Podcasts about barnes jewish hospital

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Best podcasts about barnes jewish hospital

Latest podcast episodes about barnes jewish hospital

MomDocs
Annual Wellness Exams - What Happens During An OB/GYN Visit At Each Stage Of Life

MomDocs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022


Women from teens to seniors should have an annual visit with their OB/GYN. But, just as women's healthcare needs change as they age, their annual OB/GYN appointments change, too. Dr. Rosanna Gray-Swain, a BJC Medical Group Ob/Gyn affiliated with Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital, talks about what to expect during an annual visit with your OB/GYN during each stage of life.

Total Information AM
What to expect during flu season

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:11


Dr. Steve Lawrence, Washington University infectious disease expert at Barnes - Jewish Hospital joins Carol Daniel and Tom Ackerman about what to expect this year in flu season.

Total Information AM
How to protect yourself in extreme heat

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 3:59


Local doctors are trying to get the message out once again about protecting yourself in this extreme heat.  KMOX Health Editor Fred Bodimer talked about that with Dr. Rob Poirier, Washington University emergency medicine physician at Barnes Jewish Hospital

St. Louis on the Air
BJC surgery resident learned from the best: Her dad

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 21:17


Dr. Sophia Roberts is a resident training to become a cardiothoracic surgeon — a rarity for females in the U.S. As if that wasn't unique enough, she's following in her dad's footsteps. Dr. Harold Roberts is himself a cardiothoracic surgeon for more than 30 years. In honor of Father's Day, the duo discussed their relationship and what it's like to work at Barnes-Jewish Hospital together.

Science Friday
Race And Medicine, Salmon Recovery, Emergency Mushroom ID. June 10, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 48:21 Very Popular


Americans' Knowledge Of Reproductive Health Is Limited As the nation awaits a momentous Supreme Court decision that could overturn or severely limit the 1973 Roe V. Wade opinion on abortion, a new poll released by the Kaiser Family Foundation found serious gaps in Americans' understanding of certain scientific aspects of reproductive health. For instance, the poll found that while medication abortion now accounts for more than half of all abortions in the U.S., fewer than three in ten U.S. adults (27%) say they have heard of the medication abortion pill known as mifepristone—though that number is up slightly from a 2019 poll, which found that 21% of adults had heard of the medication. And even among those who had heard of it, poll respondents were unsure over when and how it was used, or how to obtain the drug. Rachel Feltman, executive editor at Popular Science, joins John Dankosky to talk about the poll findings and other stories from the week in science—including an experimental drug for rectal cancer, an ancient jawbone of a polar bear, an EU ruling regarding charging ports for electronic devices, and a micrometeorite ding on the shiny mirror of the recently-launched JWST.   Some Doctors Want To Change How Race Is Used In Medicine Several months ago, a lab technologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital mixed the blood components of two people: Alphonso Harried, who needed a kidney, and Pat Holterman-Hommes, who hoped to give him one. The goal was to see whether Harried's body would instantly see Holterman-Hommes' organ as a major threat and attack it before surgeons could finish a transplant. To do that, the technologist mixed in fluorescent tags that would glow if Harried's immune defense forces would latch onto the donor's cells in preparation for an attack. If, after a few hours, the machine found lots of glowing, it meant the kidney transplant would be doomed. It stayed dark: They were a match.“I was floored,” said Harried. Both recipient and donor were a little surprised. Harried is Black. Holterman-Hommes is white. Could a white person donate a kidney to a Black person? Would race get in the way of their plans? Both families admitted those kinds of questions were flitting around in their heads, even though they know, deep down, that “it's more about your blood type—and all of our blood is red,” as Holterman-Hommes put it. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   How A $2 Billion U.S. Plan To Save Salmon In The Northwest Is Failing CARSON, Wash.—The fish were on their way to be executed. One minute, they were swimming around a concrete pond. The next, they were being dumped onto a stainless steel table set on an incline. Hook-nosed and wide-eyed, they thrashed and thumped their way down the table toward an air-powered guillotine. Hoses hanging from steel girders flushed blood through the grated metal floor. Hatchery workers in splattered chest waders gutted globs of bright orange eggs from the dead females and dropped them into buckets, then doused them first with a stream of sperm taken from the dead males and then with an iodine disinfectant. The fertilized eggs were trucked around the corner to an incubation building where over 200 stacked plastic trays held more than a million salmon eggs. Once hatched, they would fatten and mature in rectangular concrete tanks sunk into the ground, safe from the perils of the wild, until it was time to make their journey to the ocean.   Read more at sciencefriday.com.   How A Facebook Group Helps People Identify Mysterious Mushrooms Mushroom season has begun. A wide variety of fungi are sprouting up in forests and yards, especially after a heavy rainstorm. While wild mushrooms are generally safe to touch, eating mysterious fungi is a terrible idea. But, sometimes a child or a dog gobbles up an unknown species. In order to determine if it's poisonous or not, you'll need an expert opinion—quickly. That's why Kerry Woodfield helped start a Facebook group to help people correctly identify poisonous mushrooms and plants. She recruited over 200 botanists and mycologists from all over the world to volunteer their time. In the past few years, the group has mushroomed to over 130,000 members. Guest host John Dankosky talks with Woodfield, co-founder of the Facebook group, Poisons Help; Emergency Identification For Mushrooms & Plants and foraging instructor at Wild Food UK. She discusses why she decided to start the group, its role within the poison control system, and how to talk to the kids in your life about poisonous plants and mushrooms.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

St. Louis on the Air
How Wash U scientists — and St. Louis patients – helped perfect COVID-19 tests

St. Louis on the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 16:32


If you've used an at-home test to figure out whether you had COVID-19, you may have a patient at Barnes-Jewish Hospital to thank. More than 6,500 patients there were enrolled in clinical trials to evaluate COVID-19 tests. Washington University's Dr. Stacey House, the principal investigator in those trials, discusses how her team handled 24 trials in just two years.

Total Information AM
Magic Mushrooms: One dose can have profound effect on the human brain

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 7:17


Dr. Ginger Nicol, Washington University Psychiatrist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital joins Carol Daniel and Tom Ackerman to answer questions about Psilocybin mushrooms.  Law enforcement agents recently siezed hundreds of pounds of the psychedelic fungus.  

Total Information AM
What is a TIA, treatment and concern for a bigger stroke?

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 4:21


Hailey Bieber, the 25 year old wife of Justin Bieber announced last week she had a T-I-A or a mini stroke.  KMOX Health Editor Fred Bodimer talked with Dr. Andria Ford, a Washington University neurologist at Barnes Jewish Hospital about T-I-A's.

Vibrant You Health Show
Vibrant You Health Show: Dr. Jim Meehan. Exposing corruption in the pharmaceutical industry.

Vibrant You Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 79:02


VYHS E24 - Dr. Jim Meehan. What an incredible interview. Dr. Meehan doesn't pull any punches. Dr. Meehan was appointed to West Point Military Academy, attended medical school in Oklahoma, completed his residency at Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, MO for ophthalmology. He has been the chief resident of the John Cochran VA Medical Center, Associate editor for the Journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation, a top-ranked eye surgeon (ophthalmologist), and today, he is a physician, accomplished leader, and entrepreneur whose passion and purpose is to help people understand how their bodies are designed to heal and obtain optimal functionality. Dr. Jim Meehan has dedicated his God-given purpose to expose the greed, fraud, and pseudoscience responsible for the corruption of the American healthcare system and the intolerable harm, suffering, and even death of America's children perpetrated by an out-of-control, unaccountable, and uncaring pharmaceutical industry. You can watch and listen to all episodes of the Vibrant You Health Show at www.naturespantry.life You can find Nature's Pantry on the socials on Facebook and Instagram.

THE WAYNE AYERS PODCAST
THE WAYNE AYERS PODCAST EPISODE 34: ELYSABETH LAMOUREUX INTERVIEW

THE WAYNE AYERS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 62:56


Elysabeth Lamoureux is a ICU RN at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. She graduated from Olympic College with an AA and Lindenwood University-Belleville with a BS in Biology. Currently enrolled at Goldfarb School of Nursing. Instagram: @elysabeth_rose_ @wayneayersii @thewayneayerspodcast Twitter: @lizzlamoureux13 @waynedayersii @wayneayerspod --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thewayneayerspodcast/support

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast
BTK/ANNALS JOURNAL CLUB #19 - Empowering Surgeons, Anesthesiologists, and Obstetricians to Incorporate Environmental Sustainability in the Operating Room

Behind The Knife: The Surgery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 45:13


What is one of the most energy-intensive and waste-generating areas of the hospital? The operating room! In the new BTK/Annals of Surgery Journal Club, we talk to Dr. Elizabeth Yates and Dr. Louis Nguyen about their new article – “Empowering Surgeons, Anesthesiologists, and Obstetricians to Incorporate Environmental Sustainability in the Operating Room.” They review the impact ORs have on the environment, the consequences this has for patients, and ways surgeons lead efforts to “green” the operating room. As the topic of environmental sustainability becomes a growing concern with each passing year, the surgical workplace is going to play a big role in moving in the right direction. Join us for a great discussion!   Dr. Yates earned her medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. She is currently a General Surgery resident at Brigham and Women's Hospital where she is now completing two years of protected research time at the Center for Surgery and Public Health while also pursuing a Masters in Public Health focused on Occupational and Environmental Health. She conducts interdisciplinary research examining the interface between surgery, sustainability, and climate change. Dr. Nguyen is a vascular surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital and associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School. He earned his medical and business degrees from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, completed his General Surgery residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, and completed a vascular surgery fellowship at the Brigham as well. He also currently serves as Vice Chair of Digital Health Systems in the Department of surgery. He is a recognized leader in health services research and outcomes implementation, where he utilizes econometric analyses to better understand clinical outcomes. Link to article: https://journals.lww.com/annalsofsurgery/Abstract/2021/06000/Empowering_Surgeons,_Anesthesiologists,_and.15.aspx Climate change and equity issues permeate all aspects of our life and work.  If you are (or know) a current general surgery resident, help us understand the equity and environmental impacts of residency interviews! https://redcap.link/gensurginterview Please visit behindtheknife.org to access other high-yield surgical education podcasts, videos and more.  

Becker’s Women’s Leadership
Angelleen Peters-Lewis, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Nurse Executive at Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Becker’s Women’s Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 11:22


This episode features Angelleen Peters-Lewis, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Nurse Executive at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Here, she discusses leaders becoming more comfortable with being vulnerable, learning from mistakes, and more.

Show Me the Science
Hospital inpatient numbers skyrocket

Show Me the Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 19:02


Although there seems to be evidence that infections with the omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 are somewhat milder, you wouldn't know that from the number of COVID-19 patients in the hospital. A post-holiday spike in cases has seen the number of inpatients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children's Hospital rise to levels higher than any seen since the pandemic began. In this episode, a pair of Washington University physicians report that because of the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, people with other ailments — from sports injuries to heart issues — are having to wait longer to be seen in the emergency department and for hospital beds to open up. Hilary M. Babcock, MD, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and BJC Healthcare vice president and chief quality officer, says it's getting harder for the health-care system to keep up with the rising number of patients. Meanwhile, Jason G. Newland, MD, a professor of pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases, says that even with the current surge, it's important to keep kids in school if at all possible. Both Babcock and Newland say that although breakthrough infections have occurred, vaccinations are keeping most people out of the hospital. They are encouraging all who are not fully vaccinated and boosted to get those vaccinations as soon as possible, to avoid crowds and to wear masks in public to try to slow the spread of the virus. The podcast, “Show Me the Science,” is produced by the Office of Medical Public Affairs at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

MedAxiom HeartTalk: Transforming Cardiovascular Care Together
20 Years of Transforming Cardiovascular Care, Together

MedAxiom HeartTalk: Transforming Cardiovascular Care Together

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 48:07


In this episode, we celebrate 20 years of transforming cardiovascular care, together. From physician-hospital integration, to major legislative reform, to a global pandemic, the MedAxiom community, alongside the American College of Cardiology (ACC), has always found a way to meet the challenge of the day, pushing the needle towards innovation. On MedAxiom HeartTalk, host Melanie Lawson sits down with a powerhouse panel, who have been there since the start: Ed Fry, MD, FACC, Cathie Biga, MSN, RN, FACC, and Jerry Blackwell, MD, MBA, FACC. They discuss how it all began, the impact of collaboration, and their thoughts on what the future holds.Guest Bios:Jerry Blackwell, MD, MBA, FACC, is President and CEO of MedAxiom. Blackwell graduated from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and completed residency/chief residency/fellowship at the Ohio State University and the University of Alabama - Birmingham. He earned his executive MBA from the University of Tennessee. He has more than 30 years of experience in cardiovascular medicine including academic cardiology, private practice and large integrated cardiovascular group leadership. Most recently, he served as executive vice president and chief clinical officer of the Ballad Health System.Blackwell has a passion for physician leadership, teaching, and care transformation - particularly team-based care and organizational performance improvement. He maintains a clinical practice with special interests in advanced imaging, including cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, cardiovascular CT angiography, and cardiac positron emission tomography.Blackwell has been involved with both MedAxiom and the American College of Cardiology for many years. He has served on the ACC's Board of Governors, the board of directors for the Cardiology Advocacy Alliance, and the ACC's Health Affairs Committee.Ed T.A. Fry, MD, FACC, is Chair of Ascension Health Cardiovascular Service Line and Vice President of the ACC. Fry attended medical school at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and completed his residency in internal medicine at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. He completed a two-year cardiovascular research fellowship focused on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of native and genetically modified plasminogen activators. He also completed a general cardiology fellowship at Washington University, where he then served as assistant professor and medical director of the cardiac transplant program before completing an interventional cardiology fellowship at Ascension St. Vincent Hospital – Indianapolis.In 1991, he joined the cardiology practice at St. Vincent where he continues to be a busy interventional and general cardiologist and serves as chair of the Ascension National Cardiovascular Service Line. He helped launch Navion Healthcare Solutions, a subsidiary data quality management software company owned by Ascension, where he previously served as board chair.Fry is past president and governor of ACC's Indiana Chapter. Within the ACC, he has served on the Audit and Compliance Committee (Chair), Digital Strategy Steering Committee; Interventional Section Leadership Council; Surviving MI Initiative; Integrating the Health Enterprise Health Policy Work Group; Clinical Quality Committee; Prior Authorization Work Group; ACC Telemedicine Project; ACC COVID-19 Hub; Board of Governors Steering Committee; Innovations Development Work Group; ACC Premier Oversight Work Group (chair); Board of Trustees (BOT) Task Force on Clinician Well-Being; Health Systems Task Force; ACC/AHA Ethics and Professionalism Consensus Task Force, and ACC Nominating Committee. He has been a presenter, moderator and session chair at ACC Annual Scientific Session, ACC CV Summit, MedAxiom CV Transforum, Heart House Roundtables and is a member of HeartPAC, ACC's political action committee. He currently serves on ACC's BOT.Cathie Biga, MSN, RN, FACC, is President and CEO of Cardiovascular Management of Illinois, a cardiology physician practice management company. She works with more than 100 providers in the Chicago, IL, area and partners in their cardiovascular service lines at more than 14 acute care hospitals. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from the Mayo/College of St. Teresa and Master of Science in nursing at Northern Illinois University School of Nursing.Biga has more than 40 years of experience as a registered nurse, service line director, hospital vice president and CEO. She has 20 years of experience in physician practice management.She has been active nationally in consulting in strategic planning, operational efficiencies, integrated financial and quality initiatives, and growth and development of the cardiovascular service lines. She is focused on facilitating the integration of strategic, financial and quality perspectives between cardiovascular service lines at practices and hospitals. In addition, she consults and lectures on numerous contemporary cardiovascular topics.Biga is a member of ACC's Board of Trustees, Chair of the MedAxiom Board of Managers, a member of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and an ACC Fellow.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Angelleen Peters-Lewis, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Nurse Executive at Barnes-Jewish Hospital

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 11:22


This episode features Angelleen Peters-Lewis, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Nurse Executive at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Here, she discusses leaders becoming more comfortable with being vulnerable, learning from mistakes, and more.

SSAT Soundbites: A Podcast Series for Surgeons
Season 1, Episode 31: Mentor of the Month Interview with Dr. L. Michael Brunt

SSAT Soundbites: A Podcast Series for Surgeons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 28:08


In this edition of SSAT Mentor of the Month, Dr. Victoria Gershuni, a member of the SSAT Resident and Fellow Education Committee and current Advanced GI, Foregut, and Minimally Invasive Surgery Fellow at Washington University in St. Louis interviewed Dr. L. Michael Brunt.   Dr. Brunt, is Professor of Surgery and Section Chief of Minimally Invasive Surgery at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.  He is a Past President of SAGES and leads the SAGES Safe Cholecystectomy Task Force with the goal of reducing bile duct injuries.  Dr. Brunt is immediate Past President of the Central Surgical Association and current President of the Fellowship Council which oversees Advanced GI and MIS Fellowship training in the US and Canada. He is on the editorial board of Annals of Surgery and has over 240 publications.  His clinical and research interests are in clinical outcomes studies in minimally invasive surgery, benign foregut surgery, safety in cholecystectomy, sports hernias, and surgical education. He has received the Philip J. Wolfson Outstanding Teacher Award from the Association for Surgical Education, the Distinguished Clinician Award from Washington University, the Lifetime Achievement Award from Barnes-Jewish Hospital, and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Johns Hopkins University.  For the last 27 years, he has served as Team Surgeon for the 2019 Stanley Cup Champions, the St. Louis Blues.          Questions answered in this Mentor of the Month episode are:   What role has mentoring had in your life? Was there a particular mentor or colleague who played a significant role in your career development? What is your philosophy for training the current generation of surgeons and how does this differ from how you were trained? What advice do you have for young surgeons at the beginning of their surgical career; what are your tips for transition to practice? What components do you consider to be key for the successful transition from trainee to faculty? Do you have any intraoperative teaching strategies for young faculty to use when working with junior residents? What do you consider your most meaningful accomplishment in surgery/ what contribution to surgery are you most proud of?

Audible Bleeding
Dr. Gregorio Sicard and Dr. Frank Caputo on the Management of Endograft Failures, Open Aortic Surgical Training, and Mentorship

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 54:22


Dr. Gregorio Sicard is Professor Emeritus of Surgery and Emeritus Chief of Vascular Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He trained in general surgery at the Barnes Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, and completed the first Transplantation Fellowship there. He eventually became the Chief of Vascular Surgery and Chief of General Surgery at Washington Hospital. He founded the Vascular surgery fellowship there in 1983. He is a former President of the Society of Vascular Surgery, and recipient of the 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery Lifetime Achievement Award. He was a pioneer in the retroperitoneal approach to the aorta, and is regarded as a master aortic surgeon by his peers.  He has a legacy of trainees who have gone on to assume leadership roles in Vascular Surgery.    Dr. Frank Caputo is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. He is also the Vascular Surgery Director of the Aorta Center, Program Director of the Vascular Surgery Training Programs. His clinical interests include complex open and endovascular repair of  thoracic, thoracoabdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysms, management of thoracic dissection, endovascular and open repair of  failed endografts. Dr. Caputo earned his medical degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey, Newark, NJ, where he also served his surgical residency and two years as a National Institutes of Health research fellow. He completed his fellowship in vascular surgery at Barnes-Jewish Hospital of Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. where he served as administrative fellow. He joined the Cleveland Clinic medical staff in 2018.  Sicard, Gregorio A, Jeffrey M Reilly, Brian G Rubin, Robert W Thompson, Brent T Allen, M.Wayne Flye, Kenneth B Schechtman, Patricia Young-Beyer, Carey Weiss, and Charles B Anderson. "Transabdominal versus Retroperitoneal Incision for Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Report of a Prospective Randomized Trial." Journal of Vascular Surgery 21.2 (1995): 174-83.   What other topics would you like to hear about? Let us know more about you and what you think of our podcast through our Listener Survey or email us at AudibleBleeding@vascularsociety.org. Follow us on Twitter @audiblebleeding   Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Good Samaritan Healthcast
FDA approval of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, vaccine efficacy, vaccine boosters, pregnancy with the vaccine, why people are hesitant and more

Good Samaritan Healthcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 65:45


Clint talks with Good Samaritan Chief Operating Officer Adam Thacker about FDA approval of COVID-19 vaccine, vaccine efficacy, vaccine boosters, pregnancy with the vaccine, why people are hesitant and much more. Adam Thacker graduated from the St. Louis College of Pharmacy with a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in 2004 and then went on to earn his Master of Science in Business and Healthcare Administration in 2008 from Regis University in Denver, Colorado. He is also board certified in Healthcare Management by the American College of Healthcare Executives. Thacker began his career in health care in 2004 as a Pharmacy Supervisor at Barnes Jewish Hospital. He then went on to become the Chief Performance Officer at Hospital Sisters Health System in Springfield, Illinois, and finally came to Good Samaritan in 2013.

biobalancehealth's podcast
Healthcast 553 – Low Testosterone Found to Result in More Severe Covid Infections

biobalancehealth's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 16:10


See all the Healthcasts at https://www.biobalancehealth.com/healthcast-blog/   Welcome to the BioBalance Healthcast, I'm Dr. Kathy Maupin and my partner Dr. Rachel Sullivan, joins me today to discuss a new research finding from Washington University, in St. Louis Missouri. “Low Testosterone Levels in Men Resulted in More Severe Covid Infections”, according to a research study from Barnes Jewish Hospital in the spring of 2021.  The study did not say that low testosterone levels were the cause of severe Covid infections however many of the symptoms of men who have low T levels ARE associated with severe Covid infections: older men, sicker men, men who were obese and had AODM (diabetes).  All of these medical conditions improve with testosterone replacement with T pellets, so it is unclear whether the individual risk factors are risks or whether low testosterone that can cause all of these problems and occur in older men are the true risk. Their study revealed that more men than women were affected by Covid, and men with lower T (around 53 ng/dl) or low T, had most severe Covid infection.  Men with more than 151 ng/dl of Total T had less severe Covid infections. They state that they didn't find women's hormones associated with severity of Covid, but they didn't test free- testosterone, which is the only real test of the effect of T in women! More men died of Covid in the US and in my state of Missouri as well. I'd like to submit another possible cause for this fact. Male humans are more fragile than female humans both in infancy and when they are old.  Women are well known. To live longer than men and that is inherent in their DNA.  It may be that having one Y chromosome and one X, or being male, makes men less metabolically and immunologically hardy than women who have a matched set of Xs.  For example: We see this in male infant verses female infants at birth.  Ask any Neonatal nurse. About the “wimpy boys” verses the girls. They will always confirm that If your baby is born female at the same preterm weeks as a male baby born at the same time, it is much more likely that the female infant will survive better and with fewer disabilities than a male. It is a fact that all prenatal nurses and doctors know, and they manage preterm babies with this in mind. Male babies do not have appreciable levels of testosterone, but the genetics of having only one X chromosome instead of 2, like females have might make men less robust metabolically at the beginning and end of life.  But let's look at the hormone Testosterone and what it does to prevent infection in both men and women. Testosterone is a hormone that stimulates the Thymus gland which makes the immune cells called T Killer and T helper cells that kill cancer cells, bacteria and viruses. When both women and men age, their testosterone drops and their thymus glands shrinks, producing fewer and less aggressive T killer and Helper cells, which results in a poor immune response in aging people of both sexes. This is one of the hormonal reasons that aging men and women have a high rate of cancer, deadly infections as they age. In our practice, Dr. Sullivan and I replace Testosterone to people over 40 for women and generally 50 for men, when Testosterone naturally is deficient.  When we replace T with pellets, the number and activity of T-white blood cells increase. This means that when we replace both sexes with Testosterone in our practice, we see fewer cancers, and fewer severe infections as our patients age.  This may be the reason fewer men with normal/or at least higher T levels did not become as ill when they got Covid. Testosterone is not a guarantee, but it ups your chance of being healthy while those around you of the same age are getting sicker.  We thank Wash U Researchers for confirming our observations and beliefs about the value of normal T levels when it comes to avoiding infections.

High Truths on Drugs and Addiction
Episode #26 High Truths with Dr. Wilson Compton Deputy Director National Institute of Drug Abuse

High Truths on Drugs and Addiction

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 45:24


What is the aftermath of the COVID pandemic in terms of damage from drugs? What is the science behind helpful or harmful effects of marijuana? What are the strategies in treating methamphetamine use disorder? What is universal prevention in terms of protection from addiction. Learn all this and more from a key national leader, Dr. Wilson Compton. Dr. Wilson Compton Dr. Wilson M. Compton serves as the Deputy Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health.  NIDA supports most of the world's research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction related to preventing drug abuse, treating addiction and addressing the serious health consequences of drug abuse, including related HIV/AIDS and other health conditions. In his current role, Dr. Compton's responsibilities include working with the Director to provide scientific leadership in the development, implementation, and management of NIDA's research portfolio in order to improve the prevention and treatment of drug abuse and addiction. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Compton served as the Director of NIDA's Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research from 2002 until 2013. In this leadership role, he oversaw the scientific direction of a complex public health research program of national and international scope addressing: 1) the extent and spread of drugs of abuse, 2) how to prevent drug abuse, and 3) how to implement drug abuse prevention and treatment services as effectively as possible.  Of note, since 2010 he has led the development of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health study (PATH), a large scale longitudinal population study with 45,971 baseline participants ages 12 and older. Jointly sponsored by NIDA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), PATH includes prospective data collection using both surveys and biological assessments to inform the development of tobacco regulations in the United States. Before joining NIDA, Dr. Compton was a tenured faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program at Washington University in Saint Louis, as well as Medical Director of Addiction Services at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital in Saint Louis.  Dr. Compton received his undergraduate education from Amherst College. He attended medical school and completed his residency training in psychiatry at Washington University. During his career, Dr. Compton has achieved multiple scientific accomplishments: he was selected to serve as a member of the DSM-5 Revision Task Force; is the author of more than 200 publications including widely-cited papers drawing attention to the opioid crisis in the U.S.; and is an invited speaker at multiple high-impact venues, including multiple presentations to federal judges in presentations sponsored by the Federal Judicial Center.  These judicial presentations have focused on how the science of addiction may improve policy and practices related to persons with addiction within the criminal justice system. Dr. Compton is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the Alpha Omega Alpha medical education honor society. Dr. Compton is also the recipient of multiple awards, including the Senior Scholar Health Services Research Award from the American Psychiatric Association in 2008 and the Paul Hoch Award from the American Psychopathological Association in 2010. The FDA selected him to receive the Leveraging Collaboration A

SIBO SOS™ with Shivan Sarna
011: Dr. Leonard Weinstock on Restless Legs, LDN, the Brain-Gut Connection and SIBO as an Autoimmune Condition

SIBO SOS™ with Shivan Sarna

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 59:26


What does Restless Leg Syndrome, autoimmunity, and rosacea have to do with IBS and SIBO? It turns out - a lot! For this episode of The SIBO SOS® Podcast, Shivan Sarna is joined by board-certified gastroenterologist and internist Dr. Leonard Weinstock to talk about some of the most common and frustrating coexisting conditions with SIBO - plus, an unconventional but very effective treatment you may want to try! Dr. Weinstock's practice website: http://www.gidoctor.net/More info on LDN: https://ldnresearchtrust.org/Sign up to watch the full video interview here: https://sibosos.com/weinstock-restless-legs BIO Dr. Leonard WeinstockDr. Leonard B. Weinstock is Board Certified in Gastroenterology and Internal Medicine. He is president of Specialists in Gastroenterology and the Advanced Endoscopy Center. He teaches at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and is an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine. He is a primary investigator at the Sundance Research Center. Dr. Weinstock received a BA Magna Cum Laude from University of Vermont and the medical degree from University of Rochester School of Medicine. He completed his postgraduate training and was chief resident in Internal Medicine at Rochester General Hospital. His Gastroenterology Fellowship was performed at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Weinstock is an active lecturer and has published more than 85 articles, abstracts, editorials and book chapters. He is currently researching the role and treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in restless legs syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and rosacea. Dr. Weinstock has expertise with low dose naltrexone (LDN) in multiple inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Further information is available at www.gidoctor.net.

C. diff. Spores and More
Camilla Graham MD, Alba Muhlfeld, Erik Dubburke, MD, MSPH

C. diff. Spores and More

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2021 50:21


Join Our Guests Camilla Graham MD Ri-CoDIFy: Ridinilazole’s Phase 3 Trial for the Treatment of C. difficile and Reduction of Recurrence. . Dr.Camilla S. Graham is Vice President and Chief Clinical Information Officer at Summit Therapeutics as well as a staff physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA, and on faculty at Harvard Medical School. Guest: Alba Muhlfeld, C. diff. Survivor - Sharing her C. diff. infection journey. Guest: Erik Dubburke, MD, MSPH discusses “Optimizing Prevention of Hospital-Onset Clostridioides difficile infection.” Dr. Erik Dubberke is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where he has been a faculty member in the Division of Infectious Diseases since 2005. He is an Associate Hospital Epidemiologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Presentations delivered live during the November 14th, 2020 8th Annual International C. diff. Conference & Health EXPO

The Evan Solomon Show
EU moves toward stricter export controls for COVID-19 vaccines

The Evan Solomon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2021 78:14


Evan Solomon discusses the latest updates on the European Union's move toward imposing stricter export controls for COVID-19 vaccines.  On today's show:  We hear listeners' thoughts on giving workers paid time off to get a COVID-19 vaccine. We ask people if they feel "politically homeless."  Bill Browder, CEO of Hermitage Capital, head of the Global Magnitsky Justice campaign and the author of Red Notice, discusses Canada's new sanctions on Russian officials.  We discuss the upcoming federal budget and what you would like to see included.  Beth Potter, president and CEO of the Tourism Industry Association of Canada, explains why she thinks some government pandemic programs need to be extended for businesses.  Scott Reid, CTV News political commentator and former communications director for Prime Minister Paul Martin, plays Overhyped vs. Underplayed.  Dr. Tiffany Osborn, a professor of surgery and emergency medicine at Washington University who also works in the ICU at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in Missouri, talks about how she was finally able to move back in with her family after living in a camper for a year to protect her family from COVID-19. 

End of the Road
Episode 170: Kemia Sarraf M.D.: Intratraumatic Growth/Toxic Stress and Burnout/Vicarious Trauma/Lodestar Professional Coaching

End of the Road

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2021 62:31


Dr. Sarraf is an internist, educator and physician & leadership coach whose subspecialty paradigm focuses on coaching in and beyond severe burnout, toxic stress and the trauma of these times.  She received her Medical Degree and Master of Public Health at the University of Utah School of Medicine, and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine.  In addition to her private coaching practice, Dr. K is an Adj. Asst. Professor at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine where she works in the office of Equity, Diversity & Inclusion.  She is also the founder and CEO of Lodestar:  Trauma-Informed Physician and Professional Coaching. A gifted storyteller and much-sought speaker, Dr. K's coaching style is deeply intuitive, rooted in both the power of connection and the knowledge that intratraumatic growth is not just aspirational, but possible.  She has helped countless physicians and professionals across industries (re)discover their professional pride, joy, and internal balance.  She is an expert strategist who assists clients in discovering and naming what is essential, and setting a path for their True North. "In the end, its really very simple," she says, "we all need a deeper bench.  That's why I founded Lodestar. For more information about this gifted healer, or to contact Kemia, please see:  https://www.lodestarpc.com/ This podcast is available on your favorite podcast platform, or here:  https://endoftheroad.libsyn.com/episode-170-kemia-sarraf-md-intratraumatic-growthtoxic-stress-and-burnoutvicarious-traumalodestar-professional-coaching Have an awesome weekend!

Health Professional Radio - Podcast 454422
One in Seven Black Men Will Be Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer in the U.S.

Health Professional Radio - Podcast 454422

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2021 10:06


Dr. Arnold Bullock, MD, Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor of Urology at Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, and Barnes-Jewish Hospital discusses important information on what all men, particularly black men should know about prostate cancer, what they can do to better understand why this population of men is disproportionately affected, and about the prostate cancer screening process. He is joined by Dr. Lannis Hall, Director of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish St. Peters Hospital who discusses prostate cancer risk factors, signs and symptoms, and advice on how men and their loved ones can advocate for their health to ensure earlier diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

Chasing What Matters
CWM - Caitlyn O'Brock

Chasing What Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 43:36


In today's episode, we talk to a hero of the COVID 19 Pandemic. Caitlyn O'Brock is an ICU Nurse in one of the COVID units at Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. In her interview, you will hear about how she went above and beyond the call of duty to take care of a special patient!CBS News StoryCNN News StoryCaitlyn O'Brock InstagramChasing What Matters Instagram Chasing What Matters Website

Radio Rounds
Navigating COVID-19 and the Vaccine in Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women

Radio Rounds

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021


While the coronavirus pandemic spread across the world, information about the impact of COVID-19 and pregnant and breastfeeding women was continuously evolving. And now, with the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, there are many new questions and considerations for Ob/Gyns and healthcare providers to address as they continue to counsel their patients. Jeannie Kelly, MD, MS, Washington University maternal-fetal medicine specialist at the Women & Infants Center, a partnership among Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Washington University Physicians joins the show to talk more about how COVID-19 affects women during pregnancy and during breastfeeding, and the recommendations for this population as they become eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Medicine Mentors Podcast
Leadership 101 with Dr. Thomas De Fer

The Medicine Mentors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2021 18:12


Thomas De Fer MD is the Interim Chief of Medicine, the Associate Dean of Medical Student Education and a Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. De Fer is passionate about medical education and has published extensively on topics of curriculum development in undergraduate and graduate medical education. He is the former president of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and a recipient of numerous awards including the CDIM Service Award by AAIM. Dr De Fer completed his Medical school from University Of Missouri-Columbia and Residency in Internal Medicine from Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University. All of us want to become leaders, but is it possible to flex the muscle of leadership during our training period? Today, Dr. Thomas De Fer shares how everyday, all of us, regardless of our seniority are put in positions of leadership, from being a fourth year medical student teaching other students to a senior resident on an inpatient team with interns and medical students. What do we need to practice to become great leaders? Two things. Clarity of requests and stating the conditions of satisfaction. Tune in to learn Leadership 101 with Dr. De Fer. Pearls of Wisdom: 1. A good internist isn't just a great communicator, but rather someone who can mold their communication to suit the patient in their current situation. Being upfront and honest with patients builds strong, therapeutic relationships with them. 2. Leadership isn't just at the macro level. It can also be subtle. There are small leadership opportunities where residents can flex those muscles: practice clarity of requests and stating conditions of satisfaction. 3. The critical ingredient that a mentor is looking for in a mentee is engagement:  mentors don't carry the weight of engagement. That's the mentee's job.

AP Cardiology
Physical Exam Series: Mitral Regurgitation

AP Cardiology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2021 29:00


I am joined by Shreyas Venkataraman, MD, an internal medicine resident at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St Louis to continue our physical exam series. In this episode we talk about mitral regurgitation and the associated physical exam findings that help increase (or decrease) your likelihood of MR. Links: Evidence-Based Physical Diagnosis The Correlates of an Abnormal … Continue reading Physical Exam Series: Mitral Regurgitation →

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode #22 – Medicated Sleep and Augmented Intelligence

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2020


In this episode, Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss methods of aiding the brain through both sleep medications and neurotech. Listen as they explore the possible risks and benefits of augmented and artificial intelligence.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode #21 – Brain Development Part 2: Cerebellum Stimulation Theories

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2020


In this episode, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital dive deeper into the discussion of brain function, with a focus on the cerebellum, with Dr. Azad Bonni, Edison Professor of Neuroscience and Chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at Washington University.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode #20 – Brain Development Part 1: Sculpting the Messy Blob

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2020


As the most complex organ in the body, the brain takes decades to develop. In this episode, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital chat with Dr. Azad Bonni, Edison Professor of Neuroscience and Chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at Washington University about the process that begins in utero, including deviations which may be responsible for the spectrum of conditions classified as autism.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 18: The Latest in Stroke Treatment and Recovery

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2019


After a stroke, the clock starts ticking. Hours, even minutes, in delayed medical attention can change a patient's life. Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, host Dr. Joshua W. Osbun and hear about the evolution of treatment technologies, surgeries, and medications in extending the window of stroke treatment by hours, and in some cases, days.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 17: Understanding Truth in a Virtual World

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2019


Humans are pushed further in personal virtual interactions, navigating online conversations with minds programmed to take cues from facial expressions, tone of voice, and other missing nuances of in-person communication. This struggle to perceive meaning and truth includes our reading of news, which can include “fake news.” Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss the effects of engaging with people and information in a virtual space.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 16: Stressed Out by the News

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2019


Does the influx of news on your phone and general information overload help you stay informed or just cause detrimental stress? Is any kind of stress good? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, talk about the effects of our environment on our brains and how we can manage our exposure to stress to actually help us change our behaviors for the better.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 15: Intricacies of Sleep

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2019


Most people have experienced sleep deprivation at some point in their lives and can recall the impact on their physical and cognitive abilities. But what's the neuroscience behind feeling fatigued and disoriented? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss the purpose of sleep.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 11: What Causes Brain Freeze?

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2018


Did you know brain freeze is officially categorized as a type of headache? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, describe what happens to the brain during headaches such as brain freeze and migraines.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 12: Digital Addiction

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2018


Digital addiction is becoming more prevalent as technology continues to advance. Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, describe the brain activity of digital addicts along with using neural augmentation as a potential treatment.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 10: The Psychology of Psychopaths

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2018


Do violent video games and movies actually play a role in becoming a psychopath; or is it simply another case of correlation not implying causation? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, explain the neuroscience behind psychopathic behavior.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 4: Dogs & Emotions

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


The domestication and evolution of dogs has resulted in a strong emotional bond with humans through the alteration of both parties' oxytocin love circuit. Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, describe how this increase in oxytocin happens.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 3: Believing

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Are we actually hardwired to believe in something bigger than ourselves? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, answer this question and discuss how believing helps us develop the fundamentals for our morals and worldviews.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 9: The State of Alzheimer's Research

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


There has been a significant shift in how we treat Alzheimer's over the past 10 years. Dr. David Michael Holtzman, Washington University neurologist and chief of neurology at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, joins Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, to discuss the state of Alzheimer's research.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 7: Resilience

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Why are some people more resilient than others? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss methods for building resiliency through brain training.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 6: Looking Left

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Why do we look left when thinking or trying to remember something? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, explain the neuroscience behind this phenomenon and how it could also relate to lying.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 5: The Dopamine Market

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Does dopamine predict or follow the stock market? Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss how dopamine affects the choices we make, including decisions made on Wall Street.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 1: Consciousness

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Consciousness has many definitions but most include some reference to awareness. In this debut episode of Brain Coffee, Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, discuss what it means to be aware and conscious.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 2: Midlife Crisis

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Midlife crisis is defined as an emotional crisis of identity and self-confidence that can occur in middle-aged individuals, typically between 45 and 64 years old. Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, describe what's going on inside the brain during a midlife crisis.

The Brain Coffee Podcast
Episode 8: Mindfulness

The Brain Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2018


Although the practice of “mindfulness” has evolved over thousands of years, its core concept of intense presence has remained unchanged. Dr. Eric C. Leuthardt and Dr. Albert H. Kim, Washington University neurosurgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, explain how mindfulness and other coping mechanisms can help patients overcome a difficult diagnosis.

The Surg Onc Files
Minimally Invasive HPB and Oncologic Surgery

The Surg Onc Files

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2017


On this episode of the SO Files, Brad and Linda discuss minimally invasive hepatobiliary surgical oncology, focusing specifically on MIS pancreatic and liver surgery. The SO Files welcome special guest, Dr. Chet Hammill, Associate Professor of Surgery in the Hepatobiliary and GI Surgical Section at Wash U, Barnes Jewish Hospital.

The SIBO Doctor Podcast
Dr Lenny Weinstock - SIBO, Restless Leg Syndrome and More

The SIBO Doctor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2017 58:42


In this episode, Dr Nirala Jacobi is in conversation with world class gastroenterologist Dr Lenny Weinstock about Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and its connection to different conditions in the body. Dr Weinstock is board certified in gastroenterology and internal medicine, is the president of Specialists in Gastroenterology and the Advanced Endoscopy Centre, he teaches at Barnes Jewish Hospital and is an associate professor of clinical medicine and surgery at Washington University School of Medicine.  Dr Weinstock is also a primary investigator at the Sundance Research Centre and has written more than 80 articles, abstracts, editorials, and book chapters. He is passionate about SIBO and its connection to different conditions, such as Restless Leg Syndrome and Rosacea.   Topics discussed in this episode include: Dr Weinstock's approach to SIBO treatment in his Specialists in Gastroenterology Clinic Relapse rate after Rifaximin use Dr Mark Pimentel has mentioned relapse is hastened by adhesions - Dr Weinstock's take on this and Dr Weinstock's experience in his clinic. What are some triggers for SIBO? Autoimmune Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Post infectious IBS - damage to the migrating motor complex via an autoimmune attack on vinculin. Anatomical reasons Classical reasons Surgical reasons Adhesions Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) Ehlers-danlos Preventative therapy for SIBO Rifaximin use with prokinetic therapy Bifidobacterium Lactis HN019 as a therapeutic prokinetic. Testing for anti-vinculin antibodies on SIBO patients. POTS What's the connection to SIBO? Why is the prevalence increasing? What is the connection between POTS and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS)? Is there a potential for LPS and endotoxins to be travelling through nerves in the body? Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS), what it is, why do we get it, and what is the connection with SIBO? About hepcidin as an indicator of low serum iron in light of inflammation and how this is related to SIBO. For example: iron as a substrate for bacteria and how the body may respond by upregulating hepcidin to withhold iron from bacteria. Hepcidin as an antimicrobial peptide and its role in infectious diseases. The link between hepcidin and RLS. Why endorphins may be upregulated to protect the dopamine function in the brain in the setting of iron deficiency. Dr Weinstock's treatment strategies for RLS What to do if patient is unresponsive to Rifaximin therapy in light of SIBO positive testing. Low dose naltrexone (LDN) - its use in RLS. Low iron that does not respond to oral supplementation and the possible links to hepcidin. Biofilm therapy Exploring the 3 types of IBS in SIBO IBS - D IBS - M IBS - C The potential for large intestinal bacterial overgrowth (LIBO) to skew a hydrogen rise in SIBO tests that show consistent high methane from baseline. Treatment discussion for IBS - C Dr Jacobi's recommendation of BioGaia Protectis reuteri probiotic for methanogen treatment. 5 drops twice daily used in the study Dr Jacobi mentions. A couple of herbs Dr Jacobi uses for methane dominant SIBO treatment Garlic Myrrrh Dr Weinstock's clinical insights into the ileocecal valve (ICV) being chronically open and allowing reflux of bacteria up into small intestine from the large intestine.   Resources Dr Weinstock's Specialists in Gastroenterology Clinic BioGaia Protectis Bifidobacterium Lactis HN019 as a therapeutic prokinetic.