Podcasts about specialists

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Best podcasts about specialists

Latest podcast episodes about specialists

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Surge nurses will be able to cover intensive care units - Andrew Little

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 11:01


The Health Minister, Andrew Little, says there's surge capacity to fill crucial nursing gaps on short notice if the delta outbreak escalates. Specialists say nurses are already stretched and there is pressure to keep up with treatment of non-Covid-19 patients. Little told Morning Report the surge nurses are able to fill ICU roles on short notice - and a similar plan has worked in the UK. "The COVID patients who wind up in ICU, obviously have respiratory problems and major problems with the oxygen levels, but they're not like a patient who has just come through a highly traumatic motor vehicle accident with multiple broken bones, organ damage, traumatic brain injury. The British intensive care specialists were saying the surge trained nurses are enough," he said. "Here's the other thing too, actually, once we get to the vaccination levels, once restrictions reduce and there will be continued Covid infection the real game in town is not what happens in hospitals and ICUs, it's what happens in the community. Most people who get infected with Covid in the months ahead will be cared for at home or in the community and what keeps me awake at night is making sure that we're supporting our GPS and our community care clinics to make sure that they're supporting people." Little also said he's not sure bringing in a vaccination mandate into the health sector will cause shortages, after concern from midwives some pregnant people could be caught short. "It's not a certainty that it [the mandate] will lead to shortages. For those who are hesitant there is an opportunity to get more and better information," he said. "And with the professional organisations they are part of and health authorities I'm confident that we'll get through this."

JAT Podcasts
JATChat | Blood Flow Restriction Training

JAT Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 32:39


Dr. Kara Radzak interviews Dr. Dan Lorenz about his recent Current Clinical Concepts paper on Blood Flow Restriction. Article: https://bit.ly/39AKm8J Dan Lorenz, DPT, PT, ATC, CSCS is a sports medicine professional with 20 years of experience in a number of professional settings, including outpatient physical therapy, hospitals, Division 1 athletics, Olympics, Major League Baseball, and the National Football League. After practicing in outpatient physical therapy for a few years after PT school, from 2004-2005, he completed the Duke University Sports Physical Therapy Fellowship. Following the stint at Duke, he was an assistant athletic trainer/physical therapist for the Kansas City Chiefs. After leaving the Chiefs, he worked in various outpatient sports/orthopedic settings in the Kansas City area before opening my own practice with my partners, Agility Health, in 2012 - Specialists in Sports and Orthopedic Rehabilitation (SSOR).

Capital FM
'We Have Specialists In Over 100 Areas Operating As Full Time Employees' - AKUH CEO | Catch Up Radio

Capital FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 35:54


'We Have Specialists In Over 100 Areas Operating As Full Time Employees' - AKUH CEO | Catch Up Radio by Capital FM

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) / Raging Bull (1980) - #65 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 36)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:17


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time discussing a sci-fi thriller and an artistic boxing movie. Next up: #64 Scream (1996) and The Tree of Life (2012)

The Armor Men's Health Hour
Don't Mourn Your Buried Penis, Resurrect It! Get Help From Dr. Mistry and NAU Urology Specialists

The Armor Men's Health Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 10:46


Thanks for tuning in to the Armor Men's Health Hour Podcast today, where we bring you the latest and greatest in urology care and the best urology humor out there.Today, Dr. Mistry and Donna Lee respond to a listener who asks about options for treating his buried penis, a condition where the fatty tissue surrounding the penis effectively "buries" it.  The listener says his penis is retracted to the extent that his urethra is the only exposed area, causing it to painfully rub against his clothing when he's exercising. Dr. Mistry explains that men who are overweight or obese are the most likely to experience buried penis. For this listener, who seems to have a more active lifestyle, his buried penis is seriously limiting his day to day activities. But even for an older person or someone less active, a buried penis can make urination extremely difficult and can lead to embarrassing bathroom messes as well as nasty infections. Fortunately, our team at NAU Urology Specialists can perform an assessment and provide you with state of the art treatment options. If you or someone you love is suffering with buried penis, please give us a call today!If you enjoyed today's episode, don't forget to like, subscribe, and share us with a friend! As always, be well!Check our our award winning podcast!https://blog.feedspot.com/sex_therapy_podcasts/https://blog.feedspot.com/mens_health_podcasts/Dr. Mistry is a board-certified urologist and has been treating patients in the Austin and Greater Williamson County area since he started his private practice in 2007.We enjoy hearing from you! Email us at armormenshealth@gmail.com and we'll answer your question in an upcoming episode!Phone: (512) 238-0762Email: Armormenshealth@gmail.comWebsite: Armormenshealth.comOur Locations:Round Rock Office970 Hester's Crossing RoadSuite 101Round Rock, TX 78681South Austin Office6501 South CongressSuite 1-103Austin, TX 78745Lakeline Office12505 Hymeadow DriveSuite 2CAustin, TX 78750Dripping Springs Office170 Benney Lane Suite 202Dripping Springs, TX 78620

Dance Boss Podcast
What Classifies You As a Dance Specialists?

Dance Boss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:16


You may identify as a dance specialist. OR You may be thinking… “WTF is that?!” OR You might be thinking… “Hmmm, dance specialist is a bold claim for me!” On the baseline level, a dance specialist is anyone who specializes in an area of expertise in the dance community that helps dancers or non-dancers reach a specific result. An area of expertise is something you've been technically training in, academically studying for years, or personally experienced through the years. Every dancer has an area of expertise they specialize in.  You may even have many areas of expertise, but some are more developed than others.  In episode #156 of the Dance Boss Podcast, I dive into this further. I also talk about a mindset shift I want you to make: shifting from “I offer dance classes online for everyone” to “I am a specialist in this area of expertise.” So tell me, do you identify as a dance specialist? If yes, what's your area of expertise? If no, what's stopping you? Hit me up on IG @erinpride and let me know.   Click here for show notes  https://bit.ly/DBPShowNotes   Join Apolla Performance LIVE this and EVERY FRIDAY at 2 pm EST for Beyond the StEPS, where they tackle the big questions facing the dance community.  www.apollaperformance.com IG/FB @Apollaperfomance https://www.instagram.com/apollaperformance/   Sponsored by DancePreneur Academy, my 6-month group coaching program dance specialist who desires to create 5k consistent months in their business with a signature virtual group training program...Click Here to Learn More  https://dpaapplynow.lpages.co/erinpompa/

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Akira (1988) / Edward Scissorhands (1990) - #66 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 35)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 61:47


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time discussing a classic anime film and one of the first Tim Burton movies. Next up: #65 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016) and Raging Bull (1980)

Greater Than Code
252: Designing For Safety with Eva PenzeyMoog

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 60:45


TRIGGER WARNING: Domestic Violence, Abuse, Interpersonal Safety 01:26 - Eva's Superpower: ADHD and Hyperfocus * Workplace Accommodation * At-Will Employment (https://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/at-will-employment-overview.aspx) 08:19 - Design for Safety (https://abookapart.com/products/design-for-safety) * Tech Used For Interpersonal Harm * Might vs When * Eva Penzey Moog | Designing Against Domestic Violence (https://vimeo.com/373462514) * Weaponizing Technology 12:45 - What Engineers Need to Know * Control/Shared Accounts * Surveillance * Location Data 15:02 - Expanding Our Understanding of What “User” Means * “User as an abstraction.” 20:43 - Parallels with Security * Personas / Archetypes * Adding Layers of Friction * Ongoing Arms Race 22:23 - Spreading Awareness Across Teams Focused on Feature Delivery * Safety Designers as a Specialized Role? * Generalists vs Specialists; Literacy vs Fluency * This Book Is For Everyone: Engineers, Designers, Product Managers, etc. 31:38 - Thinking Beyond The User * Constituency * Design Justice: Community-Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need By Sasha Costanza-Chock (https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/design-justice) 35:25 - Traditional Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy * We Prioritize The Safety of Marginalized People Over the Comfort of Unmarginalized People * How Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-design-thinking-protects-white-supremacy-tickets-168123071633) (Workshop) * Kim Crayton (https://www.kimcrayton.com/): Intention Without Strategy is Chaos * Sitting with Discomfort 40:21 - Putting Ergonomics, Safety, and Security Behind Paywalls * “Ergonomics is the marriage of design and ethics.” * The History of Seatbelts (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEQ6AojkEeo) * Government Regulation * Worker Organizing 45:58 - Tech Workers and Privilege * Overpaid/Underpaid Reflections: Mandy: Inclusive and accessible technology includes people experiencing domestic abuse. Damien: If a product can be used for harm, it will be. Coraline: How systems are weaponized against marginalized and vulnerable folks. The internet is good for connecting people with shared experiences but we're breaking into smaller and smaller groups. Are we propping up systems by taking a narrow view based on our own experiences? Eva: Who didn't teach you about this? It's our job to keep ourselves safe in tech. Tech companies need to take more responsibility for user safety. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: MANDY: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode number 252. My name is Mandy Moore and today, I'm here with Damien Burke. DAMIEN: Hi, and I am here with Coraline Ada Ehmke. CORALINE: Wow. I actually showed up for once. [laughs] I'm very happy to be with y'all today and I'm very excited about the guest that we have today. Her name is Eva PenzeyMoog and Eva is a principal designer at 8th Light and the author of Design for Safety. Before joining the tech field, she worked in the non-profit space and volunteered as a domestic violence educator and rape crisis counselor. At 8th Light, she specializes in user experience design as well as education and consulting in the realm of digital safety design. Her work brings together her expertise in domestic violence and technology, helping technologists understand how their creations facilitate interpersonal harm and how to prevent it through intentionally prioritizing the most vulnerable users. Eva, I'm so happy to have you here today. Hi! EVA: Hi, thanks so much for having me. I'm so excited to be here. CORALINE: So if I recall correctly and it has been a while so Mandy, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think we open with the same question that we've been opening with for 251 other episodes and Eva, that is, what is your superpower and how did you discover, or develop it? EVA: Yeah, so my superpower is my ADHD, actually [chuckles] and specifically my ability to hyperfocus and I didn't really acquire and start to until the age of 25, which is when I was diagnosed. For people who don't know, hyperfocus is basically exactly what it sounds like. It's a state of very intense focus that people with ADHD will sometimes go into. It's not something you really have control over, it's not something you can just turn on, or off, and it isn't necessarily good, or bad. But for me, I'm really lucky because it often gets triggered when I start to code. So as I was starting to learn code and then I switched over to focusing on design and frontend like CSS and SAAS. But as I was learning that stuff, it gets triggered all the time. So I can sit down and code and oftentimes, hours have gone past and so long as I don't like miss any meetings or forget to eat, it's totally a superpower. CORALINE: That's amazing. I've talked about before, I live with bipolar disorder and I tend to stay in a low-grade manic state as my resting place and I experience very similar things with that hyper focus and just losing hours on a task and sometimes, it's very positive and I get a lot done and sometimes, I'm like, “What the hell did I do?” [chuckles] EVA: Right. CORALINE: But I think it's great that—I've been talking to some other folks with ADHD, with bipolar—the judo moves we can do takes something that really negatively affects us in a lot of ways and finding a way to turn it around, like you said, and use it as a superpower. Those are the strategies we develop when we live with things like this and I'm always happy when people have figured out how to get something good out of that. EVA: Yeah, totally and realizing that you have this thing that happens. Because I'm sure it's been happening my whole life, but I didn't recognize it, or understand it and then just being able to name it and see that it's happening is so powerful. And then to be like, “Oh, I can maybe do certain things to try to get into it,” or just being aware that it's a thing it's like very powerful. CORALINE: I'm kind of curious, Eva, if you don't mind us talking about ADHD for a little while? EVA: Sure. Yeah. CORALINE: Okay. I have a friend who is – actually, a couple of friends who were very recently diagnosed with ADHD and they had so much trouble in the traditional tech were workplace, especially working for companies that have productivity metrics like lines of code, or number of commits, or something like that. It was really difficult for both of these friends to operate in an environment where you're expected to have very consistent output day over day and not having accommodation, or not having the ability to design their work in such a way that maximizes the positives of how they work and minimizes the negatives of how they work. Is that something you've struggled with as well? EVA: Yeah, and that's so unfortunate that your friends because like I said, I feel like it is a superpower and most workplaces, they should be trying to harness it and understand that, you can have really, really awesome employees with ADHD. If you set them up for success, they can be so successful. But it is something – so I've only ever worked at 8th Light actually, when I was interviewing, over 5 years ago now, and started doing, trying to find my first job in tech, after doing a bootcamp, I interviewed at a couple different places and none of them felt super great. But obviously, I was just really eager to get my first job. But then I went into 8th Light and 8th Light was one of the places where I really, really did want to work there and was really excited for the interview. But when I got to the office, it was very quiet and there was an open workspace, but people were working very quietly and there were like lots of rooms. I got into that and I was like, “Oh, thank God” like, this is exactly the space I need. I can't handle too much activity. I can't handle offices where they're actually playing music; that type of thing is my nightmare and I don't actually like wearing headphones all day like that. That's not just a easy fix for me and for a lot of people with ADHD. So I felt like right away, now I want to work here even more and I've been really lucky that it's been a really good setup for someone like me to work and I have gotten some accommodations which has been good. I feel like if you don't give accommodations, they're breaking the law, they need to do that. DAMIEN: This is really, really validating because I've had similar experiences of that. Even just this morning where I was in the code and I had no idea how much time was going by and I had no awareness of anything else. That's possible because of the environment I have that I work in. Whereas, previous jobs I've had with bullpens and just open office plans, I was in incredibly miserable there and I didn't understand how people could get any work done in those environments. So just this understanding of how people are different; in what environments some people thrive in and other environments other people thrive in. EVA: Yeah. So have you always worked from home, or has this been a pandemic thing? DAMIEN: This has been probably about 10 years. Yeah. [laughs] I went home and never left. [laughs] EVA: Nice. [chuckles] CORALINE: I've done something very similar. I started working from home, I think in 2015 and not for a great reason, but I found the exact same thing that you're talking about. Like I am very sensitive to my environment. I use music to control my mood and like you, Eva, I hate headphones. So I do wonder, you mentioned accommodations and the legal perspective on that. In Illinois where – Eva, you live in Illinois, too. Are you local for 8th Light? EVA: Yeah. I live in Chicago. CORALINE: We have that will employment and it's really easy to discriminate against folks on multiple axes rather than providing our accommodations. Without will employment, they can just let you go and you have no proof that it was because they're ableist, or racist or transphobic, or whatever. EVA: Oh, yeah. That's so rough. Pritzker's got to get on that. Our governor. [chuckles] CORALINE: So do you want to tell us a little bit about the book that you just wrote? I understand a lot of people are finding a lot of value in it and really opening their eyes to a lot of maybe issues they weren't aware of. EVA: Yeah. So my book, Design for Safety, came out in early August and it's been really great to see people's reactions to it. I got my first formal book review, which was really cool and it was overall very positive, which has been very exciting. I'm hopeful that it is helping people understand that this is a thing because it's different, I feel like than a lot of other problems. Someone else explained this to me recently and I had this light bulb moment that I'm not providing a solution to a problem that people know that they have this problem, like how their tech is used for interpersonal harm and now I have a solution like, here's this book that's going to tell you how to fix it. It's more that people don't even know that this is a problem. So I'm educating on that as well as trying to give some of the solutions on how to fix it. It has been a lot of people just saying like, “I had no idea about any of this. It's been so eye-opening and now I'm going to think about it more and do these different things.” So that's been really great to see that just people's awareness is going up, basically. MANDY: I really like on the website, the sentence that there's a pullout quote, or I'm not sure if it's even a pullout quote, but it says, “If abuse is possible, it's only a matter of time until it happens. There's no might, so let's build better, safer digital products from the start.” I like that. EVA: Yeah, thanks. I was very intentional and well, this goes back to when I was doing a conference talk. Before I wrote the book, I did a conference talk called Designing Against Domestic Violence and I thought a lot about the type of language should I use; should I say might happen, or should I say will happen? I eventually settled on it's going to happen even if it hasn't happened yet, or oftentimes, I think we just don't know that it's happened. People who have gone through domestic violence, some of then we'll talk openly about it. But most people just don't, which makes sense. It's this really intense, personal thing to go through and there's so much judgment and survivors get blamed for all these things. So it makes sense that people don't want to talk that much about it. I ended up thinking we just need to say that it will happen. DAMIEN: That's amazing. So I really want to know everything about this book. [chuckles] but to start with, you said the book is designing for safety and you witnessed this a little bit with domestic violence, violence and abuse. Can you talk about safe from what sort of things you mean when you say safety there? EVA: Yeah, for sure because I know safety is a big word that can mean a lot of different things. But the way that I'm talking about it in my work is in terms of interpersonal safety. So it's like how is someone who has a relationship with you in an interpersonal way going to use technology, weaponized technology, in a way that was not meant to be used? We aren't designing tech with these use cases in mind, but how is it ultimately going to be weaponized for some type of abuse? Domestic violence is really the emphasis and my big focus and was mentioned in the intro, some background in domestic violence space. But there's also issues with child abuse and elder abuse, especially in terms of surveillance of those groups as well as surveillance of workers is another thing that came up a lot as I was researching that I didn't get as much into in the book. But it's basically anytime there's an interpersonal relationship and someone has access to you in this personal way where you're not just an anonymous stranger, how is tech going to be used to exert some form of control, or abuse over that person? DAMIEN: Wow, that is a very important subject. So I'm an engineer who doesn't have a lot of knowledge about interpersonal violence, domestic abuse, anything of that nature and I know you've written a whole book [laughs] and we only have an hour, or so here, but what are the first things that people, or engineers need to know about this? EVA: Yeah, so I think the first thing is to understand that this is a problem and that it's happening and to go through some different examples of how this happens, which is what the first couple chapters of the book are all about. It's different forms of this interpersonal abuse via technology in the form of shared accounts is a really big one and this question of who has control and nebulous issues of control. There's also surveillance is a really big one and then location data as well. So I guess, I don't want to say like, “Oh, just read the book,” but learning a little bit about the different – there's so many different examples of how this works. Just to start to build that mental model of how this happens like, someone taking advantage of certain affordances within a shared bank account software, or someone using an internet of things device to gaslight someone, or torment them. There's so many different examples. Location data shows up in all sorts of really sneaky in terms of stalking. It's not purely putting a tracker on someone's car, or even like Google Map and sharing your location is a more straightforward thing. But there's also, it shows up in other ways like, a grocery store app that has a timestamp and location. You can learn someone's grocery shopping habits and maybe you're estranged from this person, or they've left you because you're abusive, but they don't know that their stuff is showing up in this app and their location data. So it shows up in all sorts of different ways. This is a very long way to answer your question, but I think the first thing is to start to understand how this stuff works so that you're just aware of it and then from there, I have a whole chapter about how to implement a practice of designing for safety at your company. It is a little more design focused, but I think engineers can absolutely be doing this work, too. Even if it's just like quick research on how are any product with any type of message feature is going to be used for abuse and there's lots of literature out there. So just looking at some articles, thinking about ways that aren't covered already, that just having a brainstorm about what are some new ways this might be used for abuse and then thinking about how to prevent them. CORALINE: One of the things that I was thinking about after reading your book, Eva, is at a metal level, or zooming out a bit. I think a lot of the ways that we design software, we have this idealized and homogenous notion of a user. I think that in a lot of cases, especially if you're working on a project that's like more, or less one of those scratch your own itch problems, you tend to think of yourself as the user. It's great to have that empathy for the end user, but what we don't have, I don't think as a field, is an understanding that user is an abstraction and it is a useful abstraction. But sometimes you need to zoom down a little bit and understand the different ways that people want to use the software and will use the software and what makes them different from this average idealized user. That was one of the things that really struck me, especially from the process you were describing, is expanding our understanding of what user means and anticipating the different use cases with hostile users, with actively abusive users, and I think thinking of abstraction is super helpful, but I feel like sometimes we need to zoom down and think differently about really who the people are and what their circumstances might be. EVA: Yeah. Oh man, I just wrote down what you said, user is an abstraction. That's such a good way to think about it that I haven't heard before, but you're absolutely right that it's encapsulating such a big group of people. Even if for a small product, something that's not like Twitter that's open to billions of people, even something that's a subscription, or something that's going to have a smaller user base. There's going to be such a diverse, different group within there and to just think of the term user as a catchall is definitely problematic. Sorry, I'm just processing that user is an abstraction, that term because we use it so much as designers, definitely. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And anyone in tech is always using this term, but problematizing that term in a new way is really interesting to me. And I think my other thought about this is that we talk a lot about needing to think about more than just happy path and I feel like even that, at least in my experience, has been other things that are also very important where it's like, let's think about someone who has a crappy Wi-Fi connection, or someone who's low vision. Like there are all these other very important things to think about in terms of accessibility and inclusivity. I think I see what I'm doing as just adding another group into the mix of let's think about people who are currently surviving domestic violence, which is maybe a little bit harder to bring up than those other two that I mentioned because it's just so dark and it's something that we just don't want to have to think about, or talk about during work. It's just such a bummer, but it is really important to have this new group added when we're thinking about inclusive and accessible tech. DAMIEN: There's a really great parallel here, I think with security minded design and research. Again, that's another user who is not behaving in the happy path. That's not behaving the way your normal users are behaving and you have to design your system in such a way to be resilient to that. So I love this user as an abstraction, then breaking it down into all these ways and then also, there's a huge value to diversity in your team with this sort of thing. CORALINE: Absolutely. DAMIEN: You can understand the very different types of users having people on the team who can understand blackhat users who are going to be trying to use your servers to mine Bitcoin, or [laughs] blind users, low vision users, or colorblind users, for goodness' sake. And then in addition to that, people again, who are experiencing domestic violence, other to terms of other forms of interpersonal abuse and just being able to understand all those users and their experiences with the things you're building and designing. EVA: Yeah, definitely those are all really good points. Just going back to what you said about the parallels with security is something I've actually been thinking about that a lot, because I think there are lots of parallels to that, or useful things about how security professionals think about their work and operate. Especially the big one for me right now is thinking about a security professional. They're never going to be like, “Okay, we did it. Our system is secure. We're done. We have arrived.” That's not a thing and I feel like it's very similar with designing for safety, or even inclusion. There's just, you're never – I feel like we've had a mental model of “I can think about these things, I can check these boxes, and now, my product is inclusive, or my product is accessible.” I feel like we should be thinking more like security professionals where there's always going to be more things like, we always have to be vigilant about what's the next way that someone's going to misuse tech, or the group that's going to be identified that we've totally left out and is being harmed in some way. So I think that's just a useful shift that I'm thinking a lot about. CORALINE: And Damien, I'm so glad you brought up the parallels with security. I was actually going there as well. One of the things that I've been thinking about from an ethical source perspective is insecurity that, I think two tools that would be super useful. First of all, personas and secondly—I guess, three things—understanding that safety can be a matter of adding layers of friction to disincentivize abusive behavior and like you said, recognizing this is an ongoing arms race. Every new feature that you design opens up some kind of attack, or abuse factor and if you're not planning for that from the outset, you're going to be caught later when harm has been done. EVA: Yeah, absolutely. Since you brought up personas, there is something in the process that I created that's a similar tool where I call them archetypes because they're a little different from personas. But it's identifying who is the abuser in this scenario, who is the survivor, and what are their goals and that's basically it, we don't need to get into anything else. I don't think, but just articulating those things and then even having a little printout, kind of similar to the idea with personas like, oh, you can print them out for your sales team, or whoever it is to keep these people in mind. A similar idea of just having them printed out an on your wall so that it's something that you're thinking about like, “Oh, we have this new feature. We probably need to think about how is this abuser person that we've identified who would want to use our product to find the location data of their former partner,” whatever it is. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Use this. CORALINE: From a mechanical perspective, Eva, one of the one of the challenges I had at GitHub when I was working on community and safety is that the other engineers and the other groups were creating so many new features. I felt like the knowledge about how feature can be abused, or like you said, will be abused wasn't spread very effectively throughout, especially a large software organization, and it fell on a small team of folks who frankly were not consulted. A feature would go out and we'd be like, “Holy crap, you can't do that because of this, this, and this.” So do you have any do you have any thoughts? I know you said print it out, or put it on the wall, but do you have any thoughts for how to spread that awareness and that mode of thinking across teams who frankly may be very, very focused just on feature delivery and will see any consideration like that as slowing them down, or having negative impact on “productivity”? EVA: Yes. I have many thoughts. [chuckles] So this is bringing up something for me that I've struggled with and thought about is should there be specialized teams in this area? I feel like yes, we want people with special knowledge and experts and that's really important, but also, I feel like the ideal scenario is that it's just everyone's job. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Those teams were already doing things and it wasn't seen as “Oh, Coraline's team is going to come in and now we have to consult with those people,” or whatever because it's not our job, it's their job. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which this isn't a very maybe satisfying answer to your question because I feel like it involves a huge shift in the way that we think about this stuff, but it is something I've thought about in terms of should I call myself a safety designer? Is that something I want to do? Do I want this to be like a specialized role? Maybe is that a goal where people start to see that? Because there are people who specialize in inclusive design, or accessible design. But then the downside of that is does that just give someone else even more leeway to be like, “Not my job, I don't have to worry about this. And then we have the problems, like what you just described. I don't know, I feel like it's such a big shift that needs to happen. CORALINE: Yeah. One of the models I've been thinking about and I was thinking of this in terms of generalists versus specialists is generalists, or to map that to domain that we're talking about now, the other engineers in your group, or in your company. I feel like there has to be a balance between specialization and general knowledge. The way I describe that is everyone should have literacy on a particular topic and the basic vocabulary for it and a general knowledge of the concepts augmented by a specialist who has fluency. So kind of a dynamic relationship between literacy and fluency. Do you have any thoughts on that? EVA: I love that. I'm literally writing that down. A generalist with literacy and a specialist with fluency is such a good way to think about it because I feel like I do say this. I don't want people who read my book, or see my talk to think like, “Oh, I have to be like her, I have to learn all this stuff. I have to really dig into domestic violence works and what it means and laws.” I don't want people to feel like they have to do that because it's just such a dark, heartbreaking thing to have to think and read about every day and I don't think that's a realistic goal. But I think being a generalist with literacy is realistic augmented by specialist with fluency; I'm just like basically repeating what you just said. [chuckles] But that's just a really brilliant way to think about it. DAMIEN: That pattern actually really matches something that I learned from another Greater Than Code guest. I'm sorry, I can't remember their name right now. I believe we were talking about inclusivity and what they said was like, “It's not the expert's job to make the product, or the company inclusive. [chuckles] It's the expert job to support – it's everybody's job to make it inclusive. It's the expert's job to be an expert and to support them.” We also use again, a metaphor from security. We don't have security experts whose job it is to make your app secure, we have security experts whose job it is to support everybody in keeping your app secure. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: So I feel like that this matches really well. The job of the person with this expertise is to support, to educate, to guide not because they can't do all the work together all themselves, like Coraline said. There's just too many features being added for [laughs] for some team somewhere to go, “Oh no, this is fine,” or “That's not fine.” EVA: Yeah, totally, and I feel like that just brought up something for me, Damien, about the speed at which we work, too many features being added, not enough time to actually do this work, and how—this is getting at just way bigger critique of tech in general. DAMIEN: Yeah. EVA: But it's okay to slow down once in a while. I feel like just the urgency thing causes so many problems outside of just what we're talking about. But this is another big one that I feel like it's okay to spend an afternoon thinking through what are the ways this is going to be not inclusive, or unsafe and that's totally fine. But I fall into it, too where I'm like, “I want to deliver things quickly for my client,” or if I'm doing so internal for a flight, I want to get done quickly. I don't want to hold people up. So it is a really hard thing to break out of. CORALINE: It seems to me, Eva, that this kind of knowledge, or this kind of literacy, or this kind of making it part of the process can fall solely on engineers. Because in a lot of places, we have of product managers who are setting deadlines for us. How do you communicate to them why this work is so important when they may only see it as like, “Well, you're getting in the way of us hitting a release date and we have a press release ready,” or “We want our debut this feature at a particular time, or place”? MANDY: And now we want to take a quick time out to recognize one of our sponsors: Kaspersky Labs: Rarely does a day pass where a ransomware attack, data breach, or state sponsored espionage hits the news. It's hard to keep up, or know if you're protected. Don't worry, Kaspersky's got you covered. Each week, their team discusses the latest news and trends that you may have missed during the week on the Transatlantic Cable Podcast mixing in humor, facts and experts from around the world. The Transatlantic Cable Podcast can be found on Apple Podcasts & Spotify, go check it out! EVA: Yeah, totally. So I think ideally, this comes from everyone. My book is called Design for Safety, but I really hope that people are reading it, who are also engineers and who are also project managers—basically anyone who has a say in how the product is actually going to function, I think should be doing this work. But specifically, if you have a project manager who is rushing everyone and saying, “We don't have time for this,” I do have a couple different strategies in my book about this, where it's like we can use statistics to talk about that this is a thing that is impacting a lot of our users. It's 1 in 3 women, 1 and 4 men in the US have experienced severe physical, domestic violence and that's just severe physical, domestic violence. There's so much domestic violence that doesn't have a physical component to it so that could be like a third of our user base. So bringing stuff up like that to try to get some buy-in, but then also my process, I have little time estimate. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: So saying like, “We want to do research; it's going to be 6 hours.” “We want to do a brainstorm; it's going to be 2 hours.” Giving people very specific things that they can say yes to is always going to be better than just an open-ended, “We want to design for safety.” CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And someone being like, “I don't know what that means, but we have a deadline.” Saying like, “We're going to do a brainstorm to identify ways that our product will be used for harm. We want to do it next week and we want to spend 4 hours on it” is going to be a lot better. DAMIEN: And I want to call out how important and useful the language you use there was you said because when you find something, when you do that brainstorm, or whatever analysis process, you go like, “Oh, here's the way our products will be used for harm.” Because if you say to a product manager, “Here's a way our product might be used for harm,” they go, “Well, okay.” [laughs] “Might not be.” [laughs] If you say, “Here's a way our product will be used for harm.” Well, now that leaves a lot less of wiggle room. EVA: Hmm, yeah. That's a really good point that I actually hadn't thought about. I think the other thing is there's tangible outcomes from something like that brainstorm, or these different activities that I have outlined. You can actually show the person, like, “Here's what we did. Here's what we came up with,” which isn't necessarily – I wish we didn't have to always do that; always have some type of very explicit outcome from everything we do. But I do think that's a reality that we have that this process kind of helps with. CORALINE: I want to go back to the user thing. Again, one of the things that we're thinking about our ethical source is thinking beyond the user and thinking about not just who is using the technology that we're creating, but the people that the technology we're creating is being used on. EVA: Yes. That's such a good point. I'm actually curious, have you come up with a term for that type of user? Like nonuser? CORALINE: I have not yet, but that's a great call out. Language is so important so, yeah. EVA: Yeah. I don't know that it exists and I've seen nonuser, but I don't know that that's agreed upon. DAMIEN: I've gotten as far, the best I've come up with is constituency. CORALINE: That is very interesting, Damien because one of the things we're developing is a governance tool. The W3C, when they were working on the HTML standard—this was a couple of years ago, I think—they mentioned something called a priority of constituent and this was very much from a standards body perspective, but it was one sentence and I think it is such a powerful sentence. Just for their example, they said, “In times of conflict, we prioritize end users over developers, over browser manufacturers, over spec writers, over technical purity.” [laughter] EVA: Wow. CORALINE: That's one sentence, but writing that down, I think can really help cut through a lot of a lot of the noise and a lot of the gray area maybe that's the most encountered. It's so simple and you can do it in a single sentence. So absolutely, the notion of constituencies and being explicit about whose safety, convenience, or what have you you're optimizing for. EVA: Yeah. That's really important and I have two thoughts. One is that this comes up a lot in the surveillance space where it's like, what sort of rights, or priority should we be giving someone who is walking on the sidewalk in front of a house that has a Ring camera that's facing out to capture the porch, but is ultimately capturing the sidewalk in the street? What are the rights of that person, that nonuser, who has not agreed to be filmed and isn't part of this product's ecosystem, but is still being impacted by it? It's something I think about a lot, especially there's so many in my neighborhood I see. Since I wrote the book, I see the Ring cameras everywhere, including in places where they're not really to be like on the outside of someone's gate, just facing the sidewalk. It's like, you're not even recording your own property at that point. It's just the gate, or it's just the sidewalk, I mean, which I feel is very problematic. You also said that it's important to explicitly call out who you're prioritizing and that's something – I read this book called Design Justice by Sasha Costanza-Chock, which was very lifechanging and it's just such a good book. It's a little more theoretical. She explicitly says it's not a guide, but she talks about this, about how it's really important to, if you are going to choose not to be inclusive, or safe, or justice focused, whatever it is, you need to explicitly say, “We are choosing to prioritize the comfort of this group over the safety of this group. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Or whatever it is. Like, you need to actually just spell that out and be upfront about it. DAMIEN: Yeah. It reminds me of, I think I learned this from Marla Compton. Although, I don't know if she originated it. I guess, she probably didn't, but the phrase she taught me was, “We prioritize the safety of marginalized people over the comfort of non-marginalized people.” It's such a powerful statement. CORALINE: It really is. DAMIEN: Yeah, and just making that explicit like, “These are the tradeoffs and these are where we side on them.” CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah. Oh, yeah. That's such a good one. I did this workshop recently, it's called How Traditional Design Thinking Protects White Supremacy, but they talked a lot about how feeling entitled to comfort is just such a white supremacist thing and I feel shows up in different forms of oppression as well like men's comfort, et cetera. But that's something I've been thinking about a lot is the feeling of a right to comfort and how that also includes a right to not have to have any type of conflict and a fear of conflict. How these things all play together and how it's all part of white supremacy and how it shows up in our culture, in our workplaces. It was a great workshop. I would highly recommend it because it's also been a lifechanging thing as I digest all of the different things from it. DAMIEN: It's so powerful to name that as comfort. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: Like, this is what we're protecting. We're protecting these people's comfort [chuckles] and this is what it will cost. CORALINE: I think about what Kim Crayton said for a year is, “Get comfortable with being uncomfortable.” EVA: Yeah, that's such a good one. I love her. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: I quoted her in my book about, oh, I forget what it is. It's something about not having strategy is chaos. CORALINE: Oh my God. EVA: Like, the need for strategy. CORALINE: I learned so much from her from that one statement. That was literally lifechanging for me. That was literally lifechanging for me because I always had a negative feeling about strategy, like strategy is coercive, or insincere. And then another friend of mine I was talking to about it said strategy is good when it's not a zero-sum game. EVA: Mm. CORALINE: I think we maybe we can think about personal safety and abuse factors in that way. EVA: Yeah, definitely. I think the full quote is “Intention without strategy is chaos.” CORALINE: Yeah, that. EVA: That has been very definitely influential for me and as I feel like a big part of the reason, that idea is why I wrote my book and did my conference talk is because I was feeling frustrated with – it's a lot easier to raise awareness about an issue than it is to have actual strategies for fixing it. I felt like I would always get really fired up reading something, or listening to a talk and be like, “Yeah, this is such a huge problem. We need to fix it,” and then didn't have a takeaway, or anything that I could really do at work other than just being told to think about this, or consider this, which I'm like, “When do I do that?” CORALINE: And what does that look like? EVA: Yeah, you can't think about all of the different things we need to think about from 9:00 to 5:00 while we're at work every day. We need a strategy to do that, which is why I like made these different activities that I have in my process. But going back to this white supremacy and design workshop that I did, I also learned in there about how some other ways that white supremacy shows up is having an action bias and a sense of urgency. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: And how a lot of that can come from people, especially white people, not being able to like sit with discomfort when we're faced with really uncomfortable topics and a desire to jump into action before we fully understand the problem and have internalized it. So now I'm feeling like I need to backtrack a little bit and be like, “Yes, provide action.” But also, it is good to do deep learning. I think we need both, but I feel like a lot of people, it's one, or the other. Let's do a ton of learning, or let's jump right into action. I have always been a jump right into action person and now I'm realizing it's okay to take a beat and do some deep learning and to sit with all the discomfort of the heavy topic. CORALINE: A friend of mine gave me a concept that I like a lot. He has a definition of ergonomics that is the marriage of design and ethics. When I use the term ergonomics in that sense, what I mean is how easy is it to do a particular action. One of the things that I see quite a bit—something, I think is a terrible consequence of the web, frankly—is putting ergonomics behind paywalls and asking people who use our software to yield some degree of agency, or digital autonomy, or security in exchange for features. EVA: Hmm. So interesting. CORALINE: So I'm curious maybe how you would frame designing for safety, some of the other axes of oppression that we discussed on the show today, from the perspective of the ethical aspect of our design decisions. What workflows are we optimizing for? What workflows are we putting behind a paywall, or in exchange for okay, you're signing up. The [inaudible] says you're buying into surveillance capitalism and you just simply have to do that if you want an email account, if you want a Twitter account, what have you. EVA: Yeah. I do feel like there is a bit of an issue with putting safety and security sometimes behind a paywall where you can literally pay more to not get advertised to, for example. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which it's like, I get that products have to charge money and it's like we shouldn't – the flipside of that is well, we can't just work for free. I see that a lot with journalism when people are criticizing paywalls and it's like well, but journalists have to get paid. They can't work for free just like everyone else. But I do feel that with things like being able to opt out of advertising and I feel like there are other things. Nothing's coming in right now, but different ways that you can ease some of the crappier parts of tech, if you have enough money, to buy into the paid versions of things is definitely problematic. Who are we keeping out when we do that and who are we saying doesn't deserve this privacy and the safety? What should just be standard? The seatbelt; I'm obsessed with the history of the seatbelts. CORALINE: [chuckles] I still have the [inaudible] that's been going around. EVA: Yeah. CORALINE: It's amazing. EVA: I've talked about this in many different places, but the seatbelt used to be something that you had to pay extra for. In today's dollars, it would've been like 300 extra dollars when you bought a car to get seat belts and only 2% of the people, in 1956 when they were introduced, actually paid for them and probably even less were actually using them. And then there was a revolution in the auto industry led by activists and everyday people. It definitely not come from the auto industry; they had to be forced into these different things. But now seat belts, the government basically, they passed a law and they said, “You have to just include seat belts as a standard feature.” I think about that a lot in tech. The things now that we're making people pay for, should some of those just be standard features and how are we going to get there? Probably government regulation after a lot of activism and everyday people rallying against these different things with big tech. But I think we're going to get there with a lot of things and we're going to see a lot of seatbelts, so to speak, become just standard features and not something you have to pay for. CORALINE: And I wonder, you mentioned government regulation; I have literally zero faith in government doing anything effective in the online world at all because our government is powered by 65-year-old white men that are rich and there's no incentive for them to care about this even if they did have the basic literacy about how this stuff works. It seems to me one of the things that we've been seeing really emphasize is, especially during in post lockdown, is worker organizing and I wonder if there's a strategy here for empowering the engineers, who frankly, we are being treated rockstars right now. I hate that term rockstar, but we're overpaid, we're pampered—a lot of folks, obviously, not everyone. So can we leverage our power? Can we leverage the privilege of being in such an in-demand profession to affect change in organizations that have no financial incentive to think about stuff like this at all? EVA: Yeah. So many things I want to respond to. Definitely, I think worker power is like such a strong point in all of this and I feel like we are the ones leading out on this. A lot of it is coming from people who work in tech and understand the issues. Like, writing, speaking, and doing these different things to help everyday people who don't work in tech understand like, “Hey, actually, here's why Facebook is really terrible.” A lot of that is coming from people in tech, even former Facebook employees even. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Which is different, I think from the paradigm shift we had with the auto industry. I don't know, I would have to look, but I'm pretty sure is not coming from car designers and engineers weren't helping lead that charge the way that we are. But I also want to respond to something you said about tech workers being overpaid and pampered, which yes, I agree with you. But I also think there are privileges that everyone should have and that no one should of and I feel like everyone deserves to be well paid, to be comfortable and have all these perks, and whatnot. I had a career in nonprofit before this so I have so much internalized just baggage about and guilt around feeling with my pay, my benefits, and all these things. The work I do now, compared to the work I was doing in the nonprofit, which was helping kids who were basically on a road to dropping out before graduating high school, which was really important work and I made so much less money and worked so much harder. But I feel like everyone deserves to be as well paid as we are and it is possible. CORALINE: Yes. EVA: So I just wanted to kind of throw that out there as well that we – [chuckles] I feel like I'm trying to just absolve myself from being a well-paid tech worker. But I do think we deserve this and also, everyone else deserves similar treatment. CORALINE: Absolutely. DAMIEN: Yeah. I feel the same way, especially—to take an example within a tech company—as an engineer, I get paid a lot more than customer service people. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: And that doesn't mean I'm overpaid, [chuckles] it means they're underpaid. CORALINE: Yeah. DAMIEN: A lot. [laughs] CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah, and I feel like this whole conversation, honestly, this is a freaking tactic. This is what the people at the top, this is how they want us to feel; pitting us against each other, feeling like it's not that – the sales people, that's normal and we're overpaid. It's like, no, actually we're paid a livable amount where we can live comfortably and they're exploited even more than we are. That's how I'm trying to think about things because I do feel like this other way of looking at it is just absolutely a tactic of, I don't know, the 1%, whatever you want to call them. The company leaders definitely don't want us to feel like we're – they would rather us feel that we're overpaid and pampered than just compensated for the labor we do in a fair way, MANDY: Have us feel the shame and guilt around it, too. Before I was in tech, I went from welfare to making a reasonable standard of living in a year and sometimes, I still feel guilty about it. It's a heck of a feeling. EVA: Yeah, and I feel like that didn't just come out of nowhere. We've been taught that we should feel guilty for just surviving. I don't know. Because I think even in tech, it's a lot of people there's still so many issues with burnout, with—I don't know about you all, my body sometimes just hurts from not moving enough during – like, there's still all these like different things that could be better. But the feeling that we should feel guilty for having some comfort and decent pay, I think that's definitely a strategy that has come from these different powerful groups. It didn't just come out of nowhere. CORALINE: I appreciate y'all pushing back on that. I guess, I'm speaking from an emotional place. Eva, you went from nonprofit and the tech. In April, I went from tech and the nonprofit and personally, I took a 30% pay cut and – [overtalk] EVA: Oh, wow. CORALINE: It just really made very visible and very personal seeing what we value as a society and what we don't value as a society. I'm still comfortable; I still have a living wage and everything. But look at what happened during the lockdown with “frontline workers.' They're heroes, but we don't want to pay them more than minimum wage. So I definitely agree with what you're saying about other people being underpaid and I definitely hear what you're saying about that guilt, but guilt is a form of discomfort. What are you going to do with that? What are you going to do with the privileges and the power that we have as a result of the way we're treated in this industry? I feel like that's the more important thing and what do you do with it? Are you giving back? Are you giving back in a substantive way, or are you giving back to assuage your guilt? It's nuanced. As y'all are pointing out, it is nuanced. EVA: Yeah. It's very complicated, but I feel like agitating for those—sorry, Damien, I think you said support people—getting paid more, that's something we can agitate for. I know someone, I'll call her an online friend of mine in the infertility space, which I'm very involved in as I go through my journey. I hate that word, but I've made all these online friends who are going through it and one of them is a paralegal and she is obviously hoping, although it's not going well, to get pregnant. But she was looking into the parental benefits and realized that the lawyers where she works had, I think it's 18 weeks fully paid off and then everyone else got this weird piecemeal of 6 weeks paid off, then there's FMLA, and then there's PTO, and all this stuff that amounted to a lot less, and you had to like use all of your PTO and all these different things. She actually was able to—with some of the lawyers help, I believe—get that policy change that it was just the same for everyone because it was like, “I didn't go to law school. So therefore, I don't need as much time with my newborn? How does that make sense?” CORALINE: [chuckles] Yeah. EVA: So I feel there is a lot of potential to have more equality in our companies, especially as the most powerful people often in the companies, to push for that change to happen. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: There needs to be a lot of solidarity, I think, between these different types of workers. CORALINE: Yeah, and that's a great example of that. MANDY: Well, this has been an absolutely fantastic conversation and I feel so privileged just to be sitting here kicking back and just taking in the back and forth between the rest of you. I wrote down a bunch of a things, but one of the biggest takeaways that I have had from this episode, and especially if you've been listening to the show the past couple episodes, we've been talking about a lot of accessibility things. Eva, you said something that was mind-blowing for me and it shouldn't be mind-blowing, but it was because I was like, didn't even ever think of that and what the hell is wrong with me for not even ever thinking about that? but inclusive and accessible includes people experiencing domestic abuse. It's not something – I guess, because as what you said, people don't talk about it. So just keeping that in mind was pretty pertinent to me. I also liked what Coraline said about specialization and then the general knowledge and literacy versus fluency. That was really good as well. So it's been an awesome conversation. Thank you. Damien, what do you have? DAMIEN: Oh, well, this has been really awesome and I want to of first thank Eva for being our guest here and for the work you do and this book. The thing that's going to be sticking with me, I'll be reflecting on for a while, is this sentence both well, if the product can be used for harm, it will be, which is not only a really powerful thing to keep in mind when designing and building a thing, but also, a powerful sentence that is really useful in communicating these issues. So thank you very much for that. CORALINE: One of the things that and actually Eva, this was a reaction I had when I first read your book is, I think a lot of us, a growing number of us, have at least an awareness, if not a personal experience, with how systems are weaponized against marginalized, or vulnerable folks. So I think it's really important that in your book, you focus very specifically on a particular domain of abuse, abuse of power and loss of agency and loss of privacy, loss of physical safety. One of the things I've been thinking about a lot is how the internet has been really good for connecting people with shared experiences and creating communities around the shared experiences. But I do worry that we're breaking into smaller and smaller and smaller groups and I see that. I don't know if it's intentional, but it certainly is a way, I think that we're propping up, that we're being coerced into propping up these systems by taking a narrow view based on our own experiences. I don't see that as a criticism. What I see it as is an opportunity to connect with other folks who experience that same kind of systemic damage in collaborating and trying to understand the different challenges that we all face. But recognizing that a lot of it is based frankly, white supremacy. We used to talk about patriarchy; I think the thinking broadly has evolved beyond that. But I would love to see your publisher start putting books together on different particular axes, but also, looking at ways that we can bridge the differences between these different experiences of intentional, or unintentional harm. So that's something that I think I'm going to think about. EVA: Nice. I can't give any spoilers, but I do think my publisher might have something in the works that it's getting at some of this stuff. Wonderful. EVA: Which is exciting. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: Yeah, okay. Man, those are all so good. My reflection, I'm just thinking a lot about our conversation about the way that people in tech might feel like we're overpaid, or pampered and how that feels like an intentional thing that has come from somewhere and things like that don't just – it always comes from somewhere. I'm thinking Mandy, about what you said in your reflection. You said, “What's wrong with me for not thinking about this?” I always feel like when I hear people say things like that, it's like well, when were you – I think more who didn't teach you about this? Why wasn't this part of your education as you were learning to code and before you joined the industry? I feel like that's more where the blame lies than with individuals, but yeah. Something I was thinking about earlier today, before we started recording, is that this idea of user safety, that it's like our job to keep ourselves safe on tech and there's so many resources out there, different articles, and different things. I've been thinking similarly about that, but that's a marketing campaign. That's something that the leaders of big tech done to intentionally shift responsibility from themselves and onto the end user. We're expected to be legal experts, read these agreements, and understand every single thing about a product that no one uses every single feature, but we're expected to understand it. If we don't and something goes wrong, either interpersonal harm, what I do, or with like oh, someone guessed your password or whatever it was, it's your fault instead of it being the tech company's responsibility. I feel like that's another thing that I'm thinking like that didn't come from nowhere, that came from somewhere. CORALINE: Yeah. EVA: It feels like a very intentional strategy that big tech has used to blame us for when things go wrong. Not to say that we get to be absolved of everything, people have responsibilities and whatnot, but I feel like a lot of times it's like this comes from somewhere and I'm trying to think more about that kind of stuff. This conversation was really awesome for helping me process some of those and expand my thoughts a little bit more. So thank you all, this was just really awesome. DAMIEN: Thank you. Thank you for being here. MANDY: Thank you for coming. CORALINE: Yeah. So happy to talk to you, Eva. EVA: Yeah. You, too. MANDY: All right, everyone. Well, with that, we will wrap up and I will put a plug in for our Slack community. You can join us and Eva will get an invitation as well to come visit us in Slack and keep these conversations going. Our website to do that is patreon.com/greaterthancode. Patreon is a subscription-based thing that if you want to you can pledge to support the show. However, if you DM any one of us and you want to be let in and you cannot afford, or just simply don't want to, monetarily support, we will let you in for free. So just reach out to one of the panelists and we'll get you in there. So with that, I will say thank you again. Thank you, everybody and we'll see you next week! Special Guest: Eva PenzeyMoog.

SuperDataScience
SDS 509: Accelerating Start-up Growth with A.I. Specialists

SuperDataScience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 81:11


Parinaz Sobhani joins us to discuss the cutting-edge work of Georgian, a collaborative company that helps start-ups implement and scale machine learning and AI. In this episode you will learn: • Parinaz's work at Georgian [5:35] • Use cases of Georgian's work [14:35] • Tools and approaches Parinaz uses [32:27] • Environmental concerns of machine learning [42:52] • Hiring at Georgian and what Parinaz looks for [48:18] • How did Parinaz become interested in this? [56:19] • Fairness in AI [1:09:01] Additional materials: www.superdatascience.com/509

The Writers Room with Sam and Jim
Get Your Internal Drive off the Bench with Nate Patton

The Writers Room with Sam and Jim

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 47:30


Sam and Jim invite Nate into the room and together they work on his high school comedy, tentatively titled, "Specialists".Join us in the room for a discussion of creating deep characters that serve the story, writing kids in a way that feels true to adolescence, and creating strong internal drives. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @thesamandjimProducer: J.R. Zamora-ThalLogo Design: Julien Debar-Monclair, @jude.orangeMusic: Buddha Rays, @buddharays

The Turing Podcast
How to communicate science to non-specialists

The Turing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 42:12


We chat about all things science communication with two Turing colleagues: Ethics Research Fellow Mhairi Aitken and Science Writer James Lloyd. They discuss why we need science communicators in the first place, what makes for good communication, and what specific challenges are associated with communicating data science and AI research to the general public.

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Sin City (2005) / The Exorcist (1973) - #67 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 34)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 65:39


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time discussing a highly stylized graphic novel adaptation and one of the greatest horror movies of all time. Next up: #66 Akira (1988) and Edward Scissorhands (1990)

Future Of Health
Let's Finish Cancer: Childhood Cancer-Child Life Specialists, Nurses + Other Good Guys

Future Of Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 31:04


Play therapy is serious business for certified child life specialists, and they have an unlimited number of tools to help kids adjust to their new health needs. Along with nurses, they create a dynamic duo to support kids undergoing treatment for cancer and provide the right resources for the whole family.

Sliced Apples
Medical ”Specialists”

Sliced Apples

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 58:21


What prescribed drug abuse is flying under the radar? Why do people keep buying the same sports game every year? How does one make a tortilla-pancake? What are the hosts 2 underdog picks for this NFL weekend? Pull up a chair and join the conversation!

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast
Minnesota Vikings Podcast: Specialists Jordan Berry and Greg Joseph Join the Show + Vent Session From Week 1 and Looking Ahead to Cardinals | Episode 111

Minnesota Vikings - Wobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 54:46


On this edition of the Minnesota Vikings Podcast, vikings.com's Tatum Everett, Gabe Henderson. Chris Corso and producer Jay Nelson are joined by Vikings specialists Jordan Berry and Greg Joseph. The specialists talk about their journeys to Minnesota, the success of special teams in Week 1 and what to look ahead to in Week 2. The vikings.com crew has one final "Vent Session" following the loss to the Bengals and looks ahead to the Cardinals game.

Minnesota Vikings
Minnesota Vikings Podcast: Specialists Jordan Berry and Greg Joseph Join the Show + "Vent Session" From Week 1 and Looking Ahead to Cardinals | Episode 111

Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 54:49


On this edition of the Minnesota Vikings Podcast, vikings.com's Tatum Everett, Gabe Henderson. Chris Corso and producer Jay Nelson are joined by Vikings specialists Jordan Berry and Greg Joseph. The specialists talk about their journeys to Minnesota, the success of special teams in Week 1 and what to look ahead to in Week 2. The vikings.com crew has one final "Vent Session" following the loss to the Bengals and looks ahead to the Cardinals game.

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Hereditary (2018) / Jaws (1975) - #68 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 33)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 61:34


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time discussing two horror films, one very new and one very iconic! Next up: #67 Sin City (2005) and The Exorcist (1973). Sin City is replacing Pulp Fiction, which appears higher on Phil's list.

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
The Empire Strikes Back (1980) / Annie Hall (1977) - #69 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 32)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 69:03


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about one of the greatest sequels of all time and the movie that beat its predecessor for Best Picture! Next up: #68 Hereditary (2018) and Jaws (1975). 

Mountain Bike Radio
Trail EAffect - "Episode 38 - Mike Riter of Trail Design Specialists" (September 8, 2021 | #1400 | Host: Josh Blum)

Mountain Bike Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 74:44


September 8, 2021 Trail EAffect Show Page Rad Apparel Company 15% Discount Coupon Code: traileaffect Check out with the RAD Affiliate Link: https://radapparelcompany.com/r?id=53tsmc   ABOUT THE EPISODE Topics Covered in this Episode: The Mike Riter Back Story The 1996 Olympic Mountain Bike Course in Georgia The start of the IMBA Trail Care Crew in 1997 Traveling to Europe at the IMBA Trail Care Crew Difference between European Trails vs. Trails in North America Identifying the original Unicoi Turnpike Publishing IMBA's Guild to Building Sweet Single Track Integrating a quality shared use trail experience from a design and user perspective Directional Trails The Start of Trail Design Specialists (TDS / Two Dimensional Squirrels) The Creation of Trail Education / Trail Master Certification Class How Mike ended up teaching trail building in WI / The Midwest Side Story on how Mike Convinced the management at Kickapoo Valley Reserve in WI to allow Mountain Biking at this site Deep Dive into the Trail Master Certification Class The one Trail Feature that Mike teaches and continues to refine (Rolling Grade Dip) The evolution of Trail Building Closing Comments RELATED SHOW NOTES Trail Design Specialists: https://www.traildesign.com/ Original IMBA Trail Building Basics Booklet Written by Mike & Jan Riter: https://www.americantrails.org/images/documents/IMBA_Trailbuilding_Basics.pdf ORA Trails: www.oratrails.org Rad Apparel Company Discount Coupon Code for 15% off: traileaffect ------------- Trail EAffect Show Support Rad Apparel Company: https://radapparelcompany.com/r?id=53tsmc Smith's Bike Shop: https://smithsbikes.com/Evolution Trail Services: www.evotrails.comContact Josh at evolutiontrails@gmail.com If you have any questions about Mountain Bike Radio in general, please contact Ben at Ben@Mountainbikeradio.com -------- ABOUT TRAIL EAFFECT Trails build community and Communities build trails. What came first you may ask… Host Josh Blum digs into the stories of how trails effect and affect the people and places we call home and those we might like to call home. -------- ABOUT THE HOST Josh Blum is a father and doer of stuff - paired with Advocate, Builder of Trails and Community. Originally from La Crosse WI, Josh has been enjoying the outdoors, trails, and mountain bikes since a young age. Always curious and learning about better ways to improve trail users' experiences. Josh is employed by WisDOT, and is the owner / operator of Evolution Trail Services.

The Dean Blundell Show
527. Danko Jones vs Right Said Fred, Semen Retention Specialists, Theo Fleury Hate Vaccine Passports & A Wild Mike Bullard Appears

The Dean Blundell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 123:51


Danko Jones is back to cover his new album 'Power Trio' and his disdain for Right Said Fred and hilarious twitter war the left everyone blocked including Dean and dangerous anti-vaxxers. - Dean's new favorite politician is a 'Semen Retention Specialist' - Why Theo Fleury HATES science and vaccine passports A wild Mike Bullard appears to discuss Theo Fleury along with where he is at with his book  Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0QmW3GbWbA See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
ICU specialists "apprehensive" about very busy September and October

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 9:22


The New South Wales Government says cases could peak as early as next week, while intensive care demand won't reach its height until early to mid next month.

The Armor Men's Health Hour
Regret Your Vasectomy? Get Your No-Regrets Vasectomy Reversal at NAU Urology Specialists

The Armor Men's Health Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 10:47


Thanks for tuning in to the Armor Men's Health Hour Podcast today, where we bring you the latest and greatest in medical and urology care and the best urology humor out there.In this segment, Dr. Mistry and Donna Lee explain why some men choose to have vasectomy reversals and what that process looks like at NAU Urology Specialists. A number of factors can influence a couple to have a vasectomy reversed: change in financial situation, the heartbreaking circumstance of child loss, and/or remarriage are just a few reasons men and their partners may decide to become parents again. The success of vasectomy reversals often depends on the age of the original vasectomy. After 7-15 years there is a reduction in the likelihood of successful pregnancies resulting from a vasectomy reversal. At NAU Urology Specialists, our surgeons are incredibly experienced at these delicate procedures. Another factor to consider is the age of the partner hoping to conceive. In general, after age 34, a woman's chance of conceiving by way of her partner's vasectomy reversal declines. Luckily, the combination of sperm extraction and IVF can help older couples become parents again, too. If you or your partner are interested in learning more about these family planning options, or about fertility in general, please give us a call today!If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to like, subscribe, and share us with a friend! As always, be well!Check our our award winning podcast!https://blog.feedspot.com/sex_therapy_podcasts/https://blog.feedspot.com/mens_health_podcasts/Dr. Mistry is a board-certified urologist and has been treating patients in the Austin and Greater Williamson County area since he started his private practice in 2007.We enjoy hearing from you! Email us at armormenshealth@gmail.com and we'll answer your question in an upcoming episode!Phone: (512) 238-0762Email: Armormenshealth@gmail.comWebsite: Armormenshealth.comOur Locations:Round Rock Office970 Hester's Crossing RoadSuite 101Round Rock, TX 78681South Austin Office6501 South CongressSuite 1-103Austin, TX 78745Lakeline Office12505 Hymeadow DriveSuite 2CAustin, TX 78750Dripping Springs Office170 Benney Lane Suite 202Dripping Springs, TX 78620

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Moon (2009) / Y Tu Mama Tambien (2001) - #70 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 31)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 56:43


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about a hidden gem sci-fi flick and one of Alfonso Cuaron's first hits. Next up: #69 The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Annie Hall (1977). 

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Intensive care specialists under the pump

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 6:05


Intensive care workers are under pressure from the rising number of Covid-19 patients and the challenges in dealing with the virus. Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield says intensive care specialists are in high demand and short supply. College of Intensive Care Medicine spokesperson Andrew Stapleton.

Inside Pack Sports Live
IPS LIVE: 2021 Specialists Preview... Season Thoughts

Inside Pack Sports Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 80:34


Today on IPS Live we conclude our NC State football position previews with an in-depth look at the Wolfpack's specialists and share our overall thoughts entering the season!  What can we expect from Chris Dunn in his fourth season?  How about Trenton Gill at punter? What would be our “automatic win” for the Wolfpack in 2021?  James and Ethan answer those questions and much more!

Women in Electronics Radio
Melanie Pizzey "Leader in Highlight" Part 1

Women in Electronics Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 16:27


Tune in to this long awaited interview with Melanie Pizzey, VP Global Business Operations at TTI.  Melanie walks us through her career journey, fresh out of college to now, as she celebrates her 35 year work anniversary - while TTI celebrates their 50 year.  She talks about the strength of the organization being the foundational values laid by founder, Paul Andrews, and describes the challenges and profound loss experienced following Paul's passing. Melanie shares how  the team finds strength and confidence in the memory of Paul's encouraging, positive  spirit, a spirit that continues to live on through the current leadership team.  As the company forges ahead under Mike Morton, Melanie describes the TTI Family of Specialists's advantages in the market and how organizations need to pivot in order to succeed moving into the future. Support the show (http://www.womeninelectronics.com)

Pastor Deb & BDC
Paranoia vs The Praise of Truth

Pastor Deb & BDC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 11:16


Paranoia is described as a condition that is derived from the lack of knowledge of truth or one's resistance to the truth.The symptoms of paranoia are distrust, difficulty with forgiveness, defensive attitude, imagined criticism, preoccupation with hidden motives, fear of being deceived, inability to relax, argumentation. delusions of persecution, unwarranted jealousy, an exaggerated sense of self-importance, addictive tendencies, and a loss of touch with reality.As I read the symptoms of paranoia, I couldn't help but deal with the evident truth. We live in a world where either the lack of truth or the resistance to truth has shaped us into a culture of people who dwell in a state of paranoia.Specialists say one of the most effective ways to deal with paranoia is through cognitive behavioral therapy which aims to help one identify and challenge thoughts that are unproductive and false. In other words, face lies and deceptions head-on and exalt truth.  Simply put, what the scripture tells us about the renewing of our minds is the cure for a paranoid culture of people. Now John 14:6 Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. So let's put all of this into perspective, paranoia is derived from the lack of knowledge of truth or one's resistance to the truth.  It is evident from the symptoms that the culture in which we live is suffering from paranoia. And the experts who have studied this disease of the mind say that the best way to treat this disease is to…. in simple terms face lies and deceptions head-on and exalt truth.

PT Inquest
Extrasode Feedback Calibration Specialists

PT Inquest

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 10:31


In this Extrasode, Erik reads his post Feedback Calibration Specialists. Learn more about/Buy Erik's courses! Support us on the Patreons! Intro music for PT Inquest Extrasode is Take a Chance by Kevin MacLeod – incompetech.com

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
The Two Towers (2002) / Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) - #71 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 30)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 69:17


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about one of the best second installments of a trilogy ever, and a Coen Brothers movie that doesn't get the love it deserves. Next up: #70 Moon (2009) and Y Tu Mama Tambien (2001). Moon replaces Alien, which appears higher on Phil's list.

MUNDO EXPO
E075 Eduardo Chaillo - Global Meetings and Tourism Specialists

MUNDO EXPO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 61:36


Ya tenemos Newsletter de MUNDO EXPO, ingresa aquí para que te puedas registrar y recibirlo: https://mundoexpo.substack.com/ . Recuerda también que te podemos apoyar en ZEGA para el diseño e instalación de stand para tu exposición. Ingresa aquí para contactarnos, y haz de tu evento todo un éxito: https://www.zega.com.mx/ . El día de hoy te presento la plática que tuve con una persona que ha sido actor fundamental para la promoción de México ante el mundo especialmente en la industria del turismo de reuniones. Me refiero a Eduardo Chaillo, fundador y director de Global Meetings and Tourism Specialists. Platicamos sobre la importancia del turismo de reuniones para el desarrollo de México y Latinoamérica, así como la relevancia que tiene para el desarrollo de las regiones donde esta actividad se lleva a cabo. Puedes visitar su página web en http://www.gmtspec.com/ , su Twitter : https://twitter.com/echaillo , LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eduardo-chaillo-cmp-cmm-case-des-citp-b1aa67/ . A nosotros nos puedes contactar en nuestra página web: http://mundoexpo.mx/ , también en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SomosMundoExpo/ , en Instagram como @somosmundoexpo y en LinkedIn como: www.linkedin.com/company/somosmundoexpo , y puedes enviarnos un correo a: hola@mundoexpo.mx . Suscríbete al Newsletter de Mundo Expo aquí: https://mundoexpo.substack.com/ , y programa el diseño e instalación de tu stand aquí: https://www.zega.com.mx/

The John Clay Podcast
Kentucky football's tight ends and specialists

The John Clay Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 39:50


In the fifth installment of a Kentucky football position-by-position series, UK beat writer Josh Moore and sports columnist John Clay of the Lexington Herald-Leader break down the tight ends and specialists. Previously, Josh and John discussed the Wildcats' quarterbacks, running backs, wide receivers and secondary. For more UK athletics coverage visit www.kentucky.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Heart of a Dog (1988) / The World's End (2013) - #72 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 29)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 63:25


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about the least popular film in a very popular "trilogy" and a Russian movie that only John would find. Next up: #71 The Two Towers (2002) and Inside Llewyn Davis (2013).

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
SOB: The Expert Incentive, or ‘God Save the King of Kong'

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 12:37


On today's episode of Speaking of Bitcoin, correspondent George Frankly explores the expertise paradox through the lens of two very different historical figures.TRANSCRIPTHello there- I'm George Frankly and I'm going to take a look at how even the best and brightest people can make truly stupid decisions and terrible predictions- and what we can learn from them. This is Dare to be Stupid.This time on Dare to be Stupid, “The Expert Incentive,” or “God Save the King of Kong.”I'm not looking forward to this. I loathe misinformation. I loathe innumeracy. And before anybody asks what the word innumeracy means let me say I also loathe illiteracy. The world needs experts and experienced professionals in positions of power, now more than ever- I firmly believe that.So it honestly sucks that I've decided to sit here today and tell you that expertise is dangerous. Experts are a complicated concept, and despite agreeing on the broad strokes of the word we all have granular disagreements in what being an “expert” actually means. I want to get into the nitty-gritty of where expertise goes right and wrong by talking about two sides of the same coin- two closely-intertwined experts in their respective fields: 18th century Hungarian scientist and medical physician Ignaz Semmelweis, and 20th century professional Donkey Kong player and Hot Sauce Entrepreneur Billy J. Mitchell. I absolutely cannot tell the story of one without the other.As a dedicated fan of both men, it's hard to know where to begin. Semmelweis was an expert that pioneered the earliest concepts of germ theory, and Mitchell is an expert that cheats at the 1981 arcade game Donkey Kong for money.The key difference is that Semmelweis's fellow experts insisted he was a fraud, and Mitchell's contemporaries insisted for years that he wasn't.Ignaz Semmelweis studied law, science, and medicine at the University of Vienna and made his mark on history working at the obstetrics clinic in Vienna General Hospital. There, he was frustrated by the high rates of maternal mortality in the clinic. The death of mothers by post-childbirth fever was uncomfortably common, and he wanted answers. Infection and germ theory were not yet understood concepts, so all he had was deductive reasoning and experimental design- that thing your middle school teachers called “the scientific method.”The immediate observation that spurred him forward was the most confusing one. The mortality rate for new mothers was as high as 15% in the practicing doctors' ward… but in the next ward over, which was staffed by traditional midwives instead of university-educated doctors… the average mortality rate was under 5%. The rate of contracting fatal childbed fever was three times higher in the clinic run by the elite doctors than in the clinic run by the supposedly-unprofessional midwives. He was certain that if he could isolate the cause of the lower rates, he could adapt it into the other clinic and save lives. I'll give you a hint: he was right. But we'll get to that.Billy Mitchell is an icon. An icon of what varies from person to person, but he is nonetheless iconic. For over 25 years he's rarely been seen without a sharp suit, loud American flag necktie, and a magnificently coiffed, flowing mane of hair. He was one of the earliest faces of video game world records- a massive hobbyist sport of competing for the fastest times and highest scores in arcade and home video games.Mitchell rose to fame with his record of the world's first perfect Pac-Man score in 1999 and further for his world record high score in Donkey Kong. The 2007 documentary The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters chronicled his dramatic victory and cemented his public image as a fierce competitor… and a bit of a cinematic villain. His personal ties to the company that officiated and validated the scores allowed him to skirt a lot of the scrutiny that other competitors faced. Whereas most world records had to be achieved in a public exhibition on inspected hardware… Mitchell was able to turn in a fuzzy VHS tape of his record Donkey Kong run at home and had it accepted on the spot. The suspicion soon boiled over, and by 2018 multiple detailed technical analyses found that Billy Mitchell… had cheated.170 years previously, Dr. Semmelweis had catalogued several differences and tested their correlations over many long months. Midwives delivered with women on their sides- he had doctors move women to their sides. No effect. Patients in the doctors' ward were regularly visited by Priests with loud bell-ringing attendants. He had them ditch the bells. No effect. But then, inspiration struck. One of his coworkers died. Wait, that sounds terrible. No wait, it is terrible. But, grim or not, it gave him a lead: a fellow research doctor had accidentally lacerated his own hand while performing an autopsy, and succumbed to rising temperature and death identical to the stages of childbed fever. The link to the autopsy was a bit circumstantial, but Semmelweis noted that nearly all of the Doctors in his ward did routine autopsy research- the midwives never handled cadavers. He had a frankly absurd theory. He suspected there were “fine cadaverous particles” (in his words) being transmitted to vulnerable women and causing the illness. Midwives were rarely exposed to corpses and routinely rinsed their hands with hot water and soap, so he adopted a similar process: doctors in his ward would regularly rinse their hands and tools in a chlorinated lime solution- weak bleach, essentially. He guessed- very luckily- that the chlorine solution's ability to cleanse strong odors meant it might remove his mystery particles. He had discovered germs and then disinfectants- long before either could be fully explained.The maternal mortality rate in his ward eventually dropped under 2%- and at a few points even went entire months with no deaths. He brought his method to his next hospital posting, where rates dropped from 10% to less than 1%. He soon wrote a paper about his findings and began to distribute it across the region. It was widely and aggressively rejected. Semmelweis's core thesis of “please wash your goddamn hands” went against all of the expert consensus. His insinuation that it was Doctors- academics and experts every one of them- Doctors that were spreading childbed fever was considered insulting, hostile, and an affront to their authority. His hand-washing solution was seen as little more than magical thinking without scientific merit, and the medical establishment shunned him. He eventually died in a mental institution of complications from a hand injury- the exact same fever he had railed against. It wasn't until decades later that he would be vindicated by Louis Pasteur's seminal work on germ theory, and the history books have proven kinder to him than… well, kinder than history itself was.In the 21st century, Billy Mitchell faced the opposite problem. A small but vocal group of analysts and programming experts had found ultra-fine discrepancies in his world record video. At first, coding experts found that Mitchell's luck was supernaturally high- the random elements of the game were suspiciously generous during the recording. Soon they found that split-second variations in how the ladders and girders of Donkey Kong's stages loaded onscreen didn't match the display of real arcade hardware; in fact it perfectly matched the behavior of PC emulator software. Mitchell had essentially pulled off his miracle run on a home computer simulation of the game, with access to limitless modifications and instant do-overs. But Billy Mitchell was unbowed. The highly-technical evidence struck many as unconvincing. More than that, Mitchell and his fans touted a bigger point: he wouldn't need to cheat. Billy Mitchell had numerous public performances of extremely good Donkey Kong runs. He knew all the ins and outs of the game. Billy Mitchell was, indisputably, an expert at the game of Donkey Kong. Why would an expert bother to cheat?Ignaz Semmelweis was called a fraud because he defied the experts. Billy Mitchell was called the real deal because he was an expert. By most definitions, all these experts are experts. Why did expertise choose the wrong side of history both times?That's easy. They're all people. And being an expert doesn't cure you of common reasoning errors- in fact, it can teach you all-new ones.The doctors weren't just guided by simple egotism, although that was definitely a factor. No, they fell into something that sociologists have begun to call “the expertise paradox.” Specialists in a field- including the very best in their fields- inevitably develop tunnel vision. Hyper-specialization in a field or an industry begins to close them off to outside knowledge. To a man with a hammer, every problem is a nail: to a man with a prestigious medical degree in 1830, microbiology looks like magical bullshit. Innovation rarely grows from within a rigid institution, much less its tenured experts: hell, Donkey Kong, a groundbreaking arcade game that revitalized and revolutionized video games, didn't come from the established pioneers at Atari. It was made by upstart toy company Nintendo, and wasn't even designed by a professional coder- it was created by Shigeru Miyamoto, an aspiring cartoonist. In all trades, in all workplaces, and at every age, cross-training and cross-disciplinary learning is vital. The best discoveries come from those who are hungry to learn, not those who sit soaking in what they have learned.Hunger to learn versus hunger to be learned can be seen in every technical field- if you went to college for a specialized subject you've seen it. There are the masters who can recite every equation, muscle group, and atomic mass- the rote learners. And then there are the masters who dig into comprehension and mechanisms- the ones that can derive the equations, visualize the function of each muscle group, and see how the atomic weight informs the material properties. Expert decision-making can easily degenerate into fast-thinking repetition from muscle memory. The chess master Herbert Simon criticized the glorification of expert intuition when he said: QUOTE “The situation has provided a cue; this cue has given the expert access to information stored in memory, and the information provides the answer. Intuition is nothing more and nothing less than recognition.” END QUOTESemmelweis wanted more than memorizing and reciting answers: he wanted to understand. He experimented and extrapolated and went wherever it took him. At the end of the day he was a scientist first and a doctor second- and many of his colleagues were barely doctors at all.So what of Billy Mitchell's grand defense? Why would an expert cheat?Because experts are the most effective cheaters. In any competitive arena, the most successful cheats and cons are inevitably done by the ones that best know the craft. Gaming speed-runner and historian Karl Jobst put it best;QUOTE “You might think that having the talent to achieve a world record would make someone less susceptible to cheating, but it often works against them.” “They feel like they deserve the world record, and when the game they play doesn't give them the luck they need, they become increasingly frustrated. On top of this, having talent and deep knowledge of a game makes you a better cheater. You know what tools to use and how to hide your edits. You understand what does or doesn't make sense, what is or isn't possible, and what's believable. When top players cheat, it's almost always detected by other top players looking much deeper than a normal spectator might.”“The fact that better players make better cheaters means that arguments such as ‘he's such a good player, he has no reason to cheat' are fundamentally flawed.” END QUOTEThe incentive to prove and protect your expertise can undermine it in an instant. Billy Mitchell was routinely within spitting distance of the world record, so he employed his expertise to just take it. The fact that he could have theoretically done it for real was all the justification he needed. Semmelweis' peers worked too hard to get where they were to let an upstart with wild ideas make them feel inferior. They were doctors- to think they were making people ill was an insult to their entire identities. Experts are hugely important- vital, even, to all of society. But their self-perception and public perception can lead them down dangerous paths: experts are not inherently geniuses, and, like any human being, they are not perfect or infallible. The best experts are constantly looking to expand their understanding, and the worst are constantly trying to prove their worth. Both kinds will make mistakes, but only the former will admit to them and learn from them. Every human being has a range of their own expertise and must govern themselves similarly: respect the limits of your own knowledge, be grateful to those who can fill in the gaps, and don't put anyone on a pedestal… especially yourself.Thanks for listening. As usual I'd like to remind you that all of my illustrious job titles come with the prefix “armchair”; if you're an expert, and you're hearing me get it wrong, I'd like to hear from you.-This episode was written, performed and edited by George Frankly with additional production support by Adam B. Levine. Our theme song comes courtesy of Jared Rubens and this episodes album art features a photograph provided by Kelly Sikkema/Unsplash, modified by Speaking of Bitcoin. Have any questions or comments? Send Adam an email at adam@speakingofbitcoin.showSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos
Renal Cell Carcinoma | Proceedings from a live event held in partnership with Project ECHO® and Florida Cancer Specialists

Research To Practice | Oncology Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 50:43


Featuring perspectives from Drs Mamta Choksi and Chung-Han Lee, including the following topics: Introduction (0:00) Case: A man in his early 60s with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with ipilimumab/nivolumab (2:38) Case: A man in his late 60s with metastatic RCC and high-risk oncolytic features who responded to ipilimumab/nivolumab (28:39) Case: A man in his mid-60s with Stage III RCC (42:54) CME information and select publications

Today's RDH Dental Hygiene Podcast
Audio Article: Dental Hygienists and Specialists - Collaboration Leads to Better Patient Health Outcomes

Today's RDH Dental Hygiene Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 8:03


Dental Hygienists and Specialists: Collaboration Leads to Better Patient Health Outcomes By Charo Earle, RDH, BS, MSA Original article published on Today's RDH: https://www.todaysrdh.com/dental-hygienists-and-specialists-collaboration-leads-to-better-patient-health-outcomes/ This audio article is sponsored by Philips Oral Healthcare. Be sure to check out their in-office trial program where your patients can try out a Sonicare power toothbrush risk-free in your office. Learn more by calling (800) 422-9448 or visit https://www.philipsoralhealthcare.com/ Need CE? Start earning CE credits today at https://rdh.tv/ce Get daily dental hygiene articles at https://www.todaysrdh.com Follow Today's RDH on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TodaysRDH/ Follow Kara RDH on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DentalHygieneKaraRDH/ Follow Kara RDH on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kara_rdh/

Peaceful Heart FarmCast
A Cancer Diagnosis

Peaceful Heart FarmCast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 13:17


A cancer diagnosis is causing temporary changes to the podcast. We have had a cancer diagnosis and that will affect what I am able to do on a daily basis. I will be caring for Scott and picking up a lot of tasks he normally handles. In the end, it looks like he will be fine. However, getting to that end point will entail traveling a very difficult road of chemo and radiation. I want to take a minute and say welcome to all the new listeners and welcome back to the veteran homestead-loving regulars who stop by the FarmCast for every episode. I appreciate you all so much, even more so right now. Our Virginia Homestead Life Updates I'm going to start with a few more details about our health situation and then give you a few livestock and garden updates. A Cancer Diagnosis Over the past four weeks we have been to one appointment after another. Specialists, CAT scan, biopsy, surgery and a couple more specialist appointments all in little more than 30 days. Scott has had both tonsils out and the healing for that procedure is quite lengthy for an adult. I've been milking the cows on my own and with a little help with the heavy lifting from a neighbor. It has been going pretty well. Getting things in Order Scott and I are streamlining as much as possible so we can get through this time period with less stress. We have plenty of cheese stored up, so I will not be making any more cheese for the rest of this milking season. Milking twice a day changed to once a day almost immediately. That reduces the amount of milk that we are handling on a daily and weekly basis. Between the great herd share folks, feeding the calf, making yogurt and having drinking milk for ourselves, I think we will be in good shape here. Oh yeah, and making butter every so often as well. Cheese Cave Changes We are changing how we store the cheese in the cheese cave. Scott handles all of that, and rather than me trying to add that to my already full schedule, we are going to try vacuum packing a lot of the cheeses. I'll let you know how that goes. Garden Changes The garden is in full swing and there is not much I can do about that except get out there every day or so and bring in the harvest, process it quickly and move on to the next task. I've determined that if I get behind on that, the compost pile will be loving it. Podcast Changes The biggest change will be with this podcast. It takes a tremendous amount of time to put out each episode. My plan is to replay some of the older episodes. If you are new this will be a benefit for you. And if you are a long-time listener, I hope you will bear with me as we get through this time. The doctor let me know to expect drastic changes in lifestyle for four to six months. We can do this. Now for a few homestead updates. Creamery Of course, the creamery is completely on hold. This will be my last mention of that for several months.   Cows The cows are hanging in there. I'm a little worried about getting hay to them in the winter. I'll be looking for help from a neighbor or two in that regard. Moving them from one pasture paddock to another is something I can easily handle. But when the grass runs out, they will need hay brought to them. That means someone who knows what they are doing with a tractor. That's not me. Fortunately, that task can be done once or twice a week in an hour or so and should not be too much of a burden for those helping us through this time. Sheep The sheep are hanging out with Mack, the sheepdog. They seem to be getting along quite well. We may add a few sheep back to the flock over the next few weeks. Again, moving them from place to place is not hard. So, having six or eight instead of four is not a big deal. We shall see how that plays out. If it seems stressful to try and accomplish it, I will let that do as well. There is always next year. Donkeys Because we now have a livestock guardian dog, the donkeys are going on to another home. This is a high priority in the next few weeks. The donkeys require regular hoof care that I simply will not be able to provide. It will be better for all of us if they get resettled soon. Garden and Orchard The green beans are done. I'll be canning the last batches this week and next. The crowder peas are just coming on. Today, I packed up quite a few one-pound bags for the farmer's market tomorrow. There are more out there to pick. Crowder peas are an overall joy for me. I like picking them, shelling them and, most of all, eating them. The tomatoes are also just starting to ripen. They are ripening quite late this year. I'm happy that there is a lot of plant and not so many fruits. I really have no idea what I am going to do with these tomatoes. They are slicing tomatoes. Perhaps I will make the effort to get them to the farmer's market. Again, if any of these tasks falls behind or becomes overwhelming, the compost pile is always open to new food additions. The last of the fruit is picked. I have several gallon bags of blackberries in the freezer. I can make jelly out of that at my leisure – even next year if needed. Scott harvested the elderberries this year. The bushes have been producing for a few years now but this is the first time we've taken the time to harvest the berries. Elderberries are really, really small. They form small tree-like bunches all over the bush. Scott snipped off each little tree and filled a five-gallon bucket. Then he gently stripped the berries off of the twigs. I believe I have maybe a gallon and a half of those berries. I'll be processing those in the next few days. They will be made into elderberry syrup. It's good for sore throats and general immune system support. Lots of vitamin C. Final Thoughts That's about all for today. Again, I will be rerunning some older podcasts beginning soon. If I feel up to it, I may create a new one here and there. Please bear with me and please pray for Scott over the next few months. Oh, I almost forgot. So many have asked how they can support us. Number one is please pray for us. Number two, if you live near, I may need your help from time to time to get Scott to and from his appointments – and with the hay, as I mentioned above. These are my most pressing concerns. This will be a huge financial hit for us between the medical bills and the loss of income from products we would normally produce. If you feel moved to help us out financially, there is a very large “Donate” button on our farm website. You will find it on the podcast page. I originally set this up for donations to support the podcast in general. I have not promoted it, instead footing the bill for the podcast from our profits. At this time, I will open it up for all of you. Not only will you be supporting the cost of the podcast, but at this time you would also be supporting our homestead in general. You can make a one-time donation or set up a recurring, monthly donation. You can also send money via PayPal. Our PayPal email is melanie at peaceful heart farm dot com. Please know that listening and sharing the podcast is also supporting us. It is absolutely one of the best ways to support us. Share it on all of your social media and with friends and family. That helps the most to grow the podcast. Thank you so much for stopping by the homestead and until next time, may God fill your life with grace and peace. To learn about herd shares: Visit our website Herd Share page To share your thoughts: Leave a comment on our Facebook Page Share this show on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram To help the show: PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW for Peaceful Heart FarmCast on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher Radio, Google Play Music, TuneIn or Spotify Donate on Patreon Website www.peacefulheartfarm.com Patreon www.patreon.com/peacefulheartfarm Facebook www.facebook.com/peacefulheartfarm Instagram www.instagram.com/peacefulheartfarm Locals Peacefulheartfarm.locals.com

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Jurassic Park (1993) / Reign of Terror (1949) - #73 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 28)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 64:40


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about one of the most popular movies ever and a film noir unlike any other! Next up: #72 Heart of a Dog (1988) and The World's End (2013)

Megayacht News Radio
Megayacht News Radio: Falcon Tenders, Superyacht Tender Specialists

Megayacht News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 31:16


Mark Pascoe and Dean Stoneman run the British superyacht tender builder Falcon Tenders. While Falcon is a new name in the sector, Mark and Dean are anything but new to the world of highly detailed, high-performing craft. In fact, they're pairing their collective experience to bring something new to the superyacht tender sector: a small, family-style operation that can rival larger companies with its skilled craftspeople capable of delivering fully custom designs.In this Megayacht News Radio podcast, you'll learn how Falcon Tenders is blazing a new trail. It's doing so through partnerships with top-tier stylists like Tim Heywood, Michael Leach, and Patrick Banfield, as well as some lesser-known but equally gifted designers like David Weiss. It's further doing so by incorporating more sustainable materials like reclaimed teak and more sustainable systems like hybrid propulsion. 

Beyond 8 Figures
Building A Stronger Business By Doing Less With Pete Martin, AskMyBoard

Beyond 8 Figures

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 41:46


Serial Entrepreneur Pete Martin joins A.J. to discuss how you can go from entrepreneur, to enterprise, to empire, to exit by doing less. They talk about the importance of having the right team, why not all business is good business, escaping the rainmakers dilemma, and how co-innovating with your customers can maximize your growth and business income. Tune in to learn how to build a business around what's important to you to create long term value.About our Guest: Pete Martin is the founder of Ask My Board, which is the sixth company he has started. In AskMyBoard, he coaches businesses using the Four Pillars of Power and the Catapult Method, ensuring they grow to be resilient and financially healthy businesses. He has sold his other 5 businesses with an average return of 11x to his investors. He is the author of the upcoming book, "Sparking a Mobile Revolution; How Mobile Voting Will Change the World as We Know It.”.On today's episode:  Who is Pete Martin? - 0:47 How Pete Martin was doing this work pro bono before starting his company. - 02:11 How he grew his company without outside capital (and how he learned about organic growth). - 04:21 Who is his ideal client? -06:58 The four transition points of the entrepreneurial journey (where are you on this scale?). - 07:48 The four pillars of power explained (and how he turned down a $5 MM dollar contract).- 10:24  How the four pillars of power work together and influence each other. - 17:04  99% of the problems that entrepreneurs have are THIS kind. - 18:05 What is the rainmaker's dilemma? (and how to make a plan that actually sticks). - 24:01 What is the Catapult Method? - 27:27 How Pete Martin defines success. - 30:26  Did you know Pete Martin has an awesome band? - 32:55 Takeaways from today's show (and a HUGE discount on Pete's services)- 37:29  Key Takeaways:  The decisions you take when growing your company largely depend on whether you have external funding or are growing organically.  There are four key stages of the entrepreneurial journey: entrepreneur, enterprise, empire, and exit. Moving between these stages, and within these stages, requires different skill sets, different strategies, and different investments.  The four pillars of power are: team, customers, capital, and strategic execution. Strategic execution is when you are co-innovating with your customers and when you are co-innovating with your customers you've got an extremely valuable business and have the maximum amount of options with what you can do with your company. People problems constitute the large majority of problems that an entrepreneur faces. So, a great way to overcome this challenge is to ask yourself: what is my dream employee like? The Catapult Method is about maintaining a healthy business from the outset so that it is set up for growth but can also be a lucrative exit.  Are you using your time strategically? [26:19] “How we approach entrepreneurs as they create this growth plan is, it literally comes down to 'what are you doing on a day to day basis?', literally, because that's where the rubber meets the road. And if you say ‘hey I want to grow and I want to scale' and you're spending 8 hours filling RFPs I can tell you that you're going to hit your limit. And frankly, a lot of ego gets in the way.” How does the way you use your time facilitate or hinder your growth? Tell us in the comments, and don't forget to say hello if you would like to share your entrepreneurship story on our podcast. Connect with Pete Martin: LinkedIn: @petegmartin Twitter: @askmyboard  Website: https://askmyboard.com/  Connect with A.J.Lawrence: Website: ajlawrence.com Email: aj@b8fpodcast.com  Instagram: @ajlawrence LinkedIn: A.J. Lawrence Twitter: @ajlawrence Medium: @a.j.lawrence Follow Beyond 8 Figures: Website:  Beyond8Figures.com Twitter:  @beyond8figures  Facebook: Beyond 8 Figures Instagram:@b8fpodcast Email: team@b8fpodcast.com

Social PR Secrets: public relations podcast for entrepreneurs by Lisa Buyer
Bruce Clay on Hiring SEO Specialists, Link Mentions and How You Attribute to Google's Success

Social PR Secrets: public relations podcast for entrepreneurs by Lisa Buyer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 47:40


Bruce Clay asks...Does your SEO team even know what they are doing? Are they optimizing your website with Google’s current best practices? Did you know there is no such thing as being Google certified for SEO? Bruce Clay coined the term SEO in 1996, two years before Google even existed. So, if you’re looking to give your website a competitive edge, why not learn from the Father of SEO himself? Some requirements needed to even be considered an SEO expert working at Bruce Clay, Inc. include 10+ years experience, on-the-job training forever, and a career-driven mindset. This is how world-renowned expert Bruce Clay procures the best-of-the-best for his consulting agency. In Lisa Buyer’s newest episode of the Social PR Secrets podcast, Bruce Clay, SEO expert and founder of Bruce Clay, Inc., shares some of the strategies he uses to spot the scammers and dabblers from the 100% real-deal SEO experts. Tips on How to Hire an SEO Specialist “Google is changing their algorithm eight times a day… every Monday it’s a new industry.” --Bruce Clay SEO is a living, breathing creature. Much like the human body, it must be fed day in and day out, multiple times, 7 days a week. Since the SEO ecosystem is evolving daily, no one can truly know it all. But there are ways to keep up with the trends. Bruce says that he stays current by allotting 2 hours a day to reading. He advises that if you are or aspire to be an SEO specialist, you need to do your own research and be open to learning even off the clock. Before starting the interview process, all business owners looking to hire a consultant should consider taking Bruce’s training SEO classes. This will help you ask the right questions as well as understand the role you’re hiring for and the proper approach and methodology of SEO. Taught by Bruce Clay himself, this is for anyone -- IT specialists, content strategists, new hires, even the CEO or CMO can learn a thing or two about what to look for when hiring and asking the right questions You will learn organic, effective, and ethical methodologies for on-page and off-page optimization, user experience, SEO web design, content ranking factors, mobile best practices and soiling site architecture. SEO Common Misconception About Press Releases Before we start debunking press release theories, let’s break down some PR Marketing vocab talked about in this episode: Press Release: a short, compelling article that stirs up publicity, and in the long run, advances your company and brand through additional collateral like podcasts, features, and links. Authoritative Links: Found typically on highly regarded and esteemed sites like education (.edu) or government (.gov). This type of link is a helpful and valuable way to promote your website. Organic or Blue Links: Not offering monetary compensation or asking for a

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Ex Machina (2014) / Crash (2004) - #74 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 27)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 64:08


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about a sci-fi gem and a much-maligned Best Picture winner! Next up: #73 Jurassic Park (1993) and Reign of Terror (1949). Reign of Terror is in place of The Silence of the Lambs, which appears higher on John's list and will be discussed at that time.

Cover 1 | Buffalo
Buffalo Bills Position Preview Series - Quarterbacks & Specialists

Cover 1 | Buffalo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 61:08


Aaron and Greg continue on with the Buffalo Bills Position Preview series with the Quarterback group & Specialists for this 2021 Bills squad.Presenting Sponsor - Uncle Jumbo'shttps://www.unclejumbosdistillery.com/Fantasy Sponsor - Underdog FantasyNew Users receive free $25 when using Promo Code: COVER1Link: https://play.underdogfantasy.com/p-cover1-sportsGreat merch available through Cover 1 Affiliate partner Playbook Products below:https://bit.ly/2ETuWjSCover 1 would love to hear your thoughts on this topic and the show in general. Comment below and let us what you think!—Don't miss out on our PREMIUM CONTENT-Access to detailed Premium Content.-Access to our video library.-Access to our private Slack channel.-Sneak peek at upcoming content.-Exclusive group film room sessions.& much more.SIGN UP HERE: https://www.cover1.net/premium-content-plans/Thank you for watching this video, we can't do it without the support of our fans. If you have any ideas for content you'd like to see from us, comment below.—DOWNLOAD THE COVER 1 MOBILE APP!► Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.coverapp► iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/id1532587486—► Subscribe to our YouTube channel► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | Buffalo Podcast on iTunes► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | Buffalo Podcast on Google Play► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | NFL Draft Podcast on iTunes► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | NFL Draft on Google Play—Cover 1 provides multi-faceted analysis of the NFL and NFL Draft including: Podcasts, Video blogs, Commentary, Scouting Reports, Highlights and Video Breakdowns. NFL footage displayed is not owned by Cover 1.——Follow Us HereTwitter: https://twitter.com/Cover_1_Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/@Cover_1_Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Cover1NFL/Official Merchandise:https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/cover-1The Cover1.net web site and associated Social Media platforms are not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by the NFL or any of its clubs, specifically the Buffalo Bills. All products, marks and company names are the registered trademarks of their original owners. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder of their product brand.

Cover 1 Sports
Buffalo Bills Position Preview Series - Quarterbacks & Specialists

Cover 1 Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 61:08


Aaron and Greg continue on with the Buffalo Bills Position Preview series with the Quarterback group & Specialists for this 2021 Bills squad. Presenting Sponsor - Uncle Jumbo's https://www.unclejumbosdistillery.com/ Fantasy Sponsor - Underdog Fantasy New Users receive free $25 when using Promo Code: COVER1 Link: https://play.underdogfantasy.com/p-cover1-sports Great merch available through Cover 1 Affiliate partner Playbook Products below: https://bit.ly/2ETuWjS Cover 1 would love to hear your thoughts on this topic and the show in general. Comment below and let us what you think! — Don't miss out on our PREMIUM CONTENT -Access to detailed Premium Content. -Access to our video library. -Access to our private Slack channel. -Sneak peek at upcoming content. -Exclusive group film room sessions. & much more. SIGN UP HERE: https://www.cover1.net/premium-content-plans/ Thank you for watching this video, we can't do it without the support of our fans. If you have any ideas for content you'd like to see from us, comment below. — DOWNLOAD THE COVER 1 MOBILE APP! ► Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.coverapp ► iOS: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/id1532587486 — ► Subscribe to our YouTube channel ► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | Buffalo Podcast on iTunes ► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | Buffalo Podcast on Google Play ► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | NFL Draft Podcast on iTunes ► Subscribe to the Cover 1 | NFL Draft on Google Play — Cover 1 provides multi-faceted analysis of the NFL and NFL Draft including: Podcasts, Video blogs, Commentary, Scouting Reports, Highlights and Video Breakdowns. NFL footage displayed is not owned by Cover 1. — — Follow Us Here Twitter: https://twitter.com/Cover_1_ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/@Cover_1_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Cover1NFL/ Official Merchandise:https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/cover-1 The Cover1.net web site and associated Social Media platforms are not endorsed by, directly affiliated with, maintained, authorized, or sponsored by the NFL or any of its clubs, specifically the Buffalo Bills. All products, marks and company names are the registered trademarks of their original owners. The use of any trade name or trademark is for identification and reference purposes only and does not imply any association with the trademark holder of their product brand.

The Dental Hacks Podcast
Very Dental Shorts: "I've Been Here for an Hour and a Half!"

The Dental Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 27:26


As a dentist, do you compare the experience you've had with the medical establishment to the experience you try and offer in your own office? Recently, Al had a medical experience that he couldn't help but compare to his dental office. It's interesting, kind of funny and a little sad to compare but definitely worth the thought exercise! Do me a favor...invite a friend or colleague to become a listener to the Very Dental podcast. Better yet, show them how to download a podcast on their phone! Also, go join the Very Dental Facebook group using password: Timmerman! Would you like to support the podcast? Then you should take a look at our sponsors! The Very Dental podcast is brought to you by the Wonderist agency. The best marketing agency to build your website, logo, SEO, design, Google Ads, social media and on. And on. Marketing your dental office...the Wonderist Agency can help! Find out more at wonderistagency.com! Very Dental is also brought to you by our friends at Microcopy Dental. Single patient use carbide burs, diamond burs, polishers and a variety of single use products that make your office more efficient, make your infection control simpler and your dentistry better! Find more information at microcopydental.com/verydental! The Very Dental Podcast network is supported by Crazy Dental! Go check out some of the best selection of dental supplies powered by an amazing website! If Crazy Dental doesn't have it, you probably don't need it! Plus, you can use the coupon code "VDP10" to get another 10% off their already amazing prices and it helps support the podcast! Go check them out at www.crazydentalprices.com! Very Dental is also supported by Enova Illumination! Enova makes custom made loupes and the very best headlamps in all of dentistry. They also sell the amazing Zumax line of dental microscopes (I've got one in my office...it's amazing!) Go take advantage of the discount that they offer Very Dental people at https://bit.ly/3cSvfta.   

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Columbus (2017) / District 9 (2009) - #76 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 25)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 67:26


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time talking about two movies that actually aren't on either of their lists! Columbus replaces Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and District 9 replaces Children of Men.

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Eastern Promises (2007) / The Godfather Part 2 (1974) - #77 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 24

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 71:26


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time diving into two gangster movies from two very different eras of Hollywood. Next up: #76 Columbus (2017) and District 9 (2009). NEITHER!!! of these films actually appear on Phil or John's list and are replacing Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and Children of Men which appear higher on each other's lists.

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa
Unbreakable (2000) / The Revenant (2015) - #78 Movie Buff Specialists (Ep 23)

The Survivor Specialists: Phil and Alexa

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 69:44


Phil and John continue to journey through their favorite films of all time, this time discussing two of their favorite movies from two of the most polarizing directors. Next up: #77 Eastern Promises (2007) and The Godfather Part II (1974)

Deep Questions with Cal Newport
Ep. 111: How Do I Tame Distracting Thoughts?

Deep Questions with Cal Newport

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2021 69:25


Below are the questions covered in today's episode (with their timestamps). For instructions on submitting your own questions, go to calnewport.com/podcast.FROM THE NEWSLETTER: Notes on Quentin Tarantino's Writing Routine [3:39]DEEP WORK QUESTIONS - How fluid are my quarterly plans? [17:00] - What is a good approach to take notes in meetings? [19:59] - What do you include ads o your podcast? [23:31] - How do I install a deep work mindset in my team? [25:25] - How do you (Cal) use Evernote? [32:37] - Am I planning an app version of my time-block planner? [35:30] - Any tips to help me actually do the things I have time blocked? [37:21]DEEP LIFE QUESTIONS - How do I stop embracing my distracting thoughts? [45:37] - How does a high school student find things to be interested in? [55:24] - How do I get started writing on an already popular topic? [59:42] - How does deep work relate to Dave Epstein's idea go Generalists vs. Specialists? [1:05:45]Thanks to Jay Kerstens for the intro music and Mark Miles for mastering.

The Lucas Rockwood Show
468: Dangers of Modern Medicine with Dr. Robert Pearl

The Lucas Rockwood Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 43:00


Dangers Modern Medicine with Dr. Robert Pearl -------------------- How much would you spend to feel healthy and energized? If you were truly sick, you'd probably spend everything you had to feel well again. The USA currently spends about 20% of GDP on healthcare, and if that meant we were all glowing with health and living our best lives, the price would be a bargain. But that's not what's happening. Our reactive healthcare system offers the most expensive, worst-performance outcomes of any system in the world. It's bad for doctors, patients, and the economy. I'm not in any way qualified to offer solutions to this medical-industrial complex, but my guest on this week's show is. Meet Dr. Robert Pearl, medical doctor and former HMO executive.   Listen & Learn How individual incentives are messed up in the medical system Why primary care physicians outperform specialists in terms of absolute impact  Why culture and the system are to blame, no one person Countries and cultures to model  Links & Resources Robert's Books & Site ABOUT OUR GUEST Dr. Robert Pearl is the former CEO of The Permanente Medical Group (1999-2017). He was named one of Modern Healthcare's 50 most influential physician leaders. He serves as a clinical professor of plastic surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine and is on the faculty of the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He is the author of two books, his latest: UnCaring: How the Culture of Medicine Kills Doctors & Patients. Nutritional Tip of the Week BCAA Got Questions? Submit your question: yogabody.com/asklucas/ Like the Show? Leave us a Review on iTunes