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The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #193: Some Accountability – But Mostly Impunity – For US Law Enforcement

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 87:33


On COI #193 Kyle Anzalone discusses several examples of American police abusing, even killing, citizens and covering up the crimes. Police rarely face criminal charges – or any consequences – for misconduct on the clock. However, with growing scrutiny of the broken criminal justice system, some officers have faced accountability.  Kyle breaks down the acquittal of Andrew Coffee IV and how it compares with the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. While other men were acquitted on the grounds of self-defense, the cases are very different. Coffee was charged for murdering his girlfriend, who was actually killed by the cops, and – unlike Rittenhouse – was convicted on a gun charge and still faces 30 years in prison.  The corrupt legacy of the criminal justice system has allowed innocent Americans to rot in prison for decades. Kyle talks about the cases of Ju'zema Goldring, Kevin Strickland, and the Groveland 4.  Kyle explains how the US economic war against the Taliban is killing Afghans. A Red Cross official warned that 20 million will go hungry this winter because of international sanctions.  Kyle updates the US relationship with China. After meeting with Chinese leader Xi, Biden has taken an aggressive stand against the Asian power. The US sailed a destroyer through the Taiwan Strait – a near monthly occurrence under the Biden presidency – and announced new war games in the Philippines Sea with countries from four continents.  Kyle looks at the secretary of state's recent trip to Africa, where Antony Blinken took up an anti-China message. To counter China in Africa, Washington is looking to forge stronger ties with the militaries across the continent. Blinken also warned of rising extremism in Africa, failing to realize the likely cause is – in part – the growing US military presence.  Kyle discusses the growing conflict in Ethiopia as the Tigray People's Liberation Front presses on toward the country's capital. Ethiopian leader Abiy Ahmed is reported to have gone to the front lines to rally his forces.  Kyle breaks down the recent coup in Sudan. The military seized power on October 25 and were met with protests. Though at least 40 demonstrators were gunned down following the putsch, Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok eventually returned to power. However, many protesters are unhappy with the terms he accepted to regain his title.  Last, Kyle updates the decade-long conflict in Libya, sparked by Obama's 2011 regime change op and air war. While the country remains fractured, UN-organized elections are set for December. The son of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi, Saif al-Islam, emerged as a popular candidate, but was disqualified to run by the country's electoral commission.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

Conflicts of Interest
Some Accountability – But Mostly Impunity – For US Law Enforcement

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 87:33


On COI #193 Kyle Anzalone discusses several examples of American police abusing, even killing, citizens and covering up the crimes. Police rarely face criminal charges – or any consequences – for misconduct on the clock. However, with growing scrutiny of the broken criminal justice system, some officers have faced accountability.  Kyle breaks down the acquittal of Andrew Coffee IV and how it compares with the Kyle Rittenhouse trial. While other men were acquitted on the grounds of self-defense, the cases are very different. Coffee was charged for murdering his girlfriend, who was actually killed by the cops, and – unlike Rittenhouse – was convicted on a gun charge and still faces 30 years in prison.  The corrupt legacy of the criminal justice system has allowed innocent Americans to rot in prison for decades. Kyle talks about the cases of Ju'zema Goldring, Kevin Strickland, and the Groveland 4.  Kyle explains how the US economic war against the Taliban is killing Afghans. A Red Cross official warned that 20 million will go hungry this winter because of international sanctions.  Kyle updates the US relationship with China. After meeting with Chinese leader Xi, Biden has taken an aggressive stand against the Asian power. The US sailed a destroyer through the Taiwan Strait – a near monthly occurrence under the Biden presidency – and announced new war games in the Philippines Sea with countries from four continents.  Kyle looks at the secretary of state's recent trip to Africa, where Antony Blinken took up an anti-China message. To counter China in Africa, Washington is looking to forge stronger ties with the militaries across the continent. Blinken also warned of rising extremism in Africa, failing to realize the likely cause is – in part – the growing US military presence.  Kyle discusses the growing conflict in Ethiopia as the Tigray People's Liberation Front presses on toward the country's capital. Ethiopian leader Abiy Ahmed is reported to have gone to the front lines to rally his forces.  Kyle breaks down the recent coup in Sudan. The military seized power on October 25 and were met with protests. Though at least 40 demonstrators were gunned down following the putsch, Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok eventually returned to power. However, many protesters are unhappy with the terms he accepted to regain his title.  Last, Kyle updates the decade-long conflict in Libya, sparked by Obama's 2011 regime change op and air war. While the country remains fractured, UN-organized elections are set for December. The son of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi, Saif al-Islam, emerged as a popular candidate, but was disqualified to run by the country's electoral commission.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist
*第五季*【EP. 259】#661 經濟學人導讀 feat. 國際時事 feat. 新聞評論【半島電視台 vs. 蘇丹;利比亞的小格達費從政;美中台的三方微妙;波士尼亞與赫塞哥維納 (Bosnia & Herzegovina)】

每日一經濟學人 LEON x The Economist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 36:49


VOMRadio
LIBYA: She Forgave Her Husband's Killers

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 24:57


On December 5, 2013, Ronnie Smith was shot and killed in the Libyan city of Benghazi. Within days, Ronnie's wife, Anita, spoke on national TV in the US about her love for the Libyan people and about forgiving her husband's murderers. She also did interviews—in Arabic—that were broadcast all over the Middle East. Listen to Anita Smith share the story—the story of her grief, but also the story of how God was present in those days, and in the years since. She'll talk about how God inspired her and Ronnie to pursue overseas gospel work—and how they prayed as they moved to Benghazi just months after the US consulate was overrun by Islamist fighters. She'll tell how their neighbors welcomed and adopted them—and about the day she received the terrible phone call that Ronnie had been killed. Listen next week for Part 2 of our conversation with Anita Smith. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast.

Monocle 24: The Globalist
Wednesday 17 November

Monocle 24: The Globalist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 60:00


We preview the Libyan election as general Khalifa Haftar declares his candidacy and explore the possibility of an EU-wide defence force. Plus, the debate about the restitution of the Parthenon marbles rages on.

The Greek Current
World leaders press for Libya elections and call for the withdrawal of foreign forces

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 14:14


France hosted an international conference on Libya in the presence of US Vice President Kamala Harris, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi and other international and regional high-level officials, including Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis. Leaders reaffirmed their commitment to ensure the success of the country's political process through elections that are scheduled for next month, and agreed to push for sanctions against anyone who disrupts Libya's electoral process and political transition. French President Macron also called on Russia and Turkey to withdraw their mercenaries from the country. Libya expert Aya Burweila joins The Greek Current with the latest analysis on the summit in Paris and on the current situation in Libya as the country gears up for elections next month. Aya Burweila is a Libyan expert from Benghazi based in Athens, is the founder and director of the non-profit Code on the Road, and a BBC Woman Expert in Terrorism and Radicalization.You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:World powers press for Libya elections but disputes remainWorld leaders bolster troubled Libya ahead of key electionTurkey rebuffs French call for troop withdrawal from LibyaMacron, Putin discuss deescalating Belarus border tensionsBelarus, Russia intertwine as EU builds responseEU to widen Belarus sanctions as row intensifiesGreek prime minister tries to broker deal for return of Parthenon marbles

Africa Today
Saif al-Islam Gaddafi running to be Libya president

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 24:12


Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of the former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, says he'll stand in December's landmark presidential election. Plus, after the conclusion of the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, what does the outcome mean for Africa? And Angolans in London add their voices to the chorus of protests taking place in their home country.

Monocle 24: The Briefing
Monday 15 November

Monocle 24: The Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 30:00


Has the Cop26 summit failed to take meaningful action on climate change? Plus: Joe Biden and Xi Jinping discuss their differences; we explore the influence of the Gaddafi family on Libyan politics; and Monocle's Chris Lord reviews the day's papers.

The Greek Current
A new U.S. strategy for the East Med focused on Greece?

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 16:36


The US role in the Eastern Mediterranean and the partnership between Washington, DC and Athens is the focus of a recent report by JINSA, the Jewish Institute for National Security of America. The report, titled “At the Center of the Crossroads: A New U.S. Strategy for the East Med',' highlights the geopolitical importance of the region for the United States, and calls on Washington to re-envision its presence in the Eastern Mediterranean to better defend its interests and support its regional partners. A large part of the report centers on Greece, with the authors calling on the US to expand its presence in the country in order to address challenges around the Eastern Mediterranean basin. Vassilis Nedos, Kathimerini's diplomatic and defense editor, joins The Greek Current to talk about this report, which is also the focus of an article he is publishing in Saturday's Kathimerini. You can read the report here: At the Center of the Crossroads: A New U.S. Strategy for the East MedYou can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Greece wants dialogue with UK for return of Parthenon sculpturesPM urges return of Parthenon SculpturesWorld powers press for Libya elections but disputes remainMitsotakis: Greece ready to work with new Libyan gov't

The Opperman Report'
James & JoAnne Moriarty : Libya

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 300:02


James & JoAnne Moriarty : LibyaWe were business people doing business in Libya since 2007 January. We made a unique enzyme that rejuvenates oil wells and cleans up sludge pits, cleans out pipelines and tanks and does a whole lot of neat things to oil. We booked a huge amount of business in Libya from 2007 to 2011: 5 billion dollars worth of our product. We signed a JV with the Social Security Investment Fund of Janzour near Tripoli, Libya. We actively began to build a production facility to fulfill these contracts for our enzyme when the so called Libyan revolution began in February of 20114 years ago #&, #-, #ed, #james, #joanne, #libya, #moriarty, #opperman, #report

The Opperman Report
James & JoAnne Moriarty : Libya

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 300:02


James & JoAnne Moriarty : Libya We were business people doing business in Libya since 2007 January. We made a unique enzyme that rejuvenates oil wells and cleans up sludge pits, cleans out pipelines and tanks and does a whole lot of neat things to oil. We booked a huge amount of business in Libya from 2007 to 2011: 5 billion dollars worth of our product. We signed a JV with the Social Security Investment Fund of Janzour near Tripoli, Libya. We actively began to build a production facility to fulfill these contracts for our enzyme when the so called Libyan revolution began in February of 2011 4 years ago #&, #-, #ed, #james, #joanne, #libya, #moriarty, #opperman, #report

Da Miri Podcast
89: الزبدة | ليش لازم تعيش عمرك مع سمر جدور

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 14:54


 الزبدة أنّه الحياة مرات تفاجئك بشكل لا يمكن لك تصوره.. ولازم تتصرف!  الكاتبة والمدونة (المريوحة) تحكيلنا بكل مشاعرها عن النقطة المفصلية اللي صنعت شخصيتها وتجربة تحملها المسؤولية بعد وفاة أمها وهي عمرها بس 11 سنة.  الزبدة هذي من الحلقة رقم 33 وتقدر تسمعها كاملة يمكنك/ي الأن مشاهدتي والاشترك الى قناتي على YouTube!تابعني على الانستجرام و التويتر لآخر اخبار داميريلدعم/ي داميري:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriللاشتراك في البريد الاسبوعي اضغط سبسكرايب في الموقع:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

POMEPS Conversations
The Arab Spring Abroad, The Syrian Uprising, and Sudan's Transitional Crisis (S. 11, Ep. 8)

POMEPS Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 62:50


Dana Moss of University of Notre Dame discusses her latest book, The Arab Spring Abroad: Diaspora Activism against Authoritarian Regimes, with Marc Lynch on this week's podcast. The book presents a new framework for understanding the transnational dynamics of contention and the social forces that either enable or suppress transnational activism, examining Libyan, Syrian, and Yemeni mobilization from the US and Great Britain before and during the revolutions. (Starts at 0:42). Wendy Pearlman of Northwestern University speaks about her new article entitled, "Mobilizing From Scratch: Large-Scale Collective Action Without Preexisting Organization in the Syrian Uprising," published in Comparative Political Studies. (Starts at 30:23). Salah Ben Hammou of University of Central Florida talks about the crisis unfolding in Sudan following the military coup. (Starts at 47:17). Music for this season's podcast was created by Bashir Saade (playing Ney) and Farah Kaddour (on Buzuq). You can find more of Bashir's work on his YouTube Channel.

Overnight with Michael McLaren
Arab Spring's blood drenched legacy

Overnight with Michael McLaren

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:38


Michael is joined by Alan Howe, the Australian Newspaper History & Obituaries editor, about his recent article that looks back at the hundreds of thousands that died in the fighting sparked by an uprising in Tunisia that began in late 2010 – the Arab Spring – but where so little has changed.   Mr Howe writes, ‘The Arab world has long been a combustible fusion of fear and faith. Both have been manipulated by sometimes unhinged tyrants who long ago understood the juggling act needed to maintain power. Corruption, cruelty and murder go a long way to keeping the peace. As does eliminating noisy dissidents in foreign capitals.'   ‘It all peaked 10 years ago today when Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi was secretly buried after a hometown convoy in which he felt safe was bombed and then overwhelmed by rebels who stabbed him and shot him and put the bodies of the tyrant and his son on display.'   ‘The protests in Tunisia spread quickly to other nations, unsettled a dozen more, sparked off ongoing civil wars in Syria, Yemen and Libya, saw the rise of ISIS, a coup in Egypt and street riots in other countries, even in oppressive Saudi Arabia.' See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
October 26: 2 Kings 7; 1 Timothy 4; Psalm 119:25–48; Daniel 11

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:12


With family: 2 Kings 7; 1 Timothy 4 2 Kings 7 (Listen) Elisha Promises Food 7 But Elisha said, “Hear the word of the LORD: thus says the LORD, Tomorrow about this time a seah1 of fine flour shall be sold for a shekel,2 and two seahs of barley for a shekel, at the gate of Samaria.” 2 Then the captain on whose hand the king leaned said to the man of God, “If the LORD himself should make windows in heaven, could this thing be?” But he said, “You shall see it with your own eyes, but you shall not eat of it.” The Syrians Flee 3 Now there were four men who were lepers3 at the entrance to the gate. And they said to one another, “Why are we sitting here until we die? 4 If we say, ‘Let us enter the city,' the famine is in the city, and we shall die there. And if we sit here, we die also. So now come, let us go over to the camp of the Syrians. If they spare our lives we shall live, and if they kill us we shall but die.” 5 So they arose at twilight to go to the camp of the Syrians. But when they came to the edge of the camp of the Syrians, behold, there was no one there. 6 For the Lord had made the army of the Syrians hear the sound of chariots and of horses, the sound of a great army, so that they said to one another, “Behold, the king of Israel has hired against us the kings of the Hittites and the kings of Egypt to come against us.” 7 So they fled away in the twilight and abandoned their tents, their horses, and their donkeys, leaving the camp as it was, and fled for their lives. 8 And when these lepers came to the edge of the camp, they went into a tent and ate and drank, and they carried off silver and gold and clothing and went and hid them. Then they came back and entered another tent and carried off things from it and went and hid them. 9 Then they said to one another, “We are not doing right. This day is a day of good news. If we are silent and wait until the morning light, punishment will overtake us. Now therefore come; let us go and tell the king's household.” 10 So they came and called to the gatekeepers of the city and told them, “We came to the camp of the Syrians, and behold, there was no one to be seen or heard there, nothing but the horses tied and the donkeys tied and the tents as they were.” 11 Then the gatekeepers called out, and it was told within the king's household. 12 And the king rose in the night and said to his servants, “I will tell you what the Syrians have done to us. They know that we are hungry. Therefore they have gone out of the camp to hide themselves in the open country, thinking, ‘When they come out of the city, we shall take them alive and get into the city.'” 13 And one of his servants said, “Let some men take five of the remaining horses, seeing that those who are left here will fare like the whole multitude of Israel who have already perished. Let us send and see.” 14 So they took two horsemen, and the king sent them after the army of the Syrians, saying, “Go and see.” 15 So they went after them as far as the Jordan, and behold, all the way was littered with garments and equipment that the Syrians had thrown away in their haste. And the messengers returned and told the king. 16 Then the people went out and plundered the camp of the Syrians. So a seah of fine flour was sold for a shekel, and two seahs of barley for a shekel, according to the word of the LORD. 17 Now the king had appointed the captain on whose hand he leaned to have charge of the gate. And the people trampled him in the gate, so that he died, as the man of God had said when the king came down to him. 18 For when the man of God had said to the king, “Two seahs of barley shall be sold for a shekel, and a seah of fine flour for a shekel, about this time tomorrow in the gate of Samaria,” 19 the captain had answered the man of God, “If the LORD himself should make windows in heaven, could such a thing be?” And he had said, “You shall see it with your own eyes, but you shall not eat of it.” 20 And so it happened to him, for the people trampled him in the gate and he died. Footnotes [1] 7:1 A seah was about 7 quarts or 7.3 liters [2] 7:1 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams [3] 7:3 Leprosy was a term for several skin diseases; see Leviticus 13 (ESV) 1 Timothy 4 (Listen) Some Will Depart from the Faith 4 Now the Spirit expressly says that in later times some will depart from the faith by devoting themselves to deceitful spirits and teachings of demons, 2 through the insincerity of liars whose consciences are seared, 3 who forbid marriage and require abstinence from foods that God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth. 4 For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving, 5 for it is made holy by the word of God and prayer. A Good Servant of Christ Jesus 6 If you put these things before the brothers,1 you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, being trained in the words of the faith and of the good doctrine that you have followed. 7 Have nothing to do with irreverent, silly myths. Rather train yourself for godliness; 8 for while bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way, as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come. 9 The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance. 10 For to this end we toil and strive,2 because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all people, especially of those who believe. 11 Command and teach these things. 12 Let no one despise you for your youth, but set the believers an example in speech, in conduct, in love, in faith, in purity. 13 Until I come, devote yourself to the public reading of Scripture, to exhortation, to teaching. 14 Do not neglect the gift you have, which was given you by prophecy when the council of elders laid their hands on you. 15 Practice these things, immerse yourself in them,3 so that all may see your progress. 16 Keep a close watch on yourself and on the teaching. Persist in this, for by so doing you will save both yourself and your hearers. Footnotes [1] 4:6 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters [2] 4:10 Some manuscripts and suffer reproach [3] 4:15 Greek be in them (ESV) In private: Psalm 119:25–48; Daniel 11 Psalm 119:25–48 (Listen) Daleth 25   My soul clings to the dust;    give me life according to your word!26   When I told of my ways, you answered me;    teach me your statutes!27   Make me understand the way of your precepts,    and I will meditate on your wondrous works.28   My soul melts away for sorrow;    strengthen me according to your word!29   Put false ways far from me    and graciously teach me your law!30   I have chosen the way of faithfulness;    I set your rules before me.31   I cling to your testimonies, O LORD;    let me not be put to shame!32   I will run in the way of your commandments    when you enlarge my heart!1 He 33   Teach me, O LORD, the way of your statutes;    and I will keep it to the end.234   Give me understanding, that I may keep your law    and observe it with my whole heart.35   Lead me in the path of your commandments,    for I delight in it.36   Incline my heart to your testimonies,    and not to selfish gain!37   Turn my eyes from looking at worthless things;    and give me life in your ways.38   Confirm to your servant your promise,    that you may be feared.39   Turn away the reproach that I dread,    for your rules are good.40   Behold, I long for your precepts;    in your righteousness give me life! Waw 41   Let your steadfast love come to me, O LORD,    your salvation according to your promise;42   then shall I have an answer for him who taunts me,    for I trust in your word.43   And take not the word of truth utterly out of my mouth,    for my hope is in your rules.44   I will keep your law continually,    forever and ever,45   and I shall walk in a wide place,    for I have sought your precepts.46   I will also speak of your testimonies before kings    and shall not be put to shame,47   for I find my delight in your commandments,    which I love.48   I will lift up my hands toward your commandments, which I love,    and I will meditate on your statutes. Footnotes [1] 119:32 Or for you set my heart free [2] 119:33 Or keep it as my reward (ESV) Daniel 11 (Listen) The Kings of the South and the North 11 “And as for me, in the first year of Darius the Mede, I stood up to confirm and strengthen him. 2 “And now I will show you the truth. Behold, three more kings shall arise in Persia, and a fourth shall be far richer than all of them. And when he has become strong through his riches, he shall stir up all against the kingdom of Greece. 3 Then a mighty king shall arise, who shall rule with great dominion and do as he wills. 4 And as soon as he has arisen, his kingdom shall be broken and divided toward the four winds of heaven, but not to his posterity, nor according to the authority with which he ruled, for his kingdom shall be plucked up and go to others besides these. 5 “Then the king of the south shall be strong, but one of his princes shall be stronger than he and shall rule, and his authority shall be a great authority. 6 After some years they shall make an alliance, and the daughter of the king of the south shall come to the king of the north to make an agreement. But she shall not retain the strength of her arm, and he and his arm shall not endure, but she shall be given up, and her attendants, he who fathered her, and he who supported1 her in those times. 7 “And from a branch from her roots one shall arise in his place. He shall come against the army and enter the fortress of the king of the north, and he shall deal with them and shall prevail. 8 He shall also carry off to Egypt their gods with their metal images and their precious vessels of silver and gold, and for some years he shall refrain from attacking the king of the north. 9 Then the latter shall come into the realm of the king of the south but shall return to his own land. 10 “His sons shall wage war and assemble a multitude of great forces, which shall keep coming and overflow and pass through, and again shall carry the war as far as his fortress. 11 Then the king of the south, moved with rage, shall come out and fight against the king of the north. And he shall raise a great multitude, but it shall be given into his hand. 12 And when the multitude is taken away, his heart shall be exalted, and he shall cast down tens of thousands, but he shall not prevail. 13 For the king of the north shall again raise a multitude, greater than the first. And after some years2 he shall come on with a great army and abundant supplies. 14 “In those times many shall rise against the king of the south, and the violent among your own people shall lift themselves up in order to fulfill the vision, but they shall fail. 15 Then the king of the north shall come and throw up siegeworks and take a well-fortified city. And the forces of the south shall not stand, or even his best troops, for there shall be no strength to stand. 16 But he who comes against him shall do as he wills, and none shall stand before him. And he shall stand in the glorious land, with destruction in his hand. 17 He shall set his face to come with the strength of his whole kingdom, and he shall bring terms of an agreement and perform them. He shall give him the daughter of women to destroy the kingdom,3 but it shall not stand or be to his advantage. 18 Afterward he shall turn his face to the coastlands and shall capture many of them, but a commander shall put an end to his insolence. Indeed,4 he shall turn his insolence back upon him. 19 Then he shall turn his face back toward the fortresses of his own land, but he shall stumble and fall, and shall not be found. 20 “Then shall arise in his place one who shall send an exactor of tribute for the glory of the kingdom. But within a few days he shall be broken, neither in anger nor in battle. 21 In his place shall arise a contemptible person to whom royal majesty has not been given. He shall come in without warning and obtain the kingdom by flatteries. 22 Armies shall be utterly swept away before him and broken, even the prince of the covenant. 23 And from the time that an alliance is made with him he shall act deceitfully, and he shall become strong with a small people. 24 Without warning he shall come into the richest parts5 of the province, and he shall do what neither his fathers nor his fathers' fathers have done, scattering among them plunder, spoil, and goods. He shall devise plans against strongholds, but only for a time. 25 And he shall stir up his power and his heart against the king of the south with a great army. And the king of the south shall wage war with an exceedingly great and mighty army, but he shall not stand, for plots shall be devised against him. 26 Even those who eat his food shall break him. His army shall be swept away, and many shall fall down slain. 27 And as for the two kings, their hearts shall be bent on doing evil. They shall speak lies at the same table, but to no avail, for the end is yet to be at the time appointed. 28 And he shall return to his land with great wealth, but his heart shall be set against the holy covenant. And he shall work his will and return to his own land. 29 “At the time appointed he shall return and come into the south, but it shall not be this time as it was before. 30 For ships of Kittim shall come against him, and he shall be afraid and withdraw, and shall turn back and be enraged and take action against the holy covenant. He shall turn back and pay attention to those who forsake the holy covenant. 31 Forces from him shall appear and profane the temple and fortress, and shall take away the regular burnt offering. And they shall set up the abomination that makes desolate. 32 He shall seduce with flattery those who violate the covenant, but the people who know their God shall stand firm and take action. 33 And the wise among the people shall make many understand, though for some days they shall stumble by sword and flame, by captivity and plunder. 34 When they stumble, they shall receive a little help. And many shall join themselves to them with flattery, 35 and some of the wise shall stumble, so that they may be refined, purified, and made white, until the time of the end, for it still awaits the appointed time. 36 “And the king shall do as he wills. He shall exalt himself and magnify himself above every god, and shall speak astonishing things against the God of gods. He shall prosper till the indignation is accomplished; for what is decreed shall be done. 37 He shall pay no attention to the gods of his fathers, or to the one beloved by women. He shall not pay attention to any other god, for he shall magnify himself above all. 38 He shall honor the god of fortresses instead of these. A god whom his fathers did not know he shall honor with gold and silver, with precious stones and costly gifts. 39 He shall deal with the strongest fortresses with the help of a foreign god. Those who acknowledge him he shall load with honor. He shall make them rulers over many and shall divide the land for a price.6 40 “At the time of the end, the king of the south shall attack7 him, but the king of the north shall rush upon him like a whirlwind, with chariots and horsemen, and with many ships. And he shall come into countries and shall overflow and pass through. 41 He shall come into the glorious land. And tens of thousands shall fall, but these shall be delivered out of his hand: Edom and Moab and the main part of the Ammonites. 42 He shall stretch out his hand against the countries, and the land of Egypt shall not escape. 43 He shall become ruler of the treasures of gold and of silver, and all the precious things of Egypt, and the Libyans and the Cushites shall follow in his train. 44 But news from the east and the north shall alarm him, and he shall go out with great fury to destroy and devote many to destruction. 45 And he shall pitch his palatial tents between the sea and the glorious holy mountain. Yet he shall come to his end, with none to help him. Footnotes [1] 11:6 Or obtained [2] 11:13 Hebrew at the end of the times [3] 11:17 Hebrew her, or it [4] 11:18 The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [5] 11:24 Or among the richest men [6] 11:39 Or land as payment [7] 11:40 Hebrew thrust at (ESV)

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast
The Terror Within II - Daddy's home, Monster Baby

Stinker Madness - The Bad Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 65:24


Once again, those randy monsters try to break into an underground lab of dubious intent and the only man whose ever fought them does nothing to help anyone but himself to some horny waste-lander. But this time, he fathers his own monster baby. Daddy's home, sucka! Continuing the story of David, one of two survivors from Mojave Lab of the first film, we find him on his way to Rocky Mountain Lab where he plans to spend the rest of his days on a weekend booty/peyote hunt. I guess they don't have vaccines to the virus that killed all of mankind but now they have a method of creating one. The sole missing ingredient comes from cacti that he must gather for them on his way. As one could predict his journey is hampered by the monsters as well as a cult that sacrifices hot ladies to the monster's lusty ways in order to save themselves (that doesn't make sense). He meets a randy lady who comforts his grief for the world by offering up her luscious bits. She manages to get pregnant with his child only to later have the monster have his way with her creating a super mutant monster baby within her. The terror! Well David, doesn't bother to divulge his experiences the last time his lover got monster-impregnated, nor does he bother to use his dog whistle to stop anyone from being murdered, until it is far too late. Good stuff, David! Once, said monster-baby is born he faces off in a death battle against his offspring that represents itself in a full grown man suit with a conjoined twin on its face (we think). Hilarity ensues when mom disciplines the monster baby and David kills it in the way a certain Libyan dictator was killed by his own subjects - in the butt. Terror Within II isn't going to make it on anyone's hall of fame list but it is beyond a day a much better time than the first one. Its not draggy and while devoid of much plot, manages to fill its time with enough wacky business that keeps you engaged. The final sequence is worth the price of admission but the rest of the film isn't a joyless experience and is a great riffer. We say do it!

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner
AFRICOM, #Striketober and Line 3 Pipeline Protests

Barbarian Noetics with Conan Tanner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 120:12


What's up to my wild-hearted wildebeests and capering cape buffalos!Welcome back to the BNP everyone! Thank you for joining. Shout out to my patrons- I love you! Strap in folks, there's a lot on the docket for this one. This week is a solo mission, and I tackle 3 topics that are both timely and critical for empire babies and concerned global citizens to understand. They are also all being ignored in the corporate media, unsurprisingly.  Firstly, we cover #Striketober, a month of rolling worker strikes across the U.S. There are currently 18 active strikes, including at massive corporations like Kellogg's and John Deere. Solidarity to all striking workers!! Boycott Kellogg's products until the workers get what they deserve. Secondly, we cover the ongoing Indigenous led protests against the Enbridge Line 3 Tar Sand Pipeline in N. Minnesota.  This pipeline is brazenly breaking tribal treaties and polluting our precious land and water. Indigenous activists and allies occupied the Bureau of Indian Affairs building in D.C. for the first time since 1972. Over 150 people have been arrested and elders have been getting beaten and tazed by the state. Finally, we unpack AFRICOM, or U.S. African Command. AFRICOM represents a troublingly large and growing footprint of the U.S. military, intelligence agencies and special forces across the African continent. AFRICOM grew massively under the Obama administration, and has accelerated since the brutal overthrow of Libya, because the Libyan leadership was a major force in resisting AFRICOM. Now, it's spread out all across the continent, and the U.S. is executing 4,000+ mostly secret missions a year. We never hear about this, because the corporate media is white supremacist. This episode is my offering to help raise awareness about AFRICOM, so we can build a movement at home to end it. U.S. Out Of Africa!  Thank you for rating, reviewing and subscribing to the BNP wherever you listen to podcasts, and for spreading the word and telling a friend about the BNP. It's how we expand our tribe of philosopher-barbarians and un-fuck the world together!   Can haz patrons? Go to www.patreon.com/noetics and sign up for as little as $1/month to receive several hundred acres of beachfront real estate on Ibiza!*Can haz followers? BNP on IG @conantannerSend me a haiku at barbarian.noetics@gmail.comUntil next week everyone,be good to yourselves and excellent to each other.One Love,ConanTRACKLIST FOR THIS EPISODE Love & Light - So Much Yes Atyya & Goopsteppa - Nova Mindful Vibes Episode 05John Williams - The Magic of HalloweenDykotomi - Corvid CrunkDirty Heads - Vacations y Vacaciones feat Jon Z Scheer Intelligence Podcast - God Caged in New JerseyInner Peace and Harmony (Solfeggio Mix) Sasha Marie Radio Episode 12 Zelda and Chill Lofi Mix Alex Jones Rant as an Indie Folk Song Robo Rat - Something Al Jazeera - Why is the US in Africa? (Video Segment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzfD5WWBOrQ)Luv Sic. Lo Fi MixSoul Chef - Hello Outkast - Tomb of the BoomPooh Sheisty - Back in Blood feat Lil Durk Ana Tijoux - Antifa Dance TIME STAMPSStriketober Segment: 35 min. Line 3 Pipeline Protests: 50 min.AFRICOM Segment: Starts at 1 hr 8 min.Black Alliance for Peace AFRICOM Teach-In Resources: https://blackallianceforpeace.com/usoutofSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/noetics)

The Daily
Qaddafi's Son is Alive, and He Wants to Take Back Libya

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 34:39


Before the Arab Spring, Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi, the second son of the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, was establishing himself as a serious figure internationally. Then, the Arab Spring came to Libya.His father and brothers were killed and Seif himself was captured by rebels and taken to the western mountains of Libya.For years, rumors have surrounded the fate of Seif. Now he has re-emerged, touting political ambitions, but where has he been and what has he learned?Guest: Robert F. Worth, a contributor to The New York Times Magazine. Love listening to New York Times podcasts? Help us test a new audio product in beta and give us your thoughts to shape what it becomes. Visit nytimes.com/audio to join the beta.Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background reading: In his first meeting with a foreign journalist in a decade, Seif al-Islam Qaddafi described his years in captivity — and hinted at a bid for Libya's presidency.For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday. 

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Nostalgia For Gaddafi

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:47


Libya has been marking an anniversary of sorts this week: ten years since the dictator Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was killed, having been toppled from power as part of the Arab Spring. Since then, elections have been held, and a much-delayed election for a new President is due at the end of this year. But few have much faith in this process. Whole swathes of Libya are beyond the control of the national government in Tripoli. So it's perhaps not surprising in these circumstances that some Libyans are nostalgic for the days of Gaddafi's rule, despite the human rights abuses which took place. Among those who remain loyal is the man who was once Gaddafi's advisor, and sometime interpreter. Tim Whewell has been talking to him. Democracy in Libya may be very much a work in progress, but here in Europe, there are some who feel that long-standing democracies are also being threatened. The murder in Britain of the MP, David Amess was described by many as an attack on democracy itself. And that suggestion had echoes from a recent killing in the Peter De Vries was famous as an investigative reporter in the Netherlands. He ignored repeated threats to his life, while he bravely uncovered the power of international criminals. This week, two men went on trial in Amsterdam, accused of murdering him. It was an act the Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, said was “an attack on the free journalism so essential for our democracy". But then Mr Rutte has himself had to change his habit of cycling alone through Holland's streets, because he too has received death threats. Anna Holligan reports. During its twenty year presence in Afghanistan, American troops brought in billions of dollars' worth of gear, and quite a lot of it seems to have found its way into the hands of smugglers, who brought it across the border to neighbouring Pakistan. Some of it is still sold furtively in small towns, but one Lahore shopkeeper is making a good living by selling very openly this stolen US Army equipment. Ironically, he considers himself an implacable enemy of all things American, and a supporter of the Taleban. Ali Kazmi went to meet him. With just days to go until the COP26 summit on climate change, there's ever more pressure being applied to countries to explain how they propose to get to net zero or in other words, how to reach the point where they do not contribute any net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. They're being encouraged both to set targets, and to outline what measures they will introduce to reach them. But there's an island in Denmark which has already gone one stage further and become “carbon positive.” Ritula Shah went to Samsoe to find out how they've done it. When you think of ancient mummies, you might think of Egypt, with its famously preserved pharoes and other leading lights of that ancient civilisation. In fact, the oldest mummies in the world were discovered in Chile. They were discovered in 1917 by a German archaeologist, but it took decades for the mummies to be correctly dated, and identified as part of the Chinchorro civilisation. And they're still not on the tourist map, the way that the pyramids and their long dead occupants are. Jane Chambers travelled into the heart of what was once Chinchorro country, to see the mummies for herself.

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
How to gain power with The 48 Laws of Power & Art of Seduction with World Leading Author, NY Times Best Selling Author Robert Greene

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 66:13


How to gain power with The 48 Laws of Power & Laws of Attraction with NY Times Best Selling Author Robert Greene   The 48 Laws of Power has been referenced in songs by Jay Z, Kanye West, and Drake.  Busta Rhymes used The 48 Laws of Power to deal with problematic movie producers. Greene has claimed former Cuban President Fidel Castro had also read the book. The Libyan politician Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, read his books as part of his reading routine. The 48 Laws of Power is one of the most requested books in American prison libraries. Several American prisons have banned The 48 Laws of Power and The 33 Strategies of War. Greene's books are sometimes described as manipulative and amoral. The Sunday Times noted that The 48 Laws of Power has become the "Hollywood back-stabber's bible" and that although the book is reportedly used by some business executives, it is difficult to find people who publicly acknowledge its influence because of the book's controversial nature.  Greene responds to this sentiment by stating, "These laws… people might say, 'Oh they're wicked', but they're practiced day in and day out by businesspeople. You're always trying to get rid of your competition and it can be pretty bloodthirsty, and that's just the reality. Greene's work has been featured in The New York Times, USA Today, CNN, The New Yorker, Newsweek, the Los Angeles Times, Forbes, Huffington Post, Business Week, Business Insider, Fast Company, Slate, and XXL. Greene has also appeared on The Today Show, CNBC, ABC, and MTV News

So what you're saying is...
Andrew Neil's Replacement On GB News Discusses GB News, His Life & Career, The Culture Wars & More

So what you're saying is...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 35:35


Award-winning Colin Brazier is one of the most respected figures in broadcast journalism. His accolades include an International Emmy (for his reporting on the European migrant crisis) as well as nominations for both a BAFTA and the Royal Television Society Award for Presenter of the Year. Prior to joining GB News, where his show "Brazier" now replaces "The Andrew Neil Show" on weekday evenings, Colin was at Sky News (1997-2021). He was the first British journalist to enter Southern Lebanon with Israeli forces in 2006 and, before that, he was the first British journalist to enter Iraq with coalition troops during the 2003 invasion. His related documentary, Brothers in Baghdad, was shortlisted at the 48th Monte-Carlo Television Festival. In 2009, Brazier conducted one of the final interviews given by Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. He joins us on the #SWYSI sofa to discuss his fascinating life & career, the culture wars and much more. --------------- SUBSCRIBE: If you are enjoying the show, please subscribe to our channel on YouTube (click the Subscribe Button underneath the video and then Click on the Bell icon next to it to make sure you Receive All Notifications) AUDIO: If you prefer Audio you can subscribe on itunes or Soundcloud. Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-923838732

Da Miri Podcast
87: الزبدة | كيف يشتغل عقلك تحت سيطرة الاكتئاب مع فاطمة شريف

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 12:47


 الزبدة أنه الإكتئاب مرات يكون أسوأ من السرطان!  المدونة (فاطمة الشريف) تحكيلنا بكل شجاعة عن فترة الإكتئاب اللي مرت بيها وتراكم الأحداث اللي أدى بيها للتفكير حتى في إنهاء حياتها! وكيف تمكنت من تجاوزها في النهاية.  الزبدة هذي من الحلقة رقم 11 وتقدر تسمعها كاملة يمكنك/ي الأن مشاهدتي والاشترك الى قناتي على YouTube! تابعني على الانستجرام و التويتر لآخر اخبار داميريلدعم/ي داميري:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriللاشتراك في البريد الاسبوعي اضغط سبسكرايب في الموقع:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

Across Africa
Togolese women increasingly targeted by cyber bullies

Across Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:15


Togolese women say they're fending off more sexist cyberbullying than ever before. Also, we report on the female construction workers helping change the landscape of Central African Republic. Finally, Leptis Magna was once one of the most beautiful cities of the Roman Empire, but today the Libyan ruins are on UNESCO's list of at-risk heritage sites.

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
Trumpworld Facing Prison for Defying Jan 6th Subpoenas + A Conversation with Matthew Van Dyke

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 87:58


It's the showdown to end all showdowns as Trump orders his inner circle to defy the congressional subpoenas handed down from the January 6th Committee. But Dems are talking tough and threatening contempt charges for whoever doesn't comply. Later in the show Michael speaks with the remarkable, Matthew Van Dyke, founder of Sons of Liberty International about his time as a Libyan prisoner of war, fighting ISIS and why the January 6th rioters are traitors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Da Miri Podcast
86: الزبدة | وضع وفرص العمل المتوفرة للبنات مع محمد الباوندي

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 9:57


 الزبدة  أنه  طبيعة المجتمع هي اللي تمنع عديد النساء من التوظيف!  المترجِم ومستشار التوظيف (محمد الباوندي) يحكيلنا عن المساواة بين الجنسين في الحصول على عمل في السوق الليبي، وهل الفرص متساوية في ظل الظروف الحالية ولا فيه تحيزات ثقافية تلعب دورها فالموضوع.  الزبدة هذي من الحلقة رقم 43 وتقدر تسمعها كاملة. يمكنك/ي الأن مشاهدتي والاشترك الى قناتي على YouTube!  تابعني على الانستجرام و التويتر لآخر اخبار داميريلدعم/ي داميري:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriللاشتراك في البريد الاسبوعي اضغط سبسكرايب في الموقع:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Silence Falls in Libya

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 28:47


It's not easy to talk in Tripoli; Palestinian anger over Nizar Banat's death; the MH17 trial in the Netherlands; Rwandan forces in Mozambique; a number plate dispute in the Balkans In Libya, the promise of a new dawn after the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime a decade ago now seems to ring hollow. After its revolution came civil war – as militias proliferated and fought for control. For more than six years the country was split between rival administrations in the east and west. There's been a ceasefire since last year, and an internationally-brokered unity government is now installed. Elections are planned for December. Daily life for Libyans hasn't got much easier though. There are still frequent electricity blackouts, high unemployment – and regular street protests. But Tim Whewell was more struck by a sense of creeping silence. In Ramallah, a military trial has begun this for 14 members of the Palestinian security forces, charged in connection with the death of a prominent critic of the president. Nizar Banat – who was known for his outspoken Facebook posts alleging corruption among the Palestinian political elite – was badly beaten and died shortly after he was taken into custody in June. The official line was that he'd died of natural causes. But his death sparked some of the biggest protests against the Palestinian Authority in years.. Yolande Knell reports on the case - and the public anger it's triggered. Since 2017, Mozambique has been trying to stop a shadowy insurgency in its northern province, Cabo Delgado. The rebels there claim to be affiliated to the Islamic State – but little is known about the group. It started with small-scale, isolated attacks, but the conflict escalated last year, driving hundreds of thousands of people from their homes. It is estimated that 2,500 people have died in the fighting so far. This March the militants gained the world's attention when they launched attacks in the gas-rich area of Palma, forcing French petroleum giant Total to shut down its operations there. To fight back, Mozambique has called on help from military forces from Rwanda – who now say they've retaken 90% of the province in a month-long operation. The rebels have now been pushed deep into the area's forests - but Mozambique says it is not claiming victory yet. Anne Soy has been to the region with the Rwandan forces. A court in the Netherlands has been hearing emotional testimony from those whose relatives died aboard flight MH17, which was brought down over rebel-held eastern Ukraine in 2014. Dutch prosecutors have brought charges against three Russians and a Ukrainian citizen: they are all suspected of having key roles in transporting the missile system used to launch the rocket which hit the plane. None of the men have appeared in court; only one has appointed a team of lawyers. Two-thirds of MH17's passengers were Dutch citizens, and the Netherlands blames Moscow for the attack. Anna Holligan has seen and heard some of the evidence submitted by the bereaved. Armed conflict can break out for all kinds of reasons. But a row over car number plates seems one of the more unlikely flashpoints. Yet in the Balkans this summer, that's exactly what prompted Serbia to put its troops on high alert, Kosovo to deploy its special police – and NATO to step up its peacekeeping activities in the area. As Guy De Launey knows from long experience – it's always important to consider what's on your number plate before you set off on any journey in the region. Producer: Polly Hope

Strait Talk
Libya's Political Crisis Worsens After No-confidence Vote

Strait Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 12:18


A no-confidence vote against Libya's interim government is a new blow to the UN-backed peace efforts in the country. The situation has taken a complex turn since last year's ceasefire agreement and the forming of a transitional government to prepare for elections. But now with protests in Tripoli, it remains unclear whether Libya would be able to stick to its deadline of holding elections later this year. Moreover, the US House of Representatives recently passed a bill that could enable sanctions against foreign actors backing rival Libyan factions has added to the turmoil. Guests: Anas El Gomati Director of Sadeq Institute Umberto Profazio Associate Fellow at IISS

Da Miri Podcast
85: الزبدة | الرحلة الي وصلتني لمنحة الدكتورة مع رفاء الرجيبي

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 14:19


 الزبدة أنّه القراية في الخارج عمليّة معقّدة أكثر من اللازم في ليبيا أستاذة اللغويّات (رفاء الرجيبي) تحكيلنا عن رحلة الحصول على المنحة لاستكمال رحلتها الأكاديمية خارج البلاد، وكيف أثّرت هالرحلة على حياتها وشخصيتها وصحّتها النفسيّة.   الزبدة هذي من الحلقة رقم 26 وتقدر تسمعها كاملة تابعني على الانستجرام و التويتر لآخر اخبار داميريلدعم/ي داميري:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriللاشتراك في البريد الاسبوعي اضغط سبسكرايب في الموقع:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

The Stuart Bedasso Show
Melyssa Got Married

The Stuart Bedasso Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 70:09


Melyssa got married. But you didn't hear it from us. No, wait. You did. There was New Wave music, Libyan food, & a whole lot more. There was a honeymoon in the woods, with no chainsaw murderer. Dave's job suck. More on that later. Support Stuart Bedasso media at www.StuartBedasso.com.

Conservative Daily Podcast
More Hunter Biden Crimes Uncovered!

Conservative Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:45


Hunter Biden committed even more crimes than we thought! Now, new emails reveal he tried to shake down the Libyan government for millions of dollars in exchange for getting their assets unfrozen. This was while Joe Biden was VP and it is VERY illegal. Purchase your upside-down flag, In Dire Distress shirt here: https://store.conservative-daily.com/products/9111 Today's podcast is again sponsored by AirMedCare Network! Do you live in a rural area that's hard to reach by road? Do you like to hike or spend a lot of time outdoors? Health insurance wont always cover the cost of an emergency medical flight. But with AirMedCare Network, you're covered! For as little as $85 per year, your WHOLE household will be covered in case you ever need an air medical transport. And if you use Promo Code DAILY, you will receive up to a $50 eGift Card back when you sign up today! You can sign up right here: https://www.airmedcarenetwork.com/daily If you want to support the show, you can donate here: http://bit.ly/cd-donate If you want to support Mike Lindell and our show, use promo code CD21 to get up to 66% off at https://www.mypillow.com/radiospecials or by placing your order over the phone at 800-872-0627. When you use promo code CD21, a Queen Sized MyPillow is just $29, the cheapest it has ever been! The New Conservative Daily Store is OPEN! Check it out here and buy your Conservative Daily merch! https://store.conservative-daily.com/ Make sure you Like, Comment, and Share! Text FREEDOM to 89517 to get added to our text list to receive notifications when we go Live! Please make sure you join our newsletter to receive our action alerts: https://bit.ly/joinconservativedaily We are now also going to be streaming on dlive! Check us out here: https://dlive.tv/ConservativeDaily Follow us @ConservativeDaily on Parler! Click here to donate: http://bit.ly/cd-donate Subscribe to our daily podcast at Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/ConservativeDailyPodcast on Google Podcasts (for Android users): https://bit.ly/CDPodcastGoogle We are also available on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/2wD8YleiBM8bu0l3ahBLDN And on Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/conservative-daily-podcast/PC:37034 And on iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-conservative-daily-podcast-53710765/ on TuneIn: https://tunein.com/radio/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-p1350272/ And on Podbean: https://conservative.podbean/

Da Miri Podcast
84: الزبدة | أولادي خط أحمر مع سناء المنصوري

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 13:28


 الزبدة أنّه تقديم التنازلات مش ديما أحسن حل!  الإعلاميّة والفنّانة (سناء المنصوري) تحكيلنا عن اللحظة اللي قرّرت فيها ترك زوجها بعد 16 سنّة زواج والأسباب اللي دفعتها لهذا القرار، ومدى تأثير هالقرار على أبنائها.  الزبدة هذي من الحلقة رقم 23 وتقدر تسمعها كاملة تابعني على الانستجرام و التويتر لآخر اخبار داميريلدعم/ي داميري:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriللاشتراك في البريد الاسبوعي اضغط سبسكرايب في الموقع:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Thursday September 23 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 104:33


Thousands of Haitian migrants who flocked to Del Rio were already working and living comfortably as refugees in Chile. Dana touches on the media's racially charged reaction to the Gabby Petito case. The White House bans horses at the border. Hunter Biden asked for a retainer of $2 million per year plus 'success fees', to help unfreeze money belonging to the Libyan government. New jobless claims increase for a second straight week. Sen. Rand Paul joins us to discuss vaccine mandates, FISA and big tech. James O'Keefe joins us to discuss exposing the federal government's cover-up of vaccine side effects.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comGet the new MySlippers at 50% off with Radio Specials code DANA. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANAJoin today for premium meats delivered direct to you. Use promo code DANA for free bacon for a year!

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Thursday September 23 - Full Show

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 104:33


Thousands of Haitian migrants who flocked to Del Rio were already working and living comfortably as refugees in Chile. Dana touches on the media's racially charged reaction to the Gabby Petito case. The White House bans horses at the border. Hunter Biden asked for a retainer of $2 million per year plus 'success fees', to help unfreeze money belonging to the Libyan government. New jobless claims increase for a second straight week. Sen. Rand Paul joins us to discuss vaccine mandates, FISA and big tech. James O'Keefe joins us to discuss exposing the federal government's cover-up of vaccine side effects.Please visit our great sponsors:Patriot Mobilehttps://PatriotMobile.com/DanaPut your trust in Patriot Mobile. Now get 50% off the first 2 months OR $100 off any phone in stock with a 1-year commitment, as well as free premier activation with promo code Dana. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT. Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world. Delta Rescuehttps://deltarescue.orgGet your complete Estate Planning kit at deltarescue.org/dana today and let your passion for animals live well into the future. Black Rifle Coffee Companyhttps://blackriflecoffee.com/danatvUse code DANATV to save 20% off your first coffee club, coffee and select gear purchase. My Pillowhttps://mypillow.comGet the new MySlippers at 50% off with Radio Specials code DANA. Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comBuy 2 bags of SuperBeets Heart Chews and get a bag of Vitamin D3 Chews AND a free bag of SuperBeets Heart Chews. Moinkhttps://moinkbox.com/DANAJoin today for premium meats delivered direct to you. Use promo code DANA for free bacon for a year!

Radio Islam
Libya - gateway to hell or new beginnings?

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 7:40


Libya is touted to be the easiest route to Europe for Africans looking to create a new life.  Radio Islam International spoke to Michelangelo Severgnini, an independent film and documentary maker. He focuses on the current crisis; African countries face searching for better living in other countries. Severgnini says he has been in contact with most Libyan migrants coming into Europe in the past few years.

RT
Going Underground | Former Gaddafi spokesman: Libyan majority SILENCED by NATO bombs

RT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 28:18


On this episode of Going Underground, we firstly speak to the former spokesperson for Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. He discusses the 2011 intervention by NATO which ‘silenced the Libyan majority,' why he is in Cairo to coordinate political operations with Libyan counterparts, British and US attempts to play with the UN mandate to give ultimate control to the UN instead of the Libyan people, why the Libyan crisis should be viewed as ‘Libya v foreign powers', the potential candidacy of Saif al-Islam Gaddafi and why he believes the former leader's son can bring an end to domination by foreign powers and bring about Libyan dialogue, his criticism of General Khalifa Haftar having ‘authoritarian dreams' and being beholden to foreign powers, and much more! Finally, we speak to Juan Garces, the only aide of President Salvador Allende to survive the Augusto Pinochet coup in 1973, on Chile's Independence Day. He discusses the events of the day and how a snap decision by Allende led to him surviving the Pinochet coup, why the coup could not have happened without the election of Richard Nixon, how Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was complicit in the crimes of the Pinochet regime, Australia's involvement in the 1973 coup, his predictions for the upcoming Chilean elections, and much more!

Crossing Continents
Libya's Unfinished Revolution

Crossing Continents

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 28:53


It's ten years since Libya's dictator Col Muammar Gaddafi was overthrown. But the country's still not a a democracy – or even a unified functioning state. The militias that brought down the dictatorship in 2011 never disbanded. They turned the country into a battleground, abducting and murdering countless citizens. Since last year, there's been a ceasefire in the long civil war. Elections are planned. But how powerful are the militias – even now? And how hopeful are Libyans about their future? Reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the uprising in 2011, returns to find out what happened to Libya's revolution. At spectacular horse-races in the city of Misrata, he meets Libyans who say they have more opportunities now than under Gaddafi. But many writers and activists have fled the country or gone silent, fearing they might disappear if they say anything that displeases armed groups. Some militias have officially been turned into security arms of the state. But that's given them access to valuable state resources - and militia commanders are accused of becoming mafia bosses. Tim meets possible future leader Fathi Bashagha, who vows to tame the armed groups. But would he prosecute their commanders for past crimes? And can the eastern and western sides of Libya, effectively still under separate authorities despite a unity government, be brought together? Many think war may break out again, and some young Libyans, despairing for their country's future, are even risking the dangerous passage across the Mediterranean, to emigrate. Producer: Bob Howard

The Compass
Building a state

The Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 27:59


A decade after the end of dictatorship, Libya is gearing up for planned elections at the end of this year that many hope will finally bring a peaceful and democratic future. The country is slightly more stable since the end of civil war two years ago. But despite a peace agreement, it is still effectively split in two, politically and militarily. Separate forces control the two halves of the country, backed by different foreign powers. And some think war will break out again. BBC reporter Tim Whewell, travels around Libya to find out what progress is being made towards building a state. He visits a spectacular horse-racing event - a sign of increasing prosperity. Travel around Libya is easier now. Some armed groups have been integrated into official police and army structures. Tim visits a new government checkpoint. But he discovers many people are still terrified of militias that appear to have been "regularised" in name only. Activists and journalists who voice opinions that armed groups dislike can be threatened, and even abducted - with courts often powerless to intervene. One radio station which sprang up as a lively forum for debate after the revolution no longer dares to broadcast talk shows. Tim talks to a former presenter who was jailed and tortured by a militia after taking part in a young people's protest against corruption. He also interviews former interior minister Fathi Bashagha, who hopes to lead Libya after the elections. What is his plan to achieve security and justice? And what can be done to stem the rising numbers of Libyans attempting the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean, seeking a new life in Europe? Presenter: Tim Whewell Producer: Bob Howard (Photo: Traditional Libyan horseman in Misrata, Libya Credit: BBC)

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
September 10: Psalm 39; 1 Samuel 31; Daniel 11:2–45; Luke 7:36–8:3

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:57


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 39 Psalm 39 (Listen) What Is the Measure of My Days? To the choirmaster: to Jeduthun. A Psalm of David. 39   I said, “I will guard my ways,    that I may not sin with my tongue;  I will guard my mouth with a muzzle,    so long as the wicked are in my presence.”2   I was mute and silent;    I held my peace to no avail,  and my distress grew worse.3     My heart became hot within me.  As I mused, the fire burned;    then I spoke with my tongue: 4   “O LORD, make me know my end    and what is the measure of my days;    let me know how fleeting I am!5   Behold, you have made my days a few handbreadths,    and my lifetime is as nothing before you.  Surely all mankind stands as a mere breath! Selah6     Surely a man goes about as a shadow!  Surely for nothing1 they are in turmoil;    man heaps up wealth and does not know who will gather! 7   “And now, O Lord, for what do I wait?    My hope is in you.8   Deliver me from all my transgressions.    Do not make me the scorn of the fool!9   I am mute; I do not open my mouth,    for it is you who have done it.10   Remove your stroke from me;    I am spent by the hostility of your hand.11   When you discipline a man    with rebukes for sin,  you consume like a moth what is dear to him;    surely all mankind is a mere breath! Selah 12   “Hear my prayer, O LORD,    and give ear to my cry;    hold not your peace at my tears!  For I am a sojourner with you,    a guest, like all my fathers.13   Look away from me, that I may smile again,    before I depart and am no more!” Footnotes [1] 39:6 Hebrew Surely as a breath (ESV) Pentateuch and History: 1 Samuel 31 1 Samuel 31 (Listen) The Death of Saul 31 Now the Philistines were fighting against Israel, and the men of Israel fled before the Philistines and fell slain on Mount Gilboa. 2 And the Philistines overtook Saul and his sons, and the Philistines struck down Jonathan and Abinadab and Malchi-shua, the sons of Saul. 3 The battle pressed hard against Saul, and the archers found him, and he was badly wounded by the archers. 4 Then Saul said to his armor-bearer, “Draw your sword, and thrust me through with it, lest these uncircumcised come and thrust me through, and mistreat me.” But his armor-bearer would not, for he feared greatly. Therefore Saul took his own sword and fell upon it. 5 And when his armor-bearer saw that Saul was dead, he also fell upon his sword and died with him. 6 Thus Saul died, and his three sons, and his armor-bearer, and all his men, on the same day together. 7 And when the men of Israel who were on the other side of the valley and those beyond the Jordan saw that the men of Israel had fled and that Saul and his sons were dead, they abandoned their cities and fled. And the Philistines came and lived in them. 8 The next day, when the Philistines came to strip the slain, they found Saul and his three sons fallen on Mount Gilboa. 9 So they cut off his head and stripped off his armor and sent messengers throughout the land of the Philistines, to carry the good news to the house of their idols and to the people. 10 They put his armor in the temple of Ashtaroth, and they fastened his body to the wall of Beth-shan. 11 But when the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead heard what the Philistines had done to Saul, 12 all the valiant men arose and went all night and took the body of Saul and the bodies of his sons from the wall of Beth-shan, and they came to Jabesh and burned them there. 13 And they took their bones and buried them under the tamarisk tree in Jabesh and fasted seven days. (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Daniel 11:2–45 Daniel 11:2–45 (Listen) 2 “And now I will show you the truth. Behold, three more kings shall arise in Persia, and a fourth shall be far richer than all of them. And when he has become strong through his riches, he shall stir up all against the kingdom of Greece. 3 Then a mighty king shall arise, who shall rule with great dominion and do as he wills. 4 And as soon as he has arisen, his kingdom shall be broken and divided toward the four winds of heaven, but not to his posterity, nor according to the authority with which he ruled, for his kingdom shall be plucked up and go to others besides these. 5 “Then the king of the south shall be strong, but one of his princes shall be stronger than he and shall rule, and his authority shall be a great authority. 6 After some years they shall make an alliance, and the daughter of the king of the south shall come to the king of the north to make an agreement. But she shall not retain the strength of her arm, and he and his arm shall not endure, but she shall be given up, and her attendants, he who fathered her, and he who supported1 her in those times. 7 “And from a branch from her roots one shall arise in his place. He shall come against the army and enter the fortress of the king of the north, and he shall deal with them and shall prevail. 8 He shall also carry off to Egypt their gods with their metal images and their precious vessels of silver and gold, and for some years he shall refrain from attacking the king of the north. 9 Then the latter shall come into the realm of the king of the south but shall return to his own land. 10 “His sons shall wage war and assemble a multitude of great forces, which shall keep coming and overflow and pass through, and again shall carry the war as far as his fortress. 11 Then the king of the south, moved with rage, shall come out and fight against the king of the north. And he shall raise a great multitude, but it shall be given into his hand. 12 And when the multitude is taken away, his heart shall be exalted, and he shall cast down tens of thousands, but he shall not prevail. 13 For the king of the north shall again raise a multitude, greater than the first. And after some years2 he shall come on with a great army and abundant supplies. 14 “In those times many shall rise against the king of the south, and the violent among your own people shall lift themselves up in order to fulfill the vision, but they shall fail. 15 Then the king of the north shall come and throw up siegeworks and take a well-fortified city. And the forces of the south shall not stand, or even his best troops, for there shall be no strength to stand. 16 But he who comes against him shall do as he wills, and none shall stand before him. And he shall stand in the glorious land, with destruction in his hand. 17 He shall set his face to come with the strength of his whole kingdom, and he shall bring terms of an agreement and perform them. He shall give him the daughter of women to destroy the kingdom,3 but it shall not stand or be to his advantage. 18 Afterward he shall turn his face to the coastlands and shall capture many of them, but a commander shall put an end to his insolence. Indeed,4 he shall turn his insolence back upon him. 19 Then he shall turn his face back toward the fortresses of his own land, but he shall stumble and fall, and shall not be found. 20 “Then shall arise in his place one who shall send an exactor of tribute for the glory of the kingdom. But within a few days he shall be broken, neither in anger nor in battle. 21 In his place shall arise a contemptible person to whom royal majesty has not been given. He shall come in without warning and obtain the kingdom by flatteries. 22 Armies shall be utterly swept away before him and broken, even the prince of the covenant. 23 And from the time that an alliance is made with him he shall act deceitfully, and he shall become strong with a small people. 24 Without warning he shall come into the richest parts5 of the province, and he shall do what neither his fathers nor his fathers' fathers have done, scattering among them plunder, spoil, and goods. He shall devise plans against strongholds, but only for a time. 25 And he shall stir up his power and his heart against the king of the south with a great army. And the king of the south shall wage war with an exceedingly great and mighty army, but he shall not stand, for plots shall be devised against him. 26 Even those who eat his food shall break him. His army shall be swept away, and many shall fall down slain. 27 And as for the two kings, their hearts shall be bent on doing evil. They shall speak lies at the same table, but to no avail, for the end is yet to be at the time appointed. 28 And he shall return to his land with great wealth, but his heart shall be set against the holy covenant. And he shall work his will and return to his own land. 29 “At the time appointed he shall return and come into the south, but it shall not be this time as it was before. 30 For ships of Kittim shall come against him, and he shall be afraid and withdraw, and shall turn back and be enraged and take action against the holy covenant. He shall turn back and pay attention to those who forsake the holy covenant. 31 Forces from him shall appear and profane the temple and fortress, and shall take away the regular burnt offering. And they shall set up the abomination that makes desolate. 32 He shall seduce with flattery those who violate the covenant, but the people who know their God shall stand firm and take action. 33 And the wise among the people shall make many understand, though for some days they shall stumble by sword and flame, by captivity and plunder. 34 When they stumble, they shall receive a little help. And many shall join themselves to them with flattery, 35 and some of the wise shall stumble, so that they may be refined, purified, and made white, until the time of the end, for it still awaits the appointed time. 36 “And the king shall do as he wills. He shall exalt himself and magnify himself above every god, and shall speak astonishing things against the God of gods. He shall prosper till the indignation is accomplished; for what is decreed shall be done. 37 He shall pay no attention to the gods of his fathers, or to the one beloved by women. He shall not pay attention to any other god, for he shall magnify himself above all. 38 He shall honor the god of fortresses instead of these. A god whom his fathers did not know he shall honor with gold and silver, with precious stones and costly gifts. 39 He shall deal with the strongest fortresses with the help of a foreign god. Those who acknowledge him he shall load with honor. He shall make them rulers over many and shall divide the land for a price.6 40 “At the time of the end, the king of the south shall attack7 him, but the king of the north shall rush upon him like a whirlwind, with chariots and horsemen, and with many ships. And he shall come into countries and shall overflow and pass through. 41 He shall come into the glorious land. And tens of thousands shall fall, but these shall be delivered out of his hand: Edom and Moab and the main part of the Ammonites. 42 He shall stretch out his hand against the countries, and the land of Egypt shall not escape. 43 He shall become ruler of the treasures of gold and of silver, and all the precious things of Egypt, and the Libyans and the Cushites shall follow in his train. 44 But news from the east and the north shall alarm him, and he shall go out with great fury to destroy and devote many to destruction. 45 And he shall pitch his palatial tents between the sea and the glorious holy mountain. Yet he shall come to his end, with none to help him. Footnotes [1] 11:6 Or obtained [2] 11:13 Hebrew at the end of the times [3] 11:17 Hebrew her, or it [4] 11:18 The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [5] 11:24 Or among the richest men [6] 11:39 Or land as payment [7] 11:40 Hebrew thrust at (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: Luke 7:36–8:3 Luke 7:36–8:3 (Listen) A Sinful Woman Forgiven 36 One of the Pharisees asked him to eat with him, and he went into the Pharisee's house and reclined at table. 37 And behold, a woman of the city, who was a sinner, when she learned that he was reclining at table in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster flask of ointment, 38 and standing behind him at his feet, weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears and wiped them with the hair of her head and kissed his feet and anointed them with the ointment. 39 Now when the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, “If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, for she is a sinner.” 40 And Jesus answering said to him, “Simon, I have something to say to you.” And he answered, “Say it, Teacher.” 41 “A certain moneylender had two debtors. One owed five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. 42 When they could not pay, he cancelled the debt of both. Now which of them will love him more?” 43 Simon answered, “The one, I suppose, for whom he cancelled the larger debt.” And he said to him, “You have judged rightly.” 44 Then turning toward the woman he said to Simon, “Do you see this woman? I entered your house; you gave me no water for my feet, but she has wet my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair. 45 You gave me no kiss, but from the time I came in she has not ceased to kiss my feet. 46 You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. 47 Therefore I tell you, her sins, which are many, are forgiven—for she loved much. But he who is forgiven little, loves little.” 48 And he said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.” 49 Then those who were at table with him began to say among1 themselves, “Who is this, who even forgives sins?” 50 And he said to the woman, “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.” Women Accompanying Jesus 8 Soon afterward he went on through cities and villages, proclaiming and bringing the good news of the kingdom of God. And the twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, 3 and Joanna, the wife of Chuza, Herod's household manager, and Susanna, and many others, who provided for them2 out of their means. Footnotes [1] 7:49 Or to [2] 8:3 Some manuscripts him (ESV)

Da Miri Podcast
82: Zibda | Adjusting with a new world as a teenager! W/ Nada Elfeiruri

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 9:28


 Zibda is, My entire world changed when I got back to Libya!  Activist and Blogger, Nada Elfeituri from Episode #16,  talks about how her life changed when her family decided to go back and live in Benghazi after she was brought up in CanadaFollow me on Instagram and Twitter for Damiri's Latest newsTo Support Damiri:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriTo receive our weekly newsletter, press subscribe on our website:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

Daily News Brief by TRT World
Thursday, September 9, 2021

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 2:28


*) Morocco's ruling party suffers crushing defeat in elections Morocco's ruling Justice and Development Party has suffered great losses in the parliamentary elections, according to preliminary results. The PJD went from holding 125 seats to 12 in Parliament. The vote has seen the rise of the main liberal and centre-right parties. The PJD has been in power since 2011 following pro-democracy protests. *) Taliban forbid protests and, possibly, women sports The new Taliban government is seeking to end protests in Afghanistan after days of heavy-handed assaults on protesters as well as journalists covering the demonstrations. The minister has issued an order to end all protests unless demonstrators get prior permission, including approval of slogans and banners. It's unlikely the women who have been leading rallies demanding their rights from the hardline rulers will be allowed to protest under the rules. Women will also be prohibited from playing sports, Australian media quoted the Taliban cultural commission as saying on Wednesday. *) Afghan national flag carrier to resume international flights next week Afghanistan's national flag carrier is preparing to resume international flights next week, its new president has said. Rahmatullah Gulzad praised Qatari and Turkish technical experts for their assistance in getting Kabul airport operational in the shortest possible time. The teams are still working on Kabul airport, he said, adding they will stay for another month to ensure that it meets international standards. *) Libyan warlord Haftar hires American lobbyists to woo Biden Libyan warlord Khalifa Haftar has hired veteran American political insiders to lobby on his behalf with the Biden administration and Congress. Haftar has paid a $40,000 retainer to former special counsel to president Bill Clinton, Lanny Davis and ex-Republican House lawmaker Robert Livingston. A Foreign Agents Registration Act filing dated September 3 shows Haftar will pay some $960,000 over the course of six months. And finally... *) Confederate leader Robert Lee's statue removed in Virginia The statue of the confederate general Robert E Lee has been taken down in the US state of Virginia. The pro-slavery leader's monument was removed after a year-long battle. The figure had been towering over Richmond since 1890. Memorials of confederate leaders had been increasingly targeted in the country's protests against racism.

The Compass
The rule of the gun

The Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 27:30


BBC reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the 2011 uprising, returns to the country to ask why plans to integrate the militias into a unified national army came to nothing. He talks to past and present militiamen - including the young man Wadah al-Keesh, who later left his group in disgust - and Mohammed al-Durat, truck-driver turned police commander, who has reunited with a band of friends to fight in every major battle over the last ten years - and believes he will in future too. Tim talks to revolutionary politician Abdul-Rahman al-Suwayhli and famous brigade commander Salah Badi about the lead-up to civil war - and hears too about its human cost from a young woman, Rasha Akhdar, who lost her father in fighting around Tripoli. Back in Britain, he learns the inside story of the UK's failed attempt to train a new Libyan fighting force from senior military officer Hugh Blackman - and asks former foreign secretary William Hague whether foreign powers could have adopted different policies to help stabilise Libya.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sun. Sept. 5, 2021 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the recent military coup against President Alpha Conde of Guinea-Conakry; former South African President Jacob Zuma has been released from prison on medical parole; the son of former Libyan leader Col. Muammar Gaddafi has been released from detention after seven years; and the aftermath of Hurricane Ida has left devastation from the Gulf to the northeast of the United States. In the second hour we look at events taking place in Africa and around the world. Finally, we listen to a documentary on the contributions of Jazz musician and composer Duke Ellington in recognition of the virtual Detroit Jazz Festival.

Libya Matters
28: Looking Ahead

Libya Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 22:08


In the final episode in this season, our producer Tariq Elmeri goes deeper into Salwa's family's pursuit for justice, and why an independent investigation is very important to her sister Iman. We will also hear from activists and journalists, who will bring us closer to understanding what it's like to work in these fields in Libya today, and what that means for Salwa's legacy. This is a story of tragedy and triumph, and one we are honoured to tell. LFJL is sincerely grateful to Salwa's family and friends, and all of our friends and partners in Libyan civil society who have given us their time and trust to tell this story.   LFJL created the Ali Nouh Fund to provide emergency assistance to human rights defenders who are at risk due to their work. To donate, visit https://alinouhfund.ly/. Every penny you donate will go to support human rights defenders in Libya.    Follow us: Twitter: @Libyamatterspod Facebook: @Libyamatters Instagram: @libyamatterspodcast  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave us a 5 star review on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen.  Find our regular hosts on Twitter @Elham_LFJL and @Marwa_LFJL. Libya Matters is produced by @telmeri. Thanks to Iman Bugaighis, Raghda Ibraheem, Ghazi Gheblawi and Libya Idres El-Mesmary for contributing to this episode. Artwork by @OzDominika.  Libya Matters is a production of Lawyers for Justice in Libya.  Follow LFJL at:    Twitter: @LibyanJustice Facebook: @LibyanJustice Instagram: lawyersforjusticeinlibya Subscribe to our mailing list Support our work with a single or regular donation 

Da Miri Podcast
79: Zibda | How to choose from 25 ideas

Da Miri Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 10:36


 Zibda is, You can always start from scratch!"Business owner" and a new mother, Malak Ben Hmeda in episode #24,  talks about how she left her job without any clue what to do next and how she started off a new journey of successful business by choosing the right idea. To Listen to Libya Matters Podcast, Click the Link Below:https://www.buzzsprout.com/450046Follow me on Instagram for Damiri's Latest news:https://www.instagram.com/damiri.official/Follow me on Twitter for Damiri's Latest news:https://twitter.com/Damiri_officialTo Support Damiri:https://www.patreon.com/telmeriTo receive our weekly newsletter, press subscribe on our website:https://www.tariqelmeri.com

ESV: Chronological
August 13: 2 Chronicles 13–16

ESV: Chronological

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 10:49


2 Chronicles 13–16 2 Chronicles 13–16 (Listen) Abijah Reigns in Judah 13 In the eighteenth year of King Jeroboam, Abijah began to reign over Judah. 2 He reigned for three years in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Micaiah1 the daughter of Uriel of Gibeah. Now there was war between Abijah and Jeroboam. 3 Abijah went out to battle, having an army of valiant men of war, 400,000 chosen men. And Jeroboam drew up his line of battle against him with 800,000 chosen mighty warriors. 4 Then Abijah stood up on Mount Zemaraim that is in the hill country of Ephraim and said, “Hear me, O Jeroboam and all Israel! 5 Ought you not to know that the LORD God of Israel gave the kingship over Israel forever to David and his sons by a covenant of salt? 6 Yet Jeroboam the son of Nebat, a servant of Solomon the son of David, rose up and rebelled against his lord, 7 and certain worthless scoundrels2 gathered about him and defied Rehoboam the son of Solomon, when Rehoboam was young and irresolute3 and could not withstand them. 8 “And now you think to withstand the kingdom of the LORD in the hand of the sons of David, because you are a great multitude and have with you the golden calves that Jeroboam made you for gods. 9 Have you not driven out the priests of the LORD, the sons of Aaron, and the Levites, and made priests for yourselves like the peoples of other lands? Whoever comes for ordination4 with a young bull or seven rams becomes a priest of what are not gods. 10 But as for us, the LORD is our God, and we have not forsaken him. We have priests ministering to the LORD who are sons of Aaron, and Levites for their service. 11 They offer to the LORD every morning and every evening burnt offerings and incense of sweet spices, set out the showbread on the table of pure gold, and care for the golden lampstand that its lamps may burn every evening. For we keep the charge of the LORD our God, but you have forsaken him. 12 Behold, God is with us at our head, and his priests with their battle trumpets to sound the call to battle against you. O sons of Israel, do not fight against the LORD, the God of your fathers, for you cannot succeed.” 13 Jeroboam had sent an ambush around to come upon them from behind. Thus his troops5 were in front of Judah, and the ambush was behind them. 14 And when Judah looked, behold, the battle was in front of and behind them. And they cried to the LORD, and the priests blew the trumpets. 15 Then the men of Judah raised the battle shout. And when the men of Judah shouted, God defeated Jeroboam and all Israel before Abijah and Judah. 16 The men of Israel fled before Judah, and God gave them into their hand. 17 Abijah and his people struck them with great force, so there fell slain of Israel 500,000 chosen men. 18 Thus the men of Israel were subdued at that time, and the men of Judah prevailed, because they relied on the LORD, the God of their fathers. 19 And Abijah pursued Jeroboam and took cities from him, Bethel with its villages and Jeshanah with its villages and Ephron6 with its villages. 20 Jeroboam did not recover his power in the days of Abijah. And the LORD struck him down, and he died. 21 But Abijah grew mighty. And he took fourteen wives and had twenty-two sons and sixteen daughters. 22 The rest of the acts of Abijah, his ways and his sayings, are written in the story of the prophet Iddo. 7 Asa Reigns in Judah 14 Abijah slept with his fathers, and they buried him in the city of David. And Asa his son reigned in his place. In his days the land had rest for ten years. 2 8 And Asa did what was good and right in the eyes of the LORD his God. 3 He took away the foreign altars and the high places and broke down the pillars and cut down the Asherim 4 and commanded Judah to seek the LORD, the God of their fathers, and to keep the law and the commandment. 5 He also took out of all the cities of Judah the high places and the incense altars. And the kingdom had rest under him. 6 He built fortified cities in Judah, for the land had rest. He had no war in those years, for the LORD gave him peace. 7 And he said to Judah, “Let us build these cities and surround them with walls and towers, gates and bars. The land is still ours, because we have sought the LORD our God. We have sought him, and he has given us peace on every side.” So they built and prospered. 8 And Asa had an army of 300,000 from Judah, armed with large shields and spears, and 280,000 men from Benjamin that carried shields and drew bows. All these were mighty men of valor. 9 Zerah the Ethiopian came out against them with an army of a million men and 300 chariots, and came as far as Mareshah. 10 And Asa went out to meet him, and they drew up their lines of battle in the Valley of Zephathah at Mareshah. 11 And Asa cried to the LORD his God, “O LORD, there is none like you to help, between the mighty and the weak. Help us, O LORD our God, for we rely on you, and in your name we have come against this multitude. O LORD, you are our God; let not man prevail against you.” 12 So the LORD defeated the Ethiopians before Asa and before Judah, and the Ethiopians fled. 13 Asa and the people who were with him pursued them as far as Gerar, and the Ethiopians fell until none remained alive, for they were broken before the LORD and his army. The men of Judah9 carried away very much spoil. 14 And they attacked all the cities around Gerar, for the fear of the LORD was upon them. They plundered all the cities, for there was much plunder in them. 15 And they struck down the tents of those who had livestock and carried away sheep in abundance and camels. Then they returned to Jerusalem. Asa's Religious Reforms 15 The Spirit of God came10 upon Azariah the son of Oded, 2 and he went out to meet Asa and said to him, “Hear me, Asa, and all Judah and Benjamin: The LORD is with you while you are with him. If you seek him, he will be found by you, but if you forsake him, he will forsake you. 3 For a long time Israel was without the true God, and without a teaching priest and without law, 4 but when in their distress they turned to the LORD, the God of Israel, and sought him, he was found by them. 5 In those times there was no peace to him who went out or to him who came in, for great disturbances afflicted all the inhabitants of the lands. 6 They were broken in pieces. Nation was crushed by nation and city by city, for God troubled them with every sort of distress. 7 But you, take courage! Do not let your hands be weak, for your work shall be rewarded.” 8 As soon as Asa heard these words, the prophecy of Azariah the son of Oded, he took courage and put away the detestable idols from all the land of Judah and Benjamin and from the cities that he had taken in the hill country of Ephraim, and he repaired the altar of the LORD that was in front of the vestibule of the house of the LORD.11 9 And he gathered all Judah and Benjamin, and those from Ephraim, Manasseh, and Simeon who were residing with them, for great numbers had deserted to him from Israel when they saw that the LORD his God was with him. 10 They were gathered at Jerusalem in the third month of the fifteenth year of the reign of Asa. 11 They sacrificed to the LORD on that day from the spoil that they had brought 700 oxen and 7,000 sheep. 12 And they entered into a covenant to seek the LORD, the God of their fathers, with all their heart and with all their soul, 13 but that whoever would not seek the LORD, the God of Israel, should be put to death, whether young or old, man or woman. 14 They swore an oath to the LORD with a loud voice and with shouting and with trumpets and with horns. 15 And all Judah rejoiced over the oath, for they had sworn with all their heart and had sought him with their whole desire, and he was found by them, and the LORD gave them rest all around. 16 Even Maacah, his mother, King Asa removed from being queen mother because she had made a detestable image for Asherah. Asa cut down her image, crushed it, and burned it at the brook Kidron. 17 But the high places were not taken out of Israel. Nevertheless, the heart of Asa was wholly true all his days. 18 And he brought into the house of God the sacred gifts of his father and his own sacred gifts, silver, and gold, and vessels. 19 And there was no more war until the thirty-fifth year of the reign of Asa. Asa's Last Years 16 In the thirty-sixth year of the reign of Asa, Baasha king of Israel went up against Judah and built Ramah, that he might permit no one to go out or come in to Asa king of Judah. 2 Then Asa took silver and gold from the treasures of the house of the LORD and the king's house and sent them to Ben-hadad king of Syria, who lived in Damascus, saying, 3 “There is a covenant12 between me and you, as there was between my father and your father. Behold, I am sending to you silver and gold. Go, break your covenant with Baasha king of Israel, that he may withdraw from me.” 4 And Ben-hadad listened to King Asa and sent the commanders of his armies against the cities of Israel, and they conquered Ijon, Dan, Abel-maim, and all the store cities of Naphtali. 5 And when Baasha heard of it, he stopped building Ramah and let his work cease. 6 Then King Asa took all Judah, and they carried away the stones of Ramah and its timber, with which Baasha had been building, and with them he built Geba and Mizpah. 7 At that time Hanani the seer came to Asa king of Judah and said to him, “Because you relied on the king of Syria, and did not rely on the LORD your God, the army of the king of Syria has escaped you. 8 Were not the Ethiopians and the Libyans a huge army with very many chariots and horsemen? Yet because you relied on the LORD, he gave them into your hand. 9 For the eyes of the LORD run to and fro throughout the whole earth, to give strong support to those whose heart is blameless13 toward him. You have done foolishly in this, for from now on you will have wars.” 10 Then Asa was angry with the seer and put him in the stocks in prison, for he was in a rage with him because of this. And Asa inflicted cruelties upon some of the people at the same time. 11 The acts of Asa, from first to last, are written in the Book of the Kings of Judah and Israel. 12 In the thirty-ninth year of his reign Asa was diseased in his feet, and his disease became severe. Yet even in his disease he did not seek the LORD, but sought help from physicians. 13 And Asa slept with his fathers, dying in the forty-first year of his reign. 14 They buried him in the tomb that he had cut for himself in the city of David. They laid him on a bier that had been filled with various kinds of spices prepared by the perfumer's art, and they made a very great fire in his honor. Footnotes [1] 13:2 Spelled Maacah in 1 Kings 15:2 [2] 13:7 Hebrew worthless men, sons of Belial [3] 13:7 Hebrew soft of heart [4] 13:9 Hebrew to fill his hand [5] 13:13 Hebrew they [6] 13:19 Or Ephrain [7] 13:22 Ch 13:23 in Hebrew [8] 14:2 Ch 14:1 in Hebrew [9] 14:13 Hebrew They [10] 15:1 Or was [11] 15:8 Hebrew the vestibule of the Lord [12] 16:3 Or treaty; twice in this verse [13] 16:9 Or whole (ESV)

Global News Podcast
Afghanistan: President Ghani rallies troops in besieged city

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 29:59


President Ashraf Ghani has flown to Mazar-i-Sharif as Taliban militants close in. If this key northern city falls, it will be catastrophic for the Afghan government. Also, German police arrest British man in Berlin on suspicion of spying for Russia, and BBC investigation exposes role of Russian mercenaries in Libyan civil war.

Real Dictators
Colonel Gaddafi Part 7: 9/11 and the West's New Friend

Real Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 46:16


On September 11th, 2001, life in the West is transformed in an instant. Amidst the fall-out, Gaddafi spots an opportunity. To the surprise of many, he makes it his mission to rejoin the international fold. A new phase of surreal diplomacy begins as the Libyan dictator pitches his Bedouin tent on the front lawns of palaces and parliaments across the world. Muammar Gaddafi - the man of many masks - is transforming once again, this time into the West's most eccentric ally. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Dictators
Colonel Gaddafi Part 5: The ‘Brother Leader' vs President Reagan

Real Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 49:02


Gaddafi takes his terror onto the streets of London and Berlin. It seems nowhere is beyond his reach as Libyan agents hunt down his opponents across the globe. The Reagan administration launches retaliatory airstrikes, targeting the dictator and his inner circle. With the stakes higher than ever, the Libyan security network continues to stamp out dissent. Some 6,000 children are bussed to a sports arena where they bear witness to a gruesome lesson in tyranny. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Dictators
Colonel Gaddafi Part 4: Cheerleader for Terror

Real Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 42:01


In Munich, West Germany, in the summer of 1972, there is a buzz of expectation. The city is preparing to host the Olympic Games. It's a symbolic welcoming of the country back into the international fold. But this festival of sport will soon become a terrifying nightmare. The Munich massacre is one of many terrorist attacks to which Colonel Gaddafi will attach himself - as patron or cheerleader. As the Libyan leader tightens his grip on power at home, and exports terror abroad, tension with America is coming to breaking point. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices