you don't have to feel like you meet a 100% of the requirements in any job posts. As a hiring manager, when I read those job posts often, it's like, this is my birthday wish list. I hope I can find this mythical unicorn that has all of these traits [laughter] and skills and characteristics and that person doesn't exist. In fact, if I ever got a resume where they claim to have all that stuff, I would immediately probably throw the resume in the bin because they're probably lying, because either they have all those skills and they're about to hit me up for double the salary, or they're just straight up lying that they really don't have all those skills. As a hiring manager, those are things that we have to discern over time as we're evaluating people and talking with them and so on. But I would say if you meet like 30 to 40% of those skills, you could probably still apply. The challenge then is when you get that phone call, how do you convince them that you're worth taking a shot, that you're worth them taking the risk of hiring you, helping train you up in the skills that you don't have. But on those calls, you still need to present this is what I do bring to the company. I'm bringing energy, I'm bringing passion, and I'm bringing other experience and background and perspectives on things, hopefully from – just increasing the diversity in tech, just as an example. You're coming from a background, or a walk of life that maybe we don't currently have on the team and that's great for us and great for our team because you're going to open our eyes to things that we might not have thought of. So I think apply anyway. If they're asking for a couple of years' experience and you don't have it, apply anyway. If they're asking for programming languages you don't know, apply anyway. The languages you do know, a lot of that skill is going to transfer into a new language anyway. And I think a lot of companies are really missing out on the malleability and how they can shape an entry-level developer into the kind of developer and kind of engineer that they want to have on the team. Now you use that person as an example and say, “Now we've trained them with the process that we want, with the language and the tools that we want. They know the company goals.” We've trained them. We've built them up. We've invested in them and now everybody else we hire, we're going to hold to that standard and say, “If we're going to hire from outside, this is what we want,” and if we hire someone who doesn't have that level of skill, we're going to bring them up to that skill. I think a lot of companies are missing out on that whole aspect of hiring, that is they can take a chance on somebody who's got the people skills and the collaboration skills and that background and the experiences of life and not necessarily the technical skills and just train them on the technical skills. I went on a rant on this on LinkedIn the other day, where I was saying the return on investment. If a company is spending months and months and months trying to hire somebody, that's expensive. You're paying a recruiter, you're paying engineers, you're paying managers to screen all these people, interview all these people, and you're not quite finding that 100% skill match. Well, what if you just hired somebody months ago, spend $5,000 training them on the skills they didn't have, and now you're months ahead of the game. You could have saved yourself so much money so much time. You would have had an engineer on the team now. And I think a lot of companies are kind of missing that point. Sorry, I know I get very soapbox-y on some of the stuff. ARTY: I think it's important just highlighting these dynamics and stuff that are broken in our industry and all of the hoops and challenges that come with trying to get a job. You mentioned a couple of things on the other side of one, is that the interview processes themselves don't align to what it is we actually need skill-wise day-to-day. What are the things that you think are driving the creation of interviews that don't align with the day-to-day stuff? Like what factors are bringing those things so far out of alignment? IAN: That's a great question. I would say I have my suspicions. So don't take this as gospel truth, but from my own perspective, this is what I think. The big, big tech companies out there, like the big FAANG companies, they have a very specific target in mind of the kind of engineers that they want on their team. They have studied very deep data structures and algorithms, the systems thinking and the system design, and all this stuff. Like, they've got that knowledge, they've got that background because those big companies need that level of knowledge for things like scaling to billions of users, highly performant, and resilient systems. Where the typical startup and typical small and mid-sized company, they don't typically need that. But those kinds of companies look at FAANG companies and go, “We want to be like them. Therefore, we must interview like them and we must ask the same questions that they ask.” I think this has this cascading effect where when FAANG companies do interviews in a particular way, we see that again, with this ripple effect idea and we see that ripple down in the industry. Back in the early 2000s, mid 2000s—well, I guess right around the time when Google was getting started—they were asking a lot of really oddball kinds of questions. Like how many golf balls fit in a school bus and those were their interview challenges. It's like, how do you actually go through the calculation of how many golf balls would fit in a school bus and after a while, I think by 2009, they published an article saying, “Yeah, we're going to stop asking those questions. We weren't getting good signals. Everybody's breaking down those problems the same way and it wasn't really helpful.” Well, leading up to that point, everyone else was like, “Oh, those are cool questions. We're going to ask those questions, too,” and then when Google published that paper, everyone else was like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb. We're not going to ask those questions either.” And then they started getting into what we now see as like the LeetCode, HackerRank type of technical challenges being asked within interviews. I think that there's a time and place for some of that, but I think that the types of challenges that they're asking candidates to do should still be aligned with what the company does. One criticism that I've got. For example, I was looking at a technical challenge from one particular company that they asked this one particular problem and it was using a data structure called Heap. It was, find a quantity of location points closest to a target. So you're given a list of latitude, longitude values, and you have to find the five latitude and longitude points that are closest to a target. It's like, okay and so, I'm thinking through the challenge, how would I solve that if I had to solve it? But then I got thinking that company has nothing to do with latitude and longitude. That company has nothing to do with geospatial work of any kind. Why are they even asking that problem? Like, it's so completely misaligned that anybody they interview, that's the first thing that's going to go through their mind as a candidate is like, “Why are they asking me this kind of question?” Like, “This has nothing to do with the job. It had nothing to do with the role. I don't study global positioning and things like that. I know what latitude and longitude are, but I've never done any kind of math to try to figure out what those things would be and how you would detect differences between them.” Like, I could kind of guess with simple math, but unless you've studied that stuff, it's not going to be this, “Oh yeah, sure, no problem. It's this formula, whatever.” We shouldn't have to expect that candidates coming to a business are going to have that a, formula memorized, especially when that's not what your company does. And a lot of companies are like, “Oh, we're got to interview somebody. Quick, go to LeetCode and find a problem to ask them.” All you're going to do is you're going to bias your interview process towards people that have studied those problems on LeetCode and you're not actually going to find people that can actually solve your day-to-day challenges that your company is actually facing. ARTY: And instead, you're selecting for people that are really good at things that you don't even need. [chuckles] It's like, all right! It totally skews who you end up hiring toward people that aren't even necessarily competent in the skills that they actually need day-to-day. Like you mentioned FAANG companies need these particular skills. I don't even think that for resilience, to be able to build these sort of systems, and even on super hardcore systems, it's very seldom that you end up writing algorithmic type code. Usually, most of the things that you deal with in scaling and working with other humans and stuff, it's a function of design and being able to organize things in conceptual ways that make sense so that you can deconstruct a complex, fuzzy problem into little pieces that make sense and can fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. I have a very visual geometric way of thinking, which I find actually is a core ability that makes me good at code because I can imagine it visually laid out and think about the dependencies between things as like tensors between geographically located little code bubbles, if you will. IAN: Sure. ARTY: Being able to think that way, it's fundamentally different than solving algorithm stuff. But that deconstruction capability of just problem breakdown, being able to break down problems, being able to organize things in ways that make sense, being able to communicate those concepts and come up with abstractions that are easy enough for other people on your team to understand, ideally, those are the kinds of engineers we want on the teams. Our interview processes ought to select for those day-to-day skills of things that are the common bread and butter. [chuckles] IAN: I agree. ARTY: What we need to succeed on a day-to-day basis. IAN: Yeah. We need the people skills more than we need the hard technical skills sometimes. I think if our interview process could somehow tap into that and focus more on how do you collaborate, how do you do code reviews, how do you evaluate someone else's code for quality, how do you make the tradeoff between readability and optimization—because those are typically very polarized, opposite ends of the scale—how do you function on a team, or do you prefer to go heads down and just kind of be by yourself and just tackle tasks on your own? I believe that there's a time and place for that, too and there are personality types where you prefer to go heads down and just have peace and quiet and just get your work done and there's nothing wrong with that. But I think if we can somehow tap into the collaborative process as part of the interview, I think it's going to open a lot of companies up to like, “Oh, this person's actually going to be a really great team member. They don't quite have this level of knowledge in database systems that we hope they'd have, but that's fine. We'll just send them on this one-week database training class that happens in a week, or two and now they'll be trained.” [overtalk] MANDY: Do they want to learn? IAN: Right. Do they want to learn? Are they eager to learn? Because if they don't want to learn, then that's a whole other thing, too. But again, that's something that you can screen for. Like, “Tell me what you're learning on the side, or “What kinds of concepts do you want to learn?” Or “In this role, we need you to learn this thing. Is that even of interest to you?” Of course, everyone's going to lie and say, “Yeah,” because they want the paycheck. But I think you can still narrow it down a little bit more what area of training does this person need. So we can just hire good people on the team and now our team is full of good people and collaborative, team-based folks that are willing to work together to solve problems together and then worry about the technical skills as a secondary thing. MANDY: Yeah. I firmly believe anybody can learn anything, if they want to. I mean, that's how I've gotten here. IAN: Yeah, for sure. Same with me. I'm mostly self-taught. I studied computer engineering in college, so I can tell you how all the little microchips in your computer work. I did that for the first 4 years of my career and then I threw all that out the window and I taught myself web development and taught myself how the internet works. And then every job I had, that innate curiosity in me is like, “Oh, I wonder how e-commerce works.” Well, I went and got an e-commerce job, it's like, okay, well now I wonder how education works and I got into the education sector. Now, I wonder how you know this, or that works and so, I got into financial systems and I got into whatever and it just kind of blew my mind. I was like, “Wow, this is how all these things kind of talk to each other,” and that for me was just fascinating, and then turning around and sharing that knowledge with other people. But some people are just very fixed mindset and they want to learn one thing, they want to do that thing, and that's all they know. But I think, like we kind of talked about early in the podcast, you sign up for a career in this industry and you're signing up for lifelong learning. There's no shortage to things that you can go learn, but you have to be willing to do it. MID-ROLL: Rarely does a day pass where a ransomware attack, data breach, or state sponsored espionage hits the news. It's hard to keep up with all this and also to know if you're protected. Don't worry, Kaspersky's got you covered. Each week their team looks at the latest news, stories, and topics you might have missed during the week on the Transatlantic Cable Podcast. Mixing in-depth discussion, expert guests from around the world, a pinch of humor, and all with an easy to consume style - be sure you check them out today. ARTY: What kind of things could we do to potentially influence the way hiring is done and these practices with unicorn skilled searches and just the dysfunctional aspects on the hiring side? Because you're teaching all these tech interview skills for what to expect in the system and how to navigate that and succeed, even though it's broken. But what can we do to influence the broken itself and help improve these things? IAN: That's a great question. Breaking it from the inside out is a good start. I think if we can collectively get enough people together within these, especially the bigger companies and say like, “Hey, collectively, as an industry, we need to do interviewing differently.” And then again, see that ripple effect of oh, well, the FAANG companies are doing it that way so we're going to do it that way, too. But I don't think that's going to be a fast change by any stretch. I think there are always going to be some types of roles where you do have to have a very dedicated, very deep knowledge of system internals and how to optimize things, and pure algorithmic types of thinking. I think those kinds of jobs are always going to be out there and so, there's no fully getting away from something like a LeetCode challenge style interview. But I think that for a lot of small, mid-sized, even some large-sized companies, they don't have to do interviewing that way. But I think we can all stand on our soapbox and yell and scream, “Do it differently, do it differently,” and it's not going to make any impact at all because those companies are watching other companies for how they're doing it. So I think gradually, over time, we can just start to do things differently within our own company. And I think for example, if the company that I was working at, if we completely overhauled our interview process that even if we don't hire somebody, if someone can walk away from that going, “Wow, that was a cool interview experience. I've got to tell my friends about this.” That's the experience that we want when you walk away from the company if we don't end up hiring. If we hire you, it's great. But even if we don't hire you, I want to make sure that you've still got a really cool interview experience that you enjoyed the process, that it didn't just feel like another, “Okay, well, I could have just grind on LeetCode for three months to get through that interview.” I don't ever want my interviews to feel like that. So I think as more of us come to this understanding of it's okay to do it differently and then collectively start talking about how could we do it differently—and there are companies out there that are doing it differently, by the way. I'm not saying everyone in the industry is doing all these LeetCode style interviews. There are definitely companies out there that are doing things differently and I applaud them for doing that. And I think as awful as it was to have the pandemic shut everything down to early 2020, where no hiring happened, or not a lot of hiring happened over the summer, it did give a lot of companies pause and go, “Well, hey, since we're not hiring, since we got nobody in the backlog, let's examine this whole interview process and let's see if this is really what we want as a company.” And some companies did. They took the time, they took several months and they were like, “You know what, let's burn this whole thing down and start over” as far as their interview process goes. Some of them completely reinvented what their interview process was and turned it into a really great process for candidates to go through. So even if they don't get the job, they still walk away going, “Wow, that was neat.” I think if enough of us start doing that to where candidates then can say, “You know what, I would really prefer not to go through five, or six rounds of interviews” because that's tiring and knowing that what you're kind of what you're in for, with all the LeetCode problems and panel after panel after panel. Like, nobody wants to sit through that. I think if enough candidates stand up for themselves and say, “You know what, I'm looking for a company that has an easier process. So I'm not even going to bother applying.” I think there are enough companies out there that are desperately trying to hire that if they start getting the feedback of like you know what, people don't want to interview with us because our process is lousy. They're going to change the process, but it's going to take time. Unfortunately, it's going to drag out because companies can be stubborn and candidates are also going to be stubborn and it's not going to change quickly. But I think as companies take the step to change their process and enough candidates also step up to say, “Nah, you know what, I was going to apply there,” or “Maybe I got through the first couple of rounds, but you're telling me there's like three more rounds to go through? Nah, I'm not going to bother.” Companies are now starting to see candidates ghost them and walk away from the interview process because they just don't want to be bothered. I think that's a good signal for a company to take a step back and go, “Okay, we need to change our process to make it better so the people do want to apply and enjoy that interview process as they come through.” But it's going to take a while to get there. ARTY: Makes me think about we were talking early on about open source and the power of open source. I wonder with this particular challenge, if you set up a open source hiring manifesto, perhaps of we're going to collaborate on figuring out how to make hiring better. Well, what does that mean? What is it we're aiming for? We took some time to actually clarify these are the things we ought to be aiming for with our hiring process and those are hard problems to figure out. How do we create this alignment between what it is we need to be able to do to be successful day-to-day versus what it is we're selecting for with our interview process? Those things are totally out of whack. I think we're at a point, at least in our industry, where it's generally accepted that how we do interviewing and hiring in these broken things—I think it's generally accepted that it's broken—so that perhaps it's actually a good opportunity right now to start an initiative like that, where we can start collaborating and putting our knowledge together on how we ought to go about doing things better. Even just by starting something, building a community around it, getting some companies together that are working on trying to improve their own hiring processes and learning together and willing to share their knowledge about things that are working better, such that everybody in the industry ultimately benefits from us getting better at these kinds of things. As you said, being able to have an interview process that even if you don't get the job, it's not a miserable experience for everyone involved. [chuckles] Like there's no reason for that. IAN: Yeah. MANDY: That's how we – I mean, what you just explained, Arty isn't that how we got code of conducts? Everybody's sitting down and being like, “Okay, this is broken. Conferences are broken. What are we going to all do together?” So now why don't we just do the same thing? I really like that idea of starting an open source initiative on interviewing. Like have these big FAANG companies be like, “I had a really great interview with such and such company.” Well, then it all spirals from there. I think that's super, super exciting. ARTY: Yeah. And what is it that made this experience great? You could just have people analyze their interview experiences that they did have, describe well, what are the things that made this great, that made this work and likewise, you could collect anti-patterns. Some of the things that you talked about of like, are we interviewing for geolocation skills when that actually has absolutely nothing to do with our business? We could collect these things as these funky anti-patterns of things so that people could recognize those things easier in there because it's always hard to see yourself. It's hard to see yourself swinging. IAN: An interesting idea along those lines is what if companies said like, “Hey, we want the community to help us fix our interview process. This is who we are, this is what our business does. What kinds of questions do you think we should be asking?” And I think that the community would definitely rally behind that and go, “Oh, well, you're an e-commerce platform so you should be asking people about shopping cart implementations and data security around credit cards and have the interview process be about what the company actually does.” I think that that would be an interesting thing to ask the community like, “What do you think we should be asking in these interviews?” Not that you're going to turn around and go, “Okay, that's exactly what we're going to do,” but I think it'll give a lot of companies ideas on yeah, okay, maybe we could do a take-home assignment where you build a little shopping cart and you submit that to us. We'll evaluate how you did, or what you changed, or we're going to give you some code to start with and we're going to ask you to fix a bug in it, or something like, I think that there's a bigger movement now, especially here in Canada, in the US of doing take-home assignments. But I think at the same time, there are pros and cons of doing take-home assignments versus the on-site technical challenges. But what if we gave the candidate a choice as part of that interview process, too and say, “Hey, cool. We want to interview you. Let's get through the phone screen and now that you've done the phone screen, we want to give you the option of, do you want to do a small take-home assignment and then do a couple of on-site technical challenges? Do you want to do a larger take-home and maybe fewer on-site technical challenges?” I think there's always going to be some level of “Okay, we need to see you code in front of us to really make sure that you're the one that wrote that code.” I got burned on that back in 2012 where I thought somebody wrote some code and they didn't. They had a friend write it as their take-home assignment and so, I brought them in for the interview and I'm like, “Cool, I want you to fix this bug,” and they had no idea what to do. They hadn't even looked at the code that their friend wrote for them it's like, why would you do that? So I think that there's always going to be some amount of risk and trust that needs to take place between the candidates and the companies. But then on the flip side of that, if it doesn't work out, I really wish companies would be better about giving feedback to people instead of just ghosting them, or like, “Oh, you didn't and pass that round. So we're just not even going to call you back and tell you no. We're just not ever just going to call.” The whole ghosting thing is, by far, the number one complaint in the tech industry right now is like, “I applied and I didn't even get a thanks for your resume. I got nothing,” or maybe you get some automated reply going, “We'll keep you in mind if you're a match for something.” But again, those apple looking at tracking systems are biased because the developers building them and the people reading the resumes are going to have their own inherent bias in the search terms and the things that they're looking for and so on. So there's bias all over the place that's going to be really hard to get rid of. But I think if companies were to take a first step and say like, “Okay, we're going to talk to the community about what they would like to see the interview process be,” and start having more of those conversations. And then I think as we see companies step up and make those changes, those are going to be the kinds of companies where people are going to rally behind them and go, “I really want to work there because that interview process is pretty cool.” And that means the company is – well, it doesn't guarantee the company's going to be cool, but it shows that they care about the people that are going to work there. If people know that the company is going to care about you as an employee, you're far more likely to want to work there. You're far more likely to be loyal and stay there for a long term as opposed to like oh, I just need to collect a paycheck for a year to get a little bit of experience and then job hop and go get a better title, better pay. So I think it can come down to company loyalty and stuff, too. MANDY: Yeah. Word of mouth travels fast in this industry. IAN: Absolutely. MANDY: And to bring up the code of conduct thing and now people are saying, “If straight up this conference doesn't have a code of conduct, I'm not going.” IAN: Yeah. I agree. It'll be interesting to see how something like this tech interview overhaul open source idea could pick up momentum and what kinds of companies would get behind it and go, “Hey, we think our interview process is pretty good already, but we're still going to be a part of this and watch other companies step up to.” When I talked earlier about that ripple effect where Google, for example, stopped asking how many golf balls fit in a school bus kind of thing and everyone else is like, “Yeah, those questions are dumb.” We actually saw this summer, Facebook and Amazon publicly say, “We're no longer going to ask dynamic programming problems in our interviews.” It's going to be interesting to see how long that takes to ripple out into the industry and go, “Yeah, we're not going to ask DP problems either,” because again, people want to be those big companies. They want to be billion- and trillion-dollar companies, too and so, they think they have to do everything the same way and that's not always the case. But there's also something broken in the system, too with hiring. It's not just the interview process itself, but it's also just the lack of training. I've been guilty of this myself, where I've got an interview with somebody and I've got back-to-back meetings. So I just pull someone on my team and be like, “Hey, Arty, can you come interview this person?” And you're like, “I've never interviewed before. I guess, I'll go to LeetCode and find a problem to give them.” You're walking in there just as nervous as the candidate is and you're just throwing some technical challenge at them, or you're giving them the technical challenge that you've done most recently, because you know the answer to it and you're like, “Okay, well, I guess they did all right on it. They passed,” or “I think they didn't do well.” But then companies aren't giving that feedback to people either. There's this thinking in the industry of oh, if we give them feedback, they're going to sue us and they're going to say it's discriminatory and they're going to sue us. Aline Lerner from interviewing.io did some research with her team and literally nobody in recent memory has been sued for giving feedback to candidates. If anything, I think that it would build trust between companies and the candidates to say, “Hey, this is what you did. Well, this is what we thought you did okay on. We weren't happy with the performance of the code that you wrote so we're not moving forward,” and now you know exactly what to go improve. I was talking to somebody who was interviewing at Amazon lately and they said, “Yeah, the recruiter at Amazon said that I would go through all these steps,” and they had like five, or six interviews, or something to go through. And they're like, “Yeah, and they told me at the end of it, we're not going to give you any feedback, but we will give you a yes, or no.” It's like so if I get a no, I don't even find out what I didn't do well. I don't know anything about how to improve to want to go apply there in the future. You're just going to tell me no and not tell me why? Why would I want to reapply there in the future if you're not going to tell me how I'm going to get better? I'm just going to do the same thing again and again. I'm going to be that little toy that just bangs into the wall and doesn't learn to steer away from the wall and go in a different direction. If you're not going to give me any feedback, I'm just going to keep banging my head against this wall of trying to apply for a job and you're not telling me why I'm not getting it. It's not helpful to the candidate and that's not helpful to the industry either. It starts affecting mental health and it starts affecting other things and I think it erodes a lot of trust between companies and candidates as well. ARTY: Yeah. The experience of just going through trying to get a job and going through the rejection, it's an emotional experience, an emotionally challenging experience. Of all things that affect our feels a lot, it's like that feeling of social rejection. So being able to have just healthier relationships and figuring out how to see another person as a human, help figure out how you can help guide and support them continuing on their journey so that the experience of the interview doesn't hurt so much even when the relationship doesn't work out, if we could get better at those kinds of things. There's all these things that if we got better at, it would help everybody. IAN: I agree. ARTY: And I think that's why a open source initiative kind of thing maybe make sense because this is one of those areas that if we got better at this as an industry, it would help everybody. It's worth putting time in to learn and figure out how we can do better and if we all get better at it and stuff, there's just so many benefits and stuff from getting better at doing this. Another thing I was thinking about. You were mentioning the language thing of how easy it is to map skills that we learned from one language over to another language, such that even if you don't know the language that they're coding in at a particular job, you should apply anyway. [chuckles] I wonder if we had some data around how long it takes somebody to ramp up on a new language when they already know similar-ish languages. If we had data points on those sort of things that we're like, “Okay, well, how long did it actually take you?” Because of the absence of that information, people just assume well, the only way we can move forward is if we have the unicorn skills. Maybe if it became common knowledge, that it really only takes say, a couple months to become relatively proficient so that you can be productive on the team in another language that you've never worked in before. Maybe if that was a common knowledge thing, that people wouldn't worry about it so much, that you wouldn't see these unicorn recruiting efforts and stuff. People would be more inclined to look for more multipurpose general software engineering kinds of skills that map to whatever language that you're are doing. That people will feel more comfortable applying to jobs and going, “Oh, cool. I get the opportunity to learn a new language! So I know that I may be struggling a bit for a couple months with this, but I know I'll get it and then I can feel confident knowing that it's okay to learn my way through those things.” I feel if maybe we just started collecting some data points around ramp up time on those kind of things, put a database together to collect people's experiences around certain kind of things, that maybe those kinds of things would help everyone to just make better decisions that weren't so goofy and out of alignment with reality. IAN: Yeah, and there are lots of cheat sheets out there like, I'm trying to remember the name of it. I used to have it bookmarked. But you could literally pull up two programming languages side by side in the same browser window and see oh, if this is how you do it in JavaScript, this is how you do it on Python, or if this is how you write this code in C++, here's how you do it in Java. It gives you a one-to-one correlation for dozens, or hundreds of different kinds of blocks of code. That's really all you need to get started and like you said, it will take time to come proficient to where you don't have to have that thing up on your screen all the time. But at the same time, I think the company could invest and say, “You know what, take a week and just pour everything you've got into learning C Sharp because that's the skill we want you to have for this job.” It's like, okay, if you are telling me you trust me and you're making me the job offer and you're going to pay me this salary and I get to work in tech, but I don't happen to have that skill, but you're willing to me in that skill, why would I not take that job? You're going to help me learn and grow. You're offering me that job with a salary. Those are all great signals to send. Again, I think that a lot of companies are missing out and they're like, “No, we're not going to hire that person. We're just going to hold out until we find the next person that's a little bit better.” I think that that's where some things really drop off in the process, for sure is companies hold out too long and next thing they know, months have gone by and they've wasted tons of money when they could have just hired somebody a long time ago and just trained them. I think the idea of an open source collective on something like this is pretty interesting. At the same time, it would be a little subjective on “how quickly could someone ramp up on a, or onboard on a particular technology.” Because everybody has different learning styles and unless you're finding somebody to curate – like if you're a Ruby programmer and you're trying to learn Python, this is the de facto resource that you need to look at. I think it could be a little bit subjective, but I think that there's still some opportunity there to get community input on what should the interview process be? How long should it really be? How many rounds of interviews should there be from, both the candidates experience as well as the company experience and say, as a business, this is why we have you doing these kinds of things. That's really what I've been to teach as part of the Tech Interview Guide and the daily email series is from my perspective in the business, this is why. This is why I have you do a certain number of rounds, or this is why I give you this kind of technical challenge, or this is why I'm asking you this kind of question. Because I'm trying to find these signals about you that tell me that you're someone that I can trust to bring on my team. It's a tough system when not many people are willing to talk about it because I think a lot of people are worried that others are going to try to game the system and go, “Oh, well, now that I know everything about your interview process, I know how to cheat my way through it and now you're going to give me that job and I really don't know what I'm doing.” But I think that at the same time, companies can also have the higher, slow fire, fast mentality of like, “All right, you're not cutting it.” Like you're out right away and just rehire for that position. Again, if you're willing to trust and willing to extend that offer to begin with. If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out. It's a business decision; it's not a personal thing. But it's still devastating to the person when they don't get the job, or if they get fired right away because they're not pulling their weight, but if they're cheating their way through it, then they get what they deserve to. MANDY: Awesome. Well, I think that's a great place to put a pin in this discussion. It is definitely not a great place to end it. I think we should head over to our reflection segment. For me, there were so many things I wrote down. I loved that you said that people's tech journey is like a choose your own adventure. You can learn one thing and then find yourself over here and then the next thing you know, you find yourself over here. But you've picked up all these skills along the way and that's the most important thing is that as you go along this journey, you keep acquiring these skills that ultimately will make you the best programmer that you can be. Also, I really like that you also said something about it being a lifelong learning. Tech is lifelong learning and not just the technical skills. It's the people skills. It's the behavioral skills. Those are the important skills. Those skills are what ultimately it comes down to being in this industry is, do you have the desire to learn? Do you have the desire to grow? I think that should be one of the most important things that companies are aware of when they are talking to candidates that it's not about can this person do a Fibonacci sequence. It's can they learn, are they a capable person? Are they going to show up? Are they going to be a good person to have in the office? Are they going to be a light? Are they going to be supportive? Are they going to be caring? That's the ultimate. That right there for me is the ultimate and thank you for all that insight. ARTY: Well, I really, really loved your story, Ian at the very beginning of just curiosity and how you started your journey, getting into programming and then ended up finding ways to give back and getting really excited about seeing people's light bulbs go off and how much joy you got from those experiences, connecting with another individual and making that happen. I know we've gotten on this long tangent of pretty abstract, big topics of just like, here's the brokenness in the industry and what are some strategies that we can solve these large-scale problems. But I think you said some really important things back of just the importance of these one-on-one connections and the real change happens in the context of a relationship. Although, we're thinking about these big things. To actually make those changes, to actually make that difference, it happens in our local context. It happens in our companies. It happens with the people that we interact with on a one-on-one basis and have a genuine relationship with. If we want to create change, it happens with those little ripples. It happens with affecting that one relationship and that person going and having their own ripple effects. We all have the power to influence these things through the relationships with the individuals around us. IAN: I think my big takeaway here is we have been chatting for an hour and just how easy it is to have conversation about hey, what if we did this? How quickly it can just turn into hey, as a community, what if? And just the willingness of people being in the community, wanting to make the community better,

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 162 - Everything you need to know for the 2021 Bathurst 1000

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 112:27


It's time for that special Sunday in … December! V8 Sleuth's Aaron Noonan and Will Dale run through what you need to know ahead of this year's Repco Bathurst 1000.V8 Sleuth Bookshop: https://bookshop.v8sleuth.com.auBathurst Open Night tickets: https://bit.ly/3noJf3s

Python Bytes
#260 It's brutally simple: made just from pickle and zip

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 48:49


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Shortcut - Get started at shortcut.com/pythonbytes Special guest: Chris Patti Brian #1: Using cog to update --help in a Markdown README file Simon Willison I've wanted to have a use case for Ned Batchelder's cog Cog is a utility that looks for specially blocks [[[cog some code ]]] and [[[end]]] These block can be in comments, [HTML_REMOVED] for markdown. When you run cog on a file, it runs the “some code” and puts the output after the middle ]]] and before the [[[end]]]. Simon has come up with an excellent use, running --help and capturing the output for a README.md file for a CLI project. He even wrote a test, pytest of course, to check if the README.md needs updated. Michael #2: An oral history of Bank Python Bank Python implementations are effectively proprietary forks of the entire Python ecosystem which are in use at many (but not all) of the biggest investment banks. The first thing to know about Minerva is that it is built on a global database of Python objects. Barbara is a simple key value store with a hierarchical key space. It's brutally simple: made just from pickle and zip. Applications also commonly store their internal state in Barbara - writing dataclasses straight in and out with only very simple locking and transactions (if any). There is no filesystem available to Minerva scripts and the little bits of data that scripts pick up has to be put into Barbara. Barbara also has some "overlay" features: # connect to multiple rings: keys are 'overlaid' in order of # the provided ring names db = barbara.open("middleoffice;ficc;default") # get /Etc/Something from the 'middleoffice' ring if it exists there, # otherwise try 'ficc' and finally the default ring some_obj = db["/Etc/Something"] Lots of info about modeling with classes (instruments, books, etc) If you understand excel you will be starting to recognize similarities. In Excel, spreadsheets cells are also updated based on their dependencies, also as a directed acyclic graph. Dagger allows people to put their Excel-style modelling calculations into Python, write tests for them, control their versioning without having to mess around with files like CDS-OF-CDS EURO DESK 20180103 Final (final) (2).xlsx. Dagger is a key technology to get financial models out of Excel, into a programming language and under tests and version control. Time to drop a bit of a bombshell: the source code is in Barbara too, not on disk. Remain composed. It's kept in a special Barbara ring called sourcecode. Interesting table structures, like Pandas, but closer to a DB (MnTable) Over time the divergence between Bank Python and Open Source Python grows. Technology churns on both sides, much faster outside than in of course, but they do not get closer. Minerva has its own IDE - no other IDEs work if you keep your source files in a giant global database. What I can't understand is why it contains its own web framework. Investment banks have a one-way approach to open source software: (some of) it can come in, but none of it can go out BTW, I “read” this with naturalreaders app Chris #3: Pyxel Pyxel is a ‘retro gaming console' written in Python! This might seem old and un-shiny, but the restrictions imposed by the environment gift simplicity Vastly decreased learning time and effort compared to something like Unity or even Pygame Straight forward simple commands, just like it was for micro-computers in the 80s cls(), line(), rect(), circ() etc. Pyxel is somewhat more Python and less console than others like PICO-8 or TIC-80 but this is a feature! Use your regular development environment to build. Brian #4: How to Ditch Codecov for Python Projects Hynek Schlawack Codecov is a third party service that checks your coverage output and fails a build if coverage dropped. It's not without issues. Hynek is using coverage.py --fail-under flag in place of this in GitHub actions. It's not as simple as just adding a flag if you are using --parallel to combine coverage for multiple test runs into one report. Hynek is utilizing the coverage output as an artifact for each test, then pulling them all together in a coverage stage combine and check coverage. He provides the snippet of GH Action, and even links to a working workflow file using this process. Nice! Michael #5: tiptop (like glances) via Zach Villers tiptop is a command-line system monitoring tool in the spirit of top. It displays various interesting system stats, graphs it, and works on all operating systems. Really nice visualization for your servers Good candidate for pipx install tiptop Chris #6: pyc64 A Commodore 64 emulator written in pure Python! Not 100% complete - screen drawing is PETSCII character mode only This still allows for a lot of interesting apps & exploration Actual machine emulation using py65 - a pure Python 6502 chip emulator! You can pop to a Python REPL from inside the emulator and examine data structures like memory, registers, etc! An incredible example of what Python is capable of 0.6 Mhz with CPython and over 2Mhz with pypy! Extras Michael: Michael's FlaskCon 2021 HTMX Talk Chris: Amazon OpsTech IT is hiring! (If deemed appropriate :) Joke: I hate how the screens get bright so early this time of year

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 729, temporada 22: Travis Strikes Again – No More Heroes

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Travis Strikes Again – No More Heroes (Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4, PC). La hora de las letras: El gato negro / El que…

ARG Presents
Games That Became OTHER GAMES - Time Pilot (Arcade) and Brataccas (Amiga) - ARG Presents 193

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 64:00


SWITCHAROO this week on ARG Presents! Join THE BRENT and Amigo Aaron as we take a look at Games that became OTHER GAMES! These are games that started off in one direction, and for a variety of reason, turned out COMPLETELY differently in the end! Join the fellas as they look at TIME PILOT from the arcades and the INFAMOUS BRATACCAS aka BANDERSNATCH on the Commodore Amiga! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 160 - Garry Rogers

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 104:32


We're talking to Garry Rogers this week on the V8 Sleuth Podcast powered by Repco. Garry shares all sorts of stories from his long career in motorsport, both as a driver and as the boss of Garry Rogers Motorsport, chats memorabilia thanks to our mates at The Motorsport Trader, and tackles your National Motor Racing Museum Couch Racer Questions and the V8 Sleuth Top 10 Shootout.V8 Sleuth Bookshop: https://bookshop.v8sleuth.com.auBathurst Open Night tickets: https://bit.ly/3noJf3s

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast
Pixel Gaiden - Episode 70 - What Is A ”Franken System”? + 6 Good Games With Radar

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 168:33


Link: https://pixelgaiden.podbean.com/e/episode-70-what-is-a-franken-system-6-good-games-with-radar/ We're back for Episode 70 In this episode Cody and Eric catch up on the news and discuss 6 Good Games With Radar. We are doing news for the first monthly episode and then "catching up" later in the month. Episode Guide --------------- 7:21 Quick Questions 18:14 Patreon 28:30 News 1:19:35 Eric's Take - Systems I Didn't Have 1:34:38 Cody's Corner - Cody's Collecting Future 1:54:35 6 Good Games With Radar Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon. Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, Mark Scott, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show. Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amigospodcast/message

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast
Episode 70 - What Is A ”Franken System”? + 6 Good Games With Radar

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 167:34


We're back for Episode 70 In this episode Cody and Eric catch up on the news and discuss 6 Good Games With Radar. We are doing news for the first monthly episode and then "catching up" later in the month.   Episode Guide --------------- 7:21 Quick Questions  18:14 Patreon  28:30 News  1:19:35 Eric's Take - Systems I Didn't Have 1:34:38 Cody's Corner - Cody's Collecting Future 1:54:35 6 Good Games With Radar News -    (Cody) https://www.retrorgb.com/vectorlink-vectrex-multi-controller-adapter.html  (Cody) https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2021/10/the-intellivision-amico-has-a-unique-approach-to-physical-media-and-digital-ownership  (Eric) https://sarahjaneavory.itch.io/briley-witch-chronicles  (Cody) = https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2021/11/fishing-paradiso-will-try-to-lure-in-switch-players-in-early-2022  (Eric) Atari 8bit First Person Shooter - Final Assault - A rather impressive FPS released by GMG for the Atari 8bit - http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/final-assault-rather-impressive-fps.html    (Cody) https://www.retrorgb.com/sega-channel-revival-homebrew-released.html  (Cody) https://www.playstationlifestyle.net/2021/10/05/konami-is-letting-indie-devs-use-its-ips-for-a-game-competition-but-only-classic-ones/  (Eric) Win XP Turned 20 Years on on Oct 25th - https://www.techradar.com/news/windows-xp-turns-20-why-its-time-to-say-goodbye  (Cody) Holy Amstrad Batman!    CPCRetroDev 2021 competition  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/amstred-avoid-being-splattered-into.html  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/cosmic-gatlin-another-run-n-gun.html  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/survive-week-sims-style-amstrad-game.html  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/wrecking-ball-new-breakout-style-arcade.html  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/wireware-enjoyable-run-n-gun-released.html  http://www.indieretronews.com/2021/11/shovel-adventure-high-quality-arcade.html  (Cody) https://www.retrorgb.com/doom-32x-resurrection-patch-released.html  (Eric) Galaxian DX released on c64! - https://arlagames.itch.io/galaxian-dx-c64 - Not just a port – co-op mode added where you share lives  (Cody) https://kotaku.com/you-can-now-play-doom-via-twitter-1847881209  (Cody) https://www.retrorgb.com/forever-pak-n64-memory-card.html  (Eric) The Rubber Keyed Wonder – ZX Spectrum Documentary on Kickstarter - https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1195082866/the-rubber-keyed-wonder-40-years-of-the-zx-spectrum  (Cody) https://www.retrorgb.com/jaguar-gamedrive-firmware-v1-11-released.html  (Eric) Steam Deck delayed two months - https://twitter.com/swlovinist/status/1458526328014004226?s=20  (Cody) GTA Collection released on Switch  Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon.    Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, Mark Scott, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show. Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order!    

The Hyper Space: Podcasting in the 25th Century

The Hyper Space takes you back to the to the dawn of the World Wide Web when AOL was king and the digital song of dial-up on your 300 baud modem ruled the airways. So get your floppy disks ready and standby for 37 minutes for a picture to download - this is an episode you can't miss!          

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 728, temporada 22: Lost Judgment

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Lost Judgment (XBox One, XBox Series, Playstation 4, Playstation 5). Lo Indie: Entrevista a Endflame, creadores de Ikai. Diógenes: Death Trash, Lone McLonegan…

ARG Presents
Games Based on British Cartoons - Bangers & Mash (ZX) and Mr. Bean (DS) - ARG Presents 192

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 62:05


Remember those bygone days of youth this week on ARG Presents, as we look at games based on beloved British cartoons! After a brief discussion, we jump right into the action! Go APE with Bangers and Mash on the ZX Spectrum, and then it's time for everyone favorite bumbling, grumbling, and stumbling man-child with Mr. Bean on the Nintendo DS! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

Gettin' Grown
Mary Mcleod Bethune's Change Purse (Feat. Dr. Felecia Commodore & Dr. Nadrea Njoku)

Gettin' Grown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:14


Jade and Keia welcome Dr. Nadrea Njoku and Dr. Felecia Commodore to the kitchen table for a candid conversation about recent trends in HBCU giving and how best to support and sustain HBCUs and HBCU students both now and into the future. This special bonus episode of Gettin' Grown is presented commercial-free thanks to Target. Target is partnering with HBCU's to support the next generation of Black talent.

The Stack Overflow Podcast
The polyglot who leads Stack Overflow's Platform team

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 28:41


Rennie grew up in Kenya, Honduras, Somalia, and Oklahoma; his parents volunteered for the Peace Corps before working for the US Government overseas. Audio tape drives are real!  Check out this Retrocomputing question about how the Commodore 64 audio interface worked. If you  want  to remember something better, a 2014 study says you should write it out by hand. Rennie worked at Blackberry, and Ben remembered his colleagues at the Verge fondly hoping for their comeback. In fact, here's Ben hoping for their comeback!We did a podcast on moving from engineer to manager, which Rennie said was one of the hardest things to do. Rennie gave a shoutout to the book he's reading now, The Elegant Puzzle by Will Larson. Rennie works on our Platform team, which works on all of our reusable stuff, including our design system, Stacks. This week's Lifeboat badge goes to Vinzzz for explaining how to Create an array of random numbers in Swift.

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 8: MilCog and Nexus Game Fair

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks as they chat with Jamie about MilCog and Nexus Game Fair which will be Thursday, June 23, through Sunday, June 26, 2022, at the Brookfield Conference Center FB MilCog: https://www.facebook.com/MilwaukeeCompanyofGamers/FB Nexus: https://www.facebook.com/nexusgamefairWEB MilCog: https://milcogcom.wordpress.comWEB Nexus: http://www.nexusgamefair.comMilCog Info: We curate one of the largest game libraries in the hobby which is available at regional gaming conventions and local events we host. Depending on the event we're attending the library usually contains 1000 – 2000 games for check-out. Our professional, uniformed staff is friendly and knowledgeable and can recommend just the right games for your group and the library is fully automated getting you to your table and playing quickly.Audio Only Version Below

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 7: Beer Court With Hinterland Brewery

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks for Beer Court with Special Guest Brian from Hinterland Brewery located in Green Bay WisconsinWEB: https://hinterlandbeer.com/brewery/FB: https://www.facebook.com/HinterlandBreweryTwitter:  https://twitter.com/hinterlandbeerAll the tasty beers we reviewed this evening.Blueberry Wheat   https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/blueberry-wheat/Octoberfest  https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/oktoberfest/Jamaican Haze I.P.A.  https://hinterlandbeer.com/beers/jamaican-haze-ipa/Audio Only Version Below

Rated G for Gamers
Saturday Morning Retro Episode 17 - Splatterhouse (TG-16), Halloween (Atari 2600), Little Nightmares (X1), Friday the 13th (C64)

Rated G for Gamers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 58:59


On this month's episode of Saturday Morning Retro, Dan and Dave talk about Little Nightmares for the Xbox One and Friday the 13th for the Commodore 64 and in our Triple R segment, the Splatterhouse series and Halloween for the Atari 2600.

Scene World – The C64 NTSC/PAL Disk Magazine – Podcast
Podcast Episode #127 - Nicola and Anthony Caulfield

Scene World – The C64 NTSC/PAL Disk Magazine – Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


In our new podcast episode we are happy to have Nicola and Anthony Caulfield: a filmmaking team from London, responsible for awesome documentaries like From Bedrooms To Billions and its sequel The Amiga Years. We are talking with them about their new project The Rubbed Key Wonder - a documentary about the ZX Spectrum which is currently on Kickstarter. Interview starts at 09:47 minutes

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 158 - Repco Supercars Weekly: The sport needs niggle ... and we got it!

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:00


For this week's edition of Repco Supercars Weekly, V8 Sleuth's Aaron Noonan runs through the key happenings from last weekend's ARMOR ALL Sydney SuperNight, runs through what you need to know for this weekend's BP Ultimate Sydney SuperSprint, while On This Day looks at moments from Supercars history that happened on November 9.The Garage: https://www.repco.com.au/thegarageWin a DJR Ford Mustang from Repco: https://bit.ly/3nQMMXi

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Unsigthed (PC, Playstation 4, XBox One, Nintendo Switch). La sección de los oyentes: Vuestras anécdotas con la saga Resident Evil. Descarga el programa.

ARG Presents
ComX-35 Computer - Get Your Gadget & Cross Horde - ARG Presents 191

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 64:01


Oh man, I get excited about this one! YES, after MUCH DEMAND, it's TIME for THE ComX-35 Computer...a computer with a murky past from the mysterious high-tech streets of 1980's HONG KONG! Water proof keyboard? Built-in joystick? RADIATION PROOF PROCESSOR?!? It's got it all! THRILL to the story of the ComX-35, and then relax and enjoy a few gaming offerings as we look at the provocatively titled GET YOUR GADGET and CROSS HORDE, the GAME OF 1000 PORTS! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

The V8 Sleuth Podcast
Ep. 156 - Repco Supercars Weekly: The weekend of Anton

The V8 Sleuth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 10:35


For this week's edition of Repco Supercars Weekly, V8 Sleuth's Aaron Noonan runs through the key happenings from last weekend's Bunnings Trade Sydney SuperSprint, runs through what you need to know for this weekend's ARMOR ALL Sydney SuperNight, while On This Day looks at moments from Supercars history that happened on November 2.The Garage: https://www.repco.com.au/thegarage

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 6: Pick Up and Go Games

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021


G2B friends and regulars Scott and Heather spend some quality alone time with the Gutter Geeks in this extra sultry episode of Guys Games and Beer! Oh yeah: They also talk about the Crypts and Creatures Box Set! Pick Up and Go GamesWEB:  http://pickupandgo.games/FB: https://www.facebook.com/PickUpandGoGamesAudio Only Version Below

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.
Game Over 726, temporada 22: Champion Island Games

Game Over, el primer programa satirico sobre videojuegos.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


Sumario: Noticias. El juego de la semana: Champion Island Games (Doodle). Alguien tenía que hacerlo: GOTYs picaditos de la pandemia que, por injusticias de la vida, no lo han sido…

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con #5: TableTop Gaymers

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks at GameHole Con 2021 as they meet the TableTop Gaymers! Tabletop Gaymers Inc. is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to address homophobia in the tabletop gaming community by providing educational, social, and networking opportunities for LGBTQ+ (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer) “gaymers” and allies. Web: https://tabletopgaymers.org/ FB: https://www.facebook.com/tabletopgaymers/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TabletopGaymersAudio Only Version Below

ARG Presents
Laser Disc Games - Us Vs. Them & I'm Your Man - ARG Presents 190

ARG Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 50:17


Happy Halloween everyone! Welcome to ARG 190, costume edition! Grab that candy sack for some treats with no tricks...we promise! Join THE BRENT and Amigo Aaron for some holiday fun as we take another look at LASER DISC GAMES! Thrill to the innovation of "I'm Your Man" and then it's time to DEFEND EARTH FROM INVADERS in US VS. THEM! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/arg-presents/support

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast
Bloodfest / Horror Zombies from the Crypt - Halloween SPOOKTACULAR! Amigos: Everything Amiga 323

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 88:48


On Amigos Halloween Spooktacular VI, we take a look at Bloodfest, a PD dungeon crawler from Finland, and the aptly named Horror Zombies from the Crypt!

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast
Pixel Gaiden - Episode 69 - Eric Talks About The Best Part Of Fall (Beer!) + Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive)

Amigos: Everything Amiga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 153:58


We're back with Episode 69! In this episode Cody, Tim, and Eric catch up on what they've been playing and adding to their collections. Battle of the Systems – Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive) Episode Guide ------------------- 3:16 - Quick Questions 17:42 - Patreons 28:48 - Game Show 59:22 - Catching Up 2:06:16 - Battle of the Systems – Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive) Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon. Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show. Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/amigospodcast/message

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast
Episode 69 - Eric Talks About The Best Part Of Fall (Beer!) + Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive)

Pixel Gaiden Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 152:00


We're back with Episode 69!   In this episode Cody, Tim, and Eric catch up on what they've been playing and adding to their collections. Battle of the Systems – Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive)   Episode Guide ------------------- 3:16 - Quick Questions 17:42 - Patreons 28:48 - Game Show 59:22 - Catching Up 2:06:16 - Battle of the Systems – Pop N Twinbee (SNES) vs. Twinkle Tale (MegaDrive)   Please give us a review on Apple Podcasts! Thanks for listening! You can always reach us at podcast@pixelgaiden.com. Send us an email if we missed anything in the show notes you need. You can now support us on Patreon.    Thank you to Henrik Ladefoged, Roy Fielding, Garry Heather, Matthew Ackerman, Josh Malone, Daniel James, 10MARC, Eric Sandgren, David Motowylak, Team Gray All The Way, Maciej Sosnowski, Paradroyd, RAM OK ROM OK, Mitsoyama, David Vincent, Ant Stiller, CityXen, Hermski, VaderGB, Mr. Toast, Jason Holland, and Dustin Newell for making this show possible through their generous donation to the show.   Support our sponsor Retro Rewind for all of your Commodore needs! Use our page at https://retrorewind.ca/pixelgaiden and our discount code PG10 for 10% off any order!

No Time For Time Travel Pod
184. Halloween Special: Spooky Games, Scary Stories, and More!

No Time For Time Travel Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 63:32


184. Halloween Special: Spooky Games, Scary Stories, and More! Tony and Lam finally record again! Happy HALLOWEEN! Check out our Halloween Special where we talk about horror games, scary real life stories, some spooky movies, and that terrible Friday the 13th game on the NES and Commodore 64 (courtesy of JudgeGreg of Enthusiacs). ========== Follow us onTwitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Patreon Stream us on Twitch! Visit our site at www.ntfttpod.com ! You can contribute by emailing us at ntfttpod@gmail.com! Hurdy gur and warp speed! Support No Time For Time Travel Pod by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/no-time-for-time-travel-pod Find out more at https://no-time-for-time-travel-pod.pinecast.co This podcast is powered by Pinecast. Try Pinecast for free, forever, no credit card required. If you decide to upgrade, use coupon code r-e52a8a for 40% off for 4 months, and support No Time For Time Travel Pod.

Guys Games and Beer
G2B at GameHole Con 2021 Part 4: Banana Chan!

Guys Games and Beer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021


Join the Gutter Geeks for another amazing interview: This time with game designer Banana Chan!  Banana Chan FB: https://www.facebook.com/bananachangames WEB: http://www.gameandacurry.com/bananachanTIKTOK https://www.tiktok.com/@banana.chan.games RPG and Board Game Writer, Designer & Publisher Banana Chan Banana Chan (she/they) is a game designer, writer and publisher. She is the owner and co-founder of a small board game and RPG publishing company called Game and a Curry. Her latest work has been on Jiangshi: Blood in the Banquet Hall, Scooby-Doo: Betrayal at Mystery Mansion and Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft. When she's not busy making games, she's watching horror movies and hanging out with the pigeons on her patio. You can find her on Twitter like, all the time, @bananachangames Audio Only Version Below

Hamin Media Group
The Academy Star Trek Podcast 09.20.2021: Commodore Zourdos Is Back After Tarkalean Flu

Hamin Media Group

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:26


The Academy Podcast 9-20-2021   Star Date: 75187 Today the boys talk nothing but Star Trek Day 9-8-2021. 55 years of Star Trek from the airing of the very first episode on September 8th of 1967. Oh the places Trek will go. On this episode the boys talk about the merch from Trek day, the panels, but more importantly they talk about the new air dates for a lot of the shows in production right now. Also how did we feel about startrek.com's list of 55 of the most influential moments in Star Trek History. Take a listen and find out!   Tell us what you think! Hit us up at these places: Email: theacademyhmg@yahoo.com Twitter: @theacademyhmg Facebook: @AcademyHMG Hamin Media Discord server!   SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEW HAMIN MEDIA GROUP AFFILIATES CHANNEL! www.haminmediagroup.podbean.com YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnZkzOodkDzBN5wiunvCXkg CHECK OUT OUR SPONSORS!! JustCBDStore.com Use promo code "HTM" for 20% off!!! Vince Russo Bro! Coffee from TheBroasters.com Artisan Greek Olive Oil from zourdosoliveoil.com Pro Wrestling Tees Prowrestlingtees.com/SuperStarSilvio ProWrestlingTees.com/BinHamin ProWrestlingTees.com/StevieRichards ProWrestlingTees.com/SEGShirts ProWrestlingTees.com/GreekGodPapadon

The History of Computing
Our Friend, The Commodore Amiga

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 13:32


Jay Miner was born in 1932 in Arizona. He got his Bachelor of Science at the University of California at Berkeley and helped design calculators that used the fancy new MOS chips where he cut his teeth doing microprocessor design, which put him working on the MOS 6500 series chips. Atari decided to use those in the VCS gaming console and so he ended up going to work for Atari. Things were fine under Bushnell but once he was off to do Chuck E Cheese and Time-Warner was running Atari things started to change. There he worked on chip designs that would go into the Atari 400 and 800 computers, which were finally released in 1979. But by then, Miner was gone after he couldn't get in step with the direction Atari was taking. So he floated around for a hot minute doing chip design for other companies until Larry Kaplan called. Kaplan had been at Atari and founded Activision in 1979. He had half a dozen games under his belt by then, but was ready for something different by 1982. He and Doug Neubauer saw the Nintendo NES was still using the MOS 6502 core, although now a Ricoh 2A03. They knew they could do better. Miner's company didn't want in on it, so they struck out on their own. Together they started a company called Hi-Toro, which they quickly renamed to Amiga. They originally wanted to build a new game console based on the Motorola 68000 chips, which were falling in price. They'd seen what Apple could do with the MOS 6502 chips and what Tandy did with the Z-80. These new chips were faster and had more options. Everyone knew Apple was working on the Lisa using the chips and they were slowly coming down in price. They pulled in $6 million in funding and started to build a game console, codenamed Lorraine. But to get cash flow, they worked on joysticks and various input devices for other gaming platforms. But development was expensive and they were burning through cash. So they went to Atari and signed a contract to give them exclusive access to the chips they were creating. And of course, then came the video game crash of 1983. Amazing timing. That created a shakeup around the industry. Jack Tramiel was out at Commodore, the company he founded originally to create calculators at the dawn of MOS chip technology. And Tramiel bought Atari from Time Warner. The console they were supposed to give Atari wasn't done yet. Meanwhile Tramiel had cut most of the Atari team and was bringing in his trusted people from Commodore, so seeing they'd have to contend with a titan like Tramiel, the team at Amiga went looking for investors. That's when Commodore bought Amiga to become their new technical team and next thing you know, Tramiel sues Commodore and that drags on from 1983 to 1987. Meanwhile, the nerds worked away. And by CES of 1984 they were able to show off the power of the graphics with a complex animation of a ball spinning and bouncing and shadows rendered on the ball. Even if the OS wasn't quite done yet, there was a buzz. By 1985, they announced The Amiga from Commodore - what we now know as the Amiga 1000. The computer was prone to crash, they had very little marketing behind them, but they were getting sales into the high thousands per month. Not only was Amiga competing with the rest of the computer industry, but they were competing with the PET and VIC-20, which Commodore was still selling. So they finally killed off those lines and created a strategy where they would produce a high end machine and a low end machine. These would become the Amiga 2000 and 500. Then the Amiga 3000 and 500 Plus, and finally the 4000 and 1200 lines. The original chips evolved into the ECS then AGA chipsets but after selling nearly 5,000,000 machines, they just couldn't keep up with missteps from Commodore after Irving Gould outside yet another CEO. But those Amiga machines. They were powerful and some of the first machines that could truly crunch the graphics and audio. And those higher end markets responded with tooling built specifically for the Amiga. Artists like Andy Warhol flocked to the platform. We got LightWave used on shows like Max Headroom. I can still remember that Money For Nothing video from Dire Straits. And who could forget Dev. The graphics might not have aged well but they were cutting edge at the time. When I toured colleges in that era, nearly every art department had a lab of Amigas doing amazing things. And while artists like Calvin Harris might have started out on an Amiga, many slowly moved to the Mac over the ensuing years. Commodore had emerged from a race to the bottom in price and bought themselves a few years in the wake of Jack Tramiel's exit. But the platform wars were raging with Microsoft DOS and then Windows rising out of the ashes of the IBM PC and IBM-compatible clone makers were standardizing. Yet Amiga stuck with the Motorola chips, even as Apple was first in line to buy them from the assembly line. Amiga had designed many of their own chips and couldn't compete with the clone makers at the lower end of the market or the Mac at the higher end. Nor the specialty systems running variants of Unix that were also on the rise. And while the platform had promised to sell a lot of games, the sales were a fourth or less of the other platforms and so game makers slowly stopped porting to the Amiga. They even tried to build early set-top machines, with the CDTV model, which they thought would help them merge the coming set-top television control and the game market using CD-based games. They saw MPEG coming but just couldn't cash in on the market. We were entering into an era of computing where it was becoming clear that the platform that could attract the most software titles would be the most popular, despite the great chipsets. The operating system had started slow. Amiga had a preemptive multitasking kernel and the first version looked like a DOS windowing screen when it showed up iii 1985. Unlike the Mac or Windows 1 it had a blue background with oranges interspersed. It wasn't awesome but it did the trick for a bit. But Workbench 2 was released for the Amiga 3000. They didn't have a lot of APIs so developers were often having to write their own tools where other operating systems gave them APIs. It was far more object-oriented than many of its competitors at the time though, and even gave support for multiple languages and hypertext schemes and browsers. Workbench 3 came in 1992, along with the A4000. There were some spiffy updates but by then there were less and less people working on the project. And the tech debt piled up. Like a lack of memory protection in the Exec kernel meant any old task could crash the operating system. By then, Miner was long gone. He again clashed with management at the company he founded, which had been purchased. Without the technical geniuses around, as happens with many companies when the founders move on, they seemed almost listless. They famously only built features people asked for. Unlike Apple, who guided the industry. Miner passed away in 1994. Less than two years later, Commodore went bankrupt in 1996. The Amiga brand was bought and sold to a number of organizations but nothing more ever became of them. Having defeated Amiga, the Tramiel family sold off Atari in 1996 as well. The age of game consoles by American firms would be over until Microsoft released the Xbox in 2001. IBM had pivoted out of computers and the web, which had been created in 1989 was on the way in full force by then. The era of hacking computers together was officially over.

Screaming in the Cloud
Teasing Out the Titular Titles with Chris Williams

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 39:59


About ChrisChris Williams is a Enterprise Architect for World Wide Technology — a technology solution and service provider. There he helps customers design the next generation of public, private, and hybrid cloud solutions, specializing in AWS and VMware. His first computer was a Commodore 64, and he's been playing video games ever since.Chris blogs about virtualization, technology, and design at Mistwire. He is an active community leader, co-organizing the AWS Portsmouth User Group, and both hosts and presents on vBrownBag. He is also an active mentor, helping students at the University of New Hampshire through Diversify Thinking—an initiative focused on empowering girls and women to pursue education and careers in STEM.Chris is a certified AWS Hero as well as a VMware vExpert. Fun fact that Chris doesn't want you to know: he has a degree in psychology so you can totally talk to him about your feelings.Links: WWT: https://www.wwt.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mistwire Personal site: https://mistwire.com vBrownBag: https://vbrownbag.com/team/chris-williams/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things I miss the most from the pre-pandemic times is meeting people at conferences or at various business meetings, not because I like people—far from it—but because we go through a ritual that I am a huge fan of, which is the exchange of business cards. Now, it's not because I'm a collector or anything here, but because I like seeing what people's actual titles are instead of diving into the morass of what we call ourselves on Twitter and whatnot. Today, I have just one of those folks with me. My guest is Chris Williams, who works at WWT, and his business card title is Enterprise Architect, comma AWS Cloud. Chris, welcome.Chris: Hi. Thanks for having me on the show, Corey.Corey: No, thank you for taking the time to speak with me. I have to imagine that the next line in your business card is, “No, I don't work for AWS,” because you know a company has succeeded when they get their name into people's job titles who don't work there.Chris: So, I have a running joke where the next line should actually be cloud therapist. And my degree is actually in psychology, so I was striving to get cloud therapist in there, but they still don't want to let me have it.Corey: Former guest Bobby Allen is now a cloud therapist over at Google Cloud, which is just phenomenal. I don't know what they're doing in a marketing context over there; I just know that they're just blasting them out of the park on a consistent, ongoing basis. It's really nice to see. It's forcing me to up my game a little bit. So, one of the challenges I've always had is, I don't like putting other companies' names into the title.Now, I run the Last Week in AWS newsletter, so yeah, okay, great, there's a little bit of ‘do as I say, not as I do' going on here. Because it feels, on some level, like doing unpaid volunteer work for a $2 trillion company. Speaking of, you are an AWS Community Hero, where you do volunteer work for a $2 trillion company. How'd that come about? What did you do that made you rise to their notice?Chris: That was a brilliant segue. Um—[laugh]—Corey: I do my best.Chris: So I, actually prior to becoming an AWS Community Hero, I do a lot of community work. So, I have run and helped to run four different community-led organizations: the Virtualization Technology User Group of New England; the AWS Portsmouth User Group, now the AWS Boston User Group; I'm a co-host and presenter for vBrownBag; I also do the New England AWS Community Day, which is a conglomeration of all the different user groups in one setting; and various and sundry other things, as well, along the way. Having done all of that, and having had a lot of the SAs and team members come and do speaking presentations for these various and sundry things, I was nominated internally by AWS to become one of their Community Heroes. Like you said, it's basically unpaid volunteer work where I go out and tout the services. I love talking about nerd stuff, so when I started working on AWS technologies, I really enjoyed it, and I just, kind of like, glommed on with other people that did it as well. I'm also a VMware vExpert, which basically use the exact same accolade for VMware. I have not been doing as much VMware stuff in the recent past, but that's kind of how I got into this gig.Corey: One of the things that strikes me as being the right move with respect to these, effectively, community voice accolades is Microsoft got something very right—they've been doing this a long time—they have their MVP program, but they have to re-invite people who have to requalify for it by whatever criteria they are, every year. AWS does not do this with their Heroes program. If you look at their Heroes page, there's a number of folks up there who have been doing interesting things in the cloud years ago, but then fell off the radar for a variety of reasons. In fact, the only way that I'm aware that you can lose Hero status is via getting a job at AWS or one of AWS competitors.Now, the hard part, of course, is well, who is Amazon's competitors? Basically everyone, but it mostly distills down to Microsoft, Google, and Oracle, as best I can tell, for Hero status. How does VMware fall on that spectrum? To be more specific, how does VMware fall on the spectrum of their community engagement program and having to renew, not, “Are they AWS's competitor?” To which the answer is, “Of course.”Chris: So, the renewal process for the VMware vExpert program is an annual re-up process where you fill out the form, list your contribution of the year, what you've done over the previous year, and then put it in for submission to the board of VMware vExperts who then give you the thumbs up or thumbs down. Much like Nero, you know, pass or fail, live or die. And I've been fortunate enough, so my vBrownBag contributions are every week; we have a show that happens every week. It can be either VMware stuff, or cloud in general stuff, or developer-related stuff. We cover the gamut; you know, people that want to come on and talk about whatever they want to talk about, they come on. And by virtue of that, we've had a lot of VMware speakers, we've had a lot of AWS speakers, we've had a lot of Azure speakers. So, I've been fortunate enough to be able to qualify each year with those contributions.Corey: I think that's the right way to go, from my perspective at least. But I want to get into this a little bit because you are an enterprise architect, which is always one of those terms that is super easy to make fun of in a variety of different ways. Your IDE is probably a whiteboard, and at some point when you have to write code, I thought you had a team of people who would be able to do that all for you because your job is to cogitate, and your artifacts are documentation, and the entire value of what you do can only be measured in the grand sweep of time, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.Chris: [laugh].Corey: But you don't generally get to be a Community Hero for stuff like that, and you don't usually get to be a vExpert on the VMware side, by not having at least technical chops that make people take a second look. What is it you'd say it is you do hear for, lack of a better term?Chris: “What would you say ya, do you here, Bob?” So, I'm not being facetious when I say cloud therapist. There is a lot of working at the eighth layer of the OSI model, the political layer. There's a lot of taking the requirements from the customer and sending them to the engineer. I'm a people person.The easy answer is to say, I do all the things from the TOGAF certification manual: the requirements, risks, assumptions, and constraints; the logical, conceptual, and physical diagrams; the harder answer is the soft skill side of that, is actually being able to communicate with the various levels of the industry, figuring out what the business really wants to do and how to technically solution that and figure out how to talk to the engineers to make that happen. You're right EAs get made fun of all the time, almost as much as consultants get made fun of. And it's a very squishy layer that, you know, depending upon your personality and the personality of the customer that you're dealing with, it can work wonderfully well or it can crash and burn immediately. I know from personal experience that I don't mesh well with financials, but I'm really, really good with, like, medical industry stuff, just the way that the brain works. But ironically, right now I'm working with a financial and we're getting along like a house on fire.Corey: Oh, yeah. I've been saying for a while now that when it comes to cloud, cost and architecture are the same things, and I think that ties back to a lot of different areas. But I want to be very clear here that we talk about, I'm not super deep into the financials, that does not mean you're bad at architecture because working on finance means different things to different folks. I don't think that it is possibly a good architect in the cloud environment and not have a conception of, “Huh, that thing seems really expensive if I do it that way.” That is very different than having the skill of reading a profit and loss statement or understanding various implications of the time value of money calculation that a company uses, or how things get amortized.There are nuances piled on top of nuances in finance, and it's easy to sit here and think that oh, I'm not great at finance means I don't know how money works. That is very rarely true. If you really don't know how money works, you'll go start a cryptocurrency startup.Chris: [laugh]. So, I plugged back to you; I was listening to one of your old shows and I cribbed one of your ideas and totally went with it. So, I just said that there's the logical, conceptual, and physical diagrams of an environment; on one of your shows, you had mentioned a financial diagram for an environment, and I was like, “That's brilliant.” So, now when I go into a customer, I actually do that, too. I take my physical diagram, I strip out all of the IP addresses, and our names, and everything like that, and I plot down how much it's going to cost, like, “This is the value of the EC2 instance,” or, “This is how much this pipe is going to cost if you run this over it.” And they go bananas over it. So, thanks for providing that idea that I mercilessly stole.Corey: Kind of fun on a lot of levels. Part of the challenge is as things get cloudier and it moves away from EC2 instances, ideally the lie we would like to tell ourselves that everything's in an auto-scaling group. Great—Chris: Right.Corey: —stepping beyond that when you start getting into something that's even more intricately tied to a specific user, we're talking about effectively trying to get unit economic measures of every user, every thousand users is going to cost me X dollars to service them on average, on top of a baseline of steady-state spend that is going to increase differently. At that point, talking to finance about predictive models turn into, “Well, this comes down to a question of business modeling.” But conversely, for engineering minds that is exactly what finance is used to figuring out. The problem they have is, “Well, every time we hire a new engineer, we wind up seeing our AWS bill increase.” Funny how that works. Yeah, how do you map that to something that the business understands? That is part of what they do. But it does, I admit, make it much more challenging from a financial map of an environment.Chris: Yeah, especially when the customer or the company is—you know, they've been around for a while, and they're used to just like that large bolus of money at the very beginning of a data center, and they buy the switches, and they buy the servers, and they virtualize them, and they have that set cost that they knew that they had to plunk down at the beginning. And it's a mindset shift. And they're coming around to it, some faster than others. Oddly enough, the startups nowadays are catching on very quickly. I don't deal with a lot of startups, so it takes some finesse.Corey: An interesting inflection that I've seen is that there's an awful lot of enterprises out there that say, “Oh, we're like a startup.” Great. You mean with weird cultural inflections that often distill down to cult of personality, the constant worry about whether you're going to wind up running out of runway before finding product-market fit? And the rooms filled with—Chris: The eighty-hour work weeks? The—[laugh]—Corey: And they're like, “No, no, no, it's like the good parts.” “Oh, so you mean out the upside.” But you don't hear it the other way around where you have a startup that you're interviewing with, “Ha-ha, we're like an enterprise. We have a six-month interview process that takes 18 different stages,” and so on and so forth. However, we do see startups having to mature rapidly, and move up the compliance path as they're dealing with regulated entities and the rest, and wanting to deal with serious customers who have no sense of humor about, “Yeah, we'll figure that part out later as part of an audit document.”So, what we also see, though, is that enterprises are doing things that look a lot more startup-y. If I take a look at the common development environments and tools and techniques that big enterprises use, it looks an awful lot like how startups were doing it five or ten years ago. That is the slow and steady evolution of time. And what startups are doing today becomes enterprise tomorrow, and I can't shake the feeling that there's a sea of vendors out there who, in the event that winds up happening are eventually going to find themselves without a market at all. My model has been that if I go and found a Twitter for Pets style startup tomorrow and in ten years, it has grown to become an S&P 500 component—which is still easier to take seriously than most of what Tesla says—great.During that journey, at what point do I become a given company's customer because if there is no onboarding story for me to become your customer, you're in a long-tail decline phase. That's been my philosophy, but you are a—trademarked term—Enterprise Architect, so please feel free to tell me if I'm missing any of the nuances there, which I'm sure I am because let's face it, nuance is hard; sweeping statements are easy.Chris: As an architect, [laugh] it would be a disservice to not say my favorite catchphrase, it depends. There are so many dependencies to those kinds of sweeping statements. I mean, there's a lot of enterprises that have good process; there are a lot of enterprises that have bad process. And going back to your previous statement of the startup inside the enterprise, I'm hearing a lot of companies nowadays saying, “Oh, well, we've now got this brand new incubator system that we're currently running our little startup inside of. It's got the best of both worlds.”And I'm not going to go through the litany of bad things that you just said about startups, but they'll try to encapsulate that shift that you're talking about where the cheese is moving so quickly now that it's very hard for these companies to know the customer well enough to continue to stay salient and continue to be able to look into that crystal ball to stay relevant in the future. My job as an EA is to try to capture that point in time where what are the requirements today and what are the known detriments that you're going to see in your future that you need to protect against? So, that's kind of my job—other than being a cloud therapist—in a nutshell.Corey: I love the approach. My line has been that I do a lot of marriage counseling between engineering and finance, which is a fun term that also just so happens to be completely accurate.Chris: Absolutely. [laugh]. I'm currently being a marriage counselor right now.Corey: It's an interesting time. So, you had a viral tweet recently that honestly, I'm a bit jealous about. I have had a lot of tweets that have done reasonably well, but I haven't ever had anything go super-viral, where it was just a screenshot of a conversation you had with an AWS recruiter. Now, before we go into this, I want to make a couple of disclaimers here. Before I entered tech myself, I was a technical recruiter, and I can say that these people have hard jobs.There is a constant pressure to perform, it is a sales job that is unlike most others. If you sell someone a pen, great, you can wrap your head around what that's like. But you don't have to worry about the pen deciding it doesn't want to go home with the buyer. So, it becomes a double sale in a lot of weird ways, and there's a constant race to the bottom and there's a lot of competition in the space. It's a numbers game and a lot of folks get in and wash out who have terrible behaviors and terrible patterns, so the whole industry gets tainted—in some respects—like that. A great example of someone who historically has been a terrific example of recruiting done right has been Jill Wohlner. And she's one of the shining beacons of the industry as far as how to do these things in the right way—Chris: Yes.Corey: —but the fact that she is as exceptional as she is is in no small part because there's a lot of random folks coming by. All which is to say that our conversation going forward is not and should not be aimed at smacking around individual recruiters or recruiting as a whole because that is unfair. Now, that disclaimer has been given. Great, what happened?Chris: So, first off, shout out to Jill; she actually used to be a host on vBrownBag. So, hey girl. [laugh]. What happened was—and I have the utmost empathy and sympathy for recruiting; I actually used to have a side gig where I would go around to the local recruiting places around my area here and teach them how to read a cloud resume and how to read a req and try to separate the wheat from the chaff, and to actually have good conversations. This was back when cloud wasn't—this was, like, three or four years ago.And I would go in there and say, “This is how you recruit a cloud person nowadays.” So, I love good recruiters. This one was a weird experience in that—so when a recruiter reaches out to me, what I do is I take an assessment of my current situation: “Am I happy where I'm at right now?” The answer is, “Yes.” And if they ping me, I'll say, “Hey, I'm happy right now, but if you have something that is, you know, a million dollars an hour, taste-testing margaritas on St. John island in the sand, I'm all ears. I'm listening. Conversely, I also am a Community Hero, so I know a ton of people out in the industry. Maybe I can help you out with landing that next person.”Corey: I just want to say for the record, that is absolutely the right answer. And something like that is exactly what I would give, historically. I can't do it now because let's be clear here. I have a number of employees and, “Hey, Corey's out there doing job interviews,” sends a message that isn't good when it comes to how is that company doing anyway. I miss it because I enjoyed the process and I enjoyed the fun, but even when I was perfectly happy, it's, “Well, I'm not actively on the market, but I am interested to have a conversation if you've got something interesting.”Because let's face it, I want to hear what's going on in the market, and if I'm starting to hear a lot of questions about a technology I have been dismissive of, okay, maybe it's time to pay more attention. I have repeatedly been able to hire the people interviewing me in some cases, and sometimes I've gone on interviews just to keep my interview skills sharp and then wound up accepting the job because it turned out they did have something interesting that was compelling to me even though I was reasonably happy at the time. I will always take the meeting; I will always at least have a chat about what they're doing, and I think that doing otherwise is doing yourself a disservice in the long arc of your career.Chris: Right. And that's basically the approach that I take, too. I want to hear what's out there. I am very happy at World Wide right now, so I'm not interested, interested. But again, if they come up with an amazing opportunity, things could happen. So, I implied that in my response to him.I said, “I'm happy right now, thanks for asking, but let's set up the meeting and we can have a chat.” The response was unexpected. [laugh]. The response was basically, “If you're not ready to leave right now, it makes no sense for me to talk to you.” And it was a funny… interaction.I was like, “Huh. That's funny.” I'm going to tweet about that because I thought it was funny—I'm not a jerk, so I'm going to block out all of the names and all of the identifying information and everything—and I threw it up. And the commiseration was so impressive. Not impressive in a good way; impressive in a bad way.Every person that responded was like, “Yes. This has happened to me. Yes, this is”—and honestly, I got a lot of directors from AWS reaching out to me trying to figure out who that person was, apologizing saying that's not our way. And I responded to each and every single one of them. And I was like, “Somebody has already found that person; somebody has already spoken to that person. That being said, look at all of the responses in the timeline. When you tell me personally, that's not the way you do things, I believe that you believe that.”Corey: Yeah, I believe you're being sincere when you say this, however the reality of what the data shows and people's lived experience in the form of anecdotes are worlds apart.Chris: Yeah. And I'm an AWS Hero. [laugh]. That's how I got treated. Not to blow my own horn or anything like that, but if that's happening to me, either A, he didn't look me up and just cold-called me—which is probably the case—and b, if he treats me like that, imagine how he's treating everybody else?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. 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We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: Every once in a while I get some of their sourcers doing outreach to see folks who are somewhat aligned on them via LinkedIn or other things, and, “Oh, okay, yeah; if you look at the things I talked about in various places, I can understand how I might look like a potentially interesting hire.” And they send outreach emails to me, they're always formulaic, and once in a while, I'll tweet a screenshot of them where I redact the person's name, and it was—and there's a comment, like, “Should I tell them?” Because it's fun; it's hilarious. But I want to be clear because that often gets misconstrued; they have done absolutely nothing wrong. You've got to cast a wide net to find talent.I'm surprised I get as few incidents of recruiter outreach as I do. I am not hireable and that's okay, but I don't begrudge people reaching out. I either respond with a, “No thanks,” if it's a particularly good email, or I just hit the archive button and never think about it again. And that's fine, too. But I don't make people feel like a jerk for asking, and that is an engineering behavioral pattern that drives me up a wall.It's, “So, I'm thinking about a job here and I'm wondering if you might be a fit,” and your response is just to set them on fire? Well, guess what an awful lot of those people sending out those emails in the sourcing phase of recruiting are early career, and guess what, they tend to get promoted in the fullness of time. Sometimes they're no longer recruiting at all; sometimes they wind up being hiring managers in different ways or trying to figure out what offer they're going to extend to someone. And if you don't think that people in those roles remember when they're treated poorly as a response to their outreach, I have news for you. Don't do it. Your reputation lingers long after you no longer work there.Chris: Just exactly so. And I feel really bad for that guy.Corey: I do hope that he was not reprimanded because he should not be. It is clearly a systemic problem, and the fact that one person happened to do this in a situation where it went viral does not mean that they are any worse than other folks doing it. It is a teachable opportunity. It is, “I know that you have incredible numbers of roles to hire for, all made all the more urgent by the fact that you're having some significant numbers of departures—clearly—in the industry right now.” So, I get it; you have a hard job. I'm not going to waste your time because I don't even respond to them just because, at AWS particularly, they have hard work to do, and just jawboning with me is not going to be useful for them.Chris: [laugh].Corey: I get it.Chris: And you're trying to hire the same talent too. So.Corey: Exactly. One of the most egregious things I've seen in the course of my career was when that whole multiple accounts opened for Wells Fargo's customers and they wound up firing 3500 people. Yeah, that's not individual tellers doing something unethical. That is a systemic problem, and you clean house at the top because you're not going to convince me that you're hiring that many people who are unethical and setting out to do these things as a matter of course. It means that the incentives are wrong, it means that the way you're measuring things are wrong, and people tend to do things out of fear or because there's now a culture of it. And if you fire individuals for that, you're wrong.Chris: And that was the message that I conveyed to the people that reached out to me and spoke to me. I was like, there is a misaligned KPI, or OKR, or whatever acronym you want to use, that is forcing them to do this churn-and-burn mentality instead of active, compassionate recruiting. I don't know what that term is; I'm very far removed from the recruiting world. But that person isn't doing that because they're a jerk. They're doing that because they have numbers to hit and they've got to grind out as many as humanly possible. And you're going to get bad employees when you do that. That's not a long-term sustainable path. So, that was the conversation that I had with them. Hopefully, it resonated and hits home.Corey: I still remember from ten years ago—and I don't always tell the story, but I absolutely will now—I went up to San Francisco when I lived in Los Angeles; I interviewed with Yammer. I went through the entire process—this was not too long before they got acquired by Microsoft so that gives you some time basis—and I got a job offer. And it was a not ridiculous offer. I was going to think about it, and I [unintelligible 00:24:19], “Great. Thank you. Let me sleep on this for a day or two and I'll get back to you definitely before the end of the week.”Within an hour, I got a response rescinding the offer claiming it had been sent by mistake. Now, I believe that that is true and that they are being sincere with this. I don't know that if it was the wrong person; I don't know if that suddenly they didn't have the req or they had another candidate that suddenly liked better that said no and then came back and said yes, but it's been over a decade now and every time I talk to someone who's considering something in that group, I tell this story. That's the sort of thing that leaves a mark because I have a certain philosophy of I don't ever resign from a job before I wind up making sure everything is solid—things are signed, good to go, the background check clears, et cetera—because I don't want to find myself suddenly without income or employment, especially in that era. And that was fine, but a lot of people don't do that.As soon as the offer comes in, they're like, “I'm going to go take a crap on my boss's desk,” which, let's be clear, I don't recommend. You should write a polite and formulaic resignation letter and then you should email it to your boss, you should not carve it into their door. Do this in a responsible way, and remember that you're going to encounter these people again throughout your career. But if I had done that, I would have had serious problems. And so that points to something systemically awful at a company.I have never in my career as a hiring manager extended an offer and then rescinded it for anything other than we can't come to an agreement on this. To be clear, this is also something I wonder about in the space, when people tell stories about how they get a job offer, they attempt to negotiate the offer, and then it gets withdrawn. There are two ways that goes. One is, “Well if you're not happy with this offer, get out of here.” Yeah, that is a crappy company, but there's also the story of people who don't know how to negotiate effectively, and in turn, they come back with indications that you do not know how to write a business email, you do not know how negotiations work, and suddenly, you're giving them a last-minute opportunity to get out before they hire someone who is going to be something of a wrecking ball in the company, and, “Whew, dodged a bullet on that.”I haven't encountered that scenario myself, but I've seen it from other folks and emails that have been passed around in various channels. So, my position on this is everyone should negotiate offers, but visit fearlesssalarynegotiation.com, it's run by my friend, Josh; he has a whole bunch of free content on his site. Look at it. Read it. It is how to handle this stuff effectively and why things are the way that they are. Follow his advice, and you won't go too far wrong. Again, I have no financial relationship, I just like what he's done a lot and I've been talking to him for years.Chris: Nice. I'll definitely check that out. [laugh].Corey: Another example is developher—that's develop H-E-R dot com. Someone else I've been speaking to who's great at this takes a different perspective on it, and that's fine. There's a lot of advice out there. Just make sure that whoever it is you're talking to about this is in a position to know what they're talking about because there's crap advice that's free. Yeah. How do you figure out the good advice and the bad advice? I'm worried someone out there is actually running Route 53 is a database for God's sake.Chris: That's crazy talk. Who would do that? That's madness.Corey: I can't imagine it.Chris: We're actually in the process of trying to figure out how to do a panel chat on exactly that, like, do a vBrownBag on salary negotiations, get some really good people in the room that can have a conversation around some of the tough questions that come around salary negotiation, what's too much to ask for? What kind of attitude should you go into it with? What kind of process should you have mentally? Is it scrawling in crayon, “No. More money,” and then hitting send? Or is it something a little bit more advanced?Corey: I also want to be clear that as you're building panels and stuff like that—because I got this wrong early on in my public speaking career, to be clear—I built talks aligned with this based on what worked for me—make sure that there are folks on the panel who are not painfully over-represented as you and I are because what works for us and we're considered oh, savvy business people who are great negotiators comes across as entitled, or demanding, or ooh, maybe we shouldn't hire her—and yes, I'm talking about her in a lot of these scenarios—make sure you have a diverse group of folks who can share lived experience and strategies that work because what works for you and me is not universal, I promise.Chris: So, the only requirement to set this panel is that you have to be a not-white guy; not-old-white guy. That's literally the one rule. [laugh].Corey: I like the approach. It's a good way to do it. I don't do manels.Chris: Yes. And it's tough because I'm not going to get into it, but the mental space that you have to be in to be a woman in tech, it's a delicate balance because when I'm approaching somebody, I don't want to slide into their DMs. It's like this, “Hey, I know this other person and they recommended you and I am not a weirdo.” [laugh]. As an old white guy, I have to be very not a weirdo when I'm talking to folks that I'm desperate to get on the show.Because I love having that diverse aspect, just different people from different backgrounds. Which is why we did the entire career series on vBrownBag. We did data science with Ayodele; we did how to get into cybersecurity with Christoph. It was a fantastic series of how to get into IT. This was at the beginning of the pandemic.We wanted to do a series on, okay, there's a lot of people out there that are furloughed right now. How do we get some people on the show that can talk to how to get into a part of IT that they're passionate about? We did a triple series on how to get into game development with Dennis Diack, the founder of Apocalypse Studios. We had a bunch of the other AWS Heroes from serverless, and Lambda, and AI on the show to talk, and it was really fantastic and I think it resonated well with the community.Corey: It takes work to have a group of guests on things like podcasts like this. You've been running vBrownBag for longer than I've been running this, and—Chris: 13 years now.Corey: Yeah. This is I think, coming up on what, four years-ish, maybe three, in that range? The passing of time, especially in a pandemic era, is challenging. And there's always a difference. If I invite a white dude to come on the podcast, the answer is yes before I get the word podcast fully out of my mouth, whereas folks who are not over-represented, they're a little more cautious. First, there's the question of, “Am I a trash bag?” And the answer is, “No.” Well, no, not in the way that you're concerned about other ways—Chris: [laugh]. That you're aware of. [laugh].Corey: Oh, God, yes, but—yeah. And then—and that's part of it, and then very often, there's a second one of, “Well, I don't think I have anything, really, to talk about,” is often a common objection here. And it's, yeah, if I'm inviting you on this show, I promise that's not true. Don't worry about that piece of it. And then it's the standard stuff that just comes with being me, of, “Yeah, I've read your Twitter feed; you got to insult me here?” It's, “No, no, not really the same tone. But great question; throw the”—it goes down to process. But it takes constant work, you can't just put an open call out for guest nominations, and expect that to wind up being representative of our industry. It is representative of our biases, in many respects.Chris: It's a tough needle to thread. Because the show has been around for a long time, it's easier for me now, because the show has been around for 13 years. We actually just recorded our two thousandth and sixtieth episode the other night. And even with that, getting that kind of outreach, [#techtwitter 00:31:32] is wonderful for making new recommendations of people. So, that's been really fun. The rest of Twitter is a hot trash fire, but that's beside the point. So yeah, I don't have a good solution for it. There's no easy answer for it other than to just be empathic, and communicative, and reach people on their level, and have a good show.Corey: And sometimes that's all it takes. The idea behind doing a podcast—despite my constant jokes—it's not out of a love affair of the sound of my own voice. It's about for better or worse, for reasons I don't fully understand, I have a platform. People listen to the show and they care what people have to say. So, my question is, how can I wind up using that platform to tell stories that lift up narratives that are helpful for folks that they can use as inspiration—in my case, as critical warnings of what to avoid—and effectively showcasing some of the best our industry has to offer, in many respects.So, if the guest has a good time and the audience can learn something, and I'm not accidentally perpetuating horrifying things, that's really more than I have any right to ask from a show like this. The fact that it's succeeded is due in no small part to not just an amazing audience, but also guests like you. So, thank you.Chris: Oh no, Thank you. And it is. It's… these kinds of shows are super fun. If it wasn't fun, I wouldn't have done it for as long as I have. I still enjoy chatting with folks and getting new voices.I love that first-time presenter who was, like, super nervous and I spend 15 minutes with them ahead of the show, I say, “Okay, relax. It's just going to be me and you facing each other. We're going to have a good time. You're going to talk about something that you love talking about, and we're going to be nerds and do nerd stuff. This is me and you in front of a water cooler with a whiteboard just being geeks and talking about cool stuff. We're also going to record it and some amount of people is going to see it afterwards.” [laugh].And yeah, that's the part that I love. And then watching somebody like that turn into the keynote speaker at a conference ten years down the road. And I get to say, “Oh, I knew that person when.”Corey: I just want to be remembered by folks who look back fondly at some of the things that we talk about here. I don't even need credit, just yeah. People who see that they've learned things and carry them forward and spread to others, there's so many favors that people have done for us that we can only ever pay forward.Chris: Yeah, exactly. So—and that's actually how I got into vBrownBag. I came to them saying, “Hey, I love the things that you guys have done. I actually passed my VCIX because of watching vBrownBags. What can I do to help contribute back to the community?” And Alistair said, “Funny you should mention that.” [laugh]. And here we are seven years later.Corey: Well, to that end, if people are inspired by what you're saying and they want to hear more about what you have to say or, heaven forbid, follow in your footsteps, where can they find you?Chris: So, you can find me on Twitter; I am at mistwire.com—M-I-S-T-W-I-R-E; if you Google ‘mistwire,' I am the first three pages of hits; so I have a blog; you can find me on vBrownBag. I'm hard to miss on Twitter [laugh] I discourage you from following me there. But yeah, you can hit me up on all of the formats. And if you want to present, I'd love to get you on the show. If you want to learn more about what it takes to become an AWS Hero or if you want to get into that line of work, I highly discourage it. It's a long slog but it's a—yeah, I'd love to talk to you.Corey: And we of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:35:01]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me, Chris. I really appreciate it.Chris: Thank you, Corey. Thanks for having me on.Corey: Chris Williams, Enterprise Architect, comma AWS Cloud at WWT. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with a comment telling me that while you didn't actively enjoy this episode, you are at least open to enjoying future episodes if I have one that might potentially be exciting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The CyberWire
Mark Nunnikhoven: Providing clarity about security. [Cloud strategy] [Career Notes]

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 8:23


Distinguished Cloud Strategist at Lacework, Mark Nunnikhoven, has gone from taking technology to its limits for his own understanding to providing clarity about security for others. Mark fell in love with his Commodore 128 and once he realized he could bend the machine to his will, it set him on the path to technology. While he had some bumps in the road, dropping out of high school and not following the traditional path in college, Mark did complete his masters in information security. His professional life took him from Canadian public service to the private sector where Mark noted the culture shift was an eye-opening experience. Mark always looks to learn something new and share that with others and that is evidenced as his includes teaching as a facet of his career. We thank Mark for sharing his story with us.

Career Notes
Mark Nunnikhoven: Providing clarity about security. [Cloud strategy]

Career Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 8:23


Distinguished Cloud Strategist at Lacework, Mark Nunnikhoven, has gone from taking technology to its limits for his own understanding to providing clarity about security for others. Mark fell in love with his Commodore 128 and once he realized he could bend the machine to his will, it set him on the path to technology. While he had some bumps in the road, dropping out of high school and not following the traditional path in college, Mark did complete his masters in information security. His professional life took him from Canadian public service to the private sector where Mark noted the culture shift was an eye-opening experience. Mark always looks to learn something new and share that with others and that is evidenced as his includes teaching as a facet of his career. We thank Mark for sharing his story with us.