Podcasts about rpm

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  • 585PODCASTS
  • 1,443EPISODES
  • 1h 3mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about rpm

Show all podcasts related to rpm

Latest podcast episodes about rpm

LIVE Ontwowheels
The Yamaha XSR 900 MIGHT be my NEXT BIKE! | Live Ontwowheels #39

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 62:10


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Live Ontwowheels will be moving channels soon! Be one of the first to sub: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRzHhmsrf_bVUBzg4KJUpvgWelcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Mastering Medical Device
Understanding Telehealth and Remote Patient Monitoring with Kent Dicks

Mastering Medical Device

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 63:06


Kent Dicks has been involved in providing technology for remote patient monitoring or RPM since 2006. Kent is a thought leader in the space and is currently CEO of Life365, a leader in RPM. Prior to that he founded MedApps, which was sold to Alere in 2012. In this episode Kent shares some common terms used in connected health and their definitions, how the segment has evolved, how consumer choice is effecting where medicine is and will be delivered, the role of remote patient monitoring, how RPM works from patient enrollment and training to use, how it's implemented in a physician's office, and the future of connected health.Links from this episode:Kent Dicks LinkedInLife365.healthMastering Medical Device:WebsitePat Kothe LinkedIn

LIVE Ontwowheels
Which US STATES have the MOST RIDERS?! | Live Ontwowheels #38

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:25


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Live Ontwowheels will be moving channels soon! Be one of the first to sub: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRzHhmsrf_bVUBzg4KJUpvgWelcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Today we're talking with Assemblymember Phara Souffrant Forrest and her district manager Justin Freeman about how they are bringing their socialist office directly to the community they represent and are building power not just to win elections, but pass legislation that meaningful changes the lives of the working class in Brooklyn like the Less is More bill, which was signed into law this year, and Public Power and ‘Good Cause Eviction' bill which are top priorities for DSA electeds this upcoming legislative session. And it's not just the power in the halls of government that is being challenged by organizers in New York City right now. Workers are taking on one of the most powerful and influential Ivy League universities and newspapers in the country at the same time. We'll hear from RPM's own Chris Carr who is one of many union members of the Student Workers of Columbia currently on strike and from one of the New York Times' Wirecutter union members who plan to strike on Black Friday. Follow Phara and Justin on twitter @phara4assembly and @JustinR_Freemanand get involved with Phara's office at bit.ly/pharaoffice 

LINUX Unplugged
432: Three Tumbleweed Temptations

LINUX Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 62:32


Can we live with openSUSE Tumbleweed? We try three different builds and prepare ourselves for our journey into SUSE land. Our setups, what we liked, and what we still need to figure out.

LIVE Ontwowheels
2022 Yamaha MT10 is HERE! Did they RUIN it? | Live Ontwowheels #37

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 65:28


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Live Ontwowheels will be moving channels soon! Be one of the first to sub: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRzHhmsrf_bVUBzg4KJUpvgWelcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Future of Fitness
Shane & Josh Rogers - ATOM & Taking Functional Fitness Virtual

Future of Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 58:48


Shane Rogers is Co-Founder and CEO of RPM Training Co. An entrepreneur at heart, Shane's background in Engineering, along with his love of training and the outdoors, took him from leading engineering teams at Gore Medical to the creator of the RPM speed rope, adding to his running list of patents. Even as CEO, Shane still leads all manufacturing initiatives and does most of the technical design for RPM.  Josh Rogers is Co-Founder and CCO of RPM Training Co. As the owner of one of the earliest CrossFit affiliate gyms, Josh used his love of design and training to create the RPM brand along with his brother, Shane. He now drives the long-term vision and strategy for the brand, breaking daily at noon of course to train with the rest of the RPM team.    connect with us: www.futureoffitness.co 

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor
The Car Doctor - 11/13/21 - Information, Please

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 49:24


Ron starts this episode starts talking about how future changes in the automobile will change other industries : takes a call on a 90 Firebird that misses between 1700 and 2000 RPM : talks with Ben Johnson, Director of Product Management at Mitchell One on car repair information. Visit our website at https://www.cardoctorshow.com Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets
Margaret Kuhlow: Bridging the Worlds of Nature and Finance

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:59


In part four of RPM's climate change special, Suzanne Tavill, StepStone head of responsible investment, hosts Margaret Kuhlow, Global Finance Practise Leader for WWF, to explain why today biodiversity and climate change have to be considered as interrelated systems and why this topic is relevant for our global economy (00:45). Margaret leads us through goals and plans defined by the post-2020 global biodiversity framework (06:53); WWF's perspective on this framework (11:30); and how biodiversity can be incorporated into the evaluation and valuation of financial assets (15:28). To conclude, Margaret explores WWF findings about the abovementioned interrelationships (19:25). You can find reports and studies mentioned in the podcast on our show page. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LIVE Ontwowheels
Why don't more people ride motorcycles? | Live Ontwowheels #36

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 66:04


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Live Ontwowheels will be moving channels soon! Be one of the first to sub: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRzHhmsrf_bVUBzg4KJUpvgWelcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

Election day was Tuesday and DSA's 30+ nationally-endorsed campaigns were put to voters. With a nearly 70% win rate for DSA's campaigns nationally, there's much to discuss about organizing for socialism at the ballot box and the rising tensions between the left and the existing Democratic establishment. On tonight's show,  we'll share provisional election results and an interview with a DSA-endorsed candidate for Somerville, Massachusetts City Council, Tessa Bridge. Here in NYC, Eric Adams has -- unfortunately -- swept to victory as mayor. Adams has publicly distanced himself from the left and socialism, so to extend the courtesy, let us just say that *all* cops are bastards.  How are we going to beat Adams and the bourgeois, capitalist interests he represents? We discuss that question live with our comrade Robert Cuffy, a union city worker and police abolitionist who organizes with NYC-DSA's Labor Branch and Afrosocialist Caucus. We also hear a report from RPM's antifascist correspondent Amy Wilson on the rise of far-right organizing in New York City around the wedge issue of mandates for COVID-19 vaccine. Keep up with the results of DSA's nationally-endorsed races as they develop, thanks to our comrades at Metro DC DSA: https://washingtonsocialist.mdcdsa.org/station-z/dsa-races-2021 

Mediavine On Air
The Spooky Sweet Land of Money with the Support Team | Mediavine On Air Episode 31

Mediavine On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 54:34


Q4: It's heeeeere. And it can be a ghoulish time for content creators. But never fear: The Mediavine Support team is here to guide you to scary good earnings this year. On this episode of Mediavine On Air, Ghostess with the Mostest Jenny Guy is joined by devilishly good Director of Support Heather Tullos. She's bringing all her top RPM-raising tips to ensure all treats, no tricks for the holiday season. You don't want to miss it! Helpful Resources Heather's Presentation + Helpful Resources SlideHow To Set Up Universal PlayerAd ViewabilityMediavine Ads and Core Web Vitals FAQ https://youtu.be/gg9s13g_9BY Transcript [MUSIC PLAYING] JENNY GUY: Hello, and welcome, foolish mortals to another episode of Mediavine's Teal Talk. I am your host, your ghost host, Jenny Guy. Today is Tuesday October 26, which means that it's Scorpio season, and Halloween is Sunday. You might have noticed that things look a little bit different around here today. We are going all in on celebrating the spooky season, and we're so glad that you're here to celebrate with us. If you are here with us live, there are some hair-raising prizes for you to win this episode. So make sure that you're paying attention, and all will be revealed in good time. Again, welcome. We are so glad that you are here. And speaking of the spooky holiday season, it also happens to be Q4. And if you've been a content creator for any length of time, you know that Q4 can be a little spooky for us. It's marked by increased advertiser spend and a slew of influencer marketing campaigns. So it has the potential to be the craziest and most lucrative time of the year. But how do you ensure that your Q4 is all treats and no tricks this year? Leave it to my guest for today. Morticia Addams, Director of Support, Heather Tullos, is here. After running a successful blog for the last 10 years, she transitioned to helping build and lead the Mediavine support team, kicking all the ass and taking all the names, while rescuing all the dogs. Seriously though, adopt, don't shop. Heather, welcome back. I mean, Morticia. Excuse me. I'm sorry. HEATHER TULLOS: Hello. Hello, Cruella. You look amazing. JENNY GUY: As do you look incredible. You look like you're in gray scale, and I am dying. OK. So friends, as I said, pay attention. Make sure you're paying attention to the screen. I won't tell you why, but you just need to be doing it, and also paying attention to everything that Heather is telling you. She's going to give us some of her top tips. If you have questions for the Mistress of Support, please drop them in the comments. She's going to, like I said, share some top tips and a presentation to start us off. But we will definitely be opening up the floor for your questions later. All righty, folks. I'm going to turn it over to Heather. We're going to get this presentation going, and let's do it. HEATHER TULLOS: Hi, everybody. It's me. I feel like you know me. Today, you might not know me as well. [LAUGHTER] And in case nobody told you, Halloween is my very favorite holiday. So I'm super excited that I got to work with our excellent marketing team to put this presentation together. Also, shout out to Rosie for this beautiful presentation. I cannot take credit for any of it. Yeah. So we're going to talk about making more in Q4. I feel like it's a popular topic. We've had a lot of changes in the last year. The approach to how you're going to make some more money might be a little different than it was in years past. Some of our advice has changed. And so let's talk through some of the differences and some of the ways that we're going to help you make some more money. Hopefully, I will give you a few tips and tricks that you didn't know already. Tricks and treats, straight from the spooky land of money. JENNY GUY: If you haven't met our mascot, this is Leaf. And they are wearing a farmer costume. As you can see,

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast
Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll_146

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 77:21


RARE & SCRATCHY ROCK 'N ROLL_146 – “THE TOP 20 ROCK & ROLL COMPOSING TEAMS DURING THE GOLDEN AGE OF 45 RPM RECORDS” – This episode spotlights “The Top 20 Rock & Roll Composing Teams During The Golden Age Of 45 RPM Records.” We've based our survey on the research of acclaimed popular music statistician, Bill Carroll, Ph.D. He's our featured guest. Our resident “Rare & Scratchy Rock ‘N Roll” Rockologist, Ken Deutsch, and Radio Dave will count down the most successful composing teams, which also include individual songwriters who penned charted 45 RPM platters. Our time period for this tabulation is the golden age of that format for rock & roll singles. And we'll sample the two strongest-charted hit singles for each entry on our ranking. These include the only husband-wife team on our roll-call, plus the only family of record labels with four of the top 20 entries on our list. And just for fun, we've asked a valued member of our staff, Mr. Announcer, to reveal some of the famed rock and roll songwriters who were among the tops in their profession – but not among our top 20. It's all by the numbers, and you'll hear it all here.

The Star Wars Collectors Archive Podcast
Tales from the Sithsonian Crypt- A Very Duncan Halloween: The SWCA Podcast #118

The Star Wars Collectors Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 98:22


Duncan Jenkins joins us from the cobwebbed cloisters of his Sithsonian Crypt. Every item has a relation to Halloween, can you figure out what it is… before it is tooooo late??? Table of Contents: 3:43. Finnish LIquorice 8:44 Hershey ESB Treys with Collector Cards 12:21 Bootleg Rubber Toys 18:01. Spanish C-3PO Mobile 23:25 Scholastic News Explorer with Rick Baker 28:57 Mexican Googly-Eyed Wicket 30:26 Blue Harvest Rain Jacket 32:57 Jabba the Hutt Finnish Monster Magazine 35:31 Halloween Cards Galore 46:00 Taiwanese Match Book 51:34 Bootleg 45-RPM “Arturito” Mexican Funk Song 53:39 Bootleg 8-Track Star Wars Song 58:31 Bootleg 45-RPM, Italian Ewok Celebration Song and Do Do Phone Me 01:00:00 Jedi Ghost Toothbrush 01:07:33 Spanish Cap Gun 01:10:59 Bootleg American T-Shirt - Costume-o-Rama 01:13:43 Croner Stormtrooper Costume 01:16:36 Mexican Bootleg “Darth Vader- Enemy of He-Man” costume 01:21:30 British Cheryl C-3P0 Costume 01:23:25 Canadian Fameux Halloween C-3P0 Halloween 01:28:25 French César Tusken Raider Mask 01:30:48 Line Art for Ben Cooper Ad 01:32:05 Canadian Fameux Halloween Chewbacca Costume 01:35:00 Outro and Haunted Dead (tape) Story

LIVE Ontwowheels
Is HONDA changing the GOLDWING? | Live Ontwowheels #35

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 68:09


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Live Ontwowheels will be moving channels soon! Be one of the first to sub: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRzHhmsrf_bVUBzg4KJUpvgWelcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

NASCAR on NBC podcast
AJ Allmendinger reflects on his NASCAR career and renaissance with an Xfinity title in sight

NASCAR on NBC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:14


Xfinity Series championship contender AJ Allmendinger on  assessing his dream 2021 season and whether it's his best ever (2:00); reflecting back on the NASCAR transition 15 years later (4:00); the “blur” of his early seasons between Red Bull, RPM and Penske (6:00); his biggest regret from the early years of his NASCAR career (7:30); the impact of Roger Penske with the Indy 500 and Xfinity (9:30); how close AJ has come to leaving racing and how he stays in a good place mentally (11:45); fear being one of his big motivators (14:30); on how joining Kaulig Racing interrupted a career shift and also made him a part of something bigger in “trying to write history” (16:00); his impact on Kaulig's growth (18:45); whether he feels as if he's been the feel-good story in the Xfinity Series this season (20:00); what a championship celebration would be like (22:30). 

A Heavy Metal Podcast - The Mighty Decibel
2020 : THE YEAR IN EXTREME METAL - In 40 Minutes

A Heavy Metal Podcast - The Mighty Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:46


Welcome back to our series where we curate what we think are the best 40 minutes of music from an underrated band's career ... with headbangers and hard rockers in mind (ie. you won't be hearing many ballads!). Basically, it's what we'd put on a single vinyl release (being limited to 20 minutes per side) if we were asked to put a Best Of record together to convince the uninitiated long haired miscreant that this band is worth checking out. Today we complete our and final curation of the best tracks of 2020, this is episode focusing on all things extreme metal (black, thrash and death). Duck for cover!!!! Side 1 (00:00) "Blood For The Crypt Dagger": CRYPT DAGGER - From Below (2:45) "Panzer VI": WARKVLT - Deathymn (5:59) "Final Declaration": VADER - Solitude In Madness (8:16) "Rebirth By Blasphemy": MIDNIGHT - Rebirth By Blasphemy (11:24) "Shadowed By A Veil of Scythian Arrows": HATE FOREST - Hour of Centaur (15:32) "Frostbite Bitch": TORONTO - Under Siege (18:31) "Machine Gun Blasphemy": FRONT - Antichrist Militia Side 2 (23:19) 'Naegleric Outbreak": CARDIAC ARREST - The Day That Death Prevailed (25:59) "45 RPM": BUTCHER - 666 Goats Carry My Chariot (29:41) "Eyes of the Possessed": BASTARD PRIEST - Vengeance ...of the damned (37:40) "Black Thrash Dos 80s": COMMANDO - Love Songs #1 (38:50) "The Second Death": HORNCROWNED - Rex Exterminii

Drew and Sam Talk Training
Let Them Lead! No Really, it'll be GREAT! With Special Guests Margaret Jackson and Brooke Fleming from RPM Pizza!

Drew and Sam Talk Training

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 107:00


In long awaited Episode 19 the guys talk about leadership and the need for you to “Let Them Lead”.  Speaking of “Let Them Lead”, we talk about the latest book from John U. Bacon and get some unexpected lessons on leadership hearing about America's worst hockey team.  We spend some remarkable time with the RPM training team! Buckle up, this is a great episode!

LIVE Ontwowheels
Ducati is GOING ELECTRIC! | Live Ontwowheels #34

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 64:53


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets
Jean-Marc Champagne: Filling the Funding Gap In Nature-Based Investing

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 20:48


In part three of RPM's climate change special, Jean-Marc Champagne the head of bankable nature solutions at the WWF, joins StepStone's head of responsible investment, Suzanne Tavill, to discuss new ways of bringing private sector capital into the natural capital sector. They discuss why the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures could be a gamechanger for biodiversity (4:00); why bankable nature solutions are critical to filling the fund gap in conservation (5:40); concrete examples that prove nature-based solutions entail more than just forestry or sustainable agriculture (11:40); and how the WWF and its partners are redefining the concept of seed financing (16:35). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

B-Time with Beth Bierbower
The Value Of Remote Patient Monitoring with Health Recovery Solutions CEO & Cofounder Jarrett Bauer.

B-Time with Beth Bierbower

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:10


Remote patient monitoring is the early monitoring concept that many are counting on to help providers get to the right patients faster and diagnose and treat issues earlier to improve health outcomes.  Remote patient monitoring – or RPM for short - is one of those broad industry terms that can mean many things.  I am looking forward to gaining a better understanding of what RPM is and how it can lead to better outcomes and lower costs in our discussion today with Jarrett Bauer the CEO & Co-founder of Healthcare Recovery Solutions a nationally recognized healthcare remote monitoring company.  Jarrett holds an MBA from the Johns Hopkins Care School of Business and has been focused on RPM for the last ten years.  Show notes:  The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey.  Podcasts:  The Wall Street Journal & Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman & The B-Time Podcast with Beth Bierbower

LIVE Ontwowheels
Buell is BACK! | Live Ontwowheels #33

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 63:40


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

This Week in Health IT
Newsday - Health IT Staff Shortage, Telehealth Long-Term, and the Future Patient Portal

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 47:03


October 11, 2021: It's Newsday with Dr. Justin Collier, Chief Healthcare Advisor for World Wide Technology. A lawsuit is alleging that a cyber incident at Springhill Medical Center led to an infant's death. A Mercer report confirms that the healthcare workforce is burned-out and traumatized following COVID. Graphite Health launched with its first three organizing members SSM Health, Presbyterian Healthcare and Intermountain. And the ONC reported an increase in patient portal usage. How do we bring clinicians up to speed quicker with technology? How can we make the onboarding process faster and more efficient for traveling nurses? And telehealth use is still surging but patient satisfaction has declined. Key Points:00:00:00 - Introduction00:06:30 - In the next 5 years 900,000 nurses are projected to permanently leave their profession00:10:36 - The clinicians focus on the patient and on patient interaction is what really fuels their engines00:19:00 - If I were a CIO today, I'd be planning on a significant amount of turnover00:21:48 - One of the key drivers of joy is knowing that your work has meaning 00:26:04 - Patient portal usage is up. Why is that?00:34:30 - Once the world is healthier, I think it's going to be convenience and ease that will drive continued telehealth encountersStories:Hospital ransomware attack led to infant's death, lawsuit alleges - Healthcare IT NewsGreat Attrition' or ‘Great Attraction'? The choice is yours - McKinseyMercer Report: Healthcare Labor Shortage Will Continue to Grow - Healthcare InnovationGraphite Health Launches with Three Founding Partners Intermountain, SSM Health and PresbyterianONC: More patients are downloading their medical records and using portals - Healthcare IT NewsHow CMS is boosting telehealth and RPM with new CPT codes - Healthcare IT NewsTelehealth use is surging but patient satisfaction with the service has declined, new study finds - FierceHealthcareMaryland Insurer CareFirst Launches Virtual-First Primary Care Business - Healthcare InnovationTelehealth Experi

LIVE Ontwowheels
Triumphs NEW Tiger 660 makes the others look BAD! | Live Ontwowheels #32

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:26


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets
Carl Prins: Carbon Footprinting & Going Net Zero

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 22:23


In part two of RPM's climate change special, Carl Prins, the CEO of Pathzero and an expert on carbon footprinting, joins StepStone's head of responsible investment, Suzanne Tavill, to discuss some of the more technical aspects that companies pledging to go net zero will encounter. They cover the types (or "scopes") of emissions and how to measure them (4:00); how measuring portfolio-level emissions helps GPs think about long-term risks (12:12); and why setting a shadow price for carbon is critical for companies that wish to become carbon neutral (19:04). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LIVE Ontwowheels
How does my WIFE HONESTLY feel about me riding MOTORCYCLES? | Live Ontwowheels #31

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 60:42


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets
Linda Romanovska: Europe's Sustainable Finance program and drive to Net Zero

RPM - Reflections on Private Markets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 27:07


In part one of RPM's climate change special, Linda Romanovska, an expert in sustainable finance and one of the architects of the EU's climate change program, joins StepStone's head of responsible investment, Suzanne Tavill, to discuss the intricacies and finer points of the EU's climate program including its origins (1:50); how the Taxonomy, SFDR disclosure regimes, and various other policy tools work together to create the three "pillars" of the EU's sustainability framework; how the EU defines sustainability (15:18); and how new focus areas in the updated finance program including its data repository will help standardize climate reporting (17:30).  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Week in Health IT
Newsday - Epic's Big Week, St Jude's Awesome Fundraiser, and Binge Watching Ideas with Drex

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 45:02


October 4, 2021: Drex DeFord and Bill discuss wearables, the VA EHR rollout, the Epic dental module, cybersecurity, remote work, the CHIME, HLTH and HIMSS Vibe conferences and even golf. SpaceX owner Elon Musk is donating $50 million to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Walmart announced a new partnership with Epic to help customers simplify their health care. HP released a Security report titled "Rebellions & Rejection” showing that work from home is a cybersecurity "ticking time bomb. And Epic's vaccine credential tech is now available to 25 million patients.Key Points:The Epic dental module used to be the forgotten stepchild. Now it's legit. [00:13:00] Epic's vaccine credentialing technology is now available to 25 million individuals through their My Chart account [00:18:10] 83% believe remote work has become a ticking time bomb for network breaches [00:25:13] Our processes in security are cautious and err on the side of safety which means they are generally slow [00:28:11] CrowdStrikeStories:Elon Musk chips in $50 million for SpaceX Inspiration4's children's cancer fundraising effort - Market WatchWalmart Selects Epic To Help Customers Simplify Their Health Care - Walmart.comEpic's vaccine credential tech now available to 25M patients - Healthcare IT NewsWFH is a cybersecurity "ticking time bomb," according to a new report - Tech RepublicHow CMS is boosting telehealth and RPM with new CPT codes | Healthcare IT NewsA New Spin on an "Age-Old Problem": How Leaders Are Tacking Interoperability | healthsystemcio.com

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Host Tom Foley talks to Soheil Saadat, Founder and CEO of GenieMD about the shift from initial COVID phase and the adoption of video conferencing services to the shift of virtual care services and beyond into RPM and and CCM. This show is sponsored by HP and Intel. HP Engage long lifecycle products provide the stability, safety and security you need plus flexibility and performance designed for today and tomorrow. Intel would like you to know, they are going above and beyond together with new standards for business, with the latest intel VPro processors, delivering what IT needs for performance, security, remote manageability and stability. To stream our Station live 24/7 visit www.HealthcareNOWRadio.com or ask your Smart Device to “….Play HealthcareNOW Radio”. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen

Men at the Movies
Ford vs Ferrari with Paul McDonald and Britt Mooney

Men at the Movies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 64:46


Paul McDonald and Britt Mooney begin week one of our three part “Who am I?” series with Ford vs Ferrari. We discover we were rescued for a reason. What is your reason? There's a vast difference between living a 6,000 RPM life of safety and security, and pushing your life to 7,000 RPM with risk and adventure. And we must go through our initiation so that, when life does push our limits, we don't soil ourselves. Start your engines, and let's go after the perfect lap. Questions What's the pace of your life? How high are your RPM's in your everyday experience? What are you striving for? Dreaming of? If we are rescued for a reason, what's your reason? Where have you stopped dreaming? Said it's too late? What are your biggest dreams? Who criticizes your dreams? Who speaks life into them? What fear keeps you from following your dreams? When have you felt the simultaneous emotions of terror and joy? What matters more, reliability or victory? How can they align? How are they different? Would you rather be known as a man who always played it safe, or a man who risked everything? What are the pros and cons of each? When confronted with failure, will you fold or will you fight? Who do you know who is chasing the same things you are? How's your heart? How much margin do you have? If a catastrophe happened (house burns down, family member dies, lockdown, etc.), how do you think you can handle it? How do you handle the pressure that life puts on you? What are you chasing? How do you define winning and losing? Edited and mixed by Grayson Foster (https://graysonfoster.com/) Audio quotes performed by Britt Mooney, Paul McDonald, and Tim Willard, taken from Epic (written by John Eldredge) and Song of Albion (written by Stephen Lawhead). Southerly Change performed by Zane Dickinson, used under license from Shutterstock

Billy Joel A to Z
Half A Mile Away

Billy Joel A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 25:56


The H's begin with the fast moving Half a Mile Away song. Half a Mile Away is the seventh song off of Billy Joel's sixth and Grammy Winning Album of the Year, 52nd Street and was released only as a B-Side, depending on what country you live in, on the 45 RPM of Big Shot, which came out on January of 1979. And, in trivia this week -- which Billy Joel album covers were shot "a half a mile away from each other"? Exciting! We are also making Little Geo a permanent friend of ours. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Corey Screws Up Logstash For Everyone with Jordan Sissel

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 43:34


About JordanJordan is a self proclaimed “hacker.” Links:Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordansissel TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by “you”—gabyte. Distributed technologies like Kubernetes are great, citation very much needed, because they make it easier to have resilient, scalable, systems. SQL databases haven't kept pace though, certainly not like no SQL databases have like Route 53, the world's greatest database. We're still, other than that, using legacy monolithic databases that require ever growing instances of compute. Sometimes we'll try and bolt them together to make them more resilient and scalable, but let's be honest it never works out well. Consider Yugabyte DB, its a distributed SQL database that solves basically all of this. It is 100% open source, and there's not asterisk next to the “open” on that one. And its designed to be resilient and scalable out of the box so you don't have to charge yourself to death. It's compatible with PostgreSQL, or “postgresqueal” as I insist on pronouncing it, so you can use it right away without having to learn a new language and refactor everything. And you can distribute it wherever your applications take you, from across availability zones to other regions or even other cloud providers should one of those happen to exist. Go to yugabyte.com, thats Y-U-G-A-B-Y-T-E dot com and try their free beta of Yugabyte Cloud, where they host and manage it for you. Or see what the open source project looks like—its effortless distributed SQL for global apps. My thanks to Yu—gabyte for sponsoring this episode.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at VMware. Let's be honest—the past year has been far from easy. Due to, well, everything. It caused us to rush cloud migrations and digital transformation, which of course means long hours refactoring your apps, surprises on your cloud bill, misconfigurations and headache for everyone trying manage disparate and fractured cloud environments. VMware has an answer for this. With VMware multi-cloud solutions, organizations have the choice, speed, and control to migrate and optimize applications seamlessly without recoding, take the fastest path to modern infrastructure, and operate consistently across the data center, the edge, and any cloud. I urge to take a look at vmware.com/go/multicloud. You know my opinions on multi cloud by now, but there's a lot of stuff in here that works on any cloud. But don't take it from me thats: VMware.com/go/multicloud and my thanks to them again for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been to a lot of conference talks in my life. I've seen good ones, I've seen terrible ones, and then I've seen the ones that are way worse than that. But we don't tend to think in terms of impact very often, about how conference talks can move the audience.In fact, that's the only purpose of giving a talk ever—to my mind—is you're trying to spark some form of alchemy or shift in the audience and convince them to do something. Maybe in the banal sense, it's to sign up for something that you're selling, or to go look at your website, or to contribute to a project, or maybe it's to change the way they view things. One of the more transformative talks I've ever seen that shifted my outlook on a lot of things was at [SCALE 00:01:11] in 2012. Person who gave that talk is my guest today, Jordan Sissel, who, among many other things in his career, was the original creator behind logstash, which is the L in ELK Stack. Jordan, thank you for joining me.Jordan: Thanks for having me, Corey.Corey: I don't know how well you remember those days in 2012. It was the dark times; we thought oh, the world is going to end; that wouldn't happen until 2020. But it was an interesting conference full of a bunch of open-source folks, it was my local conference because I lived in Los Angeles. And it was the thing I looked forward to every year because I would always go and learn something new. I was in the trenches in those days, and I had a bunch of problems that looked an awful lot like other people's problems, and having a hallway track where, “Hey, how are you solving this problem?” Was a big deal. I missed those days in some ways.Jordan: Yeah, SCALE was a particularly good conference. I think I made it twice. Traveling down to LA was infrequent for me, but I always enjoyed how it was a very communal setting. They had dedicated hallway tracks. They had kids tracks, which I thought was great because folks couldn't usually come to conferences if they couldn't bring their kids or they had to take care of that stuff. But having a kids track was great, they had kids presenting. It felt more organic than a lot of other conferences did, and that's kind of what drew me to it initially.Corey: Yeah, it was my local network. It turns out that the Southern California tech community is relatively small, and we all go different lives. And it's LA, let's face it, I lived there for over a decade. Flaking as a way of life. So yeah, well, “Oh, we'll go out and catch dinner. Ooh, have to flake at the last minute.” If you're one of the good people, you tell people you're flaking instead of just no-showing, but it happens.But this was the thing that we would gather and catch up every year. And, “Oh, what have you been doing?” “Wow, you work in that company now? Congratulations, slash, what's wrong with you?” It was fun, just sort of a central sync point. It started off as hanging out with friends.And in those days, I was approaching the idea of, “You know what? I should learn to give a conference talk someday. But let's be clear. People don't give conference talks; legends give conference talks. And one day, I'll be good enough to get on stage and give a talk to my peers at a conference.”Now, the easy, cynical interpretation would be, “Well, but I saw your talk and I figured, hey, any jackhole can get up there. If he can do it, anyone can.” But that's not at all how it wound up impacting me. You were talking about logstash, which let's start there because that's a good entry point. Logstash was transformative for me.Before that, I'd spent a lot of time playing around with syslog, usually rsyslog, but there are other stories here of when a system does something and it spits out logs—ideally—how do you make sure you capture those logs in a reliable way so if you restart a computer, you don't wind up with a gap in your logs? If it's the right computer, it could be a gap in everything's logs while that thing is coming back up. And let's avoid single points of failure and the rest. And I had done all kinds of horrible monstrosities, and someone asked me at one point—Jordan: [laugh]. Guilty.Corey: Yeah. Someone said, “Well, there are a couple of options. Why don't you use Splunk?” And the answer is that I don't have a spare princess lying around that I can ransom back to her kingdom, so I can't afford it. “Okay, what about logstash?” And my answer was, “What's a logstash?” And thus that sound was Pandora's Box creaking open.So, I started playing with it and realized, “Okay, this is interesting.” And I lost track of it because we have demands on our time. Then I was dragged into a session that you gave and you explained what logstash was. I'm not going to do nearly as good of a job as you can on this. What the hell was logstash, for folks who are not screaming at syslog while they first hear of it.Jordan: All right. So, you mentioned rsyslog, and there's—old is often a pejorative of more established projects because I don't think these projects are bad. But rsyslog, syslog-ng, things like that were common to see for me as a sysadmin. But to talk about logstash, we need to go back a little further than 2012. So, the logstash project started—Corey: I disagree because I wasn't aware of it until 2012. Until I become aware of something it doesn't really exist. That's right, I have the object permanence of an infant.Jordan: [laugh].That's fair. And I've always felt like perception is reality, so if someone—this gets into something I like to say, but if someone is having a bad time or someone doesn't know about something, then it might as well not exist. So, logstash as a project started in 2008, 2009. I don't remember when the first commits landed, but it was, gosh, it's more than ten years ago now.But even before that in college, I was fortunate to, through a network of friends, get a job as a sysadmin. And as a sysadmin, you stare at logs a lot to figure out what's going on. And I wanted a more interesting way to process the logs. I had taught myself regular expressions and it wasn't finding joy in it… at all, like pretty much most people, probably. Either they look at regular expressions and just… evacuate with disgust, which is absolutely an appropriate response, or they dive into it and they have to use it for their job.But it wasn't enjoyable, and I found myself repeating stuff a lot. Matching IP addresses, matching strings, URLs, just trying to pull out useful information about what is going on?Corey: Oh, and the timestamp problem, too. One of the things that I think people don't understand who have not played in this space, is that all systems do have logs unless you've really pooched something somewhere—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —and it shows that at this point in time, this thing happened. As we start talking about multiple computers and distributed systems—but even on the same computer—great, so at this time there was something that showed up in the system log because there was a disk event or something, and at the same time you have application logs that are talking about what the application running is talking about. And that is ideally using a somewhat similar system to do this, but often not. And the way that timestamps are expressed in these are radically different and the way that the log files themselves are structured. One might be timestamp followed by hostname followed by error code.The other one might be hostname followed by a timestamp—in a different format—followed by a copyright notice because a big company got to it followed by the actual event notice, and trying to disambiguate all of these into a standardized form was first obnoxious, and secondly, very important because you want to see the exact chain of events. This also leads to a separate sidebar on making sure that all the clocks are synchronized, but that's a separate story for another time. And that's where you enter the story in many respects.Jordan: Right. So, my thought around what led to logstash is you can take a sysadmin or software IT developer—whatever—expert, and you can sit them in front of a bunch of logs and they can read them and say, “That's the time it happened. That's the user who caused this action. This is the action.” But if you try and abstract and step away, and so you ask how many times did this action happen? When did this user appear? What time did this happen?You start losing the ability to ask those questions without being an expert yourself, or sitting next to an expert and having them be your keyboard. Kind of a phenomenon I call the human keyboard problem where you're speaking to a computer, but someone has to translate for you. And so in around 2004, I was super into Perl. No shocker that I enjoyed—ish. I sort of enjoyed regular expressions, but I was super into Perl, and there was a Perl module called Regexp::Common which is a library of regular expressions to match known things: IP addresses, certain kinds of timestamps, quoted strings, and whatnot.Corey: And this stuff is always challenging because it sounds like oh, an IP address. One of the interview questions I hated the most someone asked me was write a regular expression to detect an IP address. It turns out that to do this correctly, even if you bound it to ipv4 only, the answer takes up multiple lines on a screen.Jordan: Oh, for sure.Corey: It's enormous.Jordan: It's like a full page of—Corey: It is.Jordan: —of code you can't read. And that's one of the things that, it was sort of like standing on the shoulders of the person who came before; it was kind of an epiphany to me.Corey: Yeah. So, I can copy and paste that into my code, but someone who has to maintain that thing after I get fired is going to be, “What the hell is this and what does it do?” It's like it's the blessed artifact that the ancients built it and left it there like it's a Stargate sitting in your code. And it's, “We don't know how it works; we're scared to break it, so we don't even look at that thing directly. We just know that we put nonsense in, an IP address comes out, and let's not touch it, ever again.”Jordan: Exactly. And even to your example, even before you get fired and someone replaces you and looks at your regular expression, the problem I was having was, I would have this library of copy and pasteable things, and then I would find a bug, and edge case. And I would fix that edge case but the other 15 scripts that were using the same way regular expression, I can't even read them anymore because I don't carry that kind of context in my head for all of that syntax. So, you either have to go back and copy and paste and fix all those old regular expressions. Or you just say, “You know what? We're not going to fix the old code. We have a new version of it that works here, but everywhere else this edge case fails.”So, that's one of the things that drew me to the Regexp::Common library in Perl was that it was reusable and things had names. It was, “I want to match an IP address.” You didn't have to memorize that long piece of text to precisely and accurately accept only regular expressions and rejects things that are not. You just said, “Give me the regular expression that matches an IP.” And from that library gave me the idea to write grok.Well, if we could name things, then maybe we could turn that into some kind of data structure, sort of the combination of, “I have a piece of log data, and I as an expert, I know that's an IP address, that's the username, and that's the timestamp.” Well, now I can apply this library of regular expressions that I didn't have to write and hopefully has a unit test suite, and say, now we can pull out instead of that plain piece of text that is hard to read as a non-expert, now I can have a data structure we can format however we want, that non-experts can see. And even experts can just relax and not have to be full experts all the time, using that part of your brain. So, now you can start getting towards answering search-oriented questions. “How many login attempts happened yesterday from this IP address?”Corey: Right. And back then, the way that people would do these things was Elasticsearch. So, that's the thing you shove all your data into in a bunch of different ways and you can run full-text queries on it. And that's great, but now we want to have that stuff actually structured, and that is sort of the magic of logstash—which was used in conjunction with Elasticsearch a lot—and it turns out that typing random SQL queries in the command line is not generally how most business users like to interact with this stuff, seems to be something dashboard-y-like, and the project that folks use for that was Kibana. And ELK Stack became a thing because Elasticsearch in isolation can do a lot but it doesn't get you all the way there for what people were using to look at logs.Jordan: You're right.Corey: And Kibana is also one of the projects that Elastic owned, and at some point, someone looks around, like, “Oh, logstash. People are using that with us an awful lot. How big is the company that built that? Oh, it's an open-source project run by some guy? Can we hire that guy?” And the answer is, “Apparently,” because you wound up working as an Elastic employee for a while.Jordan: Yeah. It was kind of an interesting journey. So, in the beginning of logstash in 2009, I kind of had this picture of how I wanted to solve log processing search challenges. And I broke it down into a couple of parts of visualization—to be clear, I broke it down in my head, not into code, but visualization, kind of exploration, there's the processing and transmission, and then there's storage and search. And I only felt confident really attending to a solution for one of those parts. And I picked log processing partly because I already had a jumpstart from a couple of years prior, working on grok and feeling really comfortable with regular expressions. I don't want to say good because that's—Corey: You heard it here first—Jordan: [laugh].Corey: —we found the person that knows regular expressions. [laugh].Jordan: [laugh]. And logstash was being worked on to solve this problem of taking your data, processing it, and getting it somewhere. That's why logstash has so many outputs, has so many inputs, and lots of filters. And about I think a year into building logstash, I had experimented with storage and search backends, and I never found something that really clicked with me. And I was experimenting with Leucine, and knowing that I could not complete this journey because that the problem space is so large, it would be foolish of me to try to do distributed log stores or anything like that, plus visualization.I just didn't have the skills or the time in the day. I ended up writing a frontend for logstash called logstash-web—naming things is hard—and I wasn't particularly skilled or attentive to that project, and it was more of a very lightweight frontend to solve the visualization, the exploration aspect. And about a year into logstash being alive, I found Elasticsearch. And what clicked with me from being a sysadmin and having worked at large data center companies in the past is I know the logs on a single system are going to quickly outgrow it. So, whatever storage system will accept these logs, it's got to be easy to add new storage.And Elasticsearch first-day promise was it's distributed; you can add more nodes and go about your day. And it fulfilled that promise and I think it still fulfills that promise that if you're going to be processing terabytes of data, yeah, just keep dumping it in there. That's one of the reasons I didn't try and even use MySQL, or Postgres, or other data systems because it didn't seem obvious how to have multiple storage servers collecting this data with those solutions, for me at the time.Corey: It turns out that solving problems like this that are global and universal lead to massive adoption very quickly. I want to get this back a bit before you wound up joining Elastic because you get up on stage and you talked through what this is. And I mentioned at the start of this recording, that it was one of those transformative talks. But let's be clear here, I don't remember 95% of how logstash works. Like, the technology you talked about ten years ago is largely outmoded slash replaced slash outdated today. I assure you, I did not take anything of note whatsoever from your talk regarding regular expressions, I promise. And—Jordan: [laugh]. Good.Corey: But that's not the stuff that was transformative to me. What was, was the way that you talked about these things. And there was the first time I'd ever heard the phrase that if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. This was 2012. The idea of empathy hadn't really penetrated into the ops and engineering spaces in any meaningful way yet. It was about gatekeeping, it was about, “Read the manual fool”—Jordan: Yes.Corey: —if people had questions. And it was actively user-hostile. And it was something that I found transformative of, forget the technology piece for a second; this is a story about how it could be different. Because logstash was the vehicle to deliver a message that transcended far beyond the boundaries of how to structure your logs, or maybe the other boundaries of regular expressions, I'm never quite sure where those things start and stop. But it was something that was actively transformative where you're on stage as someone who is a recognized authority in the space, and you're getting up there and you're sending an implicit message—both explicitly and by example—of be nice to people; demonstrate empathy. And that left a hell of an impact. And—Jordan: Thank you.Corey: I wound up doing a spot check just now, and I wound up looking at this and sure enough, early in 2013, I wound up committing—it's still in the history of the changelog for logstash because it's open-source—I committed two pull requests and minutes apart, two submissions—I don't know if pull requests were even a thing back then—but it wound up in the log. Because another project you were renowned for was fpm: Effing Package Manager if I'm—is that what the acronym stands for, or am I misremembering?Jordan: [laugh]. We'll go with that. I'm sure, vulgar viewers will know what the F stands for, but you don't have to say it. It's just Effing Package Management.Corey: Yeah.Jordan: But yeah, I think I really do believe that if a user, especially if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug, and that came from many years of participating at various levels in open-source, where if you came at it with a tinkerer's or a hacker's mindset and you think, “This project is great. I would like it to do one additional thing, and I would like to talk to someone about how to make it do that one additional thing.” And you go find the owners or the maintainers of that project, and you come in with gusto and energy, and you describe what you want to do and, first, they say, “What you want to do is not possible.” They don't even say they don't want to do it; they frame the whole universe against you. “It's not possible. Why would you want to do that? If you want to make that, do it yourself.”You know, none of these things are an extended hand, a lowered ladder, an open door, none of those. It's always, “You're bothering me. Go away. Please read the documentation and see where we clearly”—which they don't—“Document that this is not a thing we're interested in.” And I came to the conclusion that any future open-source or collaborative work that I worked on, it's got to be from a place where, “You're welcome, and whatever contributions or participation levels you choose, are okay. And if you have an idea, let's talk about it. If you're having a bad time, let's figure out how to solve it.”Maybe the solution is we point you in the right direction to the documentation, if documentation exists; maybe we find a bug that we need to fix. The idea that the way to build communities is through kindness and collaboration, not through walls or gatekeeping or just being rude. And I really do think that's one of the reasons logstash became so successful. I mean, any particular technology could have succeeded in the space that logstash did, but I believe that it did so because of that one piece of framework where if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. Because to me, that opens the door to say, “Yeah, you know what? Some of the code I write is not going to be good. Or, the thing you want to do is undocumented. Or the documentation is out of date. It told you a lie and you followed the documentation and it misled you because it's incorrect.”We can fix that. Maybe we don't have time to fix it right now. Maybe there's no one around to fix it, but we can at least say, “You know what? That information is incorrect, and I'm sorry you were misled. Come on into the community and we'll figure it out.” And one of the patterns I know is, on the IRC channel, which is where the logstash real-time community chat… I don't know how to describe that.Corey: No, it was on freenode. That's part of the reason I felt okay, talking to you. At that point. I was volunteer network staff. This is before freenode turned into basically a haven for Nazis this past year.Jordan: Yeah. It was still called lilo… lilonet [crosstalk 00:20:20]—Corey: No, the open freenode network, that predates me. This was—yeah, lilo—Jordan: Okay.Corey: —died about six years prior. But—Jordan: Oh, all right.Corey: Freenode's been around a long time. What make this thing work was that I was network staff, and that means that I had a bit of perceived authority—it's a chat room; not really—but it was one of those things where it was at least, “Okay, this is not just some sketchy drive-by rando,” which I very much was, but I didn't present that way, so I could strike up conversations. But with you talking about this stuff, I never needed to be that person. It was just if someone wants to pitch in on this, great; more hands make lighter work. Sure.Jordan: Yeah, for sure.Corey: And for me, the interesting part is not even around the logstash aspects so much; it's your other project, fbm. Well, one of your other projects. Back in 2012, that was an interesting year for me. Another area that got very near and dear to my heart in open-source world was the SaltStack project; I was contributor number 15. And I didn't know how Python worked. Not that I do now, but I can fake it better now.And Tom Hatch, the guy that ran the project before it was a company was famous for this where I could send in horrifying levels of code, and every time he would merge it in and then ten minutes later, there would be another patch that comes in that fixes all bugs I just introduced and it was just such a warm onboarding. I'm not suggesting that approach and I'm not saying it's scalable, but I started contributing. And I became the first Debian and Ubuntu packager for SaltStack, which was great. And I did a terrible job at it because—let me explain. I don't know if it's any better now, but back in those days, there were multiple documentation sources on the proper way to package software.They were all contradictory with each other, there was no guidance as to when to follow each one, there was never a, “You know nothing about packaging; here's what you need to know, step-by-step,” and when you get it wrong, they yell at you. And it turns out that the best practice then to get it formally accepted upstream—which is what I did—is do a crap-ass job, and then you'll wind up with a grownup coming in, like, “This is awful. Move.” And then they'll fix it and yell at you, and gatekeep like hell, and then you have a package that works and gets accepted upstream because the magic incantation has been said somewhere. And what I loved about fpm was that I could take any random repo or any source tarball or anything I wanted, run it through with a single command, and it would wind up building out a RPM and a Deb file—and I don't know what else it's supported; those are the ones I cared about—that I could then install on a system. I put in a repo and add that to a sources list on systems, and get to automatically install so I could use configuration management—like SaltStack—to wind up installing custom local packages. And oh, my God, did the packaging communities for multiple different distros hate you—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —and specifically what you had built because this was not the proper way to package. How dare you solve an actual business problem someone has instead of forcing them to go to packaging school where the address is secret, and you have to learn that. It was awful. It was the clearest example that I can come up with of gatekeeping, and then you're coming up with fbm which gets rid of user pain, and I realized that in that fight between the church of orthodoxy of, “This is how it should be done,” and the, “You're having a problem; here's a tool that makes it simple,” I know exactly what side of that line I wanted to be on. And I hadn't always been previously, and that is what clarified it for me.Jordan: Yeah, fbm was a really delightful enjoyment for me to build. The origins of that was I worked at a company and they were all… I think, at that time, we were RPM-based, and then as folks tend to do, I bounced around between jobs almost every year, so I went from one place that—Corey: Hey, it's me.Jordan: [laugh]. Right? And there's absolutely nothing wrong with leaving every year or staying longer. It's just whatever progresses your career in the way that you want and keeps you safe and your family safe. But we were using RPM and we were building packages already not following the orthodoxy.A lot of times if you ask someone how to build a package for Fedora, they'll point you at the Maximum RPM book, and that's… a lot of pages, and honestly, I'm not going to sit down and read it. I just want to take a bunch of files, name it, and install it on 30 machines with Puppet. And that's what we were doing. Cue one year later, I moved to a new company, and we were using Debian packages. And they're the same thing.What struck me is they are identical. It's a bunch of files—and don't pedant me about this—it's a bunch of files with a name, with some other sometimes useful metadata, like other names that you might depend on. And I really didn't find it enjoyable to transfer my knowledge of how to build RPMs, and the tooling and the structures and the syntaxes, to building Debian packages. And this was not for greater publication; this was I have a bunch of internal applications I needed to package and deploy with, at the time it was Puppet. And it wasn't fun.So, I did what we did with grok which was codify that knowledge to reduce the burden. And after a few, probably a year or so of that, it really dawned on me that a generality is all packaging formats are largely solving the same problem and I wanted to build something that was solving problems for folks like you and me: sysadmins, who were handed a pile of code and they needed to get it into production. And I wasn't interested in formalities or appeasing any priesthoods or orthodoxies about what really—you know, “You should really shine your package with this special wax,” kind of thing. Because all of the documentation for Debian packages, Fedora packages are often dedicated to those projects. You're going to submit a package to Fedora so that the rest of the world can use it on Fedora. That wasn't my use case.Corey: Right. I built a thing and a thing that I built is awesome and I want the world to use it, so now I have to go to packaging school? Not just once but twice—Jordan: Right.Corey: —and possibly more. That's awful.Jordan: Or more. Yeah. And it's tough.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: And this gets back to what I found of—it was rare that I could find a way to contribute to something meaningfully, and I was using logstash after your talk, I'd started using it and rolling it out somewhere, and I discovered that there wasn't a Debian package for it—the environment I was in at that time—or Ubuntu package, and, “Hey Jordan, are you the guy that wrote fpm and there isn't a package here?” And the thing is is that you would never frame it this way, but the answer was, of course, “Pull requests welcome,” which is often an invitation to do free volunteer work for companies, but this was an open-source project that was not backed by a publicly-traded company; it was some guy. And of course, I'll pitch in on that. And I checked the commit log on this for what it is that I see, and sure enough, I have two commits. The first one was on Sunday night in February of 2013, and my commit message was, “Initial packaging work for Deb building.” And sure enough, there's a bunch of files I put up there and that's great. And my second and last commit was 12 minutes later saying, “Remove large binary because I'm foolish.” Yeah.Jordan: Was that you? [laugh].Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah, I'm sure—yeah, it was great. I didn't know how Git worked back then. I'm sure it's still in the history there. I wonder how big that binary is, and exactly how much I have screwed people over in the last decade since.Jordan: I've noticed this over time. And every now and then you'd be—I would be or someone would be on a slow internet connection—which again, is something that we need to optimize for, or at least be aware of and help where we can—someone would be cloning logstash on an airplane or something like that, or rural setting, and they would say, “It gets stuck at 76% for, like, ten minutes.” And you would go back and dust off your tome of how to use Git because it's very difficult piece of software to use, and you would find this one blob and I never even looked at it who committed it or whatever, but it was like I think it was 80 Megs of a JAR file or a Debian package that was [unintelligible 00:28:31] logstash release. And… [laugh] it's such a small world that you're like, yep, that was me.Corey: Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let's check this just for fun here. To be clear, the entire repository right now is 167 Megs, so that file that I had up there for all of 13 minutes lives indelibly in Git history, and it is fully half of the size—Jordan: Yep.Corey: —of the entirety of the logstash project. All right, then. I didn't realize this was one of those confess your sins episodes, but here we are.Jordan: Look, sometimes we put flags on the moon, sometimes we put big files in git. You could just for posterity, we could go back and edit the history and remove that, but it never became important to do it, it wasn't loud, people weren't upset enough by it, or it didn't come up enough to say, “You know what? This is a big file.” So, it's there. You left your mark.Corey: You know, we take what we can get. It's an odd time. I'll have to do some digging around; I'm sure I'll tweet about this as soon as I get a bit more data on it, but I wonder how often people have had frustration caused by that. There's no ill intent here, to be very clear, but it was instead, I didn't know how Git worked very well. I didn't know what I was doing in a lot of respects, and sure enough in the fullness of time, some condescending package people came in and actually made this right.And there is a reasonable, responsible package now because, surprise, of course there is. But I wonder how much inadvertent pain I caused people by that ridiculous commit. And it's the idea of impact and how this stuff works. I'm not happy that people are on a plane with a slow connection had a wait an extra minute or two to download that nonsense. It's one of those things that is, oops. I feel like a bit of a heel for that, not for not knowing something, but for causing harm to folks. Intent doesn't outweigh impact. There is a lesson in there for it.Jordan: Agreed. On that example, I think one of the things… code is not the most important thing I can contribute to a project, even though I feel very confident in my skills in programming in a variety of environments. I think the number one thing I can do is listen and look for sources of pain. And people would come in and say, “I can't get this to work.” And we would work together and figure out how to make it work for their use case, and that could result in a new feature, a bug fix, or some documentation improvements, or a blog post, or something like that.And I think in this case, I don't really recall any amount of noise for someone saying, “Cloning the Git repository is just a pain in the butt.” And I think a lot of that is because either the people who would be negatively impacted by that weren't doing that use case, they were downloading the releases, which were as small as we can possibly get them, or they were editing files using the GitHub online edit the file thing, which is a totally acceptable, it's perfectly fine way to do things in Git. So, I don't remember anyone complaining about that particular file size issue. The Elasticsearch repository is massive and I don't think it even has binaries. It just has so much more—Corey: Someone accidentally committed their entire production test data set at one point and oops-a-doozy. Yeah, it's not the most egregious harm I've ever caused—Jordan: Yeah.Corey: —but it's there. The thing that, I guess, resonates with me and still does is the lessons I learned from you, I could sum them up as being not just empathy-driven—because that's the easy answer—but the other layers were that you didn't need to be the world's greatest expert in a thing in order to credibly give a conference talk. To be clear, you were miles ahead of me and still are in a lot of different areas—Jordan: Thanks.Corey: —and that's fine. But you don't need to be the—like, you are not the world's greatest expert on empathy, but that's what I took from the talk and that's what it was about. It also taught me that things you can pick up from talks—and other means—there are things you can talk about in terms of technology and there are things you can talk about in terms of people, and the things about people do not have expiration dates in the same way that technology does. And if I'm going to be remembered for impact on people versus impact on technology, for me, there's no contest. And you forced me to really think about a lot of those things that it started my path to, I guess, becoming a public speaker and then later all the rest that followed, like this podcast, the nonsense on Twitter, and all the rest. So, it is, I guess, we can lay the responsibility for all that at your feet. Enjoy the hate mail.Jordan: Uhh, my email address is now closed. I'm sorry.Corey: Exactly.Jordan: Well, I appreciate the kind words.Corey: We'll get letters on this one.Jordan: [laugh].Corey: It's the impact that people have, and someti—I don't think you knew at the time that that's the impact you were having. It matters.Jordan: I agree. I think a lot of it came from how do I want to experience this? And it was much later that it became something that was really outside of me, in the sense that it was building communities. One of the things I learned shortly after—or even just before—joining Elastic was how many folks were looking to solve a problem, found logstash, became a participant in the community, and that participation could just be anything, just hanging out on IRC, on the mailing list, whatever, and the next step for them was to get a better paying job in an environment they enjoyed that helped them take the next step in their career. Some of those people came to work with me at Elastic; some of them started to work on the logstash team at some point they decided because a lot of logstash users were sysadmins.And on the logstash team, we were all developers; we weren't sysadmins, there was nothing to operate. And a lot of folks would come on board and they were like, “You know what? I'm not enjoying writing Ruby for my job.” And they could take the next step to transition to the support team or the sales engineer team, or cloud operations team at Elastic. So, it was really, like you mentioned, it has nothing to do with the technology of—to me—why these projects are important.They became an amplifier and a hand to pull people up to go the next step they need to go. And on the way maybe they can make a positive impact in the communities they participate in. If those happen to be fpm or logstash, that's great, but I think I want folks to see that technology doesn't have to be a grind of getting through gatekeepers, meeting artificial barriers, and things like that.Corey: The thing that I took, too, is that I gave a talk in 2015 or'16, which is strangely appropriate now: “Terrible ideas in Git.” And yes, checking large binaries in is one of the terrible ideas I talk about. It's Git through counter-example. And around that time, I also gave a talk for a while on how to handle a job interview and advance your career. Only one of those talks has resulted in people approaching me even years later saying that what I did had changed aspects of their life. It wasn't the Git one. And that's the impact it comes down to. That is the change that I wanted to start having because I saw someone else do it and realized, you know, maybe I could possibly be that good someday. Well, I'd like to think I made it, on some level.Jordan: [laugh]. I'm proud of the impact you've made. And I agree with you, it is about people. Even with fpm where I was very selfishly tickling my own itch, I don't want to remember all of this stuff and I also enjoy operating outside of the boundaries of a church or whatever the priesthoods that say, “This is how you must do a thing,” I knew there was a lot of folks who worked at jobs and they didn't have authority, and they had to deploy something, and they knew if they could just package it into a Debian format, or an RPM format, or whatever they needed to do, they could get it deployed and it would make their lives easier. Well, they didn't have the time or the energy or the support in order to learn how to do that and fpm brought them that success where you can say, “Here's a bunch of files; here's a name, poof, you have a package for whatever format you want.”Where I found fpm really take off is when Gem and Python and Node.js support were added. The sysadmins were kind of sandwiched in between—in two impossible worlds where they are only authorized to deploy a certain package format, but all of their internal application developer teams were using Node.js and newer technologies, and all of those package formats were not permitted by whoever had the authority to permit those things at their job. But now they had a tool that said, “You know what? We can just take that thing, we'll take Django and Python, and we'll make it an RPM and we won't have to think a lot about it.”And that really, I think—to me, my hope was that it de-stresses that sort of work environment where you're not having to do three weeks of brand new work every time someone releases something internally in your company; you can just run a script that you wrote a month ago and maintain it as you go.Corey: Wouldn't that be something?Jordan: [laugh]. Ideally, ideally.Corey: Jordan, I want to thank you for not only the stuff you did ten years ago, but also the stuff you just said now. If people want to learn more about you, how you view the world, see what you're up to these days, where can they find you?Jordan: I'm mostly active on Twitter, at @jordansissel, all one word. Mostly these days, I post repair stuff I do on the house. I'm a stay-at-home full0 time dad these days, and… I'm still doing maintenance on the projects that need maintenance, like fpm or xdotool, so if you're one of those users, I hope you're happy. If you're not happy, please reach out and we'll figure out what the next steps can be. But yeah. If you like bugs, especially spiders—or if you don't like spiders and you want to like spiders, check me out on Twitter. I'm often posting macro photos, close-up photos of butterflies, bees, spiders, and the like.Corey: And we will, of course, throw links to that in the [show notes 00:38:10]. Jordan, thank you so much for your time today. It's appreciated.Jordan: Thank you, Corey. It's good talking to you.Corey: Jordan Sissel, founder of logstash and currently, blissfully, not working on a particular corporate job. I envy him, some days. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment in which you have also embedded a large binary.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

LIVE Ontwowheels
Suzuki JUST RELEASED the brand new GSXS 1000 GT! | Live Ontwowheels #30

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 63:18


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Sinner's Crossroads with Kevin Nutt | WFMU

Silver Quintette - "Sinner's Crossroads" [78 RPM version. Take 2.] Brother T.S. Small and the Sun-Rising Four of Summerville, S.C. - "Sweet Jesus" Original Spiritual Jubilaires - "Everytime I Feel The Spirit" Golden Stars Quintet - "The Lord Will Answer Your Prayer" - South Carolina Gospel Eagle Jubilee Four - "Good Lord I Can't Turn Back" Evangelist Gospel Singers of Alabama - "Leaning On The Lord" Four Eagle Gospel Singers - "I Have A Mind" Rev Samuel Kelsey and the Congregation of Temple Church of God In Christ of Washington D.C. - "Where Is the Lion in the Tribe of Judea" Staple Singers - "This Same Jesus" Patten Singers - "God Is Able" Burnis Geddis - "Job" Maria Bolton - "Thankful prts. 1 and 2" William Lot - "Lay Your Hands On Me Jesus" - Johnny L. Jones: The Hurricane That Hit Atlanta Robert Brickhouse and the Heavenly Tones Quartet - "Come To Jesus" True Tone Spiritual Singers - "Never Wonder About Him" Spiritualaires of East St Louis, Ill - "Jesus Is Blessing Me Right Now" Angelic Gospel Singers - "Sweet Home" https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/108166

Snap-on TV
SSX20P165 18V Cordless Blower

Snap-on TV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 0:49


Clean-up will be quick in the shop with our 18v Cordless Blower with a brushless motor. 14,800 RPM and an output of 450 CFM will help you quickly reach, and maintain the max speed of 100 MPH. Choose high or low air speed to get the airflow just right.

LIVE Ontwowheels
The Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RR is gunna DOMINATE! | Live Ontwowheels #29

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 62:54


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor
The Car Doctor - 9/18/21 - Car Warranties

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 49:18


Ron starts this episode talking about car warranties : takes a call on a 13 F-150 and problems with the blower and temperature controls : talks about the first electric school bus that has appeared in Maine : takes a call on a 91 Chevy C1500 that has lost overdrive after the cam was swapped out : takes a call on a 13 Focus with a serious RPM surge : and ends talking about an 08 Volvo that wasn't charging. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 206

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 23:13


Linus Torvalds attempts to get kernel developers to clean up their code, the performance regression that almost shipped, and the major production struggle Red Hat acknowledged this week. Plus, we try out Microsoft's Linux distro, and some thoughts on our editorial style.

Linux Action News
Linux Action News 206

Linux Action News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 23:13


Linus Torvalds attempts to get kernel developers to clean up their code, the performance regression that almost shipped, and the major production struggle Red Hat acknowledged this week. Plus, we try out Microsoft's Linux distro, and some thoughts on our editorial style.

Today in Health IT
Big Tech is not Exiting Healthcare Anytime Soon

Today in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 9:53


Google shook the healthcare world with their Google health reorg.  Too much?  You're probably right.  What can we take from this?  Is Big Tech Exiting Healthcare?  Former Amazon Exec and Current Providence Digital Health Leader Aaron Martin says, no.FTAAmazon will do well in DTC pharma, OTC, and at some point, pharmacy benefit management. The jury is out on care delivery via Amazon Care because it's really complex. That said, Amazon, when committed, is the most successful tech company in the world at growing beyond its existing competencies. Remember, they weren't in hardware before Kindle, and practically invented scalable cloud computing.Walmart, don't forget, is already the third largest pharmacy by store count. I think they also have a good shot at care delivery because they run pharmacies and complex services organizations. Just serving their own employees will drive significant economics back to them.  Microsoft has wisely stuck to its core competency and strength in selling cloud services and technology to enable the industry participants. Note that it's not without competition, as Google and Amazon are also selling similar enabling services into the industry.Google still has Verily, FitBit, and other very important health care properties and technology working in health care as a colleague pointed out to me on Twitter. I think the danger as they fold their health care business into their operating units, health care will be de-emphasized.Apple – who knows? We only have a sense of their direction based on the limited public statements and launches they've made. I think the Apple Watch could be a great all-purpose platform for RPM. Problem is it's a closed platform, only on iOS, and it's expensive.---That's not the most important point in this article.  The most important point is that we have many gaps for competitors to come in and take advantage of and we need to keep up the pace of innovation.  Agree??#healthcare #healthIT #cio #cmio #chime #himss https://www.providence-dig.org/health-systems-health-care-and-big-tech-its-really-complicated/

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor
The Car Doctor - 9/11/21 - 90 Firebird Bucking and Missing

Ron Ananian The Car Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 49:33


Ron starts this episode rebutting a critic who went after him on a podcast review for his stance on electric cars : takes a call on a 90 Firebird Formula where the engine is bucking and missing between 1700 and 2000 RPM : interviews Jenny Page a Product Manager at Cooper Tire on Tire 101 and how to choose tires with winter approaching : goes back to the 90 Firebird : and talks about Mitchell One article on diagnosing. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

LIVE Ontwowheels
Why do SMART HELMETS keep failing? | Live Ontwowheels #28

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 51:00


Check out our new Ride Apparel Co Drop here: https://rideapparelco.com/Pre-orders END on Sunday September 12th!This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

LIVE Ontwowheels
We got a TRIUMPH ROCKET 3R Black Edition | Live Ontwowheels #27

LIVE Ontwowheels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 66:05


This weeks episode is sponsored by Revzilla's RPM program: http://bit.ly/chaseRPMIt's amazon prime for motorcycle gear! Check it out at the link above!Welcome to LIVE Ontwowheels, the weekly motorcycle live show that covers all things motorcycle-related here on the Internet! Audio Versions of the show HERE!Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2OW73gOSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2OFWpdOGoogle Podcasts: https://bit.ly/3thQyukCheck out our latest build and WIN the FINISHED motorcycle here: http://bit.ly/WBRpatreonBuying Gear? Support the show when you buy from Revzilla with the link! Revzilla Link: http://bit.ly/L2Wrevzilla(This is an affiliate link. When you click on it and purchase anything on Revzilla you pay the same but it helps support the show!)Join our Live Ontwowheels DISCORD: https://discord.gg/8erHCTJMzk___________________________________Show Notes:

Revolutions Per Minute - Radio from the New York City Democratic Socialists of America

It's a Revolutions per Minute social and fundraising extravaganza! Tonight we're taking a break from our usual format to share a peek behind the scenes of the Revolutions per Minute collective: who we are, why we organize community radio for NYC-DSA, and why we support WBAI 99.5FM. Hear from our RPM hosts, producers, and behind the scenes comrades during this relaxed, casual show that emphasizes the importance of movement-based community media. Please consider giving to WBAI in the name of Revolutions per Minute. Monthly donations of any amount are appreciated, and giving $25 in a calendar year makes you a voting member of the station! To donate, visit give2wbai.org. We have more cool rewards coming, so keep listening and check back! To pitch a story for coverage on Revolutions per Minute, visit bit.ly/pitch2RPM. If you're a member of NYC-DSA looking to learn more or get involved with making RPM, please visit bit.ly/RPMJoinForm. This episode was recorded remotely during a night of heavy rain and catastrophic flooding in New York City. We urge you to join NYC-DSA's Ecosocialist Working Group or another local formation and get involved with the struggle to protect workers and tenants against climate catastrophe. 

Programmatic Digest's podcast
49. How To partner With Programmatic and Digital Media Vendors ft. Tyler Bryant

Programmatic Digest's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 45:06


This week we're throwing it way back to when we welcomed Tyler Bryant in the Sensei's Corner, at the time he was the digital media director at RPM advertising, which specializes in travel vertical and other highly regulated industries. They have a wide range of clientele that includes brick and mortar casinos and they produce television commercials for today's popular brand empires. We referred to the following articles/resources: [Critical Capabilities for For Ad Tech](https://www.gartner.com/doc/reprints?id=1-24PCEKKZ&ct=201130&st=sb) According to the Garter survey, 22% of the marketing budgets are invested in paid media across different marketing channels. More than half of that percentage is invested in digital advertising such as display, video, and ad platforms. Digital marketing leaders are responsible for using the marketing technology and trends when considering a new advertising technology solution. The Magic Quadrant for Ad Tech provides several different factors that differentiate ad tech providers. [The Trade Desk](https://pages.thetradedesk.com/Global_2020_09_GartnerReports_LandingPage_Redirect.html?aliId=eyJpIjoidXRXVHo2c1wvcUphbWJFVmsiLCJ0IjoiRUZGRktlTXNqdDhDZEJzeHlzaVVcL2c9PSJ9) Trade Desk, part of the ad tech space, is a marketplace that allows customers to purchase different types of advertisements and use that to run global campaigns in digital media. These advertisements include display advertising, social media, and advanced T.V. Unlike walled gardens, the open internet allows consumers to use the data to grow their audience and compare performances more openly and objectively. Connect with: Tyler Bryant: LinkedIn  Programmatic Digest Podcast: Shownotes | Website | YouTube | LinkedIn  Helene Parker: Website | LinkedIn | Twitter | Instagram

Inside The Adventure
EP 112: Shane and Josh Rogers - Founders of RPM Training Co.

Inside The Adventure

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 62:31


Shane Rogers is Co-Founder and CEO of RPM Training Co. An entrepreneur at heart, Shane's background in Engineering, along with his love of training and the outdoors, took him from leading engineering teams at Gore Medical to the creator of the RPM speed rope, adding to his running list of patents. Even as CEO, Shane still leads all manufacturing initiatives and does most of the technical design for RPM. In his (very) limited spare time, you can find him teaching entrepreneurship classes for Santa Clara University and exploring the beaches of Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Jackie, and their 2 young kids. Josh Rogers is Co-Founder and CCO of RPM Training Co. As the owner of one of the earliest CrossFit affiliate gyms, Josh used his love of design and training to create the RPM brand along with his brother, Shane. He now drives the long term vision and strategy for the brand, breaking daily at noon of course to train with the rest of the RPM team. When he's not writing copy, recruiting athletes, or building out RPM's ever-growing product line, you'll find him taking up some new project at his home in the hills of Santa Cruz, CA with his wife, Alicia, and their 4 homeschooled kids.

WTF Gym Talk
The Peloton of Functional Fitness Is Coming With ATOM

WTF Gym Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 59:26


Do you know the popular jump rope brand, RPM? Two brothers (Shane + Josh Rogers), who got started with CrossFit back in the OG days (PRE-Bok) and even owned an affiliate until recently, have exploded in the functional fitness market with their premium RPM jump ropes. However, they had large plans to create a remote community and improve the at-home fitness model by combining equipment kits with amazing digital workouts. And this project is called ATOM...and it's coming soon. You should pay attention and consider if this is something you'd want to offer your membership. https://rpmtraining.com/pages/atom --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/wtfgymtalk/message

Inside Outside
Ep. 262 - Naomi Shah, Founder of Meet Cute on Trends in Audio Storytelling and New Media Formats & Moving from VC to Founder

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 22:32


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Naomi Shah, founder of the venture backed modern media company Meet Cute. Naomi and I talk about some of the innovations and trends in the world of audio and new media formats, as well as her insights for moving from the world of venture capital to becoming a founder. Let's get started.Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help you rethink, reset, and remix yourself and your organization. Each week, we'll bring you the latest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses, as well as the tools, tactics, and trends you'll need to thrive as a new innovator.Interview Transcript with Naomi Shah, Founder of the venture backed modern media company Meet CuteBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger and as always, we have another amazing guest. Today we have Naomi Shah. She is the founder of the venture backed modern media company called Meet Cute. Naomi Shah: Thank you. It's so nice to be here. Brian Ardinger: I'm excited to have you here on the show because you've got a hot new startup that we want to talk about. You've got to innovate a company, innovative story. So, what is meat cute? How did you come up with the idea to start a new media company at the age of 24? Naomi Shah: So, Meet Cute, just to start with, with what it is I do every day, is an entertainment brand. We make original scripted, romantic comedies. And these are audio stories that are completely written by a network of over 500 creators. Directed, produced, and voice acted professionally. And we distribute them on Apple Podcast, Spotify, wherever you get your audio. And really what we're trying to do with Meet Cute is show that you can create a lot of scripted content and create trust with an audience because of the consistency of how often you release the stories, the types of stories, and really become the best storytellers in original scripted content. Brian Ardinger: You've got an interesting background to go down that particular path. My understanding is you started out as a macro equities trader at Goldman Sachs. You studied mechanical engineering with a minor in human biology at Stanford. Then you just started working at Union Square Ventures. How did you go about kind of that diverse background to end up where you are at? Naomi Shah: It's a really good question. I actually will start even earlier than graduating from Stanford and that is when I was growing up, I saw both my parents working on a company together. My mom was the president. My dad was the vice president, and it was always part of our family dinners, our family vacations. We always heard about what they were working on. It was this like subliminal informal look into what it's like to run your own thing. To be a founder. And to manage people and to bring people along with the vision that you have. And I never really knew how that was going to play out in my life. But I did know from a young age that was impacting the way that I wanted to go to school, study, and then start my career. And so, at Stanford, I went in wanting to be a surgeon and I left with a mechanical engineering degree. And so that kind of explains why I was a mechanical engineering major with a minor in human biology.And what fascinated me about human biology and why I wanted to be a doctor in the first place is I was really interested in the research process. Like how you ask a question, how you create a research project to answer that question, how you're very analytical and then how you convince people to listen to what you have to say.And so, in high school, and actually in middle school, I ended up going down this path of working on a lot of research. Presenting it at a lot of conferences. So, I did a TED talk when I was 15 and it was my first foray into, wow, you can have an impact on the world, that's a lot bigger than the immediate community around you.Fast forward a few years, to your point, I went into finance. I was really excited about pattern recognition in public markets and how it affected trading decisions. But I really was looking for something a little bit more creative. I always felt like I had this creative side of my brain that I couldn't really exercise day to day at work.And that was because my resume was very technical. It was very based on engineering and data and math, but I loved creative writing and I loved storytelling. And that was something that I felt like was part of my personality that I couldn't bring to work every day. So, in venture capital, it gave me a look at how founders would kind of marry different skill sets together. Make that the foundation of how they run their company. And I was really excited about that whole process, but really hadn't seen myself as an operator just yet. But I spent a lot of time at USV, which is the venture capital firm I was at right after Goldman. Our company was focused on human wellbeing. So, what are things that we do for fun?And one of the things that we do for fun is we consume content. We read books; we listen to podcasts like this one. We go to concerts with our friends. And I realized that there was kind of a gap in the market where there wasn't a lot of original scripted stories being created in a really scalable way. Where venture investors felt comfortable taking that risk and investing in a company that was working on that problem.Instead, it felt like you had Hollywood investors that were used to taking out risk profile and venture investors were like, oh no, we only do software and product. And so, I wanted to find a way to bring those two things together, which I felt like there wasn't really a company working on that out there.And that led me to starting to come up with the business model for Meat Cute. At first, from the investment side of the table, where I was looking for that company to invest in. And eventually I took that leap of faith into founding and said, if we're not seeing this company out there, let's go be the ones to create it.Brian Ardinger: So, as you were in venture, kind of looking at particular companies, did you ever think that you were going to jump to the other side of the table or was it something that came about based on your interactions with founders and that? Naomi Shah: I think it was a little bit of both. I think it kind of goes back to growing up and seeing that that was possible. I did see my mom as a leader, and I knew that at some point I wanted to follow in my parents' footsteps in some capacity. Where it's you have an impact outside of just the immediate people that you touch. And I think that that's really what inspired me with founding is that you can have an impact on millions of millions of people who use your product or listen to your stories.And that was really exciting to me. Another thing that I'll say besides seeing my mom in a leadership position early on is that I'd always seen myself on this path of, okay, I'll go to school, I'll work for a few years and then I'll go back and get my MBA. And what I saw when I was in venture capital, Is that so much of the learning that comes along with founding is just natural.It's baked into the process of struggling with how to figure out HR and how to negotiate contracts and how to hire people and how to inspire people like that. And I thought, okay, like I always saw myself on this really traditional path where it felt like if I went to business school, I could do all of these things.And being at USV and interacting with these founders, I started to see a different path for myself, where I thought, I don't have to go down this, what I felt like was a safe path for me. And I could step off that path and do something a little bit different that felt riskier in the moment. But I knew that it was a risk worth taking because all of these people before me had done. And you just learn on the job and that's just part of the CEO gig.Brian Ardinger: Yeah, absolutely. You mentioned a little bit about experimentation and that. When you started Meet Cute, what was your initial thesis and then how has it pivoted or changed based on what you found out in the marketplace? Naomi Shah: It's so interesting how these like subtle pivot tap in, and sometimes you don't even realize that they're happening, but you're learning with every single day or every single story that you make. At first, we wanted to just test, can we make a 15-minute story in audio. No one had done that before in a way that you could start, tell, and end of story, in 15 minutes, in a cohesive way. Everyone is used to 90-minute films or 22-minute TV shows, but we wanted to do it in audio and bring people in and capture audiences to the point where people felt like they were listening to a movie in their ears.And we wrote our first story. Our head of development wrote the entire script. We found a producer to make it. And we put it out there in the world when we just started sharing it with our friends and family. And we said, hey, we're working on this thing. We'd love for you to listen to it and give us feedback.That was probably the moment where we were like, okay, we're doing this now. We actually have content out there in the world with our name on it. We have conviction in short form audio content. And then the next step for us became, okay, we know we can make one story. Can we make hundreds of stories? And so, to our investors, we said, our goal for the next year is really to prove that we can make stories at scale.Anyone can make one story if they put their mind to it. But we want to tell hundreds of these stories consistently and give people something to look forward to every single day. And so that was kind of like this subtle change in the way that we thought about ourselves, where we no longer were just proving the idea of storytelling. We were now proving storytelling at scale. So, the next challenge for us became, can we grow a creator network, large enough to tell so many diverse stories within this set container. And for us, our container was we were audio only. So, we had to engage an audience without any visuals. We wanted to tell 15-minute stories. We found that a 15-minute story broken up into five three-minute chapters, really engaged people and people wouldn't leave in the middle of the story. They would stay until the end. And then finally, as we were making so many diverse stories, we learned that there were certain categories of stories or certain techniques that we could use to engage audiences even more. So, with every story that we put out there, we captured listening data, engagement data, and use that to turn it into the cycle where it fueled our development. So now we were taking our learnings from the stories that we'd already put out there and pulling it back into development and making more of those stories.The idea is we're no longer just a hit driven company where we're making all the decisions. Our listeners are the ones that are teaching us about what's right, and what's wrong. And so today to bring it to present day, what we're working on is scaling this storytelling engine, this incubator to millions of listeners, to get more and more feedback on our stories and then make each story better. And that's really towards that goal of becoming the official source of romantic comedies, the best storytellers out there. That's what we think sets us apart. Brian Ardinger: I'm curious, how much did you look back to old technologies like radio and the old radio shows of the past? We've kind of come full circle in some ways. Obviously with different types of distribution models and that. But talk about what did you learn and take from the past and how are you evolving that into the current day.Naomi Shah: I think radio plays are one of the best analogies for Meet Cute. Some of our listeners, you know, even though they're listening to us on podcast apps, they're like this doesn't really sound like what I imagine a podcast to be. Where podcasts are generally conversational, and they're more interview based, or news based. We're really taking that older analogy of taking a radio play and turning it into something that people in the digital era can consume on whatever platform they're on, making it super accessible to people whenever and wherever they want a story. But to your point, there are so many historical analogies that this works and that consistent storytelling in a tight format is what people actually crave. Another really good example of it is you look at pop music where every single pop song is about three minutes long. And there's a reason for that because not to go too far into this rabbit hole, but when records transitioned to the 45 RPM record, there was only enough room on that physical record for three minutes of music.And what that meant is that as you created a cheaper way to make records, you also needed to fit the content into that physical constraint. And so, it's interesting because people relisten to music over and over again, because it's only three minutes. And so, you listened to an Ellie Goulding song or Lady Gaga song on repeat, and you don't feel like you're wasting your time. But that behavior hasn't really translated into audio storytelling yet.And so, by changing our format to be something that we know works. With repeat listening, we found that actually our listeners keep coming back to Meet Cute stories and tuning into one chapter that they resonated with or the happily ever after, or the Meet Cute moment, in the same way that they would listen to pop songs.And so, they think that it's really fun to say let's build a next generation of storytelling, but let's look backwards at what's worked and what's engaged audiences to do that. Last example, P & G invented the soap opera literally to sell soap. And it was this really interesting tool for branded content that didn't feel super on the nose as an advertising tool. It was a story. It was something you could escape into. And I think that that's a really interesting analogy for Meet Cute. We're we're trying to create escapism and that can be a vehicle for so many things. Like the message, like a social message, or it could be a vehicle for a brand to talk about what's important to them. But through the context of a story, which is a lot more emotional than a pure advertisement, or like the news cycles. Brian Ardinger: P & G built itself on that soap opera platform and change the way they sold soap and became a massive company around it. So, talk about your business model and is it more of the traditional advertising model? What are you seeing and what kind of expectations do you have for the future? Naomi Shah: Yes. So, I think we're in a really unique position because we see ourselves as the intersection of technology and Hollywood. So, technology and media, let's put it that way. Where on the technology side, we'd love to test business models, like let's create an engaged community that cares about this content and wants more access to exclusive content and create opportunities to deepen that relationship with the community that we're building. So, we're using things like. Let's engage people with shoulder content and other podcast feeds and exclusive interviews with guests. And then let's release more content in a subscription form. We just launched on apple podcast subscriptions, which is the tried and true business model on the technology side. On the media side, advertising to your point is an incredible way to be able to bring other companies and other brands into the mix, into the storytelling process. And so that's something we're definitely exploring. We're also exploring how do we engage with our communities outside of audio? So we've gotten a lot of interest from production companies and streaming platforms to start bringing this content into video and licensing our audio to other platforms that need more content. Because while we love being the sole distributor of our content. We realized that there is constantly a lack of content in the world. People always need to tell more stories. And so we can be that source of stories for other people. And so I love it because that really allows us to say let's form a relationship directly with our listeners and our audiences and be that direct to consumer entertainment company. But we don't have to stop working on creating stories for the industry and bringing our stories to audiences in ways that Meet Cute might not be the right platform for. For example, we're not a full in-house video production studio. So we want to partner with the right people there to tell our stories in the best way possible for video production as well.Brian Ardinger: Well, you brought up video, you know, what made you decide that we're going to start tackling the audio format first versus new platforms like Tik TOK or YouTube, that seemed to be getting a lot of traction because of the video format. Naomi Shah: So, audio, what I love about it is that it's such a unique format that has the constraint built in where you can't see the characters. And at first, we were like, oh, that's really tough. It's hard to engage without seeing the characters. But that's just because people haven't done it before. And what we're trying to do is really create more intimate connections with characters and plots and narrative arcs, where people start to visualize the stories in their head.So, if like the main character Natalie goes on vacation, we want the person listening, the audience member, to say, oh, what was my last vacation? Like, let me put myself in Natalie shoes and it becomes a very intimate experience. And I think audio is an incredible way to engage in a deeper way with listeners and really have them be a part of the storytelling themselves.The other thing is audio super accessible. So, you don't need to sit down and watch something. You don't need to take time out of your day. It can really go along with you in whatever you're doing. So, we have found that our audiences actually don't listen to Meet Cutes in the traditional entertainment viewing times.Meet Cutes are consumed throughout the day from like 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM, when you're getting ready for school, getting ready to walk to your classes, getting ready to get lunch ready for your kids. These are the times that people really incorporate Meet Cutes into their daily routine. It almost feels like a meditation or an escape because it's so consistent. It's so predictable, you know exactly what you're going to get at the end of it. So, it's been this really interesting shift in what we thought entertainment behavior was or entertainment consumption was, where we're seeing people develop new habits because they haven't had cinema in audio before. And we wanted to start to push back on assumptions about what that looks like and create new behaviors around it.Brian Ardinger: As a founder, I always like to get founders opinions and insights into what recommendations can you help other folks who are out there, whether they're within a corporation, trying to spin up a new idea or an entrepreneur. What are some best practices, resources, or advice that you would recommend for folks trying to get off the ground?Naomi Shah: Great question. And I relied on so many people that came before me for advice. I would say, getting off the ground relies so heavily on conviction in your idea and standing by your idea in the face of other people telling you, I think you should do it this way, or I think you should do it that way. While it's so important to take advice from people. If you are not certain in what you want to build and the vision for your company or your project or your idea, I think it's really easy to be taken off track and to do things in a way that's already been done before. And that's not the reason that you go into founding, you go into founding to do something that no one has done before.And so actually through the fundraising process, because I just went through that in the pandemic, I learned that in meeting hundreds of really smart people, you have so many opinions coming to you every day. And it's really important to like take time, block off your calendar and like reflect on what you're hearing, because some of those things will actually help you shape your vision for the company.And you have to filter out the noise because there are going to be conflicting opinions that might not be the vision for your company. And it's really important to take time to reflect on that. Otherwise, you could find yourself in a completely different place that you didn't want to end up. So, I think having conviction is probably the number one piece of advice.And the second thing is finding people who are going to support you no matter what. I think that can be in the form of team members, it can be in the form of investors, can be in the form of people outside of your company who are your personal board of investors. Without those people, sometimes founding can be really lonely and really a little bit isolating. And I think that with those people, you find that you have sounding boards or people who will tell you, okay, you don't need to overthink that, focus on this instead. Having those people in your life makes, makes you feel like you're not alone on this journey as you're like climbing up the mountain and trying to figure out what this vision is for five years for the future or 10 years into the future. So, I would say people and having conviction are probably the two most important building blocks in the early stage. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Oh, they're fantastic building blocks. And I want to really thank you for coming on Inside Outside Innovation, telling your story and giving some focus, some insight in what it takes to really do something innovative. So, thank you for being on the show. If people want to find out more about yourself or Meet Cute, what's the best way to do that? Naomi Shah: So great to be here. Loved, loved this conversation. Finding out more about Meet Cute, were on every social platform. So, Instagram, Twitter, Tik-Tok. And the best way to learn about what we're doing is to tune in to some of our stories on any podcast platform, where you listen. Subscribe on apple podcasts.I am also super available to talk about anything entrepreneurship, business related, entertainment, podcasts, and you can find me on Twitter or on LinkedIn as well. Just feel free to DM me. Brian Ardinger: Naomi, thank you again for being on Inside Outside Innovation. Look forward to continuing the conversation and best of luck in the future for you.Naomi Shah: Thank you so much, Brian, Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Project Medtech
Episode 58--- Karen Krygier: Senior Director of Clinical Affairs at Global Kinetics --- Utilizing RPM Codes and Remote Patient Monitoring in Clinical Trials

Project Medtech

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 37:35


In this episode, Karen and I discuss their wearable Parkinson product, how they took advantage of the new RPM codes, partnering with Pharma and Medtech companies as a remote monitor for their clinical trials and more. Karen Krygier LinkedIn Global Kinetics Website Duane Mancini LinkedIn Project Medtech LinkedIn Project Medtech Website

Full-Time Influencer Podcast
Answering Your Questions: How much I make, how I deal with hate, and more

Full-Time Influencer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 32:57


If you had the opportunity to ask an influencer with 500K+ followers any question, what would it be? Keep that question in mind- today we're answering 21 questions from followers, covering topics like what to post when you're starting out, how to land brand collabs, and even an influencer's salary! Whether you're just curious about the lifestyle or a full fledged influencer already, the info shared today will definitely be valuable.Correction: the amount of money YouTubers take home is RPM, not CPR!CHECK OUT THE SHOW NOTES FOR THIS EPISODE: https://www.fulltimeinfluencer.co/blog/episode-10FREE NEW TRAINING: https://successfulinfluencer.com Save your spot now for our value-packed free training that will teach you how to explode your Instagram following and become a PAID influencer.FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM: @fulltimeinfluencer.coJOIN THE FULL-TIME INFLUENCER PROGRAM: https://successfulinfluencer.com/joinfti