Podcasts about Labor Day

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Public holiday in the United States

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  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 24, 2021LATEST
Labor Day

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Best podcasts about Labor Day

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Latest podcast episodes about Labor Day

Scandalous Diamonds
S3 Ep. 4 - "A Whorish Tongue Twister"

Scandalous Diamonds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 104:58


Jennifer and Dana cover Chapters 13-16 and Dana recounts her Las Vegas Shit Show. The girls go to a Sebastian Bach and a Willie Nelson concert in the same weekend, proving that they are the "Middle-Aged Gone Wild." They laugh about funny room service stories and Dana wearing white after Labor Day.

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Eleven years of decking the halls at Treetime Christmas Creations in Lake Barrington

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Treetime in Lake Barrington opens its doors each year on Labor Day weekend and has hundreds of trees to choose from. Treetime owner Laurie Kane joins John Williams to talk about this year’s hottest decorating trend, what sets them apart, the importance of choosing a new tree in-person, and how customers can find inspiration from […]

MRCTV's Podcast -Public Service Announcement
Episode 173: NewsBusters Podcast: Politico Notices Biden's Aerobic Avoidance of Interviewers

MRCTV's Podcast -Public Service Announcement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:01


Politico reported President Biden has granted 10 interviews as president, none since Labor Day. At this point, Trump had done 57, and Obama 131. The media haven't found democracy dying in darkness, even with only three interviews with print outlets.

RBC's Markets in Motion
A Good Enough Start To 3Q21 Reporting Season

RBC's Markets in Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 5:39


This week in the podcast, we revisit our work on investor and earnings sentiment, which we've been watching closely post Labor Day, offer a few thoughts on earnings season which officially got underway last week, and offer some new thoughts on supply chains. Four big things you need to know: First, individual investor sentiment may be starting to recover, after turning deeply bearish last month. Second, earnings sentiment has continued to deteriorate for the S&P 500, but may soon bottom in Industrials and Materials, supporting the idea that much of the pain from supply chain pressures may already be baked into those sectors. Third, 3Q21 reporting season is off to a good enough start in terms of the stats, and the commentary from companies has also continued to emphasize strong underlying demand. Fourth, we see other glimmers of hope – in data – on supply chains beyond the recent decline in freight costs that has captured investors' attention.

Raise Your Game Podcast
EP51: Expanding Your Capacity to BELIEVE What's Possible With Shannon Peebles

Raise Your Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:32


The Believe Series is back!!! And we're kicking it off with this power player... She's more than doubled her last year's income (and the year's not over)! She's made clients who pay in FULL her new normal She's up-leveled her capacity to receive again and again. Join me and my client Shannon Peebles for a candid conversation on her journey of Expanding Her Capacity to Believe What's Possible AND how to actually make it happen. Key points we covered in this episode:  ✔️ Are you like Shannon, who was so sick of not growing her business and knew something had to change? She struggled to see her value with more than a decade of experience as an executive assistant for life and business coaches. "Before I started working with Shameca, I often didn't know what my next month's paycheck was going to look like. I was charging hourly a lot of the time. I did have a couple of clients on retainer, but with no contracts in place. I was stressed out all the time. I wanted to grow my business, but I didn't know how. I didn't know how to do marketing correctly, and I was very nervous about being visible. I could pretty much count on like four hundred dollars a month to come in." ✔️ Making the shift from earning 400$ to 4500$ a month! Shannon broke through her belief that it was impossible to work enough hours to earn six figures. "When I had those awesome months, it meant I could go buy brand new jeans for my sons without worrying about not having enough grocery money. There's an extra zero coming in on the checks that I can always count on." ✔️ Challenge yourself to get your Game On! The decision to invest, join the community, and be mentored falls on how deep you desire to ultimately change your life's trajectory. Take the step and eradicate the fears, beliefs, and behaviors that keep you from being the money-making badass that you know you are.  Think what would be possible if you could come and finally get that breakthrough that you've been praying for, meditating over, declaring, and speaking out loud once and for all?   I'm going to be walking you step by step through the simple, powerful processes and the million-dollar strategies that my clients and I are using that are blowing our own minds with what's possible. Again, we're not just building businesses that pay us. We're building dynasties! We're talking about leaving legacies for generations to come.  Stop waiting for a sign and get your Game ON! Go to http://GameOnLiveEvent.com, put in the code "Labor Day," and you will be able to secure a seat for this 3-day intensive training. ————————————————————————————

Empathy Media Lab
177. Mother Jones in West Virginia Coal Fields Making Speeches to Excite Miners

Empathy Media Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:23


On June 20, 1920, Mother Jones spoke on the steps of the Williamson County Courthouse in West Virginia as a grand jury deliberated on the shooting between mine of Matewan, West Virginia and the Baldwin-Felts detectives who were terrorizing the people in the service of the Stone Mountain Coal Company to increase the profits of plutocrats like Rockefeller, Carnegie, Morgan, and Mellon, and against the United Mine Workers of America driving unionization throughout the land. The Associated Press wrote the next day “Mother Jones” in West Virginia Coal Fields Making Speeches to Excite Miners. EMLab filmed Kaiulani Lee's reenactment of Mother Jones famous speech in Matewan, West Virginia during U.S. Labor Day weekend 2021, which marked the 100 year anniversary of the Battle of Blair Mountain, which was part of the West Virginia Mine Wars. The battle was the largest armed insurrection in the U.S. since the Civil War. The sacrifices of those miners and their families provides an important history of courageously standing up and facing tyrannical men of murderous intent. ABOUT EMLab Empathy Media Lab is produced by Evan Matthew Papp and we are a proud member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network. Support media, authors, activists, artists, historians, and journalists, who are fighting to improve the prosperity of the working class everywhere. Solidarity forever.  Website - https://www.empathymedialab.com/  All Links: https://wlo.link/@empathymedialab  

No Pants Required with Jen Mann
The Powerful Book-Fluencer Zibby Owens

No Pants Required with Jen Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:25


Author, publisher, podcaster, champion of books, Zibby Owens joins Jen to discuss if you can still wear white after Labor Day. No wait, that's a different podcast. On this episode, Zibby and Jen cover everything from shaking up the publishing world to Hillary Clinton knowing your name to the art of Zooming from bed to exchanging BFF necklaces.   Follow Zibby at: https://zibbyowens.com/

Raise Your Game Podcast
EP50: MY CLIENT DID $156k in ADDITIONAL SALES (In A Day)

Raise Your Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 30:27


In this episode, listen to how my client Lia Dunlap did $156k in ADDITIONAL SALES (in a day!) She proves that BIG money months really isn't a numbers game, contrary to what you've been told. You don't need a HUGE audience to make 6-figure MONTHS and DAYS your reality. This DEFIES everything you hear in the marketplace today. Let's talk about what it really takes to master collapsing time and creating 6-Figures faster and faster... again and again. Key points we covered in this episode:  ✔️ Stop with the vanity metrics. Get out of your head thinking huge numbers for how many people comment on your post, watching your live OR the bodies showing up in your events. Thinking that you need a big following is a prerequisite before achieving your income goal is one of the biggest roadblocks of many entrepreneurs.  ✔️ Make the shift from "how many people?" to "who are the right people?" When Lia finally understood this concept, she focused more on her ideal clients and achieved 100% conversion results! Sustainable is building a business of choosing quality over quantity.  ✔️ Practice celebrating yourself.  Often as high achievers, we have been told to tone things down. We are powerful, and it's not always safe to allow that power to show up. And so what we do is we downplay it and prevent ourselves from accomplishing what we're capable of.  ✔️ Finding the right support is crucial to how you can shine and show up to the world.  Find yourself a good team, a good coach, and a good squad of cheerleaders who will support you and keep you honest about what you desire because it's meant to happen. ✔️ What would be possible if you could come and finally get that breakthrough that you've been praying for, meditating over, declaring, and speaking out loud once and for all?  Game On! LIVE is three full days with one singular mission. And that mission is to eradicate the fears, beliefs, and behaviors that keep you from being the money-making badass that you know you could be. What I'm going to be doing is walking you step by step through the simple, powerful processes and the million-dollar strategies that my clients and I are using that are blowing our own minds with what's possible. Again, we're not just building businesses that pay us. We're building dynasties! We're talking about leaving legacies for generations to come.  Stop waiting for a sign and get your game ON! Go to http://GameOnLiveEvent.com, put in the code "Labor Day," and you will be able to secure a seat for this 3-day intensive training and get huge savings only until September 13. ———————————————————————————— Loved this episode? Know that it's your time. Listen, love, when you stop playing small and show up fully, your business and income will naturally grow as you do too.  Discover how to achieve the next Level of Authority and remove any blocks sabotaging your sales. GameOnLiveEvent.com  

The Unicorn Report
Episode 170: Save a Cock, Eat a Pussy! Ep 170

The Unicorn Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 81:20


My sexy former guitar teacher invited me to her Labor Day party just recently. I was super excited. I've always had a crush on her her since my very first lesson but pretty much resigned myself to a few choice fantasies and hadn't even seen her in 9 months. Little did I know my best fantasy about this hottie was about to materialize!!! Catch us on Twitter @unicornreport @tastymuffinlvr @dragontatsn2son

Arroe Collins
Renee Taylor From The Movie Tango Shalom

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 21:11


Tango Shalom was directed by Gabriel Bologna, son of Renée Taylor and the late Joseph Bologna. The cast includes Golden Globe Nominee Lainie Kazan (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), Oscar and Emmy Award-winner Renée Taylor (Adam Sandler's The Do Over, The Producers, The Nanny), Karina Smirnoff (Dancing With The Stars), Joseph Bologna (My Favorite Year, Blame It On Rio, Big Daddy, Lovers and Other Strangers), Jos Laniado Claudio Laniado (Mudbound), Bern Cohen (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel), and Judi Beecher (Taken 3, Family is Family, La Garconne). Synopsis: When a female Tango dancer (Smirnoff) asks a Rabbi (Jos Laniado) to enter a dance competition, there's one big problem-due to his Orthodox beliefs, he's not allowed to touch her! Desperately in need of splitting the prize money to save his Hebrew school from bankruptcy, they develop a plan to enter the competition without sacrificing his faith. The bonds of family and community are tested one dazzling dance step at a time in this lighthearted fable. In Los Angeles, the film can be seen at Landmark Theaters on Pico and Town Center 5 in Encino, and September 10 opens at The Laemmle in Newhall. In New York, at AMC Empire 25, The Village East Cinema By Angelika, and also opens on September 10 at The Cobble Hill 5 and Williamsburg Cinemas Brooklyn, Kew Garden 6 Queens, and Malverne 5 and Roslyn 4 on Long Island. Canadian Cinéma Cineplex locations include Forum et VIP - Montreal, Empress Walk - Toronto, and Fifth Avenue Cinemas - Vancouver. Tango Shalom finished its three day weekend engagement better than expected at $20,581, with an astonishing per theater average of $5,145 (second best only to Marvel's Shang-Chi). Tango Shalom also claims bragging rights to the best 2021 exclusive opening, as well having the best PTA, this Memorial Day to Labor Day summer season. Showing daily gross increases this weekend (Saturday +32% from Friday and Sunday +54% from Saturday) boasts to be the number one independent film release this weekend. On Friday, September 10, the interfaith movie that promotes peace, tolerance and inclusion, will expand onto more screens in New York and Los Angeles, and also across Canada in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver with additional screens to be announced soon.

The Seven Streams Method

Download Numbers 28-30 We are in the World Stream reading from the International Standard Version. 7streamsmethod.com | @7StreamsMethod | @serenatravis | #7Streams | Donate Commentary by Dr. Drake Travis Lord God, our lives our yours, and we bring our lives to you.  We are the offering that you are really looking for. Amen. 28 -  The ten chapters of 27 - 36 are various offerings that are required to bring before the Lord. First on the list today are the daily offerings.  In today's world we may read about this and muse, "really? God wants this ritual every day?!"  Well what do we do every day? Does all of it make sense? Is it productive? Inspiring? Healthy? Inspiring? We had a neighbor/couple years ago who would make a full size cake and eat the whole thing every day - just the two of them...this happened seven days a week, 'wouldn't miss it without a panic. People walk their dog every day. A woman in our church years ago wouldn't miss this daytime show for anything.  It was mindless, unedifying, the host was vehemently anti-Christian and joked about it. It's such a waste, but the show's funny (I guess) so it was her daily hour long routine. She did it as religiously as she would pray for 16 seconds before her double breakfast every morning.. People check facebook three times an hour every day,  My husband had a guy on his hall in college who drank 15 cups of coffee every day - not making this up!. Take away his coffee and he was a crazed depressed soul. 'Kind of sad isn't it? [And he was a minister-in-training.]  What do we do daily without fail? Well God wants us to come to Him daily, to offer ourselves daily, to remember Him daily, to live for Him daily, to worship Him daily, to embrace Him daily v.s. our selves and our possessions.  This daily offering remedied all the misgivings that surely yet unwittingly takeover the lives of everyone who will not come to Him daily and make their offerings.  And to remain focused upon God continually there were the Sabbath offerings each week, the monthly offerings, the annual offerings, the offerings for the week following Passover, and also the offerings that God required during the beginning of harvest.  This is not oppressive to be living through. And also keep in mind that God doesn't personally need this. He didn't sit in heaven and sigh, "oh good, there's that smoldering lamb pelt aroma/smoke coming up to me again. I need this, because this is my smoking habit."  Not The Case.  We needed to be making offerings and going through this ritual because we are souls that are prone to wander without our regular protracted time in God's Presence.  And in case anyone was wondering, a liquid "hin" is about a gallon.  And an ephah of grain is between 40-45 lbs. 29 - The Festival of Trumpets heralded the New Year.  It was a jubilant gathering and there was also time for solemn worship within this same holiday stretch.  It was eight days of celebration and worship. This may strike us as awfully peculiar - to be just doing a religious ordeal for eight days straight.  Well it was a party with God who had brought through another year.  And God is into celebration. Wait until we experience "day one" in heaven!  My husband finished college in Jerusalem over 30 years ago. Judaism was his major. He catered at a business in New York 1985-1988 and much of the events were Jewish holidays/weddings/festivals.  He said that much of the gatherings were so joyful with food and music and Hebrew worship dance routines that they actually became zany fun. And some went on for 2-3 days.  We cannot even think of a wedding going on for three days. We're too preoccupied and needing to get back to our frivolity. Some of it is productive, yes, but much of it is the long path to nothing. Most of our holidays have precious little to do with God. New Years is gazoos, kisses, and fireworks. We holiday for Presidents (sort of), civil rights leaders, ground hogs (ahem), Memorial Day, 4th/July, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Pumpkins on Halloween. We do have our Christian Holidays of Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas but the pop culture is desperately trying to paganize them into bunnies, turkeys and presents floating in egg nog or whatever people are trying to do to get it secularized.  These holidays in the Bible times were the meaning of life itself; the joy of being with God. Try to see it in this light. God wants to celebrate with us.  Those who won't celebrate with God eventually end up partying with the devil.  It's a disastrous fact. 30 - Vows made before the Lord were taken seriously and were binding.  Vows made by females were also taken seriously and were at the same time assessed in a different manner.  It isn't news to anyone literate that men and women think differently. They also emote (feel), and express and calculate and communicate differently. Therefore women's vows were sifted via a different grid. Their vows whether made while single, married, widowed or divorced in the presence of her espoused or her father affected others in her household and so the man was to become involved when needed. They were even held responsible at times and were to execute leadership in these matters.  To feign oblivion against a vow that should not have been made held the household male culpable.  All this was set up because vows made by females were subject to emotions and/or illogic at times and the females nor the family members of that household were to be punished because of a vow made without their knowledge. The male head of household was to step in and remedy the situation.

Arroe Collins
Renee Taylor From The Movie Tango Shalom

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 21:11


Tango Shalom was directed by Gabriel Bologna, son of Renée Taylor and the late Joseph Bologna. The cast includes Golden Globe Nominee Lainie Kazan (My Big Fat Greek Wedding), Oscar and Emmy Award-winner Renée Taylor (Adam Sandler's The Do Over, The Producers, The Nanny), Karina Smirnoff (Dancing With The Stars), Joseph Bologna (My Favorite Year, Blame It On Rio, Big Daddy, Lovers and Other Strangers), Jos Laniado Claudio Laniado (Mudbound), Bern Cohen (The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel), and Judi Beecher (Taken 3, Family is Family, La Garconne). Synopsis: When a female Tango dancer (Smirnoff) asks a Rabbi (Jos Laniado) to enter a dance competition, there's one big problem-due to his Orthodox beliefs, he's not allowed to touch her! Desperately in need of splitting the prize money to save his Hebrew school from bankruptcy, they develop a plan to enter the competition without sacrificing his faith. The bonds of family and community are tested one dazzling dance step at a time in this lighthearted fable. In Los Angeles, the film can be seen at Landmark Theaters on Pico and Town Center 5 in Encino, and September 10 opens at The Laemmle in Newhall. In New York, at AMC Empire 25, The Village East Cinema By Angelika, and also opens on September 10 at The Cobble Hill 5 and Williamsburg Cinemas Brooklyn, Kew Garden 6 Queens, and Malverne 5 and Roslyn 4 on Long Island. Canadian Cinéma Cineplex locations include Forum et VIP - Montreal, Empress Walk - Toronto, and Fifth Avenue Cinemas - Vancouver. Tango Shalom finished its three day weekend engagement better than expected at $20,581, with an astonishing per theater average of $5,145 (second best only to Marvel's Shang-Chi). Tango Shalom also claims bragging rights to the best 2021 exclusive opening, as well having the best PTA, this Memorial Day to Labor Day summer season. Showing daily gross increases this weekend (Saturday +32% from Friday and Sunday +54% from Saturday) boasts to be the number one independent film release this weekend. On Friday, September 10, the interfaith movie that promotes peace, tolerance and inclusion, will expand onto more screens in New York and Los Angeles, and also across Canada in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver with additional screens to be announced soon.

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast
118. The Story of FreedomToons ft. Jordan Peterson

The Mikhaila Peterson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 52:19


You are in for a treat in this episode as the founder of Freedom Toons joins me. After Seamus Coughlin shares his journey since high school, he also explains how his Catholic roots factored in. All that got me hyped up to share my own experience of finding God. Following that serious discussion, I have to say that it's been a while I haven't laughed this much. I promise you'll get a good laugh too as you watch Coughlin impersonating Trump and the one and only Dr. Jordan. Yes, I know. Wait till you see HIS reaction too. Get the true taste of the expression of freedom as Mikhaila and Seamus Coughlin discuss his experience in animation. In this episode, they tackle values, religion, and complex emotions. Coughlin's shares his experience with his Youtube Channel “Freedom Toons”, and ends up imitating well-known figures like Trump and none other than Dr. Jordan himself. Check out this episode to see the impact “Freedom Toons” has had and how Dr. Jordan reacts towards an impersonation of him. Seamus Coughlin is a libetarian animator and political cartoonist, columnist, and Youtuber with an affinity for multimedia production. During his high school career, he qualified for many local and national awards. Ever since his mentor encouraged him to start his own business, he has been working in the digital industry. Remember to subscribe if you enjoyed this episode. Find more Seamus Coughlin on YouTube: @FreedomToons Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Seamus_Coughlin ———————————— Follow Me On ———————————— Audio - https://linktr.ee/mikhailapeterson Twitter - https://twitter.com/MikhailaAleksis Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/mikhailapeterson Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/mikhailapetersonpodcast Lion Diet - https://linktr.ee/liondiet Telegram - https://t.me/mikhailapeterson ———————————— Show Notes ———————————— [0:00] Intro [02:20] Seamus Coughlin's background. [05:20] The success of “Freedom Toons”. [06:40] Coughlin's thoughts on values. [07:05] Dr. Peterson's thoughts on conservatives. [09:30] Coughlin's Catholic roots. [12:30] Mikhaila's experience finding God. [18:55] Finding joy in misery. [21:27] Dr. Peterson's Jungian technique to analyze Mikhaila's dream. [24:50] Dr. Peterson's opinion on commitment. [26:35] The different imitations of Seamus. [31:10] Seamus's most popular videos. [38:37] The Thanksgiving video. [40:20] The growth journey of “Freedom Toons”. [41:58] Wearing white after Labor Day. [42:42] Coughlin's impersonation of Dr. Peterson in the presence of Dr. Peterson. [45:30] Coughlin's impersonation of Trump. [29:09] The impact of “Freedom Toons”. [30:53]Wrap Up. #MikhailaPeterson #SeamusCoughlin #FreedomToons #JordanPeterson #Conservatism

Arroe Collins
Eyal Press ReleasesThe Book Dirty Work

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 12:33


In Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America (Farrar, Straus and Giroux on August 17, 2021), New Yorker contributor Eyal Press profiles dozens of workers to explain Americans have delegated society's most unpleasant, morally troubling tasks to a separate, largely invisible class of dirty workers, revealing painful truths about the structure of work in America. For Labor Day 2021, Press is calling on Americans to look at the work taking place – especially those difficult jobs society considers essential but morally compromised. The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn unprecedented attention to essential workers, and to the health and safety risks to which workers in the Florida prisons and slaughterhouses are exposed. Other jobs highlighted include drone pilots who carry out targeted assassinations, Google site engineers developing artificial intelligence, oil rig workers and much more. Dirty Work examines a less familiar set of occupational hazards: psychological and emotional hardships such as stigma, shame, PTSD, and moral injury. These burdens fall disproportionately on low-income workers, undocumented immigrants, women, and people of color. As Press explores many different examples of dirty work, certain commonalities begin to emerge: Inequality: workers often feel trapped in occupations by economic circumstances, even though their work produces enormous profits for their employers. Unequal distribution of dirty work therefore becomes yet another symptom of economic inequality, allowing more fortunate Americans to occupy more socially respected professions. "Moral injury" or the psychological or even spiritual cost of transgressing one's own sense of morality. “The invisible class” also suffers from invisible wounds from America's status quo. For example, progressive-minded individuals may look down on slaughterhouse workers, but it does not stop many from consuming meat. In each case, Press finds the desire for lower “costs” including cheaper consumer prices, fewer American casualties in foreign wars, less government spending, etc. has led to the exploitation of these workers. Press explains, when abuses have been exposed, such as the crowded, unsanitary conditions that led to the rampant spread of Covid-19 among slaughterhouse workers, Americans have been led to believe “the key moral failures rested with a few reckless individuals, rather than with the system in which they worked.” Dirty Work is full of gut-wrenching scenes, including a congressional hearing about the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in which politicians expressed more concern about the disaster's impact on native bird populations than the deaths of 11 oil workers.

Arroe Collins
Eyal Press ReleasesThe Book Dirty Work

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 12:33


In Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America (Farrar, Straus and Giroux on August 17, 2021), New Yorker contributor Eyal Press profiles dozens of workers to explain Americans have delegated society's most unpleasant, morally troubling tasks to a separate, largely invisible class of dirty workers, revealing painful truths about the structure of work in America. For Labor Day 2021, Press is calling on Americans to look at the work taking place – especially those difficult jobs society considers essential but morally compromised. The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn unprecedented attention to essential workers, and to the health and safety risks to which workers in the Florida prisons and slaughterhouses are exposed. Other jobs highlighted include drone pilots who carry out targeted assassinations, Google site engineers developing artificial intelligence, oil rig workers and much more. Dirty Work examines a less familiar set of occupational hazards: psychological and emotional hardships such as stigma, shame, PTSD, and moral injury. These burdens fall disproportionately on low-income workers, undocumented immigrants, women, and people of color. As Press explores many different examples of dirty work, certain commonalities begin to emerge: Inequality: workers often feel trapped in occupations by economic circumstances, even though their work produces enormous profits for their employers. Unequal distribution of dirty work therefore becomes yet another symptom of economic inequality, allowing more fortunate Americans to occupy more socially respected professions. "Moral injury" or the psychological or even spiritual cost of transgressing one's own sense of morality. “The invisible class” also suffers from invisible wounds from America's status quo. For example, progressive-minded individuals may look down on slaughterhouse workers, but it does not stop many from consuming meat. In each case, Press finds the desire for lower “costs” including cheaper consumer prices, fewer American casualties in foreign wars, less government spending, etc. has led to the exploitation of these workers. Press explains, when abuses have been exposed, such as the crowded, unsanitary conditions that led to the rampant spread of Covid-19 among slaughterhouse workers, Americans have been led to believe “the key moral failures rested with a few reckless individuals, rather than with the system in which they worked.” Dirty Work is full of gut-wrenching scenes, including a congressional hearing about the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in which politicians expressed more concern about the disaster's impact on native bird populations than the deaths of 11 oil workers.

Leading From the Front!
Mike Skrypnek - Changing the World through a Social Movement!

Leading From the Front!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 31:58


Mike Skrypnek describes himself as a 'reformed investor'. On a memorable snowy day in British Columbia, Canada he realized he was working VERY HARD to make money while not living a life he enjoyed. He decided to change that. With the help of a firend he defined his life's vision and purpose. That's when it all came together. Today he is working to CHANGE THE WORLD through the SOCIAL MOVEMENT TV Series. The first season of SOCIAL MOVEMENT will air over Labor Day on Rednight.tv | The second season is in production. To contact Mike: LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/growgetgive Websites: mikeskrypnek.com growgetgive.com mikeskrypnek.com/entrepreneurfreedomcouncil

Thoughts on the Market
Matt Hornbach: Inflation Fears Drive Central Bank Actions

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 3:40


Real interest rates are on the rise in Europe and the US and central banks are responding. This may impact currency markets headed into the fall. Matt Hornbach, Global Head of Macro Strategy, explains.-----Transcript -----Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Matt Hornbach, Global Head of Macro Strategy for Morgan Stanley. Along with my colleagues, bringing you a variety of perspectives, I'll be talking about global macro trends and how investors can interpret these trends for rates and currency markets. It's Tuesday, September 28th, at 12:30p.m. in New York. Just like clockwork, markets have become much more interesting and volatile after Labor Day in the U.S. Investors have been confronted with several issues that have collided in a big bang after what had been a relatively quiet summer. And central bank reactions have been a key part of the story going into the fall. To start, supply disruptions in commodity markets have led to inflation fears that have manifested themselves in higher market prices for inflation protection, mostly in Europe and the U.K. In response, the Bank of England has expressed more concern over the inflation outlook, since inflation is having a negative impact on the region's growth outlook. This combination of factors has caused real interest rates in Europe and the UK to remain extremely low and has also put downward pressure on the value of the British pound and the euro. Meanwhile, the U.S. economy has been more insulated from the commodity price shock, and inflation protection in the U.S. was already fully valued. In other words, worries about inflation in the U.S. began to build last year and, as a result, investors had already prepared themselves for the elevated inflation prints we're experiencing in the U.S. today. This means that real interest rates in the U.S. are left marching to the beat of other drummers. In particular, real interest rates in the U.S. have begun to respond to Federal Reserve monetary policy machinations. Last week, the Fed signaled that tapering its asset purchases could begin near term. That means the Fed will start purchasing less Treasury and agency mortgage-backed securities, leading to a decline in the amount of monetary accommodation the Fed has been providing. The question is, is this tapering akin to tightening policy? Participants on the Federal Open Market Committee would have you believe that tapering isn't the same thing as tightening policy. And technically they would be correct. When the Fed purchases assets in the open market such that its balance sheet grows, it is easing monetary policy. It's a different form of cutting interest rates. When the Fed's balance sheet no longer grows because it has stopped purchasing assets on a net basis, it is no longer easing monetary policy. In the transition between these two states, the Fed's balance sheet continues to grow, but at a slower rate than before. In this way, the process of tapering is akin to easing policy, but by less and less each month. But, and this is a big 'but', the process of tapering is the first step towards the process of tightening. Without the Fed tapering its asset purchases and slowing the growth of its balance sheet, rate hikes wouldn't appear on the radar screens of investors. So, the prospect of tapering this year has shown a spotlight on the prospect of rate hikes next year. And that has driven real interest rates higher in the U.S. So, what happens now? As long as real interest rates in the U.S. rise gradually, as they have done so far this year, the overall level of interest rates in the U.S., as you can see in the Treasury market, should also rise gradually. And if U.S. interest rates rise relative to those in Europe, which already began in August and we think will continue through the balance of the year, then the value of the U.S. dollar should appreciate relative to the euro. Thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcasts app. It helps more people to find the show.

Strawberry Letter
She Gives A Great Performance

Strawberry Letter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 18:41


Dear Steve and Shirley, I've been dating a very attractive woman with the perfect body and beautiful brown skin. I met her at a gym and she asked me out, which I loved because she is not afraid to go after something if she wants it. We have been dating for a little over a month and we finally had sex over the Labor Day holiday. I wasn't expecting the performance I got................................. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Let's Pod This
Show Us the Maps

Let's Pod This

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 22:59


More than six weeks since the 2020 Census data was released, but the Oklahoma legislature has yet to release any maps. What's up with that? Also—a breaking news announcement happened during recording! Outline & Links State Fair is underway! And tonight: Ginuwine! Oklahoma passes 10,000 Covid deaths Stitt's removal of two OHCA board members over the Labor Day weekend has ruffled the feathers of some lawmakers from both parties. His ability to do that, of course, stems from the legislature's decision in 2019 to grant the Governor broader authority over state agencies. https://www.oklahoman.com/story/news/2021/09/19/oklahoma-gov-kevin-stitt-firings-spur-debate-gubernatorial-power/8339729002/ (According to The Oklahoman,) Representatives Marcus McEntire & Mark McBride expressed some reservations or regrets about how it happened. Rep. Monroe Nichols has pre-filed legislation to change the Governor's role with the OHCA board specifically by requiring the governor to appoint to the board at least one licensed physician, two Medicaid recipients and several people who have experience in health care fields. The Governor would be able to pick appointees only from a set of three candidates nominated by the board, appointees would have set term limits and the governor would not be able to remove them without cause.  https://nondoc.com/2021/09/23/oklahoma-county-sheriffs-office-new-body-camera-policy/ (Oklahoma County Sherrifs will now be equipped with body cameras) and they released their policy for them. https://nondoc.com/2021/09/24/oklahoma-special-session-date-set/ (Special session begins Nov 15th! ) Support this podcast

Pastors of Payne (County)
Why Does Father Kerry Hate Labor Day?

Pastors of Payne (County)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 30:00


There's a phenomenon in Catholic campus ministry: After Labor Day, some students disappear. What's going on? Father O'Brien and Father Kerry talk it through. Also, some Stillwater trivia!

The Fitnessista Podcast: Healthy In Real Life
087: Eating for health and vitality with Esther Blum

The Fitnessista Podcast: Healthy In Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 41:39


Hi hi! New podcast episode is live and today, I'm thrilled to be chatting with Esther Blum. Here's what we discuss:   - Getting to the root cause of illness - The DUTCH test and other important baseline health tests - What to do if you're doing all the things but not seeing results - Changing your diet to make changes for better health and so.much.more.  Here's a bit more about Esther: Esther Blum is an Integrative Dietitian and High-Performance Coach. She has helped thousands of women permanently balance hormones and lose stubborn belly fat by treating the root cause of their health struggles. Esther is the bestselling author of Cavewomen Don't Get Fat, Eat, Drink and Be Gorgeous, Secrets of Gorgeous, and The Eat, Drink, and Be Gorgeous Project. She currently maintains a busy virtual practice where she provides 360 degrees of healing with physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual support. Esther believes that diet and supplements are the foundation to healing, but treating the whole person is paramount. You can connect with Esther on her website and Instagram.  Resources from this episode: Get 15% off Organifi with the code FITNESSISTA. I drink the green juice and red juice daily, and also love adding the gold powder at night for relaxation and sleep.  I love love love the meals from Sakara Life. Use this link and the code XOGINAH for 20% off their meal delivery and clean boutique items. The goji rose donut is my very fave! CBD has changed my life. It helps so much with my anxiety and sense of calmness. You can read more about my experience with CBD here and use the code FITNESSISTA here to get an extra 15% off your first order. (I love the flavored drops and gummies! Labor Day sale is happening right now and you can stack my code.)  Thank you so much for listening and for all of your support with the podcast! Please leave a rating or review if you enjoyed this episode. If you leave a rating, head to this page and you'll get a little “thank you” gift from me to you. 

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The worldwide war over the pandemic is getting close to a breaking point

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am Fierce and Fearless— I am here to tell the truth—I mean lets be honest—somebody has to—And—I'm the guy—   Here are three big Things you need to know right now—   Three— Jeffrey Epstein may not have killed himself—which of course you know—but a big bombshell may kill a few marriages very soon—because there will be names!   Two— Texas decided that Joe Biden had enough chances to close the border and secure the nation—finally he made his own decision—and sent hundreds of police officers and national guard to the border—and—it closed—   One— The worldwide war over the pandemic is getting close to a breaking point—   They are shooting at crowds in Australia—with rubber bullets and tear gas—as the anger continues to rise—   In Canada—old folks just trying to get a morning coffee are getting corralled by the vax police—demanding compliance and proof it too—   But let me start with something that was supposed to happen by now—BUT has not—and its happened a couple times now—   You see Anthony Fauci—I am not calling him doctor anymore—because he has lost that privilege—but Tony was predicting doom and gloom for super spreader events because of Labor Day—but—that's been a month now—and cases are going down—   And Tony has been telling us that tens of thousands of cheering fans in football stadiums would most certainly be super spreader events—and yet—stadiums all over the country—and most notably—all over the south—have been packed—right to the breaking point—BUT still no college football super spreader monster has reared its ugly head—no—that's now what is happening at all—  

What Up Patna
#84 Dabor Lay Vol. 2

What Up Patna

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 40:24


We get into the depth and history of Labor Day. Last year was dope but this year was on anotha level. Big A couldn't hang, Nick-loc came correct, and SledMan was in the drivers seat. So many left and rights on this one Patnas. Enjoy this Dabor Lay Vol. 2 !!! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatuppatna/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whatuppatna/support

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Slate Star Codex Podcast
Links For September

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 27:09


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/links-for-september [Remember, I haven't independently verified each link. On average, commenters will end up spotting evidence that around two or three of the links in each links post are wrong or misleading. I correct these as I see them, and will highlight important corrections later, but I can't guarantee I will have caught them all by the time you read this.] 1: My parents' and grandparents' generations had lots of weird rules about fashion like “never wear white after Labor Day”. I'd always been baffled by this kind of stuff - why not? What would happen if you did? In 1922, someone wore a straw hat after official stop-wearing-straw-hats date September 15, leading to the week-long Straw Hat Riot in New York and several hospitalizations. 2: The Story Of Adrenochrome: QAnon believes that elites are addicted to adrenochrome, a drug synthesized from the glands of tortured children. Where did this theory come from? The short version is “Hunter S Thompson made it up for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”. But read the long version for, among other things, explanations for why it shows up in Dune and A Clockwork Orange. 3: While the Aztecs were sacrificing prisoners to the gods, their neighbors in the Tlaxcala were “a republic ruled by an assembly of commoners and nobles”. 4: Contra speculation, there is no link between knowledge of the Tuskegee experiment and black people's unwillingness to take the COVID vaccine.

DJ Rolemodel Mixes
Episode 472: Labor Day 2021 Workout Mix - Part 2 (Live From Kelly's)

DJ Rolemodel Mixes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 63:09


SOME LISTENERS ARE LOSING MIXES ON THEIR APPLE PODCASTS. NOT SURE THE REASON, BUT ALL MIXES ARE AVAILABLE (& FREE) ON THE PODOMATIC APP. *Explicit Mix* - 128BPM - New workout mix!  Instagram: @djrolemodel ❤❤❤ #djrolemodelPart 2 of Workout Mix recorded at Kelly's in Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Fried w/ Jon Reep
Norm MacDonald, Mike Vick, Si Robertson, Reno Collier, Josh Blue, & Potty Trained Cows! - COUNTRY-ish with Jon Reep!

Fried w/ Jon Reep

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 90:06


In this episode Jon & Stamos get tother and talk "Sober October", Jon's DC gig getting canceled for "security concerns", and they give a huge update on the Reep's Peeps Comedy Cruise. Then in "Best Trends" the boys pay tribute to legendary comedian Norm MacDonald who just passed away at age 61 after a long private battle with cancer. And to celebrate National Double Cheeseburger Day on September 15th everyone enjoys double cheeseburgers from Cook-Out. After that, it's time for the "Troll Patrol”! This week Jon leaves comments online for Ex-NFL Quarterback Michael Vick and Duck Dynasty's Si Robertson. How will they respond? Next up, it's time to give away some of Jon's money when they play another round of "How Much Is That Screen Actors Guild Residual Check?" Then we get a little clip of the Heffron & Reep Show with Josh Blue. Will he win America's Got Talent? After that it's “Who's Zoomin Who?” as Reno Collier joins the show to talk about touring with Jon and his crazy Labor Day weekend with a drunk Mayor. And finally, in "Small Town News", scientists in Germany are potty-training cows. This episode is Jam-Packed and Star-Studded. Join actor/comedian Jon Reep as he hosts his weekly show COUNTRY-ISH from Hickory, NC with special guest comedian RENO COLLIER! I'm Gonna Give Away Money! Plus we talk about  @Norm Macdonald , Michael Vick, Si Robertson,  @Josh Blue Tube , Reno Collier, and Potty Trained Cows! Join Jon and his crew as they discuss the latest BEST TRENDS, give away Jon's money in another round of HOW MUCH IS THAT SCREEN ACTORS GUILD RESIDUAL CHECK? and talk about the latest SMALL TOWN NEWS. It's a little bit country... but a whole lot of fun! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Janky Town
Ep. 57 Master Johnny

Janky Town

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 72:52


White Pants after Labor Day, Omar went to Tatantino Live, Marriage proposals at Weddings, Dave's roadtrip to Vegas, Mugs went to Hella Mega, Jizz Master Johnny, Out one year birthday gift from Tenisha, Tik Tok Don't Stop, Jank Line. Thanks to our sponsor ManscapedGo to http://manscped.com/ and get 20% off + free shipping with the code: JANKY20 #manscapedpod, Any questions or comments JankyTown69@gmail.com or 855-Janky-69, follow @JankyTown69 on IG and Twitter for the latest Jank

Tell Em Steve-Dave
#491: We don't watch birds, birds watch us!

Tell Em Steve-Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 74:02


Labor Day weekend, has TESD gone PC, conspiracy theories.

New Rory & MAL
Episode 12 | “PEMDAS”

New Rory & MAL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 105:45


Let's get to it !! Rory & Mal do a short recap of their Labor Day weekends, and then immediately get into their review of the highly anticipated Certified Lover Boy album that released hours after they recorded last week's episode, track by track (6:45) ! They also get into the leaked Kanye track featuring Andre3000's verse about his late mother (45:45), which leads into a discussion about the guys own relationships with their mothers (55:45) . Rory gives Mal a wild math lesson ( 1:13:55) , the guys give flowers to the beloved Michael K Williams (1:26:45), + more! Like, comment, subscribe! And don't forget to text us questions for next week at 917-810-2295!

The Journal.
The Dashed Hopes of a Swift Economic Rebound

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 16:28


Economists, CEOs and many others predicted earlier this summer that the economy would recover around Labor Day. But the Delta variant has changed all of that. WSJ's Eric Morath explains how the highly contagious strain is affecting business and job growth.

Commentary Magazine Podcast
Solving the Hostage Crisis You Started

Commentary Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 56:14


We're back after the Labor Day and Rosh Hashanah break to discuss the Biden administration's negotiations with terrorists and the praise it's getting for doing so; the fact that Biden is now trying to put us on a war footing against COVID; and the Biden team's effort to change the plotline of the last month by firing Trump officials. And what is going on with Trump and boxing? Give a listen.

Dumb, Gay Politics
Hot Psaki for Labor Day

Dumb, Gay Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 83:49


This episode is late because Julie & Brandy got drunk on Labor Day. They woke up Tuesday with a massive hangover and a Texas-sized abortion-grudge, so they skipped JoJo & KiKi, and went straight into Hot Psaki for lunch, where they took out all their (displaced) rage on the reporters in the White House Press Briefing. After that, the furious fun continues when Judge Julie orders the forced castration of all the men in the United States Supreme Court, as well as the Governor of Texas! If you're reading this, consider yourself warned: This episode is… a lot.  *********************************************************************************************************** *** Click the link to listen to a FREE episode of our Patreon Podcast!! *No Politics! No ads! *** https://www.patreon.com/posts/windows-up-sing-42013006?utm_medium=clipboard_copy&utm_source=copy_to_clipboard&utm_campaign=postshare DEALS FROM OUR SPONSORS! *** PROSE HAIR CARE: Get 15% off your first order at Prose.com/DumbGay *** EVERYPLATE: Get it for $1.99 per meal plus an additional 20% off your next 2 boxes. Go to EveryPlate.com and enter promo code dumbgay199 at checkout *** *** BETTER HELP:  Get 10% off your first month at BetterHelp.com/DumbGay *** *** NATIVE DEODORANT:  Get 20% off your first order at NativeDeo.com/DGP (or use code DGP at checkout) *** *** MAGIC SPOON CEREAL: Get $5 off a Variety Pack! Go to www.magicspoon.com/dumbgay (put the Variety Pack in your cart) and enter promo code dumbgay at checkout *** ***** Dumb Gay Politics with Julie & Brandy **** Julie Goldman **** Brandy Howard **** Julie and Brandy *** The People's Couch *** DGP *** Gay Podcast *** Political Podcast *** Lesbian *** Bravo *** Housewives *** Pride *** LGBTQ *** Comedy *** Starburns Audio  *** Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-09-08 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 59:00


The Taliban takes a major step in reestablishing their Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan as protests grow across the country; We speak with Sharon Lavigne, winner of the 2021 Goldman Environmental Prize, an environmental activist who is documenting the aftermath of Hurricane Ida in Louisiana's St. James Parish; Unemployment benefits for millions of U.S. workers expire on Labor Day. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

The Solid Verbal
Week 2 Preview: Ohio State-Oregon clash + Cy-Hawk Trophy + Notre Dame-Florida State recap

The Solid Verbal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 84:35


Ty and Dan dig into college football's Week 2, featuring a huge non-conference clash between the Ohio State Buckeyes and Oregon Ducks, the battle for the Cy-Hawk Trophy between Iowa and Iowa State, a secretly awesome match-up between NC State and Mississippi State, the Holy War, and much more. Plus, a quick look back at Notre Dame's overtime win over Florida State and a dominant effort by Ole Miss on Labor Day.Follow The Solid Verbal on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Watch our videos on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/thesolidverbal.Join our Patreon at Verballers.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Having Funlessness with Jen Kirkman

This week: Jen's talking about why the Handmaid's Tale memes are annoying, the time she had a fake assistant, when old friends go Alt-Left, working on Labor Day weekend, and listener emails about reincarnation.Get the ad-free video version (with bonus content) of this episode here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/55734465Get this week's short bonus episode about Joe Rogan getting Covid here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/55734465Buy tickets to Jen's five shows in December 2021 (album tapings) in Brooklyn here: https://unionhallny.comJoin Jen's newsletter to get an email when the Anxiety Bites podcast premieres! https://tinyurl.com/vfcc6nTo subscribe to Jen's You Tube Channel, buy merchandise, albums, books, or coffee for Jen click here: jenkirkman.bio.link“No Fun: the Jen Kirkman Podcast” is part of the Misfit Toys Comedy Network. To find all of the other great podcasts on the network go here: https://art19.com/networks/misfit-toysSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – September 7, 2021

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 171:01


The Clinton/Lewinsky alternate universe, Murdaugh murder mystery, new 9/11 docs, Scott Disick, another Storm of the Century, Britney's Jason Alexander GoFundMe update, WATP's Karl joins us, and Dr. Pants-on-Fire.Drew is searching for Bachelor Bob, star of the 2005 smash hit: The Scorned.If you missed it, check out Andy Dick and his latest antics from yesterday's show.Our 8th 'Storm of the Century' may jeopardize or power situation. DTE declares themselves heroes while eating more money on radio commercials.Joe Biden got heckled on his Ida disaster tour. He was busted telling another whopper.Abortion snitching websites are a thing in Texas.Students at The University of Texas at Austin hate The University of Texas at Austin's song, but donors love it.Woodward Sports continues to roll on. Check them out.Britney Spears' first husband and owner of the Greatest Weekend Ever is struggling. His GoFundMe is also off to a rough start.White Boy Rick is getting into the dope game... but not that one.WATP's Karl joins the show to recap Stuttering John's appearance on Elisa Jordana's Kermit and Friends. Howard Stern finally returned from his summer vacation and the fans responded accordingly.Seattle may be short a few cops after mandatory vaccines for police.The Murdaugh Family Murder Mystery is taking some crazy turns. Marc has a (conspiracy) theory and BranDon jumps right on-board."Impeachment: American Crime Story" is out and you need to watch it because we're going to talk about it.We try calling Dr. Pants-On-Fire, but his listed office quickly directs us to another line while assuring us that the phone call is recorded.9/11 Coverage: Marc recaps 9/11: Inside the President's War Room since no one has Apple TV+. Gilbert Gottfried told jokes 'too soon'. The 9/11 "surfer" speaks but some people are still doubting his story.30% COVID Rule: The Mu variant will kill us all. Labor Day traveling will kill us all. Michigan numbers are down... but we're all going to die. Oscar De La Hoya is dying ASAP.Kanye's Donda is #1 and no one likes it.Drew doesn't get the East Coast/West Coast rap rivalry.You can shoot cops with real bullets if they hit you with rubber ones.The new "friendly" Taliban isn't being very nice and doesn't like protests.Janet Jackson's documentary has been announced, but we have a feeling a lot of stuff will be left out.Another baby fell out of Cardi B's WAP.North West is a better artist than Hunter Biden, but not as good as Bob Ross.The Bob Ross documentary is a boring buzzkill.Scott Disick is so mad that KK and Barker are banging all over the place. Oh, and he's single now too. Drew wants to know is he's really that hot?Kaley Cuoco ruined her marriage over Pete Davidson's "big d energy".Jeopardy! is a "s#*t show" that no one wants to host.Social media is dumb but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H2 – Sep 7 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 45:17


It's worse than a year ago: This Labor Day weekend, we have twice as many people hospitalized from covid compared to 2020. How is that possible with a vaccine? Fauci funded the creation of covid and then lied about it under oath. Rolling Stone runs fake ivermectin story, Twitter does nothing. Liberal media knows it's a lie and still runs the story, because they know they can get away with it. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Very Bad Wizards
Episode 220: On Your Marx

Very Bad Wizards

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 110:44


In honor of Labor Day, David and Tamler dive into two works by Karl Marx - "The Communist Manifesto" and "Estranged Labor." What is Marx's theory of historical change? Why does capitalism produce an alienated workforce? What role does philosophy play in maintaining the status quo? Plus, fraudulent data in a famous study about dishonesty and former guest Dan Ariely is under investigation.

Hard Factor
9/7: Billionaire Former Walmart Executive is Convinced he will Build us the Perfect City: Telosa

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 51:42


(00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup Of Coffee In The Big Time (00:04:37) - Fun Fact Of The Day (00:06:30) - Holidays (00:08:42) - Today in History (00:10:15) - Honorable Mentions, Cat ringbearer and Bald Bezos invests in anti aging startup (00:14:50) - #3 - Accusations against Ron Jeremy that were unsealed from Grand Jury victim testimony are horrific (00:17:40) - #2 - Tom Selleck caused quite the stir on twitter on Labor Day with both the left and right really airing it out online over him (00:21:55) - #1 - RIP to Michael Williams TikTok International Moment (00:25:58) - In Israel, the first ever successful conjoined twins of the head surgery was executed, and both 1 year old girls are healthy and expected to live long separate lives (00:28:41) - Classes have resumed in Kabul and the Taliban has sent images of the class where the men and women sit on opposite sides separated by a sheet (00:30:45) - Six terrorists escaped from a prison in Israel probably because the prison blueprints can be found online (00:36:19) - An ex executive of Walmart and probably billionaire has decided his next project is to build the perfect city stealing the best parts of worldly culture and architecture in the middle of the desert in the US and all he needs is 400 billion dollars in investments to get that going. These stories and more… brought to you by our fantastic sponsors. Full Boar BBQ - Proof the American dream is still alive when you have a superior product mixed with unstoppable work ethic. What started with a group of high school friends trying their hand at a local BBQ competition has turned into a company that is trusted everywhere it is known to make you the star of your backyard. Hard Factor listeners get 10% off their entire order using promo code Factor at fullboarbbqproducts.com PaintYourLife.com - To get an amazing hand painted painting for 20% and FREE shipping text FACTOR to 64-000. Paint Your Life: Celebrate the moments that matter most. Caliper CBD - Get 20% off your first order when you use promo code FACTOR at TRY CALIPER DOT COM SLASH FACTOR. You can try Caliper CBD risk-free for 30 days. If you don't love it they'll give you a full refund! www.trycaliper.com/factor Also download the Greenroom App by Spotify to join us for LIVE What the Fuck Wednesday Shows, every Wednesday at 5 PM Eastern Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480 or or send us a voicememo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com & leave a 5-Star review on Apple Pods to hear it on Friday's show

Mark Levin Podcast
Mark Levin Audio Rewind - 9/6/21

Mark Levin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 115:27


On Monday's Mark Levin Show, we bring you the Best Of Mark Levin on Labor Day! A transcript reveals that President Biden pressured Afghan President Ghani to create the perception that the Taliban wasn't winning, whether it was true or not. Can we now impeach this president over a phone call? Then, President Biden's speech demonstrates his ignorance of the genocide he just unleashed on women, children, and the patriotic allies that stood up and fought with Americans in Afghanistan. Biden's unaware or doesn't care about the global implications with China, Iran, and other enemies of the United States now that the U.S has no presence in Afghanistan. Biden says every American that wanted to leave was given a chance. Lies! Biden says many of the Americans that stayed were once Afghan nationals and implied that we should not worry. More lies, more propaganda from the White House and the State Department. Now that the American media is gone the terrorists will do what they do and we will not hear the screams of the genocide that Biden has unleashed in Afghanistan. Afterward, Larry Elder, candidate for Governor of California in the recall election of Gavin Newsom, joins the show to discuss the issues. Elder highlighted that 75% of African American boys are reading below grade level. He also mentioned how Democrats are fearful of losing California because they need a Democrat governor to make important appointments, such as the U.S Senate should Kamala Harris ever assume the Office of the Presidency.

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0
PMS 2.0 488 - We Have NFL Football This Week + College Football Week 1 Recap With AJ Hawk

The Pat McAfee Show 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 108:58


Pat is back in studio after beating Covid 19's ass, as he and the boys recap an incredible week 1 of college football including an electrifying game last night between Notre Dame and Florida State, what other games stole the show this weekend, and they look ahead to Thursday's NFL opener between the Buccaneers and Cowboys and give a couple of leans in terms of bets, if they think the Cowboys can hang with the Bucs the night they're hanging a banner, if it's a good thing that everyone is on the same page thinking the Bucs are going to dominate on Thursday, Pat hammering the anvil before the Colts host the Seahawks and Sunday and if he should take the opportunity to cut a promo on the Seahawks, Tom Brady feeling younger and better than he has in a long time, plus everything else from the college football weekend and more news from around the league. Later, Pat and AJ Hawk chat about whether or not anyone is going to be able to beat Alabama, which way they're both leaning for Thursday night, the news that the Steelers and TJ Watt haven't come to terms on an extension yet and if Steelers fans should be worried that he didn't participate in any team drills during training camp,  and they go down the list of games from the first week of NFL football and highlight some of the matchups we'll be keeping an eye on closely (38:35-1:44:13). We are so close to the start of the NFL season, so strap in, and get ready for an incredible week. Make sure you subscribe to youtube.com/thepatmcafeeshow and listen every day on Mad Dog Radio, Sirius XM Channel 82. We appreciate you all for listening, have an incredible Labor Day. Come and laugh with us, cheers. 

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Sep 6 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 42:07


Clay so fired up by weekend college football crowds, he had to come in and do the show. Clay plays clips from college football crowds this weekend, who were living their "best lives." Middle America fed up with fear, fed up with Biden, refusing to live in fear anymore. Clay takes calls from college football fans, who confirm what Clay saw this weekend. More covid cases this Labor Day weekend than last year. Massive crowds gave giant middle finger to Biden's failures as we head into fall. NPR says Biden approval at 43%, how low is it really? Dems use abortion debate to fire up base. Three achievable goals that keep you out of poverty no matter your race, or circumstances of your birth. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Andrew Klavan Show
Happy Labor Day, Comrades!

The Andrew Klavan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 1:17


Labor Day might be a COMMUNIST HOLIDAY - But that doesn't mean we can't partake in some good old American Capitalism, now does it? RIGHT NOW get 40% off your NEW DAILY WIRE MEMBERSHIP and Leftist Tears Tumbler using code CommieTears. Make a commie cry, join now and drink up, comrades! https://utm.io/udH0c

The Dan Bongino Show
Dan Bongino Labor Day Podcast Special (Ep 1599)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 39:50


Select interviews from the Dan Bongino Radio Show from the past couple of weeks. Dan interviews Gen. Jerry Boykin, who was involved with the Black Hawk Down incident in Somalia. They discussed the terrible tactics in our pullout of Afghanistan. Dan talks with former Navy Seal Jocko Willink about leaving Americans behind in Afghanistan and the lack of accountability from leadership. Finally Dan talks with Pennsylvania Senate Candidate and former Infantry Captain who served in Afghanistan, about the botched withdrawal from that country and what we can expect to happen in the coming years. 

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast
Let's Replace Labor Day With Entrepreneur Day – Ep 729

The Peter Schiff Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 59:33


Grover Cleveland was libertarian. Populist movement under Woodrow Wilson gave way to many bad things, including Labor Day. Washington incumbents have rigged the system. Workers have benefited from entrepreneurs, despite the drag of labor unions. Henry Ford's risk taking resulted in higher wages for his workers and cheaper cars for his customers. Business owners are in the crosshairs of the government. Get an extra 3 months Free on a one year package: https://expressvpn.com/gold INVEST LIKE ME: https://schiffradio.com/invest RATE AND REVIEW on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PeterSchiff/reviews/ SIGN UP FOR MY FREE NEWSLETTER: https://www.europac.com/ Schiff Gold News: http://www.SchiffGold.com/news Buy my newest book at http://www.tinyurl.com/RealCrash Follow me on Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on Instagram: https://Instagram.com/PeterSchiff

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show
The Best Of The Mike O'Meara Show #185

Podcasts – The Mike O'Meara Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 79:02


We hope that you're all enjoying your Labor Day weekend. We will be back in the studio tomorrow so don't miss it!

The Michael Knowles Show
Happy Labor Day, Comrades!

The Michael Knowles Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 1:10


Labor Day might be a COMMUNIST HOLIDAY - But that doesn't mean we can't partake in some good old American Capitalism, now does it? RIGHT NOW get 40% off your NEW DAILY WIRE MEMBERSHIP and Leftist Tears Tumbler using code CommieTears. Make a commie cry, join now and drink up, comrades! https://utm.io/udH0c

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
The Functional Medicine Approach To Gallbladder Disease with Dr. George Papanicolaou

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 31:04


The Functional Medicine Approach To Gallbladder Disease | This episode is brought to you by Essentia and PaleovalleyThe gallbladder is an organ we don't often pay much attention to, but if you or a loved one has had gallstones, you know they can be very painful. About 6-9% of adults experience gallstones and their associated symptoms which can include nausea and vomiting. The gallbladder plays a vital role in our digestive process by storing bile which helps us break down fats. If your bile is imbalanced, gallstones may form. The conventional approach to relieving gallbladder pain and discomfort is through the use of medication or surgery to remove the gallbladder, whereas the Functional Medicine approach seeks to uncover the root cause of the problem and approaches treatment from that place.In this episode, Dr. Hyman discusses gallbladder disease with Dr. George Papanicolaou. They talk about how they work with patients to determine what is causing the disease, and how an imbalance in the composition of bile can also result in gut problems like dysbiosis and SIBO. They also provide tips on supporting your body to optimize digesting fats if you've had your gallbladder removed.George Papanicolaou is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is Board Certified in Family Medicine from Abington Memorial Hospital. He is also an Institute for Functional Medicine Practitioner. Upon graduation from his residency he joined the Indian Health Service. He worked on the Navajo reservation for 4 years at the Chinle Comprehensive Medical Facility where he served as the Outpatient Department Coordinator. In 2000, he founded Cornerstone Family Practice in Rowley, MA. He practiced with a philosophy centered on personal relationships and treating the whole person, not just not the disease. He called that philosophy “Whole Life Wellness”. Over time as the healthcare system made it harder for patients to receive this kind of personal care Dr. Papanicolaou decided a change was needed. He began training in Functional Medicine through the Institute of Functional Medicine. In 2015, he established Cornerstone Personal Health—a practice dedicated entirely to Functional Medicine. Dr. Papanicolaou joined The UltraWellness Center in 2017.This episode is brought to you by Essentia and Paleovalley.Right now, you can take advantage of Essentia's incredible Labor Day offer of 25% off with 2 free pillows (normally a $300 value) by going to learn.myessentia.com/DrMarkHyman. Paleovalley is offering 15% off your entire first order. Just go to paleovalley.com/hyman to check out all their clean Paleo products and take advantage of this deal.In this conversation, Dr. Hyman and Dr. Papanicolaou discuss:The root cause of gallbladder disease, including gallstonesWhat healthy bile is and why it's so important in the role of digesting fatsThe difference between the conventional medicine and Functional Medicine approach to treating gallbladder diseaseHow bile imbalances can lead to gut imbalances such as dysbiosis and SIBOThe tie between Hashimoto's thyroiditis and gallbladder disease and the role of glutenConsequences of surgery to remove the gallbladderSupporting the body if you don't have a gallbladderAdditional Resources:Digesting Fat, Optimizing Your Health, and My Daily Supplementshttps://drhyman.com/blog/2017/04/28/digesting-fat-optimizing-health-daily-supplements/A New Roadmap for Treating Diseasehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2018/05/16/a-new-roadmap-for-treating-disease/Healing Psoriasis from the Inside Out with Dr. Todd LePinehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2020/10/16/podcast-hc27/How to Prevent and Reverse Fatty Liver Disease with Functional Medicinehttps://drhyman.com/blog/2021/08/02/podcast-hc67/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ben Shapiro Show
Happy Labor Day, Comrades!

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 1:32


Labor Day might be a COMMUNIST HOLIDAY - But that doesn't mean we can't partake in some good old American Capitalism, now does it? RIGHT NOW get 40% off your NEW DAILY WIRE MEMBERSHIP and Leftist Tears Tumbler using code CommieTears. Make a commie cry, join now and drink up, comrades! https://utm.io/udH0c