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SuperFeast Podcast
#145 Healing Skin (and Autoimmune) from Within with Karen Fischer

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 69:52


Today on the podcast, Tahnee is joined by nutritionist and award-winning author of The Healthy Skin Diet, Karen Fischer, for a very real breakdown of why so many people suffer from skin conditions and how healing from within is always possible. Working as a nutritionist specialising in eczema and skin health for the past 20 years, Karen has just about seen it all when it comes to skin inflammation issues (acne, eczema, rosacea, psoriasis) and the lineup of factors that cause them. The author of seven health books, including best-sellers The Eczema Diet, The Eczema Detox, and The Healthy Skin Kitchen, Karen's approach to healing the skin is utterly holistic; She addresses lifestyle, environment, emotional wellbeing, and diet. Whether you're a mother of a baby who has eczema, someone who suffers from acne or allergies, has an autoimmune condition, or wants to have clear, healthy skin; This episode is brimming with something for everyone. Karen discusses the increasing prevalence of salicylate sensitivity, autoimmune conditions, food elimination diets, nourishing the liver for healthier skin, calming the nervous system, Inflammatory load, protocols for skin conditions, and provides practical lifestyle, diet-related skin advice.       "In traditional diets, when you eat seasonally, your diets change with the season, and that's how you would notice the food you're reacting to. But in western society today, we have the same foods available every day. and that's a problem with diagnosing food intolerances".   - Karen Fischer    Tahnee and Karen discuss: Acne. Eczema. Rosacea. Psoriasis The itchy dozen. Salicylate foods. Salicylate sensitivity. Inflammatory load. Eczema in babies. The eczema detox. Oils to eat/avoid or acne. Histamine intolerance. Salicylates and the Liver Autoimmune conditions and skin. Glycine for food chemical intolerance. The mind-body connection and skin sensitivities. The correlation between lung function and health skin. FID programme: Food Intolerance Diagnosis programme Why child teething gel is not great for babies with eczema.   Who is Karen Fischer?    Karen Fischer is an award-winning nutritionist who has written seven health books including, bestsellers; The Eczema Diet, The Eczema Detox, and The Healthy Skin Kitchen. Over the past 20 years, Karen has helped thousands of people with skin inflammation including, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, dermatitis, and acne.    Karen runs a skincare and supplement company called Skin Friend and The Healthy Skin Kitchen Membership; An online support network for people with skin inflammation.     CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources:   Skinfriend.com Eczema Life website Karen's Instagram Eczema Life podcast Skin Friend Facebook The Eczema Diet Facebook The Healthy Skin Kitchen Facebook The Healthy Skin Kitchen website Shop all of Karen Fischer's Books and products HERE     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Tahnee: (00:00) Hi everybody. And welcome to the SuperFeast podcast. Today, I'm joined by Karen Fischer, which makes me very happy, because I've known Karen for a very long time and she is an incredible author and creator of beautiful skin supplements and many websites, we were talking about before we jumped on, and her work has been for me, it was really profound to get to work with her in my early twenties. And I've seen just so many positive reviews and feedback from her work, especially around things like eczema and acne and rosacea. So I'm really stoked to have you here today, Karen, thanks for joining us.   Karen Fischer: (00:37) Oh, thanks Tahnee. Thanks for having me.   Tahnee: (00:40) Yeah, it's been such a long time, but so nice to see your face again.   Karen Fischer: (00:46) Yeah. [crosstalk 00:00:47]-   Tahnee: (00:46) Yeah. And so I was hoping we could start off with your journey because so just for some context, for those of you listening, Karen and I worked together on her first book, the Healthy Skin Diet, which was probably in the late 2000s, 2008 maybe.   Karen Fischer: (01:03) Yeah, it was published in 2008.   Tahnee: (01:05) Okay, great. My memory's still working. And so I remember reading your story in that book and it's just such a beautiful story because you had such a personal relationship with the work that you do and you went on and educated yourself and healed yourself and your daughter. And so if you could share that story with us, I'd love for you to start off there.   Karen Fischer: (01:27) Yeah, absolutely. Look, I became a qualified nutritionist probably about the age of 25 and shortly after I had a baby girl, Ava, and she two weeks after she was born developed really severe eczema all over her body. And it's funny, I only have like one photo of her with the eczema everywhere, as I just didn't take a lot of photos and just used the general topical treatments for her.   Karen Fischer: (01:54) And it wasn't until a nurse from the early childhood centre, she saw Ava when she was about 10 months old after seeing her earlier, and she's like, "Has your daughter still got eczema?" I was like, "What? Eczema is a genetic condition. What can I do about it?" And she knew I was a nutritionist and she's like, "Oh look." She mentioned salicylates and don't use baby teething gel because it's salicylate. Medication and salicylates are related to eczema. And I was like, it was a light bulb moment for me. I was like, "Oh wow. I know how to get rid of salicylate sensitivity because I had it when I was younger and I studied nutritional biochemistry and I worked out how to fix it from my uni studies." And I was like, so it just changed my life and started me on a journey.   Karen Fischer: (02:42) And by the time my daughter was two, I developed the eczema diet and a supplement routine for her and it cleared up her skin and I kind of, "Oh yeah, that's great." And I forgot about it. But then as a nutritionist, word got out that I treated eczema and I kept on having all these eczema patients come and see me and it grew from there. And I thought, "I don't want to specialise in eczema. I just want to specialise in skin health and beauty." But I was like, "Oh, but these people are suffering." And I was like, "No, I actually really should focus on it." So I wrote the Healthy Skin Diet first and I'm like, "I know I should be writing an eczema book, but I want to help everyone."   Karen Fischer: (03:21) I know there's acne information, acne's a very important thing to treat as well. In my first book I wanted to help everyone and then I went back to, "Okay, let's publish the eczema diet because this is what I did with my daughter." The diet for someone with eczema is totally different to a diet for somebody with acne. Acne's oily skin, eczema is very dry skin. So any dry skin condition, you are going to need a vastly different diet to someone with oily skin.   Karen Fischer: (03:53) So that was the start of my journey. And well, actually before that, I grew up with skin problems as well. I was the kind of kid that looked like I was sick all the time. And I used to joke, "I grew up on aspirin." So no one really knew [crosstalk 00:04:11] salicylate sensitivity because I had headaches every week. I was popping aspirins as a kid. So I did end up with salicylate sensitivity and that's why look, no one really talks about salicylate sensitivity, but it's the most widely researched chemical in the world because of all the problems that people had with asthma, aspirin and getting asthma attacks and being seriously ill from aspirin. So yeah, so it's a massively researched area. So when I was treating eczema, I was like, "Oh." Or there's so much scientific research on salicylates, it actually made it easier for me to design my diets.   Tahnee: (04:50) Yeah. And I mean, I remember the first time I heard about salicylates was probably from your book and then speaking to, I think it was our accountant whose son had really bad eczema and they drew it down to salicylate sensitivity being the cause. And what shocked me, I think about when I learned about them is they're in so many foods and actually a lot of foods we would consider like healthy and maybe even like the foundation of our diet for, especially if we're trying to feed our kids lots of vegetables and fruits and whole foods and that kind of stuff. Could you speak a bit to that?   Karen Fischer: (05:23) Yeah. So it looks like salicylate foods aren't unhealthy. They are definitely in healthy foods and my goal has always been to get people not being sensitive to salicylates so they have a varied diet. So yeah, I know we tend to demonise things like gluten and histamines in foods and amines in foods and salicylates in foods. And I probably did that in the early days as well going, "This is bad for eczema." But while really it's our immune systems are overreacting to a harmless substance. So that's the bottom line with any sort of food intolerance. Look, food allergies might be a little different, but with any food intolerance, such as salicylate sensitivity, histamine intolerance, even gluten intolerance in the milder sense and other food chemicals, there's glutamate such as MSG. Those are intolerances based on our immune system overreacting to stuff.   Karen Fischer: (06:24) So while with my dietary stuff, it's really important to reduce those things in the diet, to calm down your skin and get you feeling normal again, and that calms down the immune. And then you can start reintroducing those salicylate foods again, even reintroducing little bits of gluten. And it does depend on the dosage to start off with. So it's calming down the immune system by giving it a little break, a three month break from those high chemicals is often enough for people to be able to consume them again. Some people, it does take longer. Some people it takes a year or two.   Tahnee: (07:01) And I guess I'm thinking about that naturopathic concept where there's like that bucket of tolerance, I suppose, or chemical inputs into the system and the body gets to a point where it really just can't handle what's coming in anymore. And so I think what you are talking to there is that if we reduce the load on the body, it gives the body a chance to heal and repair and then it doesn't have to necessarily be a lifetime of avoiding... Because they're in mangoes and things, right? Like yummy foods.   Karen Fischer: (07:34) Yeah. So the bucket being full, that's a really good analogy because what happens is, yes, so the bucket does get full. And how that occurs is your liver is designed to deactivate salicylates and eliminate them from the body but your liver needs nutrients to do that. So your liver needs a range of B vitamins and zinc and minerals and glycine and a bunch of other proteins in order to deactivate salicylates and other chemicals and drugs such as paracetamol and so forth. The liver does all of that, but when your liver runs out of nutrients, the bucket fills up really quickly. So a nutritional approach is also really important and also calming down the nervous system is really important as well and stress, so that all helps to empty that bucket. So yeah, it's an important thing.   Karen Fischer: (08:29) Because they're our fun foods, salicylate foods, almonds, which are [crosstalk 00:08:35] as well, which can damage the gut lining. There's so many good and bad things to any health food. It's funny because people just say, "Oh avocado, coconut, almonds, the best thing for your skin." I was like, "Well, yeah, if you process them properly. Absolutely." Yeah. If your bucket's full, avocado could give someone the worst itchy night of their life and they'll be crying all night because they can't sleep and they're itching like crazy. I've had head to toe eczema myself, and I've had nights like that even while avoiding all the foods when I had an autoimmune condition for a while that made everything go crazy. I'm better now. So those things are absolutely reversible.   Karen Fischer: (09:25) And I'm really excited about that, but I know how itchy and uncomfortable it can be and I've of people email my team and just say, "Oh, I found you because I searched eczema and avocado because I've been eating a lot of avocados and I can't sleep because I'm itchy all the time." And they said, "Your website came up, your itchy dozen worst foods for eczema came up because... And I was like, oh, I've always been told to eat lots of avocado. So I was eating more and more and more and getting more [crosstalk 00:09:58]." I say one person's superfood is another person's sleepless night itching.   Tahnee: (10:07) Like a kryptonite.   Karen Fischer: (10:08) Exactly. Yeah. My daughter and I, we can eat avocado and things like that again. My daughter's a funny one. She can eat everything again, but if she has avocado every day for a week, she'll start to get itchy. So it's like having it two days a week and you're totally fine with it, but it's I just say it's not an everyday food.   Tahnee: (10:30) And in terms of that, like I mean, I guess thinking about kids coming in with eczema as tiny babies. Are you looking at the toxic load to use that sort of phrasing on their bodies? Because my understanding is their little livers don't function quite as efficiently as ours anyway. So that's-   Karen Fischer: (10:51) That's right. That's in my books, yeah.   Tahnee: (10:52) Yeah. Maybe I learned that from you, but yeah the factoring is this like, "Yes, their bodies don't process that." So is it something that if your baby's got eczema, are you looking at your diet as well? Or is it overall supplementing them to help assist their liver function? Or what are you looking at when you're dealing with babies?   Karen Fischer: (11:13) Yes. Babies are complicated.   Tahnee: (11:15) Yeah.   Karen Fischer: (11:16) There's not a lot you can do, but definitely, I mean, the first thing is look at what is going on in the home. From anything like stress within the family, babies pick up on that, if the place is dusty or carpets. So we look at the external stuff first for babies. The fabrics, if they're got a hundred percent cotton fabrics on their body, in their bedding, that's great. What you're washing their clothes with, is it a sensitive skin washing powder? So we tick all those boxes first and then we go to making sure you're not using teething gel because use the frozen kind of chew rings instead of the salicylate teething gel, because that can seriously cause eczema to bleed and some of my patients have gone, "Yeah, no. Yeah. When I gave my child teething gel, their skin started bleeding." And so it's not great for babies with eczema.   Karen Fischer: (12:23) So once we've ticked all those boxes, then we go to what the mother's eating in the diet. I don't like to tell breastfeeding mothers to take a whole bunch of things out of their diet. Just say, "Look, just avoid the itchy dozen. And once your baby's the age of one, then we can deal with things a little bit differently." But I think it's more important that because when you're breastfeeding, you're just like [crosstalk 00:12:46]-   Tahnee: (12:48) Eat whatever you need.   Karen Fischer: (12:49) [crosstalk 00:12:49]. Your baby is second priority to you, having good nutrition and getting good sleep and not having to fuss with a major diet while you are going through these big life changes with a new baby. So the eczema comes second in those cases. And look, just doing those changes is enough to reduce symptoms in a lot of cases. And having just a good skin cream as well, that's really hydrating. We've got one on my website, but just anything that's going to just lock in moisture and not make them more itchy. That's a really wonderful approach for a young baby, making sure the ingredients are okay for babies.   Karen Fischer: (13:39) A great time is when you're starting to introduce new foods for a baby. So your first foods so we have a list of babies' first foods that are lower in salicylates and lower in those natural chemicals because there is research showing that babies' livers are naturally under functioning and they don't process salicylates very well and that's aspirin research. So it's really well researched. So it's not just saying, "Oh this could be it." It's like going, "Okay, this is scientific research." So any salicylate food so don't give babies avocado first, maybe give them things like white potato is a low salicylate-   Tahnee: (14:24) Mushy pears that kind of thing.   Karen Fischer: (14:25) Yeah mushy pears. Yeah. Mushy peeled pears that's low salicylate. So just starting with the easy to digest foods for a baby, just does wonders with starting them off on the right track. And a paediatrician, not a doctor, but a paediatrician can also prescribe a really special formula if the baby's formula fed. So it might be Neocate or something, but it's something that a regular doctor can't prescribe for a baby with eczema. But yeah, that's a really great approach if someone was using formula as well.   Tahnee: (15:04) Yeah. So just back on that diet thing is an interesting thing that I came across much later after working with you when I was studying Chinese medicine and dietary therapy. So they actually recommend for babies, a clear bland diet with a lot of white foods, which is really interesting because if you look at what eczema diets typically are, and again, from having read a couple of your books, they are usually pretty bland and pretty white.   Karen Fischer: (15:33) [crosstalk 00:15:33] with white cabbage. You can have red cabbage as well [crosstalk 00:15:36].   Tahnee: (15:37) Yeah. Like the peeled potato, it's a lot of these really, like I imagine things like congee and stuff would be quite good. Things that are quite simple to digest. And we certainly didn't have that approach with my daughter. We were a bit more in that whole baby-led weaning world, but it's interesting. I think being pregnant again, I'm like, I might be a little bit more gentle this time and not be she was eating avocado and green smoothies and all sorts of crazy-   Karen Fischer: (16:05) But if she doesn't have eczema, then you don't need to worry about it. If there's no problem, you don't need to fix anything. You can be intuitive like that. An eczema baby, there is a genetic component to having eczema in the family. I don't suggest everyone has to necessarily follow that. So if the child had eczema or asthma or any signs of inflammation, then this is the approach for that type of child.   Tahnee: (16:37) Well, I remember, and this is interesting because that stuff supports lung function in Chinese medicine and spleen function, which are those two really weak organ systems in a baby according to their sort of philosophy, and I know you've spoken, I think it was in the Healthy Skin Diet, you spoke about lung function being really important to healthy skin function. So there's this interesting correlation I think, between supporting those organ systems and having minimising things like asthma and eczema and any skin dysfunction. So is that something you've seen in practise showing up?   Karen Fischer: (17:08) Yeah, absolutely. And I feel the body supports each other as a whole. I know there's a lot of diets that just focus on liver health or they just focus on gut health. And I was like, "Oh that's nice, but that's, what sometimes..." Or heart health, it's like, "Your red wine for heart health." I'm like, "Yeah, but it's not great for your liver health." Let's not forget it's a body as a whole. So absolutely, I think all those systems we can learn, take the best of all the information that helps a certain system in the body and put it together in a holistic way. It's not all about gut health, it's not all about liver health, it's like the body as a whole.   Karen Fischer: (17:54) And I think the mind is one of the biggest predictors of our health as well. What we tell ourselves every day is one of the most important things for our mental health and wellbeing. Because if we are telling ourselves, "Oh I look fat or I look this." That's an instruction, that's setting your GPS to make food decisions that will keep you that way. So we've really got to be really careful and kind with ourselves. And those thoughts will naturally pop up and you can just say, "You know what, that's not true. I'm not going to focus on that. I'm going to focus on having great health. I'm going to focus on eating for healthy skin. I'm going to focus on creating my best life." You've got to shut down the negative thinking because it's going to happen naturally, but you can't buy into it. So it's like, "Oh yeah. That's not true." You're just going to remind yourself-   Tahnee: (18:56) Not helpful, thank you. Moving right along.   Karen Fischer: (18:59) [crosstalk 00:18:59].   Tahnee: (19:00) No, it's so true. Yeah. And I mean, I had an eating disorder as a young person and it's really interesting how sitting where I am now, I can't even relate to that thinking process, but I remember that loop and I remember being like... I almost remember the day it snapped as well. And through a lot of work, it wasn't just magical, but I think it's like a spiral that you can really easily get sucked into. And I remember you addressed it in the Healthy Skin Diet. And I remember thinking, that was for me one of, [inaudible 00:19:34] you had the breathing and the mind aspect in there, which I think was really new at the time. Because a lot of people weren't talking about those factors in terms of skin health and just general wellbeing. It was the 2000s, I guess, were the start of that movement toward us really understanding that mind-body connection more collectively and I think that was really special. So thank you for bringing that into everybody's consciousness before it was a thing.   Karen Fischer: (20:03) Yeah. You remind me because that books from so long ago, but I remember people saying, "Oh, I've never thought like that." Because there's a walking meditation where you think a nice thought about a person who's walking past. You pick a good point about them whether it's something about the way they look or they look confident, they look like a nice person. Because I used to do that and I'd go, these people would smile at me, I'm going, "Oh, can they read my mind?" I got lots of comments. So I've had readers saying, "Oh, I never thought to do that, but it actually made me feel really good and really connected to people."   Karen Fischer: (20:40) And I just really wanted people to know it's just not all about food and weight and weighing yourself or denying yourself stuff. It's about eating foods that aren't harming you, whether that's for if you have a salicylate sensitivity or a gluten sensitivity or whatever, and also bringing the mind aspect into it and just that kind of self-love, it just is growing the good in you and it retrains your brain to avoiding eating disorders and avoid harming ourselves, which we do by accident. We don't mean to, but we train our brains to get into this loop of choices, which we aren't good for us.   Tahnee: (21:27) Yeah. And I think that negative or, I mean, it's easy to look for fault and negativity and what's wrong I think. And there's all the evolutionary research around why we do that and obviously our family upbringings and stuff too. I learned from a Daoist teacher, a practise called inner smile where you purposely, and at the beginning you feel like a real idiot, but you like, "Smile at my body." And over time it becomes quite, you condition yourself to look for that joy and happiness and pleasure in experiencing your body. And I think those kinds of practises are really helpful. I think if you are listening to this and that's something you're interested in, Karen's first book, which we'll link to, talks to that.   Tahnee: (22:12) You also speak to, from memory, acne and rosacea and psoriasis and ageing and all sorts of stuff in that book. So that was definitely a more general piece of work. And I remember it has all the programmes and protocols and I mean, I've looked at it when I had my daughter. She didn't, she actually, so we didn't have eczema early. She didn't have anything until she started probably when she was two, she first got eczema and it was because I was giving her heaps of coconut milk, almond milk and avocado. And I was sort of like, "What the hell was going on?" Because she'd had perfect skin before that. And I'd had sensitivity to preservatives as a kid, like fruit juices and stuff. So I knew that there was something in our family that was a bit like that. And we just took that out for a few months and she was fine after, now she can have all those things like you say, we don't overdo it.   Tahnee: (23:13) It was really interesting to me picking that book up again and it was really helpful to have a look at even that small programme on eczema you have there, but you've gone on to write the complete eczema diet and you've got your new book as well, Healthy Skin Kitchen. Is The Healthy Skin Kitchen again, aimed at a more general kind of audience or is it still specifically for-   Karen Fischer: (23:37) [crosstalk 00:23:37].   Tahnee: (23:37) Yeah. Okay. Can you tell us a bit about that then?   Karen Fischer: (23:38) Yeah. So that's really the accumulation of 20 years working as a nutritionist, specialising on skin health and eczema, because there was just so much new information. So I've covered vagus nerve wellness and some really great research on that and your microbiome and all the research that's on that. Because it's just the research side's really fascinating. So with The Healthy Skin Kitchen so I do mention the different diets for things like acne. So you can look up your skin disorder and you can see what supplements you need. For example, with acne things like flaxseed oil and chia seeds and things like that, wonderful, everyone writes about how they're great for skin, but for some with acne, who's already got oily skin that is going to make you break out like you're a teenager again. So it's little things like that.   Karen Fischer: (24:36) With acne, the only oil you should ever use really is the olive oil or extra virgin olive oil because it's not going to change your skin oiliness. So researchers who have done flax seed oil research shows how after using it for six to 12 weeks, it's increased your skin hydration and the oil content in your skin and their placebo they use is olive oil because it doesn't change your skin oiliness. That's kind of a scientific factor. If you've got oily these skin, it's just the olive oil or extra virgin olive oil.   Karen Fischer: (25:06) For someone say that has psoriasis, their diet is probably closer to the eczema diet. But one big thing with psoriasis is calcium deficiency because calcium is needed for your skin cells to differentiate so for your skin cells to exfoliate and shed in a normal way. So with psoriasis, your skin cells are turning over crazy amounts and you're getting really flaky, but with all my psoriasis patients and I've had it as well, you need calcium and magnesium in equal amounts. We've got a product specifically for that. Because too much calcium without magnesium's not good for you. You really need equal amounts of magnesium when you're doing a supplement form. And that will just really quickly decrease the psoriasis and make the skin cells not turn over as quickly, just to turn over at a normal rate. So it's just little things like that in The Healthy Skin Kitchen, just to help break it down very specific for specific skin disorders and the prescriptions that I've prescribed over the last 20 years, just so people aren't doing just a blanket, healthy skin programme that's designed for everyone because really different people-   Tahnee: (26:23) You've got to drill down really on what you need, yeah.   Karen Fischer: (26:27) Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.   Tahnee: (26:28) And I mean, if there's, because I know with psoriasis and probably a lot of these things and you mentioned the immune system at the start, that autoimmune factor, it was one of the things that my husband and I first talked about when we met. He said to me like, "You've got to understand, of course autoimmune is serious, but there has to be ways to sort of start to work with it and heal it because why would your body want to attack itself?" And I'd been to doctors and naturopaths that had just kept me on protocols and routines forever, but never really... I wasn't necessarily getting anywhere. I was just staying in this homeostasis place. And that for me was a really big mindset shift, which also then led to me exploring things like medicinal mushrooms and things which changed, I think, how my immune system functions, because I can tolerate things I could never tolerate before. I wonder what your experience with that is and how that relates to skin, because I mean it's something that I hear all the time in our business, people coming to us with autoimmune.   Karen Fischer: (27:29) Yeah. And it's such an important topic to talk about because having an autoimmune condition is just awful. It really changes the way that you interact with society. I know when I had it, so I had mast cell activation syndrome so I became allergic to cold weather. So I'm on the Gold Coast and when the Gold Coast got cold, I was covered head to toe in eczema and I'd get hives if I had a [crosstalk 00:27:57]. I tried the Wim Hof Method and I'm like-   Tahnee: (27:57) Don't do that.   Karen Fischer: (28:00) [crosstalk 00:28:00] all over my body. So with me, my autoimmune condition, it was just, and I actually I'm saying that I really don't talk about it anymore. Because just talking about it can make my skin itch. So a big thing with autoimmune is not to make it who you are, not to talk, talk about it yet when you need to, but try not to all the time or make it an excuse for not being able to do things, even if-   Tahnee: (28:29) Yeah, that identifying with it sort of-   Karen Fischer: (28:32) Yeah. I couldn't eat out with my friends, but in the end I'll just say, "Oh, I'm just busy or I can't." Rather than going, "Oh I can't eat." And now I can, I can go out with my friends and I order whatever I want and that's great. But so with autoimmune, the biggest thing I found was reducing stress or changing the way you process stress. So that's the a lot of calming activities, a lot of self-love because yeah, I always look at what's the body trying to tell you. If the immune system's attacking you or you're attacking yourself, like an auto way, how am I attacking myself? How am I attacking others? Am I being self critical? Am I being critical of others?   Karen Fischer: (29:20) I think it's changing, with the brain you're training, it's changing pathways of the past. It's the way of accepting people, accepting myself. So a lot, lot, lot of self-love, breathing techniques is important. Meditation is important. I know you guys do all of that. Someone with an autoimmune condition it's really about going within and finding what works for you. I'm actually developing a programme on how I reverse my autoimmune condition, which I'll bring it out next year. So I've got The Healthy Skin Kitchen membership and at the moment, so that's the membership that helps people to follow my diet programmes, the food intolerance diagnosis programme from the Eczema Detox so that's going to be in there. We teach people how to diagnose their food intolerances and then how to expand their diet.   Karen Fischer: (30:19) But then I've got another programme which helped me to reverse my autoimmune condition. So about calming down the nervous system and the steps and brain retraining and the steps on how to do that. Because I tried brain retraining and it didn't quite work for me so I had to flip it and do the opposite of it using partly what I learned from brain retraining. But I had to change it to suit my autoimmune condition. And I just want to share that with everyone. So I will bring that out in mid 2022, it's going to take me quite a while to do all the videos and stuff. But yeah, so autoimmune very much self-love and getting back to nature. I grow fruit trees and veggie patch, I've got 20 fruit trees in my backyard, my soil [crosstalk 00:31:09]. I'm very much in the dirt trying to get my sand to be real dirt.   Tahnee: (31:17) Coastal problems. Yeah.   Karen Fischer: (31:18) First world problems.   Tahnee: (31:22) They're good problems to have.   Karen Fischer: (31:25) Yeah. Autoimmune, yeah. And it's also important for people with autoimmune to just listen to themselves and go within, because everyone's slightly different. We have our different triggers and our different reasons for having it as well.   Tahnee: (31:42) Yeah. I really relate to that piece on attacking yourself and that shows up in your thought processes and how you... And it for me, it was around there was the eating disorder that was sort of an extreme expression of it, but the autoimmune was almost like my secret continuation of that same process if you know what I mean? And so it took a little while to really understand that. And yeah, for me, things like Yin Yoga and Yoga Nidra and meditation and the Daoist practises and stuff I learned, they all contributed to healing. But yeah, it does, I mean, I would say it took 10 years for me to really be okay and probably still have to manage things.   Karen Fischer: (32:26) [crosstalk 00:32:26].   Tahnee: (32:27) Yeah.   Karen Fischer: (32:28) We're told it's a life sentence kind of thing. We're not told, "Hey, you can reverse that." I think us talking about it today, going to people, "Hey, you can reverse that." I think that's an important conversation to have. Because I went out to dinner with a couple of friends the other night and one she's just recovered from this terrible arthritis that was all over her body and she's only in her forties and another one she's just got it because of the pandemic. It came on because then she was in lockdowns in Melbourne and she had terrible crippling after arthritis in her hands. And I was like, "Oh, hey, you can reverse that. It's a lot of self care and it's a lot of not being so driven and relaxing a little bit." She goes, "Oh no, I'm very driven. I'm not going to stop that." I was like, "I'm there with your, sister. I'm very driven too, but I had to put my health first."   Tahnee: (33:19) Yeah, it's a type A kind of a thing, isn't it? And look, I think if you look at, and that was something I wanted to touch on quickly with the piece about salicylates and the liver as well, it's like you're looking at this inflammation, this inflammatory load, and if you look at what these autoimmune conditions are all the time they're associated with really high inflammation and stress on organs like the liver and dysbiosis in the gut and things. But again, from that whole systems approach, it's like you don't need to then go and attack the liver with detox chemicals or like it's really more about how do you bring everything into harmony so that the system can harmonise. And like you're saying, reducing stress, reducing the goals in one's life, they're all really important parts of it.   Tahnee: (34:03) And I've noticed it with my daughter. I keep her home from school and you can just see when she's starting to fall onto that side of things and getting stressed and she'll... I don't know, this is something you start to see in kids and that she's been a really good mirror for me where I've been able to see her start to fall into a behavioural change or something where I go, "Okay, she's hitting stress and I'm actually reflecting. I'm really busy. I'm stressed. We all need to take it down a notch today." And if you can get onto it early, it really helps I think and so that stuff-   Karen Fischer: (34:35) Yeah. That's great. And just noticing and identifying that, that's really important in children as well, so very, very important. Because it's like modern life, we just have all these goals and are really, really driven and that can... And the funny thing is, is when I had the autoimmune condition and before it, because I think I've... I never knew that my body was so tense and then I was so, I mean maybe even anxious for it. I just thought I used to be shy as a child, but I was probably riddled with anxiety and it's only just come out in my forties, the autoimmune stuff. And once I learned to calm myself down and relax my body, I was like, "Oh wow."   Karen Fischer: (35:24) And when I do start to feel my body getting tense again or feeling tense again, I was like, "Oh yeah, that's not normal so now I need to do something." So I always feel like I could be on the brink of tipping back, but then I notice it and I just do something to tip me back the other way. And it's so simple when you identify it, it's like people that are tired all the time and need coffee all the time. Once they detox off coffee and go back to eating well, they're like, "Oh wow. I feel amazing. I never knew I could feel this good. I just thought feeling bad was feeling normal." So it's identifying stress and seeing in our children and in ourselves when we start to tip over into that stressy kind of mode because yeah, it's not healthy for our skin, it's not healthy for [crosstalk 00:36:15]-   Tahnee: (36:16) No. And yeah, what you're saying that course correct. One of my teachers used to teach this. I can't remember which one right now. But if the pendulum is swinging in extremes, then you're going to have extreme symptoms. But if you can get your pendulum to swing in like a smaller range, then you'll notice, "I'm getting tense or getting run down, course correct, rest." And then you can kind of start to navigate in a more graceful way, I suppose, without as many extreme symptoms and needing to have those... I used to need a week in bed to recover from my life and now it's like I have a day off with my daughter and we hang out and play in the garden. We're evolving, look at us let's go. And getting there.   Tahnee: (37:04) I wanted to bring it back to rosacea because this is not an area I'm super familiar with. Again, I'm aware that there's a bit of a liver correlation there and I don't know what your research has brought up around the MTHFR, is that how you say it? That sort of process, but a lot of the people I've spoken to with rosacea tend to seem to have that genetic variant. I wonder if you could speak to that and rosacea in general, what you know about that.   Karen Fischer: (37:32) Yeah, absolutely. So look with rosacea. So rosacea for anyone who doesn't know, it's kind of when your skin goes all red and you can end up with this a bulbous nose, if you have rosacea really badly for a long period of time. So you want to kind of reverse it before your nose starts to grow. So what rosacea, what your body is kind of telling you with rosacea... So blood is having trouble getting to your skin surface. So what's happening is the blood cells are opening extra wide to let the blood into the skin surface. And that's giving you this red appearance because all your blood vessels are vasodilated and staying open. If you kind of analyse that, you go, "Okay, well, how do I naturally get blood to the surface of my skin without this vasodilation needing to happen?"   Karen Fischer: (38:27) So exercise is one massive thing for people with rosacea. I had it very mildly, many years ago. I lived a sedentary lifestyle, not much of an exercise back then and whenever I exercised it went away. So it really is a matter of how do I get really great blood circulation to my skin without... And that's, first of all, exercise. Vitamin deficiencies are important to correct as well. And so rosacea is also, so drinking alcohol is a big issue with that. So histamine, so it's a histamine response. So people with rosacea, I find if we take them off amines, sometimes they need to reduce their salicylates as well ,that gives them relief really, really quickly. And then they get their body healthier so then they don't react to those things down the tracks.   Karen Fischer: (39:22) But getting onto it early is better before because the vasodilation changes can become permanent. So, but they don't need to be so that's really important. So the MTHFR that kind of gene variant, so look those genes can be switched on and off so that if you're really working on stress management, relaxation... And I know that some of their treatments, they use really high methylated B vitamins, which I disagree with very high of anything can have side effects and they talk about all the side effects. So I do really low doses, if you need the methylated version of B vitamins, but in super low doses. Our bodies don't need a lot to function properly, but they need everything in balanced amounts or else you'll end up deficient in something else. So too much of one B vitamin will cause a deficiency in the others.   Karen Fischer: (40:25) Magnesium's really, really important. So if you are deficient in magnesium and taking these methylated B vitamins, you're going to react to the methylated B vitamins. So magnesium's a really, really, really important nutrient, helps us to get calcium into the correct places in our bones or else calcium just floats around in our bloodstream. It helps with our liver to deactivate chemicals. So when our body's functioning properly, when our liver and our gut's functioning properly, we don't have these gene issues. So definitely methylated B vitamins, but low doses, more magnesium, less B vitamins would be my kind of prescription for anyone with those kind of issues. Yeah, less is more.   Tahnee: (41:14) And that epigenetic piece, I guess, is super important because that's, I think for me as well, I think I've technically been diagnosed with celiac disease, but I can tolerate gluten now. I'm going to have to be careful with dosage. I can't go and eat it for a month, every day, like it wouldn't do me any favours, but I can have it a couple of times a week without dramas. And that I believe is sort of pushing me into that space of like, "If I maintain my stress levels, if I tend to myself in other ways, then that sort of aspect of my diet needs to be less controlled." And I think that's probably that overarching theme of what we've been talking about in terms of autoimmune, in terms of all of these things, it's like, there's the environmental factor, there's the personal, and then there's the things like diet and supplements and stuff as well. It's never just one, I wish, just one piece of the puzzle. There's lots of things obviously that can be done.   Tahnee: (42:12) And I saw your product, the Skin Friend product, there's like an AM and a PM. I did notice you had magnesium in there. Do you want to talk a little bit about what the intention with that product is? Is it mostly for eczema or is it...   Karen Fischer: (42:25) Yeah, absolutely. So the Skin Friend AM, so that's like your morning multivitamin, because it's really important that we just aren't deficient in things so that I actually initially designed that for people with salicylate sensitivity and eczema, but then people with acne just said, "Oh, it got rid of my acne as well." The AM is a liver helper. So that's just giving your liver what it needs to deactivate chemicals. So it's like when your bucket gets full, I thought I needed to have something to, because it wasn't available for me to prescribe to my patients. So I designed this for my daughter initially and then one of my patients said, "Why don't you give me the supplement you gave to your daughter?" So that came from that. It's just the liver nutrients that helps your liver to deactivate all the chemicals. We can't avoid chemicals and pollution and pesticides or whatever. We breathe them in, we ingest them accidentally or on purpose. So it's better to focus on giving our liver whatever it needs to cope with all the chemicals, without the bucket getting full. And so-   Tahnee: (43:37) And like is said, a lot of the, I was just going to quickly say, a lot of the chemicals are healthy chemicals. Things like salicylates and histamines and amines aren't necessarily bad for us, but if we can process or digest them. Yeah. So moving on to PM-   Karen Fischer: (43:51) All those chemicals are in healthy foods. So yes, and the liver's job is to deactivate them. So we just want to help the liver so it's not working so hard. And now the PM, so that's got the calcium, magnesium and glycine. So a lot of [inaudible 00:44:14] people with eczema and psoriasis and skin inflammation, they're actually deficient in calcium and magnesium. But so more so calcium, they're getting it in their diet, but if they're deficient in magnesium, they're not absorbing their calcium. So everyone recommends calcium and vitamin D but it's not the whole story. So research shows that your calcium will stay floating around in your blood and not get into your bones where it's meant to be if you don't have enough magnesium. And taking calcium on its own can even be harmful because, because it needs so much magnesium to be processed properly, it will make you deficient in magnesium. So there's another 300 enzyme reactions in our body will miss out on work, it won't work properly because calcium's-   Tahnee: (45:05) Dominating.   Karen Fischer: (45:07) Dominated your, made you deficient in it. So this product's evolved over the years. So it's got equal amounts of calcium and magnesium. So it's a really safe product and it really helps with sleep. People just say, "Oh, one night have taken that and I started sleeping better." Because people with eczema, as you might know, they just get really itchy in the middle of the night. It's like, I don't know, you just wake up itchy all over. So it just helped to maybe knock those people out a little bit and it just, magnesium calms the nervous system. It's muscle relaxants. And calcium blocks the absorption of zinc. So it needed to be away from the AM ingredients as well so that's really important the way a supplement's designed to not block the absorption of other nutrients.   Tahnee: (46:07) And glycine, can you speak about that a little bit, because I feel like you mention in The Healthy Skin Diet and probably in The Eczema Diet.   Karen Fischer: (46:18) Yeah, absolutely. So glycine's a component of collagen in your skin. So it's a really important one. People talk about taking collagen supplements. So glycine is a component of collagen and I feel glycine works better than collagen supplements. I've taken a collagen supplement and they say, "Oh, it takes 18 months to show results." I don't know if that's true or not. I think maybe some are better than others and probably some would do better results, but glycine's a component. So I find that taking glycine separately can really help and it helps the liver deactivate chemicals as well. So that was just another way... It does need magnesium and B vitamins and your vitamin C as well. So it's not just all about glycine, but yeah, really, really helpful for people with food chemical intolerance.   Tahnee: (47:08) And I guess I'm hearing, as a bit of a side effect, it's going to have some of those benefits of collagen that maybe people who are looking for anti-ageing and stuff are going to have some better collagen structure in the body, in the fascia and that kind of thing is that...   Karen Fischer: (47:20) Yeah. So yeah, collagen is super important with skin elasticity as well with avoiding things like stretch marks. So yeah, so making sure you've got your collagen nutrients, that's really great. Whereas if you're taking a collagen supplement, that's naturally high in histamine, so that's not really suitable for someone say with eczema or skin inflammation.   Tahnee: (47:41) Yeah. And that was something I thought was interesting I think in The Healthy Skin Diet, you spoke to how sometimes things like bone broths and things which everyone on the internet likes to say are amazing for skin health, but not necessarily. Could you speak a little bit about that?   Karen Fischer: (47:57) Yeah, absolutely. And I do have a bone broth recipe in The Healthy Skin Diet and-   Tahnee: (48:01) You do, it's a good one. I think I still make it.   Karen Fischer: (48:06) Yes. But for someone with eczema who also has amine intolerance or someone with histamine intolerance then that's what going to make them itch like crazy. So 35% of eczema sufferers are sensitive to amines and histamines so only 35% of them can't have a bone broth. And on saying that, a homemade bone broth that's say lower in salicylates is probably a better option for them.   Tahnee: (48:29) Yeah, because storing it actually increases, is this-   Karen Fischer: (48:33) The amines.   Tahnee: (48:34) The leftovers? Yeah.   Karen Fischer: (48:36) Absolutely. Yeah. So leftover meats develop amines the next day, that's why they get all yummier the next day. [crosstalk 00:48:43] and bone broths get more flavoursome the next day as well. So amines is a flavour enhancer.   Tahnee: (48:52) Yeah. Okay. So if you're intolerant to those, then you're going to find those yummy next day foods not so good for you.   Karen Fischer: (48:58) Yeah. And we probably should say how to find out if you're intolerant to it because so it's doing a special elimination diet. So we call it the FID programme, it's the Food Intolerance Diagnosis programme. So it's temporarily taking those foods out of your diet and we just have set recipes that make it really yummy for people. So it's not just a eating rice and bean kind of diet. It's come a long way since the 1970s, we have a trendy, fabulous recipes and smoothie bowls and whatever you see online, we have a low salicylate version of it. We've got out [inaudible 00:49:39] flat breads and just some really nice gluten-free wraps or whatever so people don't miss out on a single thing.   Tahnee: (49:49) Yeah. Is that part of your online membership as well as the book?   Karen Fischer: (49:53) Yes.   Tahnee: (49:53) Yeah. Okay.   Karen Fischer: (49:55) Yeah. The Healthy Skin Kitchen membership. I've got the healthy skin kitchen book, which has lots of great recipes. My wonderful publisher, Exisle Publishing, I had 90 recipes and they went, "Oh, we can only fit in 50." So the other ones have gone in the online programme plus we do free recipe every week and we have a support network, a forum where you can chat with everyone else who's on the programmes and you can see all the videos explaining the programmes and how to diagnose your food intolerances. I find that diagnosing it rather than just taking everything out of your diet and not testing it, is really important to diagnose it, put everything back in and see how you react because you don't want to be avoiding something you actually don't need to avoid. And the diagnosis program's a temporary programme so you expanded diet after that.   Tahnee: (50:51) I'm curious as to your thoughts on those IG, I'm going to probably get this wrong IG protein allergy tests. Do you know what I'm talking about?   Karen Fischer: (51:00) Yeah.   Tahnee: (51:00) Am I making sense? Yes. Because it's really interesting you say that. I did a lot of elimination diets in the early days trying to work out what was going on before I knew the gluten factor and that was useful because I sort of isolated gluten as being a problem. But then I went and saw a naturopath probably, I don't know, a year or two later and she told me I was allergic to like the whole world through one of those IG panels. And I was like, "God how am I going to function?" Because it was everything. It was eggs, I was vegetarian at the time, but it was chicken. It was heaps of different fruits. I mean, I literally remember it being broccoli. Like it was so many things and I remember thinking, "God, I'm basically going to be eating, like you're saying, rice and beans for the rest of my life."   Karen Fischer: (51:44) Yeah.   Tahnee: (51:46) But I turned out to not really be relevant to me. I've ended up being able to eat all those. I ate everything now without exception, except for McDonald's but yeah. It's like, I don't eat crap, but yeah. If I'd gone off of that, I would've lived my life rather miserably. My understanding now is that that tests where you're at, which is you're in a highly inflammatory reactive state and you're reacting to things, but it's not necessarily a end of the world life sentence that you're stuck with that.   Karen Fischer: (52:18) Yeah, absolutely. So that type of allergy testing is probably the one that doctors don't believe in, but the one that the doctors do believe in the IgE testing, it has its limitations as well because they tested the same amount of people say with an egg allergy, they did a skin prick test and they also did a blood, another test, which was a patch test that had a immediate response and a delayed response. And they got completely different results. 60% of people react to the skin prick test and with the patch test, not a lot of people reacted, but then later like hours later, the patch test 82% of people reacted. So it's amazing. Every test kind of has different things. So 25, 20 or so percent of people who had an egg allergy wouldn't have been diagnosed if they'd just done say a skin prick test.   Karen Fischer: (53:20) So I take any test with a grain of salt and you let your body tell you what you're reacting to. That's why I love food elimination diets. Like say, if people follow the FID programme, they take the foods out and go, "Oh wow, I don't have to take antihistamine medications anymore. I'm not itchy anymore. Oh my skin's starting to clear up." Then you know you're on the right track. But if you do the IGG test or whatever it's called and you take all those foods out of the diet and go, "Oh, I'm all better. Oh, that really worked for me. I feel different. Or hey, my symptoms are starting to reduce." Then you know you're on the right track. But if you take all the foods out of your diet and you go, "I'm no different or I'm a little worse." Then further investigation is required.   Karen Fischer: (54:08) Because I know that people with eczema, they take dairy out of the diet, they take gluten out of the diet or take wheat out of the diet or egg and they go, "Oh yeah, that helped a tiny bit or that didn't really help much at all. Diet might not be the issue. Diet's not the issue because that didn't work for me." So it was just relying on allergy testing is not usually enough. I find that if we're eating the same foods every day, we'll never know what we're reacting to. So it's rotating your diet. For one week of totally avoid grains, full stop, next week, add them in, but don't have same grains every week, every day. Don't have the same smoothie every day. Don't have the coffee every day.   Karen Fischer: (54:52) That's how I knew I reacted to caffeine because I would have a coffee or tea once a month and I'd feel achy on that day or the day after and I'd go, "Oh, that's the caffeine or that's the coffee." Or else I'd probably be achy and arthritic every day and not know. And if I was having coffee and red wine, because those are the two things that made me go, "Ooh, that doesn't feel so good. So it's our same, same diets. In traditional diets when you eat seasonally, your diets change with the season and that's how you'd notice more what you're reacting to. But we have the same foods available every day. And that's a problem with diagnosing food intolerances because we're the same.   Tahnee: (55:37) And so you've mentioned a couple of times that these, like say you do do a food elimination diet and you end up, "Okay, amines are a problem for me, but that isn't a life sentence." When would someone feel confident to start experimenting with bringing those things back in? I believe you talk about this in The Eczema Diet book, because I think it's the FID diet's written up in that. Yeah. Could you speak a little bit to that as well? How do you know when it's okay to start experimenting?   Karen Fischer: (56:06) Well, I feel like as soon as your symptoms totally get better or partially get better, that's the time to reintroduce and I say, look, reintroduce just... You've just got to maybe once a month, just test stuff. I like to, if I go to a cafe go, "Oh, I feel like eating this today."   Tahnee: (56:26) It's experiment day.   Karen Fischer: (56:31) [crosstalk 00:56:31]. Exactly. So I will generally do it when I'm out with friends and I just want to eat something. But I say, if you're really stressed, if you're having a bad day, if you're really stressed, if you're under pressure, that's not a good time to test foods. But if you're really relaxed, if you're laughing with your friends, that's a really great time to try something and just try small amounts because you want to win. So with the initial testing phase, you eat big amounts of stuff to see if you get results. And I'm in two minds about doing that, because I'm like, "Well you want to win." So I know that for me, if I drink a glass of soy milk, I react to it. But if there's a little bit of soy hidden in foods, I'm fine. So I'm like, "I'm not sensitive to soy." Because with your mind stuff, you shouldn't go, "Yeah, I can't have this, this and this." So I'm like, "I'm not sensitive to soy when it's in sensible amounts."It's about testing at the right times when you feel happy and when you're laughing.   Karen Fischer: (57:40) Some brain retraining techniques involve eating while laughing and smiling while cooking and things like that. It's about not going, "Oh my God. Okay. I'm going to try this and I might react. Okay. I'll notice and if I'm looking for a reaction, I'm going to eat it and look for a reaction." Don't do that. Just don't do that, go, "You know what, I feel great." Visualise eating it maybe for a couple of days beforehand, be really happy and relaxed. So you want to win so you want to do it in low amounts when you're happy.   Tahnee: (58:15) This reminds me a lot of that holiday phenomenon where people can go to Italy and suddenly eat pasta three times a day and not die, but they come home and they can't eat anything. So much of it is how we are when we're digesting and how we...   Tahnee: (58:31) I actually had an experience that is really indicative of this. I didn't eat dairy for probably close to 10 years and then I was at work really stressed, really busy and decided to have a banana smoothie and it came out of me in about two seconds. It was a milk banana smoothie and it was the same thing, it was a whole whatever, half a litre of milk or something, whatever it was, a cafe sized banana smoothie. I was hyper stressed. I hadn't eaten in, I don't know, probably close to 12 hours because I was at work and busy and drinking coffee all morning and then I hadn't had dairy in 10 years. My body's just going like, "What is this?" And then over time I started to creep it in slowly and now I can have it, no problem. So yeah, it's very same thing.   Karen Fischer: (59:17) That's a good example, a really great example. Yes. It's [crosstalk 00:59:21] and it's gradual and sneaking it into the body. It's like, "Oh, look at that nice flower. Look at this. Oh, beautiful sky today." And it's [crosstalk 00:59:32]. It's all about not making a big deal about it as well and being in a good place.   Tahnee: (59:37) Yeah, well that's, I think that mindset thing and I was going to touch on quickly with teenagers because I know you've had two, or you've got one and you've had one, and acne because it's such a common phenomenon in young people and I'm just curious as to your advice to parents who might be listening, how to navigate that time obviously there's the hormonal factors, teenagers don't usually want to eat particularly healthily. It's all the stress of being a teenager.   Karen Fischer: (01:00:12) [crosstalk 01:00:12].   Tahnee: (01:00:12) Yeah. I'm just curious about that because I'm still 10 years away from that, but I'm interested in what you think, how we can navigate that.   Karen Fischer: (01:00:22) [crosstalk 01:00:22] primarily for that.   Tahnee: (01:00:24) Getting organised.   Karen Fischer: (01:00:25) Well, teenagers and adults in traditional societies that don't eat the crap that we eat, they don't get acne. And that really does sum it up. And there's research showing four year olds are getting acne, which is ridiculous.And I know that whenever-   Tahnee: (01:00:41) Wow, okay.   Karen Fischer: (01:00:43) Yeah. And I mean, look, my kids don't eat a perfect diet. They do most of the time, but when it's holidays and I just want to spoil my son or he steals, we only have chocolate in the fridge over the holidays and he... I spoil him a bit and I actually [crosstalk 01:00:58] chocolate. And I know if he eats a whole block of chocolate, he'll have a little spot the next day and I'm like chocolate is a big one because of all the fats in it as well. So things in moderation. And teenagers, they're away from home, they are eating a lot of crappy foods and they're really stressed.   Karen Fischer: (01:01:16) So look, I do a lot of marketing health food to kids and with teenagers, you just appeal to their vanity. It's like mention that, "Oh yeah, these are the pimple foods and these are the healthy skin foods." It's like, "Yeah, chocolates a pimple food so maybe just have it only one day a week and hey, why don't you have this instead? Why don't you make yourself this oat milk smoothie, we'll put some cacao in it or we'll put some berries in it as well, maybe we'll make a blueberry and smoothie instead. And that can be your sweet treat instead of chocolate." So it really, really is diet related, really is stress related as well.   Karen Fischer: (01:02:02) I know with my kids, I took the pressure off them achieving well at school. I know that my son went to this high pressure school that gets you ready for high school two years before high school and he couldn't cope with it. And he was anxious and he was vomiting in the morning and all stressed out. And I just, I could not get him out from under the bed to go to school some days. It was actually really stressful for me. And it was an awful, awful time and I just went, "You know what, I'm never going to pressure him to, because he's an anxious type, I'm never going to pressure him to do well at school." I was like, "I just want him to not hide under the bed and to not be so nervous in the tummy that he's vomiting." So I mean, he doesn't do that anymore. He's totally fine, loves school. I'm like as long as he does his homework, great, but I don't care if he's smart or not smart or...   Karen Fischer: (01:02:56) It's like with my daughter, I was like... We got tutoring for her because she wasn't very smart. And I didn't pressure her to do well in high school, but she ended up getting amazing grades and got into the top architectural university in Sydney, Sydney Uni [crosstalk 01:03:12] end up doing it, because she chose something else. But I was like, that was self motivation. And gosh, she was a nightmare that one in year 12 because she was so motivated, she was crying. And I was like, "Oh." Kids are under so much pressure to do well. So I, for me, mental wellbeing is top of the list for teenagers and children, teaching them how to love themself and care about themself and to have goals, but to not work themselves up into this crazy state as well. And I guess that's just long term chatting with your kids because I know my parents never chatted to me about that stuff.   Karen Fischer: (01:03:55) I was a really anxious teenager and I cut a fringe to cover the pimples on my forehead in high school because I was this super stressed out teenager. So yeah, don't be like my parents talk to your kid, talk to them about stuff. It's like, I would've loved to have been taught how to put on makeup when I was a teenager. So I could hide all the horrible bits. And I think that would've helped me to cope better, just talking about stuff and asking, "How are you going at school?" A kid will always go, "Yeah, fine." I mean, I did that and my son does that and I'm like. It's kind of maybe play video games with them because that's probably when they're going to open up about stuff, do something they love, sit side by side-   Tahnee: (01:04:41) Like get on their level, yeah.   Karen Fischer: (01:04:43) Get on their level, talk to them because they could be really stressed out on the inside and we need to know as parents because just if they can confide in you that instantly calms their nervous system and helps them to calm down is that connection of, "Wow. My mom really or my dad really knows me. I know I can tell them anything if I get into trouble, if I get stuck out in the middle or in the middle of the night, I can call and go, hey, can you pick me up?" But yeah, so-   Tahnee: (01:05:13) God bless parents.   Karen Fische

Two Zero Q: 20 Questions With Interesting People from the LGBT community and friends

Hi Everybody, Welcome to 2ZQ Hot takes, where we discuss issues both big and small; I am your host The Very Handsome Tim Kirk and today I'll be talking about Drug Names. Where DO drug companies get those names? I often see ads on everything from bus shelters to subway platforms to websites interstitials to TV ads for everything from HIV meds to Psoriasis to cholesterol lowering drugs and have long wondered how pharma companies go about creating the names of drugs they manufacture. It is a lot more complicated and involved than one might imagine.  Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Not Old - Better Show
#588 Psoriasis Disease and What You Should Know - Diane Talbert

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 29:08


Psoriasis Disease and What You Should Know - Diane Talbert The Not Old Better Show, Art of Living Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show, on KSCW.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and today's show is brought to you by Faherty Brand Clothes and , yum, Omaha Steaks. Our guest today is Diane Talbert, and we're going to discuss several things she wished she'd know, as a person of color, about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Those with immune-mediated diseases have, for too long now, felt alone in navigating through their conditions. This can be compounded for some groups by racial disparities when it comes to diagnosis for diseases like psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. These disparities can lead to troubling outcomes, and our guest today Diane Talbert understands the importance of bringing to light these aspects of psoriatic diseases. As a psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patient advocate, Diane  Talbert is working with pharmaceutical companies and organizations to better understand and address health disparities in psoriatic disease – specifically as it relates to diagnosis. This is an amazing individual and you'll enjoy our conversation with Diane Talbert, who'll share her 50-year patient journey and a unique perspectives as she has experienced first-hand the health inequities that people of color face. In particular, it took Diane 20 years for her symptoms to be taken seriously and receive a proper diagnosis – setting her up for her advocacy work around these diseases, including visits to Capitol Hill every year. Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show via internet phone, Diane Talbert. My thanks to Faherty Brand Clothes and Omaha Steaks for sponsoring today's episode.  My thanks to Diane Talbert for graciously sharing her incredible story.  My thanks to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience…be well, stay safe out there and remember to talk about better…The Not Old Better Show. Thanks everybody.

The Healthy Skin Show
223: Can Eating Healthy Make My Skin Rashes Worse?

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:18


Are you one of those people whose skin gets WORSE the cleaner and healthier your diet becomes? This is one of those things people don't talk about that can really get someone down because diet changes are so heavily pushed as a one-stop solution to clear up your skin. So if you've ever felt like you just didn't “try hard enough” or “eat clean enough” because your skin got worse, know that you're not alone. Though I don't have an exact reason WHY this happens, I do have clinical observations that I can share. My hope is that you'll stop blaming yourself (or thinking that you're just doomed) and encourage you to dig deeper than food to address triggers to your skin rashes. In this episode: Answering the question: Can eating clean make your skin rashes worse? What it means if your skin gets worse the cleaner + healthier your diet gets Diets I've seen clinically cause skin rashes to get worse in some individuals Connection between skin flare-ups and diet shifts Quotes: You are not a failure if eating “clean” or making healthy diet changes actually makes your skin rashes worse! Those with rashes that are “diet-resistant” or worsen with a healthier diet often have gut dysbiosis.

Through Being Cool Podcast
Episode 124. No Psoriasis, I Don‘t Like It!

Through Being Cool Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 91:44


Island Boys just tryin ta podcast. Island Boys talkin bout dat creamed corns. Because we are without a doubt Island Boys.  Contact - throughbeingcoolpodcast@gmail.com Twitter - @tbcoolpodcast Instagram - @throughbeingcoolpodcast

Psound Bytes
Ep. 154 "Over-the-Counter Products and Tips for Scalp Psoriasis"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 25:01


Treating scalp psoriasis can be problematic. Tirsa Quartullo, a doctoral prepared, board-certified family nurse practitioner with Arizona Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery in Phoenix, AZ, shares practical tips, over-the-counter products and cautions for care of scalp psoriasis. This Psound Bytes episode is supported by unrestricted educational grants from Amgen, Janssen and UCB. 

The Mike Madison Show
W 11.24.21 Heart Study Shocker! / Humpday Health! Psoriasis and Covid Treatments

The Mike Madison Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 81:30


The American Heart Association was presented with scary info on the jabs. Pfizer TORTURES the stats - again. Humpday Health! Psoriasis natural treatment vs damaging drug. Anti-aging benefits of nutrition vs drugs. And how to heal from Covid.

Quest for Healing
How She Rescued Her Young Baby from Body-Covering Eczema with Ali Anderson

Quest for Healing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 38:07


#058 - This week's guest is Ali Anderson and her youngest son, Anders, came down with eczema when he was only a year old and it covered his whole body.  If you follow Ali on Instagram, you may have seen some of the heartbreaking pictures of her sweet little boy when the eczema was at its worst.  We talk about some of the challenges she had with the medical system, how she found Medical Medium, how she adapted this lifestyle into her beautiful family of four, and the wonderful healing effects it had, and not just for Anders.You can find Ali on Instagram at@alinapplezHoliday Recipe Ideas: Check out my FREE Holiday Recipe Guide here with six delicious recipes so that you can have a wonderful and healthy holiday season.Holiday Gift Ideas: If you're looking for holiday gift ideas for your friends or loved ones who are on a health journey (or some ideas for yourself), check out the Quest for the Best - Holiday Gift Guide with more than 25 gift suggestions. Please feel free to share it!SHOW NOTES:Note: Some of the links provided here are affiliate links, which means that if you buy using this link, I will receive a small commission at no extra cost for you. Affiliate links are annotated with ($).Medical Medium Radio Shows on eczema:Healing Acne, Eczema and Psoriasis on Apple Podcasts and Sound CloudHealing Eczema, Psoriasis & Acne on Apple Podcasts and Sound CloudCelery Juice for Eczema and Other Skin Conditions on Apple Podcasts and Sound CloudMedical Medium Pancake Recipes that she uses to make waffles:Wild Blueberry PancakesStrawberry PancakesBooks referenced:Medical Medium, Secrets Behind Chronic and Mystery Illness and How to Finally Heal (Revised and Expanded Edition) by Anthony William ($) Medical Medium Life-Changing Foods by Anthony William ($) Medical Medium Cleanse to Heal by Anthony William ($) The Quest for Healing Podcast is hosted by Kerstin Ramstrom. For more information about Kerstin and her health coaching practice, Carefully Healing, please find her atCarefullyHealing.comFacebook: Carefully HealingInstagram: @CarefullyHealingWithKerstinYouTube: Carefully Healing with KerstinIf you're looking for a non-toxic, preservative free cleaner that really works, check out Branch Basics at BranchBasics.com and use my code CAREFULLYHEALING for 15% off any starter kit. Shipping is FREE for orders over $39 in the US and $8 for orders in Canada. ($)

The Healthy Skin Show
222: Food Allergies + Skin Rashes in Kids w/ Jennifer Brand, MS, MPH, CNS

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:13


Did you know that it is possible for children to become sensitized (and even allergic) to food through the skin? Yep... *mind blown*! This is something that we're learning more about and that blows a hole in the concept that the only way to become sensitized to food is through the gut. My guest today, Jennifer Brand, MPH (Master's degree in public health), MS (Master's degree in nutrition), CNS (Certified Nutrition Specialist) is an integrative and clinical nutritionist and the founder of Jennifer Caryn Brand Nutrition. She specializes in childhood skin rashes (eczema in particular, as well as psoriasis, tinea versicolor, hives, acne, vitiligo, and others), food allergies and sensitivities, and gut problems. Jennifer's own struggle with gut problems and disordered eating, her father's battle with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, her brother's diagnosis of psoriasis, and her mother's diagnosis of vitiligo left her frustrated and stirred her search for a different approach as conventional means fell flat: - An approach that doesn't remove more foods from the diet. Food is not the root cause of the problem. Your body runs off of nutrients from foods you eat. When they are missing, imbalances develop, and symptoms and health problems follow, even skin rashes. - An approach that doesn't include stronger prescription steroid creams, and immune-modulating prescriptions that might manage symptoms but don't address the root cause of the problem, and can cause additional problems long term. Jennifer is a relentless detective putting her strong knowledge of nutritional biochemistry to work for you, to identify what's driving symptoms and health problems in order to address the root cause of them. In 2013 she opened her private, clinical nutrition practice. Jennifer left her corporate healthcare career in 2017 to focus full time on helping clients get relief. Jennifer is a faculty member of LearnSkin, and her work has been featured in peer-reviewed scientific journals, Voyagela, as well as on podcasts, online summits, and in-person presentations at venues such as Casa Colina Hospital in California. Join us as we discuss how food allergies can affect skin rashes in children. Has identifying food allergies helped your little one's skin health? Let me know in the comments! In this episode: How a baby can potentially develop a food allergy at such a young age Is it possible to become sensitized to a particular food through the skin barrier? Connection between gut bacteria + food allergies Foods that feed friendly gut bacteria Problems that might come along with moisturizing rashy skin Quotes “When we're talking about skin allergies, that includes things like skin inflammation, eczema, hives, and contact type allergies. So when we get to the statistics here, 9.2 million children had skin allergies in 2018.” [1:33] “One of the most interesting statistics I've come across in the literature is that two out of three kids with rashes do not have food allergies.” [2:17] Links Interested in trying MegaSporeBiotic? Click HERE to grab a bottle! Find Jennifer Brand online Get Jennifer Brand's FREE Guide To Beat Your Little One's Eczema HERE Get Jennifer Brand's FREE Guide To Probiotics For Skin Rashes Healthy Skin Show episode 008: Identifying The Chemical Triggers Behind Your Skin Flare Ups w/ Jennifer Brand Healthy Skin Show ep. 110: Missing Links Between Your Little One's Skin Rashes & Mom's Health w/ Jennifer Brand, MS, CNS Healthy Skin Show ep. 178: Using Probiotics For Eczema in Little Ones w/ Jennifer Brand, MS, MPH, CNS Follow Jennifer on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Psound Bytes
Ep. 153 "A PSO Meet Up: Let's Talk About Psoriasis and Attaining Healthy Skin" A Sun Pharma sponsored podcast

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:13


Maintaining healthy skin and managing moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis go hand in hand. For those with psoriasis, it's more than just symptoms. Listen as Barry and Tommy discuss their journeys with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and life with lasting skin clearance. Dr. Daniel Carrasco joins them to discuss a treatment option for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. This podcast episode is sponsored by Sun Pharma. For important safety information: https://bit.ly/2We7fIS . 

The Healthy Skin Show
221: Do Rashes In Certain Areas Mean Something?

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 10:41


Have you ever wondered if the placement of your rashes actually was an important clue to your case? I've been asked this A LOT! So today I thought I'd share some clinical pearls that I've picked up along the way to help you become a better skin rash detective! This observation can also help you by looking back to rash placement in the past (even when you were a child) or before the onset of Topical Steroid Withdrawal (TSW). Especially because we know that skin rash conditions are often driven by internal inflammation. But you have to look for those underlying (and often hidden) root causes along the way so that you can actually address them. So let's dive into this interesting discussion on what rashes in certain areas of the body actually mean! In this episode: What do rashes in certain areas mean? Do rashes on the abdomen mean I have gut problems? Rashes around your eyes and under the nose Fungal hotspots (check out the graphic!) Quotes: In certain areas such as the armpits or groin, the skin microbiome is considered to be a damp environment making it more prone to fungal rashes. Don't assume that rashes around the mid-section automatically mean that you have a gut problem simply due to rash placement.

Less Stressed Life : Upleveling Life, Health & Happiness
#207 Eating for Psoriasis with Kellie Blake, RDN

Less Stressed Life : Upleveling Life, Health & Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:31


This week on the Less Stress Life, I talk to Kellie Blake, RDN about the challenges she's faced with a diagnosis of Psoriasis at 12 years old and symptoms since 5. "Being a somewhat sickly kid, no one put the pieces together," Kellie explains. Looking back, she talks about just how far she's come and the details of her journey to overcoming a challenging autoimmune condition. Kellie's story is relatable to so many with skin and autoimmune conditions. She shares great tips and offers real world advice for clients and practitioners alike.KEY TAKEAWAYS:Personal elimination diet experienceroot cause approach is so importantDisruptions in the gut microbiome at a young age- long term affectsAutoimmune clients respond so well to food changesStress fuels Psoriasis and exacerbates the problemGut differences with PsoriasisStress, trauma, genetics, poor nutrition, microbiome imbalances can all contribute to diagnosisGUEST SHARED HELPFUL TIPS ON:Can eat as healthy as you want but need to digest and absorbWhole foods plant based dietManaging SIBO, low fodmaps diet for a little whileStress Management TipsSleep improvement- make it a priorityThe better kinds of exercise when healingTypes of trauma and stress How psoriasis presents and different types- 90% Plaque PsoriasisMENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE:Psoriasis Cookbook and Meal Plan - by Kellie Blake The Psoriasis Diet Cookbook Easy Healthy Recipes to Soothe Your Symptoms by Kellie BlakeABOUT GUEST:Kellie Blake is a registered dietitian specializing in functional nutrition. Kellie has been able to reverse her own autoimmune symptoms with functional medicine and nutrition and she is passionate about sharing this message with her clients. She has a private practice, NutriSense Nutrition Consulting, is on the Editorial Board of Integrative Practitioner where she writes monthly articles showcasing her client case studies, and is a blogger for the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Academy. She has written 2 cookbooks: The Psoriasis Diet Cookbook and Psoriasis Cookbook + Meal Plan. In addition to her private practice, Kellie practices in the areas of psychiatry and enteral nutrition.WHERE TO FIND KELLIE:NUTRISENSENUTRITION.COMON IG & FB: nutrisensenutritionWHERE TO FIND CHRISTA:https://www.christabiegler.com/On IG: instagram.com/anti.inflammatory.nutritionist/Shop our Favorites:  christabiegler.com/shopLoving the podcast? Leave us a review and ENTER OUR GIVEAWAY NOW!Sharing & reviewing this podcast is the BEST way to help us succeed with our mission to help integrate the best of East & West empower you to raise the bar on your health story. Just go to https://reviewthispodcast.com/lessstressedlifeSPONSORS:A special thanks to our VIP sponsor RUPA Health, our lab concierge service that helps our clients get standard bloodwork 2/3 off retail direct to consumer lab test pricing. Let them know I sent you when you sign up for your free practitioner account.

Revolution Health Radio
RHR: Community Q&A: Hyperthyroidism, Psoriasis, Burnout, and Human Polarization

Revolution Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 60:04


In this episode of Revolution Health Radio, I answer questions from our listeners regarding natural ways to treat hyperthyroidism, tips for reducing psoriasis and eczema, strategies to overcome burnout, and the contributing factors that have led to worldwide polarization. The post RHR: Community Q&A: Hyperthyroidism, Psoriasis, Burnout, and Human Polarization appeared first on Chris Kresser.

Learn Skin with Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar
Episode 110: Biologics for the Multi-Layered Psoriasis Patient

Learn Skin with Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:26


Searching for some biologic wisdom? We've got just the right dose. This week, Dr. Jason Hawkes looks at biologics and gives some tips on the art of the pharmaceutical approach. Each Thursday, join Dr. Raja and Dr. Hadar, board certified dermatologists, as they share the latest evidence based research in integrative dermatology. For access to CE/CME courses, attend LearnSkin's Psoriasis Series chaired by Dr. Hawkes. He will also be moderating the next case-based webinar on the Evolving and Emerging Landscape of Psoriasis on November 16th.   Jason Hawkes, MD MS is a board-certified dermatologist and Associate Professor of Dermatology at the University of California Davis. He received his Medical Degree from the University of Utah School of Medicine. During medical school, he was selected for a one-year research fellowship year at the National Institutes of Health as part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Scholars Program. He completed his internship in internal medicine at the University of Washington/Boise VA Medical Center. He returned to the University of Utah School of Medicine for his dermatology residency training and graduated from the Program's 2+2 Translational Research Track. He then completed a Master's Degree in Clinical Investigation at the Rockefeller University in New York City, where he was also the Chief Clinical Scholar and member of the Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology. Dr. Hawkes was also a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Dermatology in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where he saw patients and taught residents, fellows, and physician assistants.

The Healthy Skin Show
220: The Gut Microbiome Of Acne [NEW RESEARCH] w/ Dr. Julie Greenberg

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 41:20


If you are struggling with adult acne, today's episode is for you! This episode is celebrating new published research by Dr. Julie Greenberg on the make-up of the gut microbiome of someone whose primary complaint is acne! These findings can help us all better know what steps can be taken to support someone struggling with acne, but it also underscores that other skin issues (like eczema) may have a very different gut microbiome diversity. Time will tell as that research eventually becomes available. For now, let's dive into the distinct gut microbiome that tends to show up in acne! My guest today, Dr. Julie Greenberg, is a licensed ND who specializes in integrative dermatology. She is the founder of the Center for Integrative Dermatology, a holistic dermatology clinic that approaches skin problems by finding and treating the root cause. Dr. Greenberg hold degrees from Northwestern University, Stanford University and Bastyr University, and received advanced clinical training at the Dermatology Clinic at the University of Washington Medical School and at the Pediatric Dermatology Center at Seattle Children's Hospital. She is also the Program Chair of the Naturopathic & Integrative Dermatology series on LearnSkin.com, a learning platform for integrative health care professionals. Join us as we discuss some exciting new research into the gut microbiome and acne. Has working on your gut health improved your acne? Let me know in the comments! In this episode: How prevalent of a problem is acne? Why does acne occur? The difference between a trigger and a root cause Three things that typify the acne gut based on her published research How much fiber do you REALLY need to eat to help with acne? The problem with eating too much meat Why dairy can be problematic for acne Quotes “Acne occurs within a hair follicle. Every acne zit or pimple that is one somebody's face, chest, back, is happening in a hair follicle.” [3:22] “What I found was three things that kind of typify the acne gut. One is H Pylori (Helicobacter pylori)  is present. One is candida. Candida is elevated or high. And the third thing is protozoa.” [11:46] Links Find Dr. Greenberg online Healthy Skin Show ep. 173: Malassezia: The Bug Behind Many Fungal Skin Problems w/ Dr. Julie Greenberg Healthy Skin Show ep. 149: How Staph Aureus Wrecks Your Skin w/ Dr. Julie Greenberg Dr. Greenberg's research on acne and the gut Gut Dysbiosis and Its Role in Skin Disease: A LearnSkin course I co-authored

The Simplicity Sessions
How to take care of your skin with David Brooke

The Simplicity Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:59


Welcome back to The Simplicity Sessions, I'm delighted that you've joined us today. My name is Jenn Pike, your host, registered holistic nutritionist, medical exercise specialist, the best-selling author of the Simplicity Project and the creator of the women's revolutionary health program, The Hormone Project. In todays' episode I have with me a friend and guest, David Brooke, the owner and founder of Skin Essence, joining me in my weekly simplicity bites. I brought him in today's episode to talk about different strategies that you can be using to support your skin coming into different times of the year. For the last 10 years, my skin has been moisturized and healthy with the help of their products. I have been using a new product from Skin Essence and it is finally on the market and we will talk about it in today's podcast.  Visit here http://www.skinessence.ca and check out their products. Save 20% off your first order when you use the code JENNPIKE20 and 10% off any purchase after that with the code JENNPIKE10. If you have a question for me and my team, send it over to hello@jennpike.com or via Instagram at @jennpike and I'll do my best to share helpful insights, thoughts and advice.  Here are the main topics of today's episode: How do you take care of your skin this time of year? Is there so much versatility in how you can use them? How often should you be exfoliating the skin? What are your recommendations for people who have Psoriasis? How long do the oils last in terms of their expiration? Is it okay to put the oils in your hair? Having good customer service Is there anything that people need to know about using the mist? What is best for your skin? Connect with us - Thank you for joining us today. If you could do me the honor of hitting the subscribe button, leaving a review, sharing this podcast with a friend, or tagging me on social media when you visit The Simplicity Sessions Community on Facebook or @jennpike on Instagram, I would be forever grateful. You can connect to this episode on iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher by searching The Simplicity Sessions, or visiting www.jennpike.com/podcast. Join our growing community via Facebook The Simplicity Sessions Community. Connect with David Brooke - Linked in: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/david-brooke-2791bb29 Online work with Jenn - Register for my signature program The Hormone Project and work with my team and me 1:1 to support your health, hormones, and more via the following link www.jennpike.com/thehormoneproject. Sign up for The Synced Program to learn how to tune your body to the lunar cycle and acquire a multidisciplinary approach to balance your body in less than 30 minutes a day!  Interested in registering for the upcoming Audacious Women mentorship? Send us a message via our website at https://jennpike.com/contact/  To learn more about the products mentioned in this episode, visit the link I've shared on my Instagram @jennpike. There you can discover where you can purchase these products and how you can start to make them part of your everyday simplicity approach. Learn more about the products and supports I recommend from some of our amazing partners -   Eaton Hemp is my favourite CBD and hemp company. They are a hundred percent organic, they're unfiltered, and they are third-party tested. To experience Eaton Hemp, use the discount code JENNPIKE20 at eatonhemp.com/jennpike to save 20% off your order. GoodJuju makes all-natural, plastic-free home & body products that are good for you and good for the planet. Use JENNPIKE10 for 10% off your order. Skin Essence is Canadian-founded, organic, non-GMO, and does not test on animals; this company is one that we love and have around the house. You can even talk to the company to get advice on which products may be right to try first. Save 15% off your first order with the code JENNPIKE15 and use code JENNPIKE10 to save 10% off every order after that. St Francis Herb Farm education includes webinars, blogs and articles on important topics including the plant medicines that they create to promote women's health by targeting digestion, allergies, immune support, heart health, brain health, and sleep. I use and recommend their products and you can use the code JENNPIKE15 at checkout to save 15% off your order. Quotes - “ And the more hydrated you can keep your skin, the better it is from an aging gracefully perspective as well.” “As we get older, skin cells don't rejuvenate as fast.” “The skin is a reflection of what's going on the inside.” “Once you get into a really good skincare routine and you have great ingredients, you intuitively can start to figure out what you need.” “It's not an overnight success.”  

Rheumnow Podcast
ACR2021 - Day4e

Rheumnow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 47:40


Glucocorticoids and CV risk in RA: Drs. Aurelie Najm and Jon Giles Might Tofacitinib Reduce Malignancy Risk with Patients with RA? Dr. Jonathan Kay Rheumatic Diseases Can Take your Breath Away: Dr.Janet Pope Best of PsA Day 4 (Tuesday): MACE in PsA: Dr. Rachel Tate Predicting Progression from Psoriasis to PsA: Dr. Robert Chao David Liew Interview Dr. Seoyoung Kim About Tofacitinib and Malignancy Risk. Third Time's the Charm - COVID Vaccination While on Rituximab: Dr. Yuz Yusof Can We Stop Medication in Systemic JIA? Dr. Bella Mehta Day 4 SpA Highlights - Pregnancy in SpA and Drug Monitoring: Dr. Robert Chao

Rheumnow Podcast
ACR2021 - Day3f

Rheumnow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 29:02


The Respiratory Tract and RA with Drs. Sparks, McDermott and Kronzer Guselkumab Use Improves Anemia in Treatment of PsA: Dr. Robert Chao Ultra Low Doses of Rituximab in RA: Dr. Eric Dein and Nathan den Broeder Uveitis and Prevalence of Psoriasis in axSpA: Dr. Robert Chao

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca
Don't Worry About Tomorrow

Mornings with Jeff & Rebecca

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 2:50


Recently, I went to the Dermatologist to get an annual check-up at the request of my primary doctor since Skin Cancer is a condition in my family. My grandfather died of melanoma and my mother deals with Psoriasis as well as had one diagnosis of a basil cell carcinoma. Everything began to look great until the doctor caught sight of a small mole on my back that was discolored so she thought it would be best to get a biopsy of that particular spot to see if it was an area of concern. Of course, as soon as I heard that, my heart dropped as the possibilities began to flood my head as worst-case scenario after worst-case scenario followed suit. My wife and I are having our first child in just a few months. What would happen if I wasn't there for them? To top it all off, they told me it was going to be 5 business days before I would know anything so naturally, that week was going to be a very hard one to get through emotionally. But despite the mental struggles of thinking about "what if", God really reminded me of what His Word already says in Matthew 6:34:"Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own." - Matthew 6:34I know it sounds stereotypical but it really spoke to me to remember that I really shouldn't stress about what I don't know. A lot of us think of worry as we're preemptively putting a down payment on the worry or stress to come, but in reality that is far from how it works. Fear doesn't stop death and it definitely doesn't stop worry. It stops life. It stops us from living in the moment and enjoying what we have and who we have. During that week of waiting for the results, I came to realize that worrying doesn't take away tomorrow's worries, it rids today of it's peace. Lamentations 3:22-24 remind us that: Because of the Lord's great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion; therefore I will wait for him.”God doesn't operate with us like a Costco or Sam's Club membership. He gives us just what we need when we need it. He is a lamp unto our feet and a light unto our path (Psalm 119:105). Tomorrow has enough troubles of it's own so let tomorrow be it's own thing and instead, live in the grace and peace that God gives for you today. They are new every morning. Also, I'll be happy to update you that the biopsy came back benign and that there was no reason for concern. But I would be remiss to say that I didn't learn a whole lot about God and His love for me during this struggle for my mind. 

My Immune System Hates Me!
Alopecia Areata + Psoriasis

My Immune System Hates Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 26:21


Follow Trenton on Instagram @trentonhudson.Visit myimmunesystempod.com to get in contact with Chelsey, listen to old episodes, learn about the RA Warrior Group, buy a signed copy of Chelsey's book, and apply to be a guest on the show.Don't forget to rate and review the show, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @myimmunesystempod***Any information discussed in this podcast is strictly my opinion and those of my guests and are for informational purposes only. We are speaking from our personal experiences and you should always consult with your doctor or medical team.

Sanamente
Síntomas, cuidados y consecuencias que causa la Psoriasis.

Sanamente

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 44:53


Síntomas, cuidados y consecuencias que causa la Psoriasis.

Psound Bytes
Ep. 152 CME 0.5 "Vaccines and Psoriatic Disease: What Do We Know?"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 32:27


Hear Dr. Sandy Chat from Indiana University School of Medicine and Dr. Christoph Ellebrecht, Clinical Instructor, Dept. of Dermatology at University of Pennsylvania, discuss the flu, shingles and mRNA vaccines and how psoriatic disease treatment can impact vaccine choices. For disclosures/credit: https://www.eeds.com/em/3419. This program is supported by educational grants from Bristol Myers Squibb, Lilly, Novartis and Ortho Dermatologics. 

The Healthy Skin Show
219: Dupixent Red Face + Neck Rash Associated With Fungal Overgrowth

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 10:12


Did you know that about 10% of people using Dupixent develop awful face and neck dermatitis? This issue (more officially called Dupilumab Facial Redness (DFR)) wasn't flagged during the randomized FDA trials, but has some dermatologists concerned because DFR can be incredibly severe, just as it was for one of my clients. Since Dupixent is a biologic drug used by some with Eczema and Topical Steroid Withdrawal to ease symptoms, this new problem isn't ideal. Rather than just assume that the person has a sensitivity to Dupixent, new research is showing that this may be a different problem — Malasezzia hypersensitivity. If you recall, Malasezzia is a fungal organism that normally lives in your skin's microbiome. It really shouldn't be causing an issue like this, but something about the way that Dupixent interacts with your immune system along with a compromised skin barrier could play a role. Here are the current papers discussing this topic so you have something to bring to your prescribing dermatologist so you can get the help you need if you are experiencing this! In this episode: Facial + neck redness that occurs in about 10% of Dupixent users What current research on what may be driving this weird “side effect” Treatment options listed in currently published articles The blood test marker that could be helpful in getting a clear diagnosis What to do if YOU have face + neck redness from Dupixent Quotes: Approximately 10% of Dupixent users develop red, inflamed, dry, scaly and itchy face + neck rashes requiring antifungal medication treatment. Dupixent Facial Redness was never described or mentioned in the Dupixent clinical trials for the FDA (which is surprising considering that it impacts approximately 10% of patients).

Psound Bytes
Ep. 151 "A Change in Gut Health Could Impact Your Skin" An AxisBiotix sponsored podcast.

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 16:29


Could dietary supplements offer a new lighter option for alleviating psoriasis symptoms? Hear from SkinBioTherapeutics CEO Stuart Ashman and CSO Dr. Catherine O'Neill about the science behind leveraging the gut-skin axis to improve skin health through a targeted blend of bacteria and from Chris, one of the participants in their recent study about his experience with his psoriasis. This episode is sponsored by AxisBiotix. 

Keeping Current
Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Psoriasis: The Evolving Treatment Landscape

Keeping Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 15:10


Learn how the disease characteristics affect treatment choices in psoriasis, the impact of disease, and clinical data with IL-17 inhibitors. Earn Credit / Learning Objectives & Disclosures: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/961514?src=mkm_podcast_addon_961514

Psound Bytes
Ep. 150 "We're Stronger Working Together for Psoriatic Disease"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:03


Celebrate World Psoriasis Day with NPF Medical Board member rheumatologist Dr. Soumya Reddy, NYU Langone Health, and Lisa Albany, AAD's Director of State Advocacy to hear how NPF, AAD, GRAPPA and PPACMAN work to build unity around policy, education and research to improve care for people with psoriasis and PsA. This World Psoriasis Day activity is supported by unrestricted educational grants from Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, CeraVe, Janssen and Novartis. 

My Immune System Hates Me!
R.A. Treatments Gone Wrong

My Immune System Hates Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 33:55


Give Jenni a follow @gracefully.jen on Instagram.Check out our website, myimmunesystempod.com, where you can get in contact with Chelsey, listen to old episodes, learn about the RA Warrior Group, buy a signed copy of Chelsey's upcoming book, and apply to be a guest on the show.Don't forget to rate and review the show, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @myimmunesystempodThis episode is sponsored by Grace & Able. Visit https://www.graceandable.com/discount/IMMUNE10 for 10% off your purchase. Follow Grace & Able on Facebook and Instagram.***Any information discussed in this podcast is strictly my opinion and those of my guests and are for informational purposes only. We are speaking from our personal experiences and you should always consult with your doctor or medical team.

Les derniers podcasts de la RTBF.be
Le psoriasis, cette maladie de la peau - La Grande Forme

Les derniers podcasts de la RTBF.be

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 8:26


Le psoriasis est très répondu en Belgique. C'est une maladie cutanée, mais aussi articulaire. Le Docteur Tennstedt, dermatologue nous informe sur cette inflammation extrêmement courante.

La Ventana
La Ventana a las 16h | Día mundial de la psoriasis

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 47:06


Ricardo Gómez y Óscar Aibar nos presentan 'El sustituto', sobre la comunidad nazi que se asentó en España después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Conectamos con La Palma y nuestra compañera Emma Vallespinós nos trae un reportaje con pacientes de psoriasis en su día mundial

Derms and Conditions
How to Avoid Getting "Tyked" Off When Learning About New JAK Inhibitors In Psoriasis

Derms and Conditions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 11:46


Live from The Wynn Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV, episode 13 of Derms and Conditions, has our host James Q. Del Rosso, DO speaking with Bruce Strober, MD in person at the 2021 Fall Clinical Dermatology Conference. First Dr. Strober discusses older biologic agents in psoriasis and how JAK inhibitors offer improved efficacy while not compromising on safety. Dr. Strober further discusses in depth how certain JAK inhibitors interact with TYK2 and what he thinks are the most important points regarding this pathway in psoriasis pathophysiology. Finally, Dr. Strober discusses in detail why allosteric binding offers improved specificity in JAK inhibition.

The Healthy Skin Show
218: TCM Diet To Support Skin Rashes w/ Dr. Olivia Hsu Friedman, DACM

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 35:11


I often talk about how nutrition and digestion can play a role in our skin health. And there are many different dietary theories out there that have been used over the decades (and even centuries) that could be beneficial. As you might already know, I don't think diet for many with chronic skin rashes is the only tool that should be used to help achieve healthier skin. It's one tool in the larger toolbox. So today I'd like to share with you the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) approach to nutrition as it could potentially relate to skin rashes. It's honestly fascinating and this ancient method does draw some interesting conclusions about the impact of different foods on the body based on certain imbalances present. My guest today is Dr. Olivia Hsu Friedman, DACM, L.Ac, Dipl.OM. She is the owner of Amethyst Holistic Skin Solutions and treats eczema, TSW, psoriasis, and acne patients throughout the US in person and via video conferencing using only herbal medicine. Dr. Olivia earned a Doctorate in Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine as well as a diploma in Traditional Chinese Medicine Dermatology. Outside of the office, Dr. Olivia serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Acupuncturists, the Advisory Board of LearnSkin and the faculty of the Chicago Integrative Eczema Support Group sponsored by the National Eczema Association. Join us as we talk about how Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) diets may help improve skin health. Has a Traditional Chinese Medicine diet improved your skin rashes? Let me know in the comments! In this episode: Historical context for the TCM diet (and why this is relevant to your skin) Understanding how different types of food affect your body How does TCM view digestion? What types of food does Dr. Friedman recommend for people with eczema and other skin conditions? Should your diet change with the seasons according to TCM Why bitter foods are important to incorporate into your diet Quotes “There was this understanding that there are foods that are on the colder side. There's foods that are on the cooler side. There are foods that are warm. There are foods that are hot. And then later on, they figured out obviously there's neutral foods too.” [5:25] “In Chinese medicine, especially when we're putting together herbal formulas, we're always looking at balance. A lot of times when we put together formulas that are looking at these inflammatory conditions like TSW, like eczema, like psoriasis, we have a lot of herbs in there that are actually cooling in nature. However, we always make sure that there's something in there that balances that, so it's not ultra cold, so that your body has a better chance of actually not being wrecked by any one individual ingredient.” [16:23] Links Find Dr. Olivia online Healthy Skin Show ep. 144: How Chinese Medicine Can Help Topical Steroid Withdrawal w/ Dr. Olivia Hsu Friedman, DACM The Tao of Healthy Eating by Bob Flaws Apple Cinnamon Porridge (congee) Follow Dr. Olivia on Facebook

Morgunútvarpið
28. okt - Psoriasis, málfar, Landsspítalinn, loftlag og Rósin

Morgunútvarpið

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Í dag er alþjóðadagur Psoriasis og af því tilefni ætla Samtök psoriasis- og exemsjúklinga hér á landi að bjóða upp á viðburð á Grand Hótel, þar sem flutt verða fjölbreytt erindi sem snerta málefni samtakanna og félagsmenn þeirra. Til að segja okkur betur frá þessu kom til okkar Þorstein Þorsteinsson, sem er formaður Samtaka psoriasis- og exemsjúklinga. Anna Sigríður Þráinsdóttir, málfarsráðunautur RÚV, snéri aftur í málfarshornið okkar eftir smá hlé. Covid-19 smitum fjölgar ört þessa dagana og viðvaranir hafa komið frá Sóttvarnarlækni í kjölfarið. Fjöldi smitaðra hefur aukist á Landsspítalanum og á hjartadeildinni kom upp smit. Þá kom fram í fréttum að um 480 starfsmenn spítalans eru ekki bólusettir. Við tókum stöðuna hjá Má Kristjánssyni, formanni farsóttanefndar spítalans og yfirlækni smitsjúkdómadeildar Landspítala. Undanfarið höfum við hér í Morgunútvarpinu tekið loftslagsmálin fyrir og þannig hitað upp fyrir 26. loftslagsráðstefnu Sameinuðu þjóðanna sem hefst nú á sunnudaginn, en niðurstöður ráðstefnunnar eru sagðar skipta sköpum fyrir framtíð heimsins. Til að ljúka upphitun okkar fyrir ráðstefnuna fengum við til okkar Guðmund Inga Guðbrandsson, umhverfis- og auðlindaráðherra, og heyrum hans sýn á stöðu mála. Sjónvarpsþættirnir Rósin hófu göngu sína fyrir viku síðan en þar fær Erna Hrund Hermannsdóttir, áhrifavaldur, til sín góða gesti sem ræða sjónvarpsþættina vinsælu Bachelorette. Aðdáendahópur þáttanna er gríðarstór og slíkir umræðuþættir hafa verið í boði á netmiðlum hér á landi, en nú er verið að fara einu skrefi lengra með gerð sjónvarpsþáttanna. Inga María Hjartardóttir, verkefnastjóri hjá Símanum, var á línunni hjá okkur og ræddi þættina og þennan mikla áhuga á ástarlífi ókunnugra. Tónlist: Baggalútur - Ég á það skilið Dolly Parton - Here you come again Páll Óskar - Betra líf Valdimar - Yfir borgina Roxy Music - More than this Third eye blind - Semi charmed life Coldplay og BTS - My Universe

You Beauty
Three Women On How They Manage Their Psoriasis

You Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 21:38


This is a You Beauty first! Today Kelly's joined by a panel of Youbies, shining her spotlight on psoriasis. You'll get to hear how they manage their condition and their top tips/products to try if you're also dealing with it! CREDITS Host: Kelly McCarren Guests:Kee Reece, Maddison Rodgers, Nicole Stuart Producer: Gia Moylan GET IN TOUCH: Got a beauty question you want answered?  Email us at youbeauty@mamamia.com.au or call the podphone on 02 8999 9386.  Join our You Beauty Facebook Group here. Want this and other podcasts delivered straight to your inbox? Subscribe to our podcast newsletter. Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lachlansavestheworld
TE #85 Raising The Feminine To Heal The Masculine & Tools For Internal Growth Using Breathwork & Quantum Flow With Karla Gomez de la Peña

Lachlansavestheworld

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 89:01


Karla Gomez de la Peña is an Ayurvedic Practitioner, Breathwork Coach, Skylight Yoga Instructor and Quantum Flow Practitioner.Her greatest passion is bringing the age-old concept of self healing to our current society that has lost many of its natural healing abilities. Her goal is to inspire as many women as she can to re-discover their soul's purpose and learn to trust their instincts. To fully embrace and love themselves as they are and help them connect the dots of their present state of health through her Ayurvedic and energetic therapies, empowering Breathwork workshops, Awakening Movement online courses, Ayurvedic Self Awareness classes, Essential oils, healing through Yoga and transforming and transmuting past traumas through Quantum Flow.Her modality of choice for personal growth and introspection that is capable of changing your mental and emotional wellbeing in just one session is Quantum Flow - it leaves you feeling energized, clear and more connected to your truth. It allows the body to release the memory of old traumas, anxiety and stress very quickly.  Lunaveda was born from Karla's own health issues from childhood Asthma and Psoriasis later on in life.  Her desire to heal herself naturally led her to “accidentally” discovering Ayurveda and changing the course of her life completely.Karla sees life through an Ayurvedic lens where the unexplainable can be explained through ancient holistic approaches, Quantum Physics, movement and breath and by surrendering to your soul's true purpose and power, by trusting that the universe has divinely conspired to help you live your highest and best life when you are ready to embrace it.Connect With KarlaWebsite: http://www.lunaveda.com/https://www.instagram.com/karla.lunaveda/https://www.linkedin.com/in/karla-gomez-de-la-pe%C3%B1a-5462aa1a/Topics Discussed:Who is karla ?Introduction to wounded masculine The 4 energies Overview of masculine and feminine energiesSociety lacking divine feminine qualities Thoughts on Transgender movement The concept of a "strong woman"We have an infinitude of possibilitiesQualities of divine energies Masculine dominated history Breath work Quantum Flow  Hope you guys love this episode :) Please leave a rating, review and subscribeConnect with me:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lachlan.dunn/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lachlan.dunn.161/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOSrM6mN5TcDst3MwUAjKfgTo check out my full SLEEP course head over to https://listenable.io/ for a free 7 day trial  and then use the link below or coupon code lachlandunnn for a 30% discount on your subscription.https://frstre.com/go/?a=76205-87a7d9&s=1505104-ffec16&p_affiliate.referral_code=lachlandunnnPRODUCT DISCOUTNSMedicinal Mushrooms And Superfoods: https://teelixir.com/  Code lachlan10StoneAge Supplement Discounts 15% Store Wide: http://www.stoneagehealth.com.au?afmc=4a

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

We had this remedy for psoriasis tested in a lab. Here's what we found out. FREE COURSE ➜ ➜ https://courses.drberg.com/product/how-to-bulletproof-your-immune-system/ FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Talk to a Dr. Berg Keto Consultant today and get the help you need on your journey (free consultation). Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Keto, Intermittent Fasting, or the use of Dr. Berg products. Consultants are available Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 10 PM EST. Saturday & Sunday from 9 AM to 6 PM EST. USA Only. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C

Psound Bytes
Ep. 149 "Does Having Psoriatic Disease Impact Vaccine Choices?"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 27:41


Join us for a conversation about types of vaccines and what's appropriate for use with immunosuppressive therapy. Dr. Sandy Chat from Indiana University School of Medicine and Dr. Christoph Ellebrecht, Clinical Instructor, Dept. of Dermatology at University of Pennsylvania, discuss the flu, shingles and mRNA vaccines. Psound Bytes is supported by unrestricted educational grants from Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer and UCB.

The Cabral Concept
2088: Mewing, Teenage Anxiety, Stress & Progesterone, Persistent Psoriasis, Nighttime Hypoglycemia, Iodine & Hashimoto's (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 20:01


Thank you for joining us for our 2nd Cabral HouseCall of the weekend! I'm looking forward to sharing with you some of our community's questions that have come in over the past few weeks… Let's get started!    Darren: Good day Dr Cabral. Hope all is well with you and family. I read James Nestor's Breathing book on your recommendation and after hearing him on your show. What are your thoughts on "mewing" as recommended in the book. If it's something you believe has benefits (or drawbacks) is it possible for you to discuss it further? Thank you Anonymous: Hi dr cabral, thank you infinitely for all you do and your passion for sharing your knowledge with us.. i love listening to the podcast. My question is for my daughter who is 18. She is in college and is busy. She enjoys exercising and is on the cheer team so lots of tumbling and is active but she suffers from anxiety. Some days worse than others, especially these days. I too have it. I take the adrenal soothe. Would that be something that she could take as well ? Any other suggestions ? Thanks so much again - take care Nicole: Hi Dr Cabral! First off, thank you for all of the time and effort you put in…it is GREATLY appreciated! I have been struggling with severe cramping, bloating and back pain about 7 days before my period starts. I've also had lab work done over the years and it has shown that my progesterone typically peaks within a high range during first half of luteal phase but then drops off “earlier than desired” (a quote from my RE). My question is, could my low progesterone be solely due to high cortisol (which I already know is one of my issues) or could it be caused by insufficient egg quality/premature ovarian failure? Is there any way to know for sure? Can the two be related? Any other advice on how to increase egg quality would be greatly appreciated! Carrie-Ann: Thank you a million times over for all that you do for this world. 12 months ago I did the big 5 labs and in the last 12 months I have done the 21 detox, CBO protocol with finisher and citrocidal drops, intestinal cleanse, heavy metal detox, 7 day detox, another 3 weeks of citrocidal drops (as symptoms hadn't cleared) and I continue to take your DNS, DFVB, magnesium, zinc, probiotic, vitamin C and D, fish and fish oil daily. I am IHP level 2 certified and also I have been a chiropractor for the last 20 years. I've lived a natural healthy lifestyle for the last 15-20 years. After having my first baby 10 years ago I developed psoriasis and now also have high grade cervical dysplasia. Since starting your protocols I've had some great things change. My two fungal toenails are almost all grown out normal and I've had 2 plantar warts on the soles of my feet for years and they are both gone. I'm thrilled about both these changes as it really lets me know things are improving internally. Although I have seen no change in my psoriasis and I still have high grade cervical dysplasia (confirmed 2 weeks ago with biopsy and colposcopy). So finally to my question, what more can I do? I have no other symptoms. Digestion is great, I sleep well, my stress levels are low and I love my life. Lilly:  Hi doctor Cabral, After you talked about your experience with a CGM, I started wearing one and am learning so much about my diet. Thank you for that great tip! I've noticed that my sugar drops extremely low a few times a night and I usually wake up when that happens. I think I know what's causing it: I eat a very early dinner and fast until breakfast. And I know that in order to prevent the nighttime dips, it would be good to eat something before sleep, but I really don't want to break my (clean) fast. Is there anything you could recommend to prevent the nighttime hypoglycemia, without using food? Thanks so much! Lilly Richard: Hello Dr. Cabral, First off I want to say thank you for all that you do. Your passion for helping people is truly remarkable and it is much appreciated! My question is regarding the use of iodine with autoimmune diseases, particularly Hashimotos. I have done a lot of research on this and listened to some of the top autoimmune specialists and most of them seem to agree that taking iodine, whether from foods or supplements, can do more harm than good. Their argument is that an autoimmune condition is basically and overactive immune system and Iodine can also increase the activity of the immune system, which in turn increases the autoimmunity. They claim there are numerous research papers in scientific literature that shows when Hashimotos patients are given iodine, their autoimmune condition can flare up. I would love to hear you thoughts on this and whether or not you recommend iodine for your patients that have Hashimotos. Thank you so much!! Thank you for tuning into this weekend's Cabral HouseCalls and be sure to check back tomorrow for our Mindset & Motivation Monday show to get your week started off right!  - - - Show Notes & Resources: http://StephenCabral.com/2088 - - - Get Your Question Answered: http://StephenCabral.com/askcabral   - - - Dr. Cabral's New Book, The Rain Barrel Effect https://amzn.to/2H0W7Ge - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: http://CabralSupportGroup.com - - -  Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Sleep & Hormones Test (Run your adrenal & hormone levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels) - - - > View all Functional Medicine lab tests (View all Functional Medicine lab tests you can do right at home for you and your family)

Con Los Editores
Metro Salud: Conoce todo sobre la Artritis Psoriásica

Con Los Editores

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:37


Cerca del 30% de las personas que padecen de Psoriasis son diagnosticadas también con Artritis Psoriásica, una condición que es producida por una respuesta inmunitaria anormal causante de un exceso en la producción de piel e inflamación en las coyunturas. Esta edición de Metro Salud aborda, junto al reumatólogo e investigador clínico José Raúl Rodríguez Santiago, las molestias y evolución de la condición. Rodríguez Santiago habla sobre la relación que tiene esta enfermedad con el historial familiar de psoriasis y los síntomas que pueden presentarse, primeramente, en uñas, puntas de los dedos y el talón. El experto advierte sobre las señales que dan la alerta para moverse a la búsqueda de un posible diagnóstico.

Natch Beaut
Beach Cruiser Butt with JC Coccoli

Natch Beaut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 88:43


One of Jackie's favorite people on the planet, the Natch Beaut JC Cocolli has returned! Today, she updates Jackie on her Psoriasis, living situation, and the self-care of a Cruise ship comic. Plus, some new spooky themed palettes and JC helps Jackie invent a new game, “Cool or Cruel?” For a list of products mentioned in this episode, go to www.NatchBeaut.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Psound Bytes
Ep. 148 CME 0.25 "Bridging Gaps Through Collaborative Care"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:50


Half of those with psoriasis have undiagnosed cardiovascular risk factors. Hear how to go beyond the skin or joint disease to address comorbidities associated with psoriatic disease with dermatologist Dr. John Barbieri, Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and NPF Board Chair Ron Grau. For disclosures/credit: https://www.eeds.com/em/3354. This program is supported by educational grants from Bristol Myers Squibb, Lilly, Novartis and Ortho Dermatologics. 

The Healthy Skin Show
217: Health Concerns Linked to Psoriasis (You SHOULD Know About)

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:55


Did you know that psoriasis is associated with a bunch of other health issues? Things like hypothyroidism, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, PCOS, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver disease, and liver fibrosis, just to name a few. Many of my clients have no idea about these connections and have unfortunately had their concerns about other health issues blown off. Because there is so much newer research coming about about these issues, I wanted to share some of the research that I've seen so that you can ask better questions and know what you should be on the lookout for. Because psoriasis can impact so so so much more than just your skin (as if that isn't bad enough on its own). In this episode: Health conditions often associated with psoriasis that should be on your radar Blood sugar + metabolic health concerns Thyroid problems — is this a big deal? Why you absolutely CANNOT overlook or ignore your liver Diabetic medication (or an herb I often use in practice) that can be helpful for psoriasis Quotes: A fascinating 2019 study found that out of the 400 patients with severe chronic plaque psoriasis, 53% were insulin resistant⁠ while 22% had type 2 diabetes⁠. Out of 215 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis in a 2021 study, 42.3% had some degree of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver disease (NAFLD).

Waist Away: The Intermittent Fasting & Weight Loss Podcast
#379 - How To Get Your Gut And Your Skin In Great Shape, Heal Psoriasis, Get Rid Of Constipation, How To Filet And Use Aloe Vera To Heal Your Gut, and more - with Dr. Michael Haley!

Waist Away: The Intermittent Fasting & Weight Loss Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 34:31


Welcome back to the podcast! In today's episode, (sponsored by FastBar) Chantel spoke with Dr. Michael Haley! Dr. Haley is a chiropractor, health coach, and Aloe Vera expert. Dr. Haley teaches people how to eat a clean diet and build a healthy lifestyle to help them achieve optimal physical, mental, and emotional well-being.    Enjoy!   Connect with Dr. Michael: https://haleynutrition.com/   Today's Episode Contains A Paid Promotion For FastBar: Join Our Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheChantelRayWay/  Order The Brand New Book, One Meal And A Tasting: https://chantelrayway.com/onemeal/      Order All The Books: Waist Away: The Chantel Ray Way - 2nd Edition:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0999823116/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tpbk_p1_i0    Fasting to Freedom: The Gift of Fasting: https://www.amazon.com/Fasting-Freedom-Gift-Chantel-Ray/dp/0999823132/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=    Freedom From Food: A Six Week Bible Study Course: https://www.amazon.com/Freedom-Food-Bible-Study-Course/dp/0999823159/ref=pd_bxgy_img_3/135-7722513-4171815?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=0999823159&pd_rd_r=91d59435-2126-4f9d-867e-00646964e3e4&pd_rd_w=mg3U0&pd_rd_wg=FcVwL&pf_rd_p=fd3ebcd0-c1a2-44cf-aba2-bbf4810b3732&pf_rd_r=NWM3687GJSRKKQ4BYQP4&psc=1&refRID=NWM3687GJSRKKQ4BYQP4    Connect With Us:   Leave us a review: https://chantelrayway.com/review/    Share YOUR Story: https://chantelrayway.com/contact/   Contact directly through email at questions@chantelrayway.com    Enjoy refreshing, all-natural wine: https://chantelrayway.com/wine/   Listen to the new audiobook as a podcast HERE: https://chantelrayway.com/purchase-audio-book/   Free Video Preview: https://chantelrayway.com/top-12-thin-eater-tips-free-video/   Check out the VIDEO COURSE here: https://chantelrayway.com/video-course/   Check out the FASTING RESET SUMMIT HERE: https://fastingresetsummit.com/   Purchase on Amazon Here: https://www.amazon.com/shop/intermittentfastingthechantelrayway   Strengthen your immune system with Vitamin C: https://chantelrayway.com/vitaminc/    Enjoy a FREE smoothie recipe book: https://chantelrayway.com/freerecipe/   Re-energize with nutritious algae Energybits: https://chantelrayway.com/energybits    Castor Oil: https://chantelrayway.com/castoroil   Connect with us on Social Media:   YouTube Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCteFjiVaY6n0SOAixcyZbWA   Like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/TheChantelRayWay       Things we love: https://chantelrayway.com/things-i-love-2/   Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheChantelRayWay   ***As always, this podcast is not designed to diagnose, treat, prevent or cure any condition and is for information purposes only. Please consult with your healthcare professional before making any changes to your current lifestyle.***

The Real Life Show: Living with a Chronic Illness
Real Talk: Live a Better Life

The Real Life Show: Living with a Chronic Illness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 23:24


It's another Real Talk episode! This week Cassie and Chelsea are sharing about their second book- Live a Better Life! We're not always great about sharing the cool things we've created so here we are trying to be better! If you'd like to purchase the Kindle or paperback copy of our book you can find it here: https://amzn.to/2ZYqVVJ As always, our DM's are open, so feel free to message us about anything on Instagram or email: Hello@TheRealSpooniesUnite.Com :)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therealwellnesshub/My Wellness Hub Community: https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)

The Healthy Skin Show
216: Could Your Rash Be A Sign Of Lymphoma? w/ Dr. Peter Lio

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 29:05


Most times, a skin rash is a skin rash. But sometimes, if the skin condition comes out of nowhere, and if it does not respond to treatment, it could be a sign that something else is going on. And that something could be lymphoma. My guest today is Dr. Peter Lio, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology & Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, completed his internship in Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, and his Dermatology training at Harvard where he served as Chief Resident in Dermatology. While at Harvard, he received formal training in acupuncture. Dr. Lio has written a textbook on Integrative Dermatology and has published over 100 papers. Join us as we discuss whether your skin rash could be a sign of lymphoma. Have you ever experienced a skin rash being a sign of something else? Tell me about it in the comments! In this episode: Can a rash start off as one thing, but become something else? How can you tell whether a rash might be an indication of something else? Why swollen lymph nodes should be assess by your doctor What is a lipoma? Could chronic hives be a sign of cancer? Quotes “Lipomas are really, really common. They're basically little fatty lumps. They're just a little bit of extra fat tissue, it's usually just under the skin.” [16:39] “There are also a whole bunch of signs that are called paraneoplastic signs. These are things that are associated with cancer. And again, they're all pretty rare.” [2:02] Links Find Dr. Lio Online Healthy Skin Show ep. 001: How to Protect & Strengthen Your Skin Barrier w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 037: Nickel Allergy And Eczema w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 104: Topical B12 For Skin Rashes w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 136: Alternative Solutions For Rosacea w/ Dr. Peter Lio Healthy Skin Show ep. 176: Dealing With Recurrent Skin Infections w/ Dr. Peter Lio Follow Dr. Lio on Twitter | Facebook

Psound Bytes
Ep. 147 "Recognition of Bullying Starts With You"

Psound Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:13


Bullying may not be what you assume it is. Hear renowned psychologist Dr. Catherine Sanderson, Department of Psychology, Amherst College, address bullying that impacts youth and adults from types of behaviors, the bystander effect, and what actions can defuse bullying and build allies for a more positive environment. Psound Bytes is supported by unrestricted educational grants from Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Janssen, Novartis, Pfizer and UCB. 

The Healthy Skin Show
215: Probiotic Tips While Taking Antibiotics (from a Nutritionist)

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:08


Have you had that dreaded diarrhea after you start a round of antibiotics? And maybe you worry that if you take probiotics, doing so while taking the antibiotics will just “cancel them out.” You're not wrong to think this because timing is everything when it comes to taking probiotics while on antibiotics! Thanks to my recent 3-week course of antibiotics after finding a gross blood-filled tick in between my toes, I got a lot of questions about what my probiotic regimen looked like. That's why I want to answer your questions about the do's and don't's of probiotic supplementation while taking antibiotics. And offer you insight into how you can approach probiotics so that they do what they're supposed to do! Otherwise, your worst fear (that the antibiotics will kill them all) will come true and you'll potentially get stuck dealing with that dreaded antibiotic-triggered diarrhea. In this episode: Why you might need antibiotics even though you'd rather not take them How to take probiotics so that antibiotics don't “cancel them out” Foods to help support your gut flora during antibiotics Are yogurt + other fermented foods enough (or is a supplement better)? Why probiotics taken during antibiotics could be really helpful When taking probiotics with antibiotics might NOT be necessary Quotes: If you don't want your probiotic “canceled out”, take probiotic supplements 2-3 hours before or after a dose of antibiotics. Probiotics are helpful during a course of antibiotics, but so are the fibers you choose to eat during this time too!

The Real Life Show: Living with a Chronic Illness
Real Talk: Getting Ready for Events/Life Update Part 1

The Real Life Show: Living with a Chronic Illness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:25


It's another Real Talk episode! Cassie and Chelsea are again chatting about the importance of rest but this time from the perspective of how much of a difference rest can make when you have a big event coming up (or lots of big events!) We both currently have a very busy fall and we talk some to share with you lovely listeners.  As always, our DM's are open, so feel free to message us about anything on Instagram or email: Hello@TheRealSpooniesUnite.Com :)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therealwellnesshub/My Wellness Hub Community: https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)Support the show (https://my-wellness-hub.mn.co/)

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:41


Red onion effective at killing cancer cells, study says University of Guelph (Ontario)  If you're looking for a flavorful way to help fight and prevent cancer, add red onion to your shopping list.  It will be worth the effort … as you will soon see why. In the first study of its kind, University of Guelph researchers looked at how the Ontario-grown red onion and several others affected the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Their findings indicate that all onions are not created equal. The Canadian researchers looked at five different kinds of onion in total from the province of Ontario. They assessed the onions in terms of their effects against cancer cells and their ability to prevent cancer. Of the five species tested, the Ruby Ring red onion was the most effective. Few people are aware that onions are somewhat of a superfood. Hopefully, studies like these will help to change that. Onions in general have very high concentrations of the flavonoid quercetin. However, the Ruby Ring Ontario red onion has particularly high levels of these compounds as compared with other species. In the study, colon cancer cells were placed in direct contact with quercetin that was extracted from the five onion varieties studied. It was found that all of the onion types created an unfavorable environment for cancer cells and initiated cancer cell death, or apoptosis. Communication between the cancer cells seems to be disrupted by the compounds in the onions, and this can help to fight and prevent cancer. The study also showed that the Ruby Ring red onion was high in anthocyanin, a compound that helps to enrich the scavenging properties of quercetin. This in turn supports quercetin in fighting cancer cells and helping to prevent cancer. Anthocyanin is the molecule that gives vegetables like red onions their rich, deep color. This is in keeping with the general increased healthbenefits that can be gained from other dark or brightly colored vegetables and fruits. The recent onion study results were published in the journal Food Research International. While all of the onions studied showed the ability to inhibit cancer cells, red onions were particularly effective. Their beneficial compounds blocked the production of both colon cancer cells and breast cancer cells within the controlled conditions of the study. The next step is to complete human trials to further explore the cancer fighting effects of onions. Researchers are also working on an extraction technique to isolate the quercetin in onions so that it can be administered as a cancer therapy. In the meantime, finding ways to include more of this cancer-fighting superfood into your diet can allow you to experience many health benefits. Enjoy red onions in salads, on sandwiches and cooked into soups, stews and stir-fry dishes.     Age and aging have critical effects on the gut microbiome   Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, October 4, 2021 Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found that aging produces significant changes in the microbiome of the human small intestine distinct from those caused by medications or illness burden. The findings have been published in the journal Cell Reports. "By teasing out the microbial changes that occur in the small bowel with age, medication use and diseases, we hope to identify unique components of the microbial community to target for therapeutics and interventions that could promote healthy aging," said Ruchi Mathur, MD, the study's principal investigator. Research exploring the gut microbiome, and its impact on health, has relied predominantly on fecal samples, which do not represent the entire gut, according to Mathur. In their study, investigators from Cedars-Sinai's Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program analyzed samples from the small intestine–which is over 20 feet in length and has the surface area of a tennis court–for examination of the microbiome and its relationship with aging. "This study is the first of its kind to examine the microbial composition of the small intestine of subjects 18 years of age to 80. We now know that certain microbial populations are influenced more by medications, while others are more affected by certain diseases. We have identified specific microbes that appear to be only influenced by the chronological age of the person," said Mathur, an endocrinologist and director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment & Education Center. The 21st century has been referred to as the "era of the gut microbiome" as scientists turn considerable attention to the role trillions of gut bacteria, fungi and viruses may play in human health and disease. The microbiome is the name given to the genes that live in these cells. Studies have suggested that disturbances in the constellations of the microbial universe may lead to critical illnesses, including gastroenterological diseases, diabetes, obesity, and some neurological disorders. While researchers know that microbial diversity in stool decreases with age, Cedars-Sinai investigators identified bacteria in the small bowel they refer to as "disruptors" that increase and could be troublesome. "Coliforms are normal residents of the intestine. We found that when these rod-shaped microbes become too abundant in the small bowel–as they do as we get older–they exert a negative influence on the rest of the microbial population. They are like weeds in a garden," said study co-author Gabriela Leite, Ph.D. Investigators also found that as people age, the bacteria in the small intestine change from microbes that prefer oxygen to those that can survive with less oxygen, something they hope to understand as the research continues. "Our goal is to identify and fingerprint the small intestinal microbial patterns of human health and disease. Given the important role the small bowel plays in absorption of nutrients, changes in the microbiome in this location of the gut may have a greater impact on human health, and warrants further study," said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the MAST program and a co-author of the study. This research is part of Cedars-Sinai's ongoing REIMAGINE study: Revealing the Entire Intestinal Microbiota and its Associations with the Genetic, Immunologic, and Neuroendocrine Ecosystem.   Study finds no association between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk University of Buffalo, September 28, 2021 Researchers from the University at Buffalo conducted a study of nearly 80,000 postmenopausal women in the U.S. to determine whether caffeine consumption from coffee and tea has any association with invasive breast cancer. The average age when U.S. women reach menopause, 51, also happens to coincide with the age group—50- to 64-year-olds—that has the highest reported caffeine consumption. In addition to that, the average age of breast cancer diagnosis in the U.S. is 62. This overlap of age at menopause, age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high caffeine consumption gave greater weight to the importance of clarifying whether caffeine intake impacts breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. It does not, according to the UB researchers' findings, published in August in the International Journal of Cancer. "From our literature review, many studies have found significant associations between coffee and/or tea consumption and reduced breast cancer incidence whereas a few studies have reported elevated risk. Our study, however, found no association," said study first author Christina KH Zheng, who worked on the study while completing her master's in epidemiology at UB. She is now a surgical resident in the MedStar Baltimore general surgery program. "About 85% of Americans drink at least one caffeinated beverage a day. It is important for the public to know whether consumption of caffeinated beverages has beneficial or harmful effects on breast cancer, the most common type of cancer and second-leading cause of cancer death for U.S. women," said Lina Mu, MD, Ph.D., the study's senior author, who is an associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health at UB. "The overlap of age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high consumption of caffeine, and the inconsistent findings from previous studies motivated us to study whether this lifestyle factor could affect breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women," said Kexin Zhu, a study co-first author and epidemiology Ph.D. student in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions. Researchers looked at a sample of 79,871 participants in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Participants have for decades now completed yearly health questionnaires that help researchers learn more about diet and exercise habits, as well as disease, and any possible linkages. After a median follow-up of 16 years, there were 4,719 cases of invasive breast cancer identified. At first glance, women who reported drinking two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day had a 12% higher risk of invasive breast cancer compared to non-drinkers. But that association was not statistically significant after adjusting for lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. "Seeing null results after adjusting for lifestyle, demographic and reproductive factors informs us of the complexity that is the relationship between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk," Zheng said. "Some lifestyle factors, like drinking alcohol and physical activity, might be associated with both coffee intake and breast cancer risk," Zhu explained. "Therefore, they might confound the initial positive associations. After we took the lifestyle factors into account, the results suggested that regular coffee drinking might not have an impact on invasive breast cancer risk." The risk of invasive breast cancer was even higher—22%—for women who reported drinking two to three cups of decaffeinated coffee each day. It was slightly lower when adjusted for lifestyle variables (smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity, etc.), and the association was not statistically significant when further accounting for reproductive variables such as family history of breast cancer and number of children The researchers were unable to determine if the elevated risk is due to the decaffeinated nature of the coffee, the amount consumed, or another factor unique to this population that was not accounted for in the study. The researchers did not observe a significant association between overall tea consumption and invasive breast cancer. Additional research needs to be done in order to understand whether different types of teas have different effects on breast cancer risk, Zhu said.   Liver function improves with the consumption of Broccoli sprout extract Tokai University Tokyo Hospital (Japan), October 5, 2021 A Japanese study of broccoli sprouts and liver function has found the sulforaphane-rich food to be highly beneficial. An extract from broccoli sprouts given to male participants was shown to improve hepatic abnormalities and overall liver function significantly. For the study, the researchers conducted a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial of males with fatty liver disease. The subjects received either extract of broccoli sprouts in capsule form, or a placebo. The capsules contained glucoraphanin, a precursor for the sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts. A number of key liver function markers were measured before and after the trial. It was determined that dietary supplementation with extract of broccoli improved liver functioning by decreasing alkali phosphatase activity and oxidative stress markers. Broccoli sprout extract was also found to prevent NDMA-induced chronic liver failure in rats. The researchers believe the antioxidants in broccoli sprouts are effective in suppressing the mechanisms of liver failure at a cellular level. The reduction of oxidative stress is crucial in protecting the liver and improving its health, and broccoli is loaded with health-supporting antioxidants. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also reaching epidemic proportions, with nearly 30 percent of Americans (90 million people) having some level of the disease. Like hep C, NAFLD can result in liver failure and cancer of the liver in the most severe cases. Exposure to environmental toxins exacerbates liver conditions as well, with the glyphosate found in weed killers, like Roundup, particularly harmful. The good news is that liver conditions are preventable by embracing a healthy lifestyle. Eating plenty of organic fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes can do wonders for liver health. As evidenced by the recent research out of Japan, sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprouts can be a key component in supporting healthy liver function. Milk thistle, vitamin E, black seed oil and dandelion root have also shown effectiveness in supporting and detoxifying the liver.       How cannabis-like substances keep the brain in balance   Utrecht University (Netherlands), October 4, 2021 Whenever we learn, remember or forget something, a surprisingly active role is played by cannabis-like substances in the brain. Researchers at Utrecht University found that the substances actively balance connections in the brain that allow cells to either activate or inhibit each other. The discovery reveals how brain cells influence each other, and how psychiatric disorders can arise when this process goes wrong. Although wisdom comes with age, our brain does not store every single experience or lesson learned. In addition to learning and remembering, our brains are also equipped to forget irrelevant things or drop unused skills. In order to find a balance in this, brain cellsconstantly communicate with each other through connections that activate or inhibit the cells. Researchers from Utrecht University discovered that brain cells can form new, inhibitory connections via so-called endocannabinoids. They reported their discovery in Journal of Neuroscience. Counterbalance Endocannabinoids derive their name from the cannabis plant, which contains similar substances. The researchers discovered the role of endocannabinoids when they induced brain cells of mice to strengthen activating connections. In response, the brain cells also started making new inhibitory connections. The researchers found that endocannabinoids kickstarted the new connections. Surprisingly active role The researchers were surprised to find that these substances play such an active role. "Nobody expected this from endocannabinoids," says research leader Dr. Corette Wierenga, neurobiologist at Utrecht University. It was already known that endocannabinoids can influence the functioning of our brains. But until now researchers assumed that the substances were merely involved in adjusting existing connections. "Now it appears that the system of endocannabinoids can actively push the production of new inhibitory connections, with which brain cells actively regulate the balance." Psychiatric disorders caused by imbalance The discovery could help scientists to better understand how psychiatric disordersand other abnormalities in the brain develop. In many of these disorders, the balance between inhibitory and activating connections is disturbed. During an epileptic seizure, for example, this balance is seriously disturbed. Although in many other disorders the disturbance is more subtle, for example in schizophrenia, the impact can still be equally profound. Cannabis-related unbalance The balance between activating and inhibiting connections in our brain is constantly being adjusted in response to our experiences. Whenever we experience something, the connections change, and the brain must restore the balance. Cannabis use can disrupt that balance. "Occasional cannabis use will not seriously disturb the balance," says Wierenga. "But if the balance is disturbed for a longer period, it can cause problems. For example, children of mothers who smoked marijuana during pregnancy can experience problems with neurological development." Early stages of life The balance is especially important in early stages of life, Wierenga says. "During our development, brain connections are constantly changing. Especially during that period, it is important that inhibitory and activating connections remain coordinated. If the coordination is malfunctioning or disturbed, you can imagine that the system becomes disrupted. And unfortunately, disruptions that occur so early cannot be easily repaired later in life." According to Wierenga, such disruptions can lead not only to loss of memory, but also initiate more serious consequences. For example, the brain might grow out to less adaptive to stressful situations. "When this happens, things get out of hand more easily in the brain, because inhibition and activation are out of balance. That could lead to learning and behavioral problems." Predicting and preventing disorders Creating a deeper understanding of the role endocannabinoids play in the brain, could lead to psychiatric disorders being more predictable or even prevented in the future. The publication in Journal of Neuroscience now sets out a new direction in which more knowledge can be built up. Wierenga: "Ultimately, as a researcher, we want to understand how brain cells coordinate the balance and what happens when that balance is disturbed.   Glycerin is safe, effective in psoriasis model Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, October 4, 2021 Patients with psoriasis have reported that glycerin, an inexpensive, harmless, slightly sweet liquid high on the list of ingredients in many skin lotions, is effective at combatting their psoriasis and now scientists have objective evidence to support their reports. They found that whether applied topically or ingested in drinking water, glycerin, or glycerol, helps calm the classic scaly, red, raised and itchy patches in their psoriasismodel, Dr. Wendy Bollag, cell physiologist and skin researcher at the Medical College of Georgia and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center and her colleagues report in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The studies also provide more evidence of the different ways glycerin enables the healthy maturation of skin cells through four stages that result in a smooth, protective skin layer. Psoriasis is an immune-mediated problem that typically surfaces in young adults in which skin cells instead multiply rapidly, piling up into inflamed patches. "We have experimental data now to show what these patients with psoriasis are reporting," says Bollag, who nearly 20 years ago first reported in The Journal of Investigative Dermatology that glycerin, a natural alcohol and water attractor known to help the skin look better, also safely helped it function better by helping skin cells mature properly. Bollag's early report led to many anecdotal reports from individuals and their reports ultimately led to the newly published study. Topically, glycerin is known to have a soothing, emollient effect. But another key part of its magic, which Dr. Bollag has helped delineate, is its conversion to the lipid, or fat, phosphatidylglycerol, which ultimately regulates the function of keratinocytes, our major skin cell type, and suppresses inflammation in the skin. Glycerin gets into the skin through avenues like aquaporin-3, a channel expressed in skin cells, and the MCG scientists have shown that once inside, aquaporin 3 funnels glycerin to phospholipase-D-2, an enzyme that converts fats in the external cell membrane into cell signals, ultimately converting glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol. In 2018, Bollag and team reported that topical application of phosphatidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin patches in a mouse model of psoriasis. This time they decided to look at the impact of its widely available precursor glycerin. For the new studies, they used imiquimod, which is known to produce psoriasis-like plaques on humans using it for problems like genital warts and some skin cancers, to produce an animal model. The mice either drank the sweet natural alcohol or the scientists applied it topically. Either way, glycerin helped reduce development of the characteristic skin lesions, the scientists report, a finding which helps underline that glycerin works in more than one way to improve the skin condition. Externally, glycerin showed its action as an emollient because even in mice missing phospholipase-D-2, it was beneficial. Additionally, topically it appears to compete with hydrogen peroxide for space inside the aquaporin 3 channel. Hydrogen peroxide is commonly known as a mild antiseptic but we produce it as well and at low levels it's a cell signaling molecule. But at high levels, hydrogen peroxide produces destructive oxidative stress, which can actually cause psoriasis. The scientists found that topical glycerin reduced the levels of hydrogen peroxide entering skin cells. When they added glycerin and hydrogen peroxide at the same time directly to skin cells, they found that glycerin protected against the oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide. "Glycerol is basically outcompeting the hydrogen peroxide in getting in there and preventing it from being able to enter and increase oxidative stress," Bollag says. Oil and water don't mix, so yet another way glycerin may be helpful is by supporting the skin's major role as a water permeability barrier so that, as an extreme, when we sit in a bathtub the bath water doesn't pass through our skin so we blow up like a balloon, she says. On the other hand, when glycerin was ingested by the mice missing the phospholipase- D-2, which converts fats or lipids in a cell's membrane to signals, it simply did not work, Bollag says, which confirmed their earlier findings that internally anyway, glycerin pairs with the enzyme to produce the signal essential to skin cell maturation. Some of their other most recent work is detailing more about how phosphatidylglycerol decreases inflammation.  Bollag would like next steps to also include clinical trials with dermatologists and patients and is working to find a formulation scientist who can make what she thinks will be the optimal combination: glycerin and phosphatidylglycerol in the same topical cream. The addition of phosphatidylglyerol itself, rather than just the glycerin that makes it, is essentially a backup since there is some evidence that in psoriasis the essential conversion of glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol is not optimal. Bollag's lab and others have shown reduced levels of aquaporin 3 in psoriasis, which likely means less phosphatidylgycerol, so making more glycerin available may help, albeit not as efficiently, raise the availability of this lipid essential to normal skin cell proliferation. Moving quickly into clinical trials should be comparatively easy since, as with glycerin, there already is experience with the use of phosphatidylglycerol in humans. For example, it's a component of some high-end cosmetics, Bollag says.  She suspects that this sort of two-punch combination, could help keep early signs of psoriasis at bay and, with more advanced disease, use existing psoriasis treatments to get the skin condition under control then start applying glycerin to help keep it that way. Bollag and her colleagues reported in 2018 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology that in a mouse model of psoriasis, phosphtidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin lesions of psoriasis.  While its exact cause is unclear, psoriasis is an immune-mediated condition and patients have higher levels of inflammation, as well as too many skin cells being produced then maturing abnormally. The heightened inflammation also puts them at increased risk for problems like heart disease. Biologics used to treat psoriasis work different ways to stem this overactive immune response but in addition to their high cost, can put the patient at risk for problems like serious infections and cancer. The only side effect she has seen in about 20 years of working with glycerin and the clinical and cosmetic use already out there, is it can leave the skin feeling slightly sticky. Our bodies can make glycerol from the carbohydrates, proteins and fats that we eat or already have in our body.    

The Healthy Skin Show
214: What's Bile Got To Do With Clearing Mold w/ Dr. Jill Crista

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:04


When you think of methods to detox from mold, bile may not be the first thing that comes to mind. But, as my guest today will explain, bile can actually play a huge role in how (and if) mycotoxins are leaving your body. My guest today is Dr. Jill Crista, a naturopathic doctor, best-selling author, and internationally recognized educator on mold illness. She helps people recover their health after exposure to toxic mold. Dr. Crista is the author of Break The Mold: 5 Tools To Conquer Mold and Take Back Your Health. She also provides online training for medical practitioners to help them become Mold-Literate, to efficiently and effectively identify and treat their mold-sick patients. Join us as we discuss why you should think about bile when trying to clear mold. Has mold affected your health? Tell me about it in the comments! In this episode: What is bile + why is it so important for tackling mold illness? What is insoluble fiber (and how can it help)? Concerns about medications used to treat mold illness Whole foods that can bind to bile (to help you clear mycotoxins) Thoughts on the use of clay + charcoal as binders Quotes “Bile is made in the liver and then some of it is secreted into the intestine. Any excess is put in the gallbladder, and that's where it's stored until you have a really fatty meal, and then it's supposed to be secreted in response to eating fat or oils.” [2:20] “...people who are missing a gallbladder can tend to have bile dump diarrhea. They can tend to have more problems assimilating fats. They're going to have more skin expression because the skin really expresses when you're not metabolizing fat very well.” [11:54] Links Healthy Skin Show ep. 166: Mold + Histamine Connection w/ Dr. Jill Crista Find Dr. Crista online Dr. Crista's book, Break The Mold: 5 Tools To Conquer Mold and Take Back Your Health  Quiz: Is Mold Affecting Your Health? Click HERE to get 10% off Dr. Jill's Practitioner Training Course Follow Dr. Crista on Facebook | Instagram Nettle Lemonade recipe Dr. Jill Crista's Find A Doc page Mold Canary Membership – an über private membership forum where those who have been affected by mold and want to work with me (but can't because my practice is full) still have access to me via my Live Q&As, How Tos, Featured lab of the month, Recipes, Notable research, and more. Mold Training Course For Medical Practitioners with Dr. Jill Crista STUDY: Foods that can bind to bile

The Healthy Skin Show
213: Stool Testing Do's + Don't's For Skin Rashes

The Healthy Skin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 14:36


Once you feel like you've exhausted what your dermatologist can do for your skin, you start to wonder if there's anything else you can dig into to help your rashes. Most people start with diet and try avoiding different foods. Eventually you might start to wonder if there's something going on in your gut! And somehow you'll stumble across a bunch of stool testing kits you can buy yourself. Many of the bigger brands advertise heavily across Google and social media hoping to catch your attention. If you've been on the verge of getting one of these kits, this episode is for you! There is nothing worse than when I have to tell someone that the $150+ they spent on certain stool testing was completely worthless. I'd like to save you that money so that you can spend it (if you feel so called to) on something that will offer you root cause explanations and actionable steps that make a difference. In this episode: Major drawbacks of stool testing through a local lab Why I use comprehensive stool tests with all of my clients Specific stool testing that can be helpful Thoughts on costs of stool testing + making it more affordable Stool tests to avoid like the plague (seriously… run the other way) Quotes: Stool tests run through a local lab (like Labcorp + Quest) are very limited by what your doctor tells the lab to look for. If you're seeing ads for stool testing on social media, think twice! While you'll get a fancy report + some general nutrition recommendations, but not much else.