Podcasts about award winners

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Best podcasts about award winners

Show all podcasts related to award winners

Latest podcast episodes about award winners

End to End
DROP THAT PUCK | 4.2

End to End

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 66:44


On a brand new episode (recorded on October 13th, 2021) End to End returns after a two month layoff with a massive episode dedicated to everything predictions. Division breakdowns/predictions, Award Winners, Hot Takes, Battle of the Buds, and are way to early Stanley Cup Finals Matchup prediction. Check out all that in the Episode! Music in this podcast was created by Drake Laugh Now Cry Later Official Instrumental ft. Lil Durk (Copyright Free)

Face Off Hockey Show
Face Off Hockey Show 10.06.21: One Week Away and Sean Leahy Comes to Play

Face Off Hockey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


This week, the boys welcome on Sean Leahy of Pro Hockey Talk on NBC to look at the Robin Lehner situation with the NHL and NHLPA, what to look for in this upcoming season, Stanley Cup picks, and Award Winners that are a guaranteed lock for the year. 

KNBR Podcast
10-4 Erwin Higueros on the impact that the Willie Mac Award winner had this season for the Giants

KNBR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 12:25


Giants Spanish broadcaster, Erwin Higueros, on the impact that the Willie Mac Award winner had this season for the Giants  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe
SF Giants 107 Wins; Lamonte Wade Willie Mac Award Winner

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 7:32


Bonta and Shasky discuss the Giants winning this 107th game and the story of Lamonte Wade joining the SF Giants. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside Giant Moments
LaMonte Wade Jr. - 2021 Willie Mac Award Winner

Inside Giant Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 27:07


In this bonus episode of Inside Giant Moments, LaMonte Wade Jr. talks about what it meant to win the Willie Mac Award voted on by his teammates, his mentality going into the 9th inning of a game, and how his life changed since joining the Giants. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Sarah Dash: A Life Well Lived! (9/30/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 67:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/Qopj7go7--Q Last year, Richard Skipper had the pleasure of celebrating Sarah Dash! Sarah reached out to Richard to do a follow up and they were excitedly planning the follow up. Sadly and unexpectedly, Sarah passed away on Monday, September 20th, 2021 Richard is honoring Sarah's request and as planned, Richard will be joined by some of Sarah's nearest and dearest friends to celebrate a Life well lived! Sarah Dash, the singer and co-founder of the all-female singing group Labelle, best known for their 1974 hit "Lady Marmalade," died Monday at the age of 76. I have decided to honor Sarah's wish and go on and celebrate her as she should be celebrated. As an award-winning vocalist, songwriter, motivational speaker, educator, entrepreneur, and humanitarian, Sarah is a unique force whose voice has touched millions of listeners around the world. From co-founding Patti LaBelle & the Bluebelles and making history as a member of Labelle to becoming the very first Music Ambassador (2017) of Trenton, New Jersey, Sarah has blazed a trail in every facet of her remarkable career. Music has been a constant source of inspiration in Sarah's life ever since her childhood in Trenton. The seventh of thirteen children born to Elder Abraham Dash and Mother Elizabeth Dash, Sarah sang in the Trenton Church of Christ Choir as a young girl and entertained her classmates with renditions of standards like "With These Hands." The radio dial introduced her to everything from R&B and rock 'n' roll to country and polka, with the voices of Tina Turner, Gladys Knight, and Smokey Robinson shaping some of Sarah's earliest influences alongside albums by Mahalia Jackson, Nat "King" Cole, Andy Williams, and her brother's jazz collection.  

Pioneer Agronomy: Indiana
Rosedale Ag, 2021 Leader of Distinction Award Winner: Leveraging Agronomy Trials for Success

Pioneer Agronomy: Indiana

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 28:19


In this episode of the Indiana Pioneer Agronomy podcast, hosts Ben Jacob and Brian Shrader discuss Pioneer as it celebrates its 95 years as a company. This leads into the episode's guest, Michael Wagler. Michael is the manager of Rosedale Ag Service in Montgomery, Indiana. Rosedale Ag were awarded the 2021 Leader of Distinction Award, awarded for Rosedale Ag and its leveraging of agronomy trials for success.

Front Row
Arthur C. Clarke Award winner, K-pop band BTS address the UN and new film, The Man Who Sold His Skin

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 28:32


Front Row announces this year's winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award for Science Fiction and Samira Ahmed interviews the winner. They are joined by Clarke Award judge Stewart Hotston to discuss the problem of diversity in the science fiction genre. K-pop group BTS opened the UN general debate last week with a speech and performance, which was streamed live by over a million people around the world. What's the impact of a the biggest band in the world taking this political stage, and what does it say about the music industry? Wim Delvoye's 2008 artwork, Tim, is an an all-over body tattoo inked on the torso of former Zurich tattoo parlour owner Tim Steiner. The skin of his back, with the tattoo will which join the collection of a German art lover after Steiner's death. This inspired Tunisian director Kaouther Ben Hania's new film. The Man Who Sold His Skin tells the story of Sam, a Syrian man who agrees to have his back tattooed by one of the world's most illustrious contemporary artists so he can to travel to Europe and reconnect with his past love, Abeer. Leila Latif joins Samira to review the film. Main image: BTS at BBC R1. Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Harry Parker

Qualitative Conversations
Episode 28: Episode 28. Book Award Winner, Jori Hall

Qualitative Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 26:48


In this episode, Dr. Travis Marn interviews Dr. Jori Hall, winner of the 2021 Qualitative Research SIG's Outstanding Book Award. The conversation revolves around Dr. Hall's book "Focus Groups: Culturally Responsive Approaches for Qualitative Inquiry and Program Evaluations." The following text is a transcript of the conversation. ---Travis Marn  00:11Hello everyone and welcome to qualitative conversations, a podcast series hosted by the Qualitative Research Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. I am Travis Marn, the current chair of the Qualitative Research Special Interest Groups Outstanding Book Award Committee. I'm excited to be joined today by Dr. Jori Hall, who was the recipient of the 2021 outstanding Book Award for her book, "Focus Groups: Culturally Responsive Approaches for Qualitative Inquiry and Program Evaluations" published by Meyer Education Press in 2020. Dr. Jori Hall is a multidisciplinary researcher, evaluator, and professor at the University of Georgia. Her work focuses on social inequalities and addresses issues of evaluation and research methodology, cultural responsiveness, and the role of values in privilege within the fields of education and health. She has contributed to numerous peer-reviewed journals and other publications like the "Handbook of Mixed Methods Research" and the "Oxford Handbook of Multi- and Mixed-Methods Research." She has evaluated programs funded by the National Science Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the International Baccalaureate Foundation. In recognition of her evaluation scholarship, Dr. Hall was selected as the Leaders of Equitable Evaluation and Diversity Fellow by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Thank you for joining me here today, Dr. Hall. It's a privilege to have you with us.Jori Hall  01:32Hey, Travis, it's an honor to be here. Thank you for having me.Travis Marn  01:36So we had a highly competitive field last cycle and your book stood out immediately to members of the committee. The committee was very impressed with how you evolved a common qualitative method like the focus group, and innovatively lensed through cultural responsiveness. Considering the rapidly changing context of what it means to conduct qualitative research with and in marginalized communities, your book is exceptionally timely and innovative. The committee was impressed with how welcoming your book was to new researchers, while not losing any of the depth and complexity of your topic. The feeling of the committee about your book can best be summed up by the very first sentence a member of the committee sent after they read your book, quote, "this book is a must read text for any qualitative researcher and program evaluator who is considering working with focus groups, or already doing so." Your book richly deserved our 2021 Outstanding Book Award.Jori Hall  02:27Well, that is humbling to hear. I appreciate you sharing that I don't think I heard that quote. So again, thank you so much. And I will say, if it is something that is digestible it is because I have spent years teaching courses on qualitative inquiry and I don't lose sight of the fact that I am constantly trying to communicate to novice and even seasoned researchers alike, how it is to think about qualitative research and how to use it in ways that are responsive. And so I'm glad that that came across in the book, because it's something that I'm always challenged by always thinking about how to best describe any particular method. But in this case, focus groups. I do think that focus groups, as you said, is something that is underutilized. It's a common method, people heard of it before, but in some respects, it is underutilized. And given today's climate, with everything being online due to COVID, there are ways to think about it that can be creative, that can be culturally responsive. And that can even bring some rich information to any research project. So I hope people can see that as they encounter the book and take it up.Travis Marn  03:52I think the accessibility and how easy to read and how well structured the book just lends itself to being a work that anyone can use any kind of researcher, whether you're just starting out, or whether like you said they're seasoned researcher, like I appreciate it, you have whole chapters on like online focus groups, and how to do indigenous focus, focus groups, and all the way from design to analysis, your book, it's really kind of an all in one for anyone looking to conduct high quality focus groups. So we definitely with the committee, we really appreciated that about your book. So why don't you just tell us about your book?Jori Hall  04:31Wow, that's a big question, but I appreciate it. So the book tried to do different things. And I'm glad that it was executed well, because it was it was quite a challenge. I wanted to tackle some topics that don't get a lot of light or when they do get light. It's within the context of a larger methodological handbook, for example, and one chapter or one section is devoted to focus groups. So I'm very excited that we have an entire book dedicated to focus group and highlights how to do those were different types of folks. And so that's what the book is about. That's what I aim to do is to say, "Okay, here's a relatively common method that's underutilized. How can we think about that with respect to different types of groups," and I thought about which groups that I wanted to focus on. And there's so many more groups that deserve attention. But again, the book had limits, I have limits. And so these were the ones that rose to the top based on my experience. And I also wanted to have examples, right? I feel like oftentimes, you could share information. But to make it more concrete, give folks an example. Let them see how it was done in practice. And so the reason why those particular groups got selected the older adults is a group I looked at, I looked at indigenous folk, I look at Black women, like you were saying, and I had really strong examples, from practice taken from former students, current evaluators, current researchers that are in the field trying to make this work happen. And I wanted to be also very transparent, and very realistic about how it is this methodology gets implemented. And that's to say, it is challenging work. It's not easy to make those connections in the context of research. So within the examples that are sprinkled throughout the book, there are lessons learned, what would you have done differently, so people reading the examples can benefit from that those lessons learned? I think they're highly instructive. And I'll just say too, one of the things that's unique about focus groups, and I try to convey this in the book is that different from individual interviews, the most fascinating thing is, you get what I call a twofer trap. And a twofer is you get the interview data, but you also get observational data. And so you get to witness how it is people construct meaning. And I think in real time, and it's very dynamic. And I think that that's really fascinating. So they have a method where you get interview data, and observational data is something that is unique to focus groups, I think and, again, that's that's what I wanted to put in the book. To get across that we need to take advantage more so of the observational data that focus groups can provide the dynamics between the participants themselves. And lastly, I'll say, there is a social justice component that I tried to weave through as well. And this is hugely important given the culturally responsive orientation that I have Travis, because one thing I'm trying to say in the book is this focus groups in and of themselves, do not require you to do anything with the data beyond you know, collected from the focus group, moderate all of it. But the the lens that I'm coming from the perspective that I'm coming from is saying to be culturally responsive also includes being active action about data, right, doing something with the data, that's a benefit to the particular community. And so to think carefully about those things, how can it benefit the community? So there's lots of other things in the book, but those are some of the main things that I set out to accomplish with the book, Travis.Travis Marn  08:25And I think the examples that you were talking about the chapter on indigenous focus groups, to me was just so insightful, even someone I've never done, focus group before. And reading it really kind of showed me how much goes into kind of that social justice focused focus group. And so I'm wondering, how did you pick which groups that you wanted to kind of highlight in the book? Jori Hall  08:50Yeah, and I was alluded to this a little bit before, but again, it came out because these are the kinds of groups that I personally worked with. And then also, for the case examples, I wanted to make sure for whatever groups I decided to put in the book that I had strong case examples. And so those happen to be the ones that I have strong case examples for I have been working, teaching, conducting research at UGA University of Georgia for over a decade. And because of that, Travis, I've worked with a lot of students, a lot of graduate students, and I called on some of those former graduate students to help me think about the cases in the book. So all of these things to have is what I'm saying is all these things kind of work together to make the decisions about which ones rose to the top. And you know, even within each group, there are there is so much diversity, right? There's no one indigenous group. And so, and I just wanted to celebrate that and and I hope that comes across that I'm not suggesting that there is one type of anything, but that and that there's diversity within the groups that I'm talking about. So I hope that that comes across,Travis Marn  10:09I think it definitely does in your work and through your examples. So I'm gonna ask you a really this is a really small question. So I hope you can answer this one, what makes for a culturally responsive focus group?Jori Hall  10:21Right. So this is something that I talked about when I did a webinar for the CDC recently, and as part of that webinar, I tried to make this very point clear, and I had a slide. And I had on one side of the slide, traditional focus group, what that is, it was a definition. And then on the other side, I had culturally responsive focus group. And you can see side by side, we don't have that now, nobody can see my slides, because this is a podcast, right? But the point I was making is that a traditional focus group is defined as a group discussion that you have, with particular people about a certain topic, nothing about that definition suggests anything about being culturally responsive, or social justice, or empowerment or anything like this. So there's no commitment to those kinds of things in a traditional focus group, and actually some of the history of focus group, how did the methodology itself come about, it's through marketing. And so it has its own history. And what I'm saying is, okay, focus group has a unique history, it comes out of marketing techniques, when people trying to get information about different things different I don't know, you can think of different items in the store or different interventions, and people want it to have groups come together and give their opinion about those things. And then it moves into social science. And now what I'm saying is, we can enhance the traditional focus group from how it was previously done to be squarely focused on social justice kinds of aims and orientations. And I was just gonna say this as well. That's what makes it different. But also, when we say social justice, that means so many different things. And we have to even clarify what that means, given the people that we're working with. So it's just a real, intentional approach around actionable data, working with the community, thinking better about them in terms of the protocol, the questions we're asking and having them participate to some extent in that in terms of giving their feedback about what they want to, you know, share, and how could it be beneficial to them?12:48And so you suggest that multicultural validity and inquirer reflexivity as criteria for establishing qualitative rigor and focus groups. Can you tell us more about that?12:58Sure, it's kind of hard to do in a little bit of time. But I will refer people to the person that I drew from in those discussions, Travis, and that is the work of Karen Kirkhart. And Karen Kirkhart is a very wonderful, thoughtful, culturally responsive inquirer. And I drew on her word to explain those things primarily, and Hazel Symonette as well in terms of reflexivity. But Karen Kirkhart has articles and things about multicultural validity, as she says a lot of things about that, that folks can go and look at later. But one point that I tried to make in the book and for the purposes of the podcast, I'll say is consequential validity is part of that. And what that means is thinking about the consequences of our focus groups for the people that are participating. We don't want to put people in harm's way. We don't want to put people in jeopardy. And so what are the consequences of these people, whoever they are participating in your focus group. And that's one of the aspects of multicultural validity. The other thing that Karen Kerr cart makes very clear that I appreciate is that this isn't some other kind of validity. This actually is part of regular validity, if you will, and does do a lot to enhance the credibility quality of the work. And you also mentioned reflexivity. I drew on the work of Hazel Symonette and she does a very good job of speaking on this, but I won't do it justice but I will say the main point with reflexivity is to as researchers evaluators, is to not just think about what's happening, but create an action plan in response to things so it's not just reflection as an "Oh, I sit and think about what happened that was horrible or that was great." But what are you now going to to do and that's reflexivity, how are you now going to adopt the design if the protocol isn't working? Now what? So that's what I'll say about those two things. I won't do them justice in the podcast, but certainly both can, you know, go back and follow up on that.Travis Marn  15:18And they can read your book for even more insights. And that's something reflexivity is definitely something just so vital to all qualitative researchers. One thing that I'm interested in is novice researchers who are kind of looking to bring social justice into focus their focus group method, where do novice researchers were can they start to kind of go down this path of social justice in focus groups?Jori Hall  15:43That is a great question, where to begin? I think a great philosopher Winnie the Pooh said, "start at the beginning." I don't know if it was Winnie the Pooh, but I always like that, um, anyway, I think that one of the things to do is to learn about the strengths and the limitations of focus groups. So when I work with graduate students, which I tend to do a lot, I tried to suggest to them very strongly that whatever method you're interested in, you want to know the ins and outs of the method, what can it afford? And what are the limitations? And I think that's a good starting place, and really understanding that so then before you decide where it could fit into a design, you already know that it may be more appropriate here and less appropriate there. Beyond that, I think once you figure out the strengths and limitations of focus groups, I think you need to think about if you know who your participants are, how might they respond to a focus group discussion, and getting feedback about that, before any final decisions are made about where it fits in your design, culturally responsive approach would implore you to get feedback on that. And you can get feedback on that from, you know, another expert in the field, or someone in the community that you intend to work with or working with. But those are the two places that I would encourage folks to begin,Travis Marn  17:16I think there's no substitute for just knowing the method in and out. And your book, I think provides such a great set of tools for our novice researchers to really engage with the focus group. So shifting topics a little bit. A lot of people who listen to this podcast are people who are writing books or want to write books. So I'd be very curious. So can you describe your process for writing and publishing this book?Jori Hall  17:39Travis, it was bananas. Writing a book is more than a notion, right? Like, let's just be honest. So but in all seriousness, one of the first things is to write a proposal, and usually publishers out there, if you intend to go with a publisher, they have a template for you. And they will tell you exactly the things to include in our proposal. One of the key things, there's a lot of key things, but one of the key things that you want to think about is if you're writing your book, what are the books that are related to the kind of book you want to write about? So for me, it was what's already out there in terms of books on focus groups, and I wanted to pitch how my book is different from those books, right? Like, what is it that my book is doing that those other books aren't doing or aren't doing as well, or that I will do differently. And so I would encourage people who are interested in writing a book to survey what books are out there that are related to the kind of book that they would like to write, and you need a sample of let's say, like, you know, a handful or so and then from there, carefully begin to articulate how your book is going to do something different or stand out above those books, right? And how is it going to contribute to whatever literature you're trying to contribute to?Travis Marn  19:00And so the actual writing of the book, how can you describe the writing process?Jori Hall  19:05Sure, well, that was bananas, too. But what helped is that I talked to people who, who wrote books, to get feedback from them how they went through the process. But ultimately, Travis, you know how it is, is, you have to come to your own way of doing something, you have to adapt it for yourself, you have to figure out what works for you. And what worked for me was plotting out my writing time and sticking to it. So what that means is we're on semesters, so I had goals for each semester about where I wanted to go with the book. And I will plot that out for myself and then weekly goals, I will play that out for myself. Of course you negotiate with the publishers the timeline for the book, but you still have to figure out if the book is due two years from now. How do you write so that it is done, and we have benchmarks for yourself. The other thing I did for myself was I took myself on my own writing retreat. So I kind of eliminated distractions from just typical everyday life. And I said, Okay, I rented an Airbnb, for example, and plop myself in front of the laptop and plugged away and took breaks. And lastly, I will say, with the brakes, rest this, this may not seem important, but it is, rest is important. And health is important. Because what I've come to find out, you have to have a sound mind, and healthy body in order to be thoughtful, right. So all of these things play a role. If you're stressed out, if you're tired, that doesn't really produce your best writing. It's not your best self. So take care of yourself. Taking care of yourself along the way, is really, really important, given the stressors of everyday life in the stress of writing a book. So those are the things that come to mind straight away.Travis Marn  21:06It's very interesting to take care of yourself while trying to produce this work. I think that's a such a good thing, just to have researchers remember that they're human, and not robots producing this work? Did you write the book sequentially? Or did you jump around in the writing process?Jori Hall  21:24Yeah, so I explained this to students like research itself, it's dynamic, I jumped all over the place, because what would happen is I would get into a chapter, and I would be inspired by something which would then trigger a thought for another chapter. So I would create little notes for myself to incorporate it in another chapter. And I will come back to it. And so it evolved, I learned different ways of saying things. And as I read more, I was simultaneously reading a little bit as I wrote the book, and I think reading to me, is so helpful with writing is so helpful. So although I had goals to complete certain chapters, certain sections, believe me, I did have to go back into a section from time to time to beef it up, or to streamline it, to say it in a way that I felt like was more clear, more coherent. And then in the end, I had other people as much as I could provide feedback to make sure that the points that I were trying to, you know, trying to make came across. Travis Marn  22:34Was there any part of the book that was especially meaningful for you? Jori Hall  22:37Hmm, that's another good question. Wow you just come in with all these awesome questions, Travis.Travis Marn  22:42Um, I try. Jori Hall  22:46I think, for me, it wasn't so much a particular section. It's just I wanted to contribute, work that would support people that are vulnerable, that are put in these situations. And I wanted to contribute research and thinking about research that would give other researchers permission to tailor their work in a way that would not just benefit the literature, but would actually help somebody would actually be meaningful, and not give up on rigor, because I think there is this undercurrent, and maybe it's not an undercurrent, maybe it's this explicit thing that if you're culturally responsive, somehow you're giving up on rigor and objectivity or something like this. And I just wanted to contribute something that suggests no, actually doing these things enhances rigor. And you can also help someone along the way how, and to what extent, sure, that varies, and we could, you know, talk about that. But I think that that's what drove me to do it. And like with anything I see where you can be improved now. And, you know, I hope to continue this conversation about focus groups and being culturally responsive. So it's just a humble attempt to do that, Travis.Travis Marn  24:15A humble attempt and an outstanding outcome I think in that process, the book's just fantastic. So where can people access your ongoing work?24:25Sure. So Wow, that's awesome question, too. I the book is on Amazon and all the other things and then I'm still trying to crank out different articles, most of my articles, land in evaluation journals. And so the American Journal of Evaluation is where some of my articles are, that's the home for many of them. But what's also fun and interesting is you might find my name in some health journals. And that's because I also work with people in health disciplines and to think about, you know, methods and analyzing focus group data. So I'm sprinkled throughout different disciplines in different journals and things like this because I truly believe in collaboration, Travis, I truly believe in interdisciplinary work. I think it strengthens whatever we're trying to accomplish. And so yeah, I enjoy working with others.Travis Marn  25:21And I believe people can follow you on Twitter as well. Jori Hall  25:24Oh yeahTravis Marn  25:25Your hour by hour thoughts as well. Jori Hall  25:27That's right, that's right Travis. Travis Marn  25:29It was an honor to read your book as a committee member. And it's been a privilege to have you here and I want to offer the committee's congratulations again, your book very much deserved our 2021 Outstanding Book Award. Thank you again.Jori Hall  25:42Thank you. This was a treat to talk to you today. Thanks for having me.QR SIG AD  25:52The Qualitative Research Special Interest Group was established in 1987 to create a space within the American Educational Research Association for the discussion of ethical, philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research. We invite you to consider joining the qualitative research SIG today. For members of AERA the annual fee for joining qualitative research special interest group for regular non-graduate student members is $10. And the annual fee for graduate students is $5. As members of the QR SIG, you will gain access to a network of fellow qualitative scholars as well as are many activities ranging from mentoring opportunities to our podcast series, To updates and news related to recent quality publications and jobs. Please visit the American Educational Research Association's website at www.aera.net to join the qualitative research SIG today.

Capital Daily
Fake It So Real: Victoria Author's First Novel is an Award-Winner

Capital Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 24:29


Victoria author Susan Sandford Blades first novel, Fake It So Real, has been receiving critical acclaim since its publication in October 2020. The gritty post-punk story of love, family bonds, pain, and the struggle for authenticity won the 2021 ReLit Award in the novel category, and has been nominated for the 2021 BC and Yukon Book Prizes Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize. And the bonus? It's set in Victoria.Get more stories like this in your inbox every morning by subscribing to our daily newsletter at CapitalDaily.ca Check our membership opportunity at CapitalDaily.ca/MemberAnd subscribe to us on our socials! Twitter @CapitalDailyVic  Instagram @CapitalDaily  Facebook @CapitalDailyVic

THE PETA PODCAST
Ep. 189: Dr. John P. Gluck--PETA Trailblazing Advocacy Award Winner--And His Journey To A Cruelty-Free Science.

THE PETA PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 71:31


Dr. John P. Gluck is being honored with PETA's Trailblazing Advocacy Award for being a shining example of ethics in science. The one-time animal experimenter, who studied with the infamous Harry Harlow, describes his own transformation from animal experimenter to a compassionate bioethicist committed to a cruelty-free science. In conversation with Emil Guillermo, Gluck talks about his childhood, his studies in college, and his professional life. As a young boy, John Gluck was kind to animals. But as a scientist, he was mentored by the notorious vivisector Dr.Harry Harlow at the University of Wisconsin. Then something clicked. He began to see the animals as patients, not tools of science. Gluck's book, "Voracious Science and Vulnerable Animals" has become a guide for scientists, especially of a new generation, seeking to practice a science aligned with their ethical identity. Gluck talks with Emil Guillermo about the ethical journey he's taken and admits he remains haunted by the faces of the animals he experimented on. For more go to PETA.org You may also contact us at PETA.org The PETA Podcast PETA, the world's largest animal rights organization, is 6.5 million strong and growing. This is the place to find out why. Hear from insiders, thought leaders, activists, investigators, politicians, and others why animals need more than kindness—they have the right not to be abused or exploited in any way. Hosted by Emil Guillermo. Powered by PETA activism. Contact us at PETA.org Listen to the very first PETA podcast with Ingrid Newkirk Music provided by CarbonWorks. Go to Apple podcasts and subscribe. Contact and follow host Emil Guillermo on Twitter @emilamok Or at www.amok.com Please subscribe, rate and review wherever you get your podcasts. Help us grow the podcast by taking this short survey. Thanks for listening to THE PETA PODCAST! (Originally published Oct.28, 2020; Republished Sept.15, 2021)

Regular Car Reviews Podcast
RCR Podcast #101: Heritage Award Winner 'Niclols Roman'

Regular Car Reviews Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 114:39


Roman has won an award! In addition to the honors from the Automotive Heritage Foundation, Roman has also bought a brand new car! What is it? And what is his award for, exactly? Meanwhile, Brian documents his ongoing struggles with the Toyota Sera and how he plans to slay the figurative dragon. Moreover, Brian talks about why his next car MUST be a Toyota 4Runner and NOTHING ELSE. The duo also answers questions from the chat on everything from best cheeses, wedding speeches, modernism and postmodernism,  and of course, cars. It's a two-hour show! 

CollisionCast
FenderBender Award Winner Scott Fabel

CollisionCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 17:42


Last week the 2021 FenderBender Award winner and runner-ups were announced.  On today's podcast, Scott Fabel, the award winner, joins staff writer Paul Hodowanic to talk about his journey as a shop owner and what has made him successful. Also, if you haven't had an opportunity to read the full story on Scott, click here to do so. FenderBender has also published a blog post detailing the reasons Scott was selected.

Ratchet+Wrench Radio
Ratchet+Wrench All-Star Award Winner Matt Lachowitzer

Ratchet+Wrench Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 16:57


Matt Lachowitzer, owner of Matt's Automotive Service Center and winner of the Ratchet+Wrench All Star Awards, joins associate editor Megan Gosch to discuss his operation and what has made him successful.  If you haven't already, check out the full feature on Lachowitzer here.

RIMScast
RIMS 2021 Goodell Award Winner Pamela L. Popp

RIMScast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 34:59


Welcome to RIMScast. Your host is Justin Smulison, Business Content Manager at RIMS, the Risk and Insurance Management Society.   Named in honor of RIMS' first president, the Harry & Dorothy Goodell Award pays tribute to an individual who has furthered the goals of the Society and the risk management discipline through outstanding service and achievement.   RIMScast's guest today is the 2021 recipient of the Goodell Award, Pamela L. Popp! Pamela is the Chief Risk Officer and Executive Vice President at Gallagher Bassett. She has been a risk practitioner for decades and has had a tremendous influence in risk management, healthcare, and health law.   In this episode, they discuss Pamela's impressive career, her achievements and highlights, key lessons she has learned that have helped guide her career and fuel her passion, and the many ways in which she has contributed to the profession during COVID-19.   Key Takeaways: [:01] About RIMS' Global Membership. [:12] About the RIMS buyer's guide. [:49] About today's episode with Pamela Popp. [:54] Register now for the upcoming RIMS ERM Conference! [1:05] Upcoming RIMS current virtual offerings. [2:15] More about today's episode with Pamela Popp. [3:01] Justin welcomes Pamela to RIMScast! [3:10] Justin congratulates Pamela on winning the 2021 Goodell Award and she shares how it felt to receive it. [3:57] Pamela shares an abridged version of her career history. [5:13] How Pamela's primary passion, healthcare, intersected with risk management over the course of her career. [7:04] Pamela reflects on the first time that she heard the term “risk management” and what she originally thought of it. [8:06] Pamela highlights some of the professional challenges that she has had to overcome in her career. [9:35] When did Pamela learn about RIMS? How and why did she first become involved? And how has RIMS helped her career over the years? [10:32] Key lessons that Pamela has learned in risk management. [13:31] About the RIMS Mobile App, registration for the RIMS Canada Conference 2021, Spencer's Risk Manager on Campus program. [15:06] When did Pamela join Gallagher Bassett? [15:16] What was Pamela's original role when she first joined Gallagher Bassett? When and why did Pamela become the Chief Risk Officer? [16:23] About Pamela's responsibilities as the Chief Risk Officer at Gallagher Bassett. [17:45] How the department has grown under Pamela's supervision. [18:43] Why Pamela loves her role as Chief Risk Officer and the opportunity that it provides. [19:40] Pamela has previously helped launch the Certified Professional in Health Care Risk Management (CPHRM). What is it? When did it launch? And what inspired Pamela to help launch it? [22:31] How did Pamela feel when CPHRM first launched? What were some of the challenges prior to launching it? [24:00] What did Pamela learn during the COVID-19 pandemic? What did she implement? And what inspired her to write her article, “Standard of Care in Flux: Patient Safety and COVID-19”? [28:47] Pamela shares where she personally sees the future of risk management headed. [30:20] Pamela's advice for new or rising risk professionals to strengthen their careers against the backdrop of COVID-19. [31:57] Justin thanks Pamela Popp for joining RIMScast and shares some of the links to look out for in this episode's show notes!   Mentioned in this Episode: RIMS Events, Education, and Services: RIMS ERM Conference 2021 will be held Nov. 11th & 12th in NYC RIMS Canada Conference 2021: Register now! NEW FOR MEMBERS! RIMS Mobile App RIMS Buyers Guide RIMS 2021 Awards Issue of Risk Management Upcoming Webinars: September 9, 2021 | “Your Go-To-Market Strategy in a Nuanced Market: Maximize Outcomes and Build Stronger Relationships at Renewal” | Sponsored by Gallagher Core360 September 15, 2021 | “Thrive Through COVID in a Delta Variant World” | Sponsored by Aon September 21, 2021 | “10 Essential Steps to Rethinking Risk Assessment” | Sponsored by OneTrust GRC September 30, 2021 | “Prepare to Plug into a High-Powered Opportunity” | Sponsored by Travelers Sponsored RIMScast Episodes: “What Could a CRO Do for Your Business?” | Sponsored by Riskonnect “Hard Reality: A Look at Rising Rates in Property & Excess Casualty” | Sponsored by AXA XL “Property Valuation Deep Dive” | Sponsored by TÜV SÜD “Property Loss Control Engineering” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers Virtual Workshops: RIMS-CRMP Exam Prep Virtual Workshops (October 2021) — Gain an edge with the RIMS-CRMP; the only internationally accredited risk management certification! RIMS Virtual Workshops: Claims Management — Register now for Nov. 8‒9th Spencer's Risk Manager on Campus Program — Volunteer Today! Related RIMScast Episodes: “RIMS 2021 Risk Manager of the Year: Michael Harrington” “Making the Grade: Cheryl Lloyd, Risk Manager of the Year Honor Roll Inductee 2021” “RIMS 2021 Award Winners: Elliott Long and Sue Mepham” “Betting It All On Risk: Mark Habersack, Heart of RIMS Award Recipient 2021” “Driving Legislative Change: Advocacy Update with 2021 Bland Memorial Award Winner, Lynn Haley Pilarski” “RIMS 2020 Award Winners: Audrey Rampinelli and Larry Glasser” Download any episode of RIMScast. RIMS Publications, Content, and Links: RIMS Membership — Whether you are a new member or need to transition, be a part of the global risk management community! RIMS Virtual Workshops Upcoming RIMS Webinars On-Demand Webinars RIMS Advisory Services — Ask a Peer Risk Management Magazine Risk Management Monitor RIMS Coronavirus Information Center RIMS Risk Leaders Series — New interview with RIMS 2021 Risk Manager of the Year, Michael Harrington! RIMS-Certified Risk Management Professional (RIMS-CRMP) RIMS-CRMP Stories — New interview featuring guests, Charles Vu and Steve Pottle! Spencer Educational Foundation RIMS Advocacy   Want to Learn More? Keep up with the podcast on RIMS.org and listen on iTunes. Have a question or suggestion? Email: Content@rims.org.   Join the Conversation! Follow @RIMSorg on Facebook and Twitter, and LinkedIn.   Follow up with Our Guest: Pamela Popp's LinkedIn “Standard of Care in Flux: Patient Safety and COVID-19,” by Pamela L. Popp   Tweetables (For Social Media Use):   “[Winning the Goodell Award] was both an honor and a moment of self-reflection to just say, ‘Well, I honestly didn't think I was old enough to get a lifetime achievement award!' But obviously, it's great.” — Pamela Popp   “Risk management is as important, if not more important, than the management of the claims and litigation side of [your] business.” — Pamela Popp   “I would love to see risk management heading in a way that it continues to be given more and more credibility for the knowledge and experience that's necessary for someone to do well in their job.” — Pamela Popp   ‘'There's a tremendous amount of wonderful, proactive, … beneficial work that comes out of risk management. And I would love to see the industry really be recognized for that work as much as for what we do in a reactive way.” — Pamela Popp

Going Green
Sylvia Earle - Time Magazine's Hero For The Planet Award Winner

Going Green

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 44:51


Green.Org host Dylan Welch sits down with Sylvia Earle, a world famous marine biologist, scientist, author, speaker, and adventurer. Sylvia is the Explorer In Residence for National Geographic, Time Magazine's Hero For The Planet, and holds the woman's record for deepest solo scuba dive mission.Support the show (http://www.GoingGreenShow.com)

Social LEADia: Making a Difference on & offline
Episode 34: Namya Joshi, grade 9 Diana Award Winner & Minecraft EDU wiz

Social LEADia: Making a Difference on & offline

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 12:24


In this episode, I speak with Namya Joshi, an impressive young lady who is the recipient of the 2021 Diana Award, UN Sustainable Development Goals Ambassador and a Minecraft EDU expert who has in-serviced thousands of teachers and created countless lessons. Find her on Twitter at @WonderNamya and her resources and other information can be found on her website: namyajoshi.com

Hang & Focus
74. Eliana Pipes, Tioni Collins, Elaine Romero, & 2021 National Latinx Playwrights Award Winner, Rachel Lynett; Hang & Focus LIVE! with Sean Daniels

Hang & Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 64:59


It's Friday and we are IN LOVE with our guests today! Join us as we speak to Award Winning Playwrights Eliana Pipes and ATC's Playwright-in-Residence Elaine Romero. Grab your chocolate de Abuelita (or have it iced like a true millennial) and get hyped for the weekend! Join us as we meet the unstoppable, amazingly talented Rachel Lynett, ATC's 2021 National Latinx Playwrights Award Winner. #NationalLatinxPlaywrightAwardWinner #ATC #LatinxPlaywright #NLPA #HangAndFocus #LiveTheatre #ElianaPipes #ElaineRomero #RachelLynett

Your Official ADHA Podcast
075- ADHA past president, award winner, DSO leader and mentor

Your Official ADHA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 30:23


Matt chats with Tammy Filipiak, MS, RDH who is a past ADHA president and leader in the DSO space about her role with Smile Brands. They discuss her recent Johnson & Johnson / ADHA Award for Excellence in Dental Hygiene, leadership and much more.  Episode Highlights   Tammy's background and journey Award The future of dental hygiene ADHA updates and awards programs   Quotes   “As you start your journey in the profession you never think of it culminating to this.”    “We do it because it's the right thing, not for the recognition.”    “People don't leave jobs they love.”    “The culture isn't just something that is talked about, it is lived.”   “I always encourage people who have an opinion or who have heard something to learn more.”    “The technology piece of it is just fascinating.”    “I'm one of the OG's in this space.”    “While I have given a lot, I have gotten so much as well.”  Links    https://www.adha.org/awards-program   The health and wellness of the dental hygiene community and the patients you serve is our top priority. We are closely monitoring developments surrounding COVID-19 and will continue to keep you informed. For more information from ADHA, visit https://www.adha.org/covid19.   COVID QUESTION EMAIL: rdhcovidinfo@ahda.net   www.ADHA2021.org    Matt's Email: MattC@ADHA.net  ADHA Annual Report: https://www.adha.org/annual-reports    Visit www.adha.org for membership processing, membership updates, renewals and conference registration! FAQ: https://www.adha2020.org/faq/    American Dental Hygienists' Association homepage:   https://www.adha.org/ ADHA Facebook Page:   https://www.facebook.com/youradha/ The Dental Podcast Network Channel One homepage: http://dentalpodcastnetworkchannelone.otcpn.libsynpro.com/ 

FemCity Business for Your Soul Podcast
Increasing Your Marketing Efforts

FemCity Business for Your Soul Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 21:43


Join FemCity Founder + CEO, Violette de Ayala with featured guests and FemCity Global Members Giselle Mascarenhas, Shannon Hinderberger, and Tayloria Grant. Don't miss this week's episode of The FemCity Podcast where these marketing and branding experts  dive into increasing your marketing efforts including their best tips! About Giselle Mascarenhas // Giselle Mascarenhas-Villareal makes her living as an entrepreneur and personal branding coach. Created for the everyday business person, the focus of BOLD Insta-tute is to teach entrepreneurs late in adopting social media on how to adapt to social media. Her unique perspective and talents have been featured in Yahoo.Finance, Thrive Global, and Buzzfeed. Giselle teaches on a global scale including the women's organization Femcity and has courses, programs, and tips at boldinstatute.com About Shannon Hinderberger // Shannon is founder and principal consultant of Shannon Lee Strategy, Shannon offers hands-on digital marketing and social media coaching, strategy, and account management for clients throughout the US. She has been honored by Cascade Business News in Bend, Oregon as an “Accomplished Under 40” Award Winner. Learn more at shannonleestrategy.com  About Tayloria Grant // Tayloria Grant is an award-winning marketing and communications professional, has appeared on all major national TV networks, and has conducted over 4000 coaching sessions for more than 300 global professionals in 45 countries. Tayloria has helped hundreds of entrepreneurs and professionals be known as industry experts, grow their businesses with social media marketing, and obtain jobs with multi-international and American companies, including Google, Amazon, and McKinsey & Company. Learn more at www.OneFullLife.com  About FemCity //  FemCity offers a Free 30-Day Trial Membership and Memberships start at only $15.99. You can also learn more about launching a FemCity Chapter in your community. FemCity has been seen in Gilt, Vogue, AP News, Entrepreneur, Forbes, and MarieClaire. Learn why FemCity is more than just a women's networking group at www.femcity.com and on all social platforms @FemCity.

Qualitative Conversations
Episode 27: Episode 27. QR SIG Dissertation Award Winner, Marie Vea

Qualitative Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 46:30


In this episode, Dr. Jenny Wolgemuth interviews the QR SIG's 2021 Outstanding Dissertation Award winner Dr. Marie Vea. Dr. Vea is the Assistant Dean for Student Services and Staff Development at the University of Vermont. Dr. Vea's dissertation is titled Sense of Place and Ways of Knowing: The Landscape of Experience for Black, Indigenous and People of Color in Natural Resources, Environmental Education and Placed-based Learning. The follow text presents a transcript of the recording. ---Jenny  0:25  Hello, everyone and welcome to qualitative conversations a podcast series hosted by the qualitative research special interest group of the American Educational Research Association. I'm Jennifer Wolgemuth, the current chair of the qualitative research special interest group outstanding dissertation award committee. I am very excited to be joined today by Dr. Maria Vea, who is the recipient of the 2021 outstanding dissertation Award for her dissertation titled, Sense of Place and Ways of Knowing: The Landscape of Experience for Black, Indigenous and People of Color in Natural Resources, Environmental Education and Placed-based Learning. Dr. Vea is an assistant dean for student services and staff development at the University of Vermont in the School of environment natural resources, where she has worked and studied for over 20 years. Her areas of research expertise and experience include green jobs and internships, social justice, and engaged learning. Thank you for joining me today, Dr. Vea. I'm really thrilled to learn more about you and your work. So to get us going, I was thinking our audience would appreciate learning more about your dissertation work. Can you talk about your dissertation, maybe about its scope, and its methodological focus.Marie  1:54  Thank you, Jenny. And thank you also for the opportunity to talk with you more and to for the award, I was really honored to stand with so many wonderful researchers, and also to bring some light to some of the work that I and my co researchers and colleagues have been doing. And as you mentioned, so the title of the dissertation speaks a lot to what the content and scope is. So sense of place, and ways of knowing. So where we are in place, not just physically but also metaphorically and figuratively, and ways of knowing epistemologies, how we arrive at the things that we believe we know and are important to us and make meaning of experience. But that's specifically what is experienced for black, indigenous and people of color bipoc folks in the field that I spend the most of my time and career in. So those are places related to natural resources, environmental education, and place based learning. So I've worked in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources for 17 years, and have worked with bipoc folks coming through those curriculum in the environment, and have found witnessed the challenges that a lot of the students, alumni and colleagues have within environmental learning and working spaces. So the dissertation really focuses on what has been called academic imperialism and epistemic injustice, how ways of knowing and experiences of this population of folks are invisible alized, diminished, erased from the larger environmental narratives. And oftentimes, what I experienced is that when we ask questions about why aren't people of color interested, or in the environmental fields, it's from a perspective of no lacking something, or it's not interesting enough, it's from a deficits, perspective. And this dissertation focuses on the strengths based perspective because, like, with underrepresented folks of all identities, we're here, we've been here and we continue to be here. And why is that? How do we sustain how do we survive? So the dissertation is a strengths based perspective, with co-researchers that are nine alumni of the Rubenstein school. And we came together to share stories and images and reflections in an environment that really was inspired by indigenous research methodologies, methodologies and methods and came out understanding having a better understanding of our individual ways of knowing and our collective Ways of Knowing that help us to survive and thrive in these learning and working spaces. A big part of the journey qualitative research. So coming together with people that I had long time relationship with, and standing shoulder to shoulder and strength to strength with them, acknowledging and honoring their experience and wisdom, and uplifting, that they have as much wisdom and expertise of their experience as anybody that might have a credential behind their name. So the other piece that I'll just add in terms of scope, and I'm talking to primarily I hope, folks in education in higher education and environmental education, and in some part, telling them what has happened and how we can make a change. But really, I want to talk to the folks of color that are wondering, how can I make find my space in place in the field of education in research in the environment? And how do I do that, that is in integrity with who I am, where I come from my ancestors, and with a spirit of joy in the face of challenges, especially in the last couple of years. So, so all of that is, is part of the scope of this particular work.Unknown Speaker  6:26  Beautiful, I'd love to hear your talk. And and that really comes through so clearly in reading your work. One of the things that I appreciated about it as a methodologist is that the the commitment and the ethic and the epistemology, your epistemological position, seem to drive your methodology that the methodology emerged through the process of the inquiry, as opposed to what we so often see, which is the methodology was chosen and decided in advance. So I would be sort of interested to hear your thoughts on that, particularly in relation to your decision to take a participatory approach to do this as a collaborative work. Can you talk about why you involved your participants, as co researchers, and then more broadly, about the methodological decision making that you made this work?Unknown Speaker  7:28  Thanks, Jenny, it's, it's interesting and great that you should say that the methodology didn't drive the work was the the the work, the capital W work that drove the methodology. And if, you know, I was a career counselor for a number of years, and I'm still kind of a career counselor when I advise students. And oftentimes, I think the aspiration for all of us is that, that I can show up to my full as my full self wherever I am. And I'm working with students for the last 20 plus years and specifically with students that are interested in the environment for the last 17 building relationship, telling stories creating environments where people can explore and fail and be awkward and you know, share and be vulnerable is part of what I think really makes the community where work really vital. And so that when I was exploring dissertation work and doctoral work, from the very beginning, I wanted it to be creative. I wanted to I wanted it to keep me engaged, and have it be fun. I don't know that you can use the word fun in research I tried. And, and also have it be you can only tell stories, best the stories that you know, well. And the stories I knew well. We're working with students, with students of color, specifically, as they came through four years of development and in education, and then after they graduated. So when I thought about what I wanted to research and what what I wanted to spend a lot of time and heart on. It was with the students and alumni, actually, and these co researchers were alumni from the years 2005 to 2018. I kept in touch with them all of those years, dinners and chats and walks and adventures and really had gotten to see them through many years of change and, and identity work. So my I had several proposals for dissertation before it actually landed on this one. That's probably the case with A lot of people, but um, but out of relationship and love, I so wanted to tell the story of these folks that came through a lot of experience, and we're making changes in the world that I so admired. And I wanted to do it in a way where it felt like we were family coming together over the course of a few months. And certainly over the course of the year that I was writing this up. So um, so that drove the methodology, being in relationship, telling stories, being accountable to each other, creating environments where we could ask hard questions of ourselves, and of each other, and honoring the wisdom that they all brought. And it came together really beautifully. Because we loved being with each other. We love telling stories. And over the course of the two to three months that we conducted the research of talking and sharing stories, we saw each other through many changes and the methodology of a visual relational narrative inquiry, using images and stories. And using larger narratives as, as a means of making meaning just felt really natural. That's how we conducted our relationship, even before we could call it a dissertation research. So that's how we came to the methodology. And I have to, I have to give a shout out to my influences, Kelly Clark Keefe and the Rubenstein school. The the many authors, Robin kimmerer, and Gregory kahit. De and so many people that were part of the story and seen and unseen ways. It's a huge network. And I think that's part of a qualitative research is for me, is that it's not just when I sit down and crunch data, but it's all of my experience that bears meaning to what I'm trying to make sense of at the time.Unknown Speaker  12:13  I love that response I've been involved in pulled into not unwillingly some grant writing, and to do grant writing, you need to tell people what you're going to do in advance. And it's difficult to for me to, to do that we're going to do this in advance, but also hold that space for the emergent methodology in the emergent design and make everyone or try to make everyone on the grant team comfortable with that idea that, that in a really good qualitative research project like yours, the methodology does emerge with the work as opposed to often the other way around. So beautiful example of it. Thank you.QR SIG AD  12:58  The qualitative research special interest group was established in 1987 to create a space within the American Educational Research Association. For the discussion of ethical, philosophical and methodological issues in qualitative research. We invite you to consider joining the qualitative research SIG today are members of a era, the annual fee for joining qualitative research special interest group for regular non graduate student members is $10. And the annual fee for graduate students is $5. As members of the QR SIG, you will gain access to a network of fellow qualitative scholars, as well as our many activities ranging from mentoring opportunities to our podcast series to update to news related to recent qualitative publications and jobs, please visit the American Educational Research Association website at www dot att era dotnet to join the qualitative research sake today.Unknown Speaker  13:52  I'm really curious about you have a strike through in your title that that caught my eye immediately. There are some words that aren't sticking through and then there are words that are stricken through and in particular, the words that are stricken through our natural resources, environmental education and place based learning. Can you talk about why strike through there and what what you wanted to communicate? And how other people have reacted to those strike? throughs?Unknown Speaker  14:22  Yeah, yeah. Um, so those terms on the in the field of environmental education, those are the most popular terms to describe anybody that is interested in the environment. And those are the names of the programs that are really popular related to that. So there's a familiarity of that. Oh, okay. So we're going to talk about these fields. And those all three of those terms have a colonialist and imperialist history to it, and it extractive history to it. So natural resources is extraction from the natural world where that the land is the source of goods and services. Environmental Education, writ large is connecting people to the land. And it was coined at a time where it felt really novel, to call it environmental education where environmental education had been happening for millennia, anybody who was living on the land was doing environmental education, and then place based education as, as a pedagogy. I had always had questions about what place whose place? How deep, are you going to ask those questions about history of place and connect and relationship to place. So I wanted to trouble all of that, to bring your eye to bring a reader's eye to those terms, and what those terms meant to them, and then putting a line right through them to say, you know, we're not, we're going to trouble this a lot. And I'm hoping to add hope to, you know, just pull the rug out from under some folks a little bit. But also demonstrate that we are going to go to some places where, you know, when you see something crossed out, it kind of gives you a little bit of a shock. And I find in my work that that little instability is actually that tension can actually be a really great site for learning if you're open to it. So that's the invitation.Unknown Speaker  16:39  I love it. I might have to connect with you after this podcast, absolutely. Questions and even some resources. So you're a fabulous source. So I'm just going to ask you about what inspired you to do the dissertation? And maybe that's still a valid question, or a good question to be asking, given everything you've shared so far, far, I'd also be interested in hearing beyond your career and your professional interest, if there's anything personal that really drove you to doing this dissertation.Unknown Speaker  17:21  Sure. Um, so I've actually been thinking, I don't know how far back we want to go. But I have been thinking it's I did, um, my graduate work a Master's of education at the University of Buffalo, in, in higher ed. And out coming out of that, I knew that I wanted to do a doctorate at some point. And, you know, of course, I'm the kind of person that just sort of follows my nose and flies by the seat of my pants. So back then back in the 90s, when I graduated, like, oh, international education, that sounded like a good doctorate, and then I hold on to that for a little bit, and then let that go. And so that the the wanting to study more and study more deeply had always been there, especially if you work in higher education, it's, it's in the water, in some ways, it's kind of an expectation. And after my master's degree, I'd worked at a couple of different institutions, or during my master's degree, I've worked at a couple of institutions. So one of them was Naropa Institute, now Naropa University. And it's the only Buddhist inspired institution in the country. And so imagine, my very first day on the job, I was in tea ceremony for six hours. So that's education. That's incredible. You can get a bachelor's degree in transcendental meditation and these disciplines that coming out of higher ed, I didn't know you could study these things. So that was one experience. And then, for four years after graduate work, I worked at the Savannah College of Art and Design. And while I can't claim to be an artist, the way that these students are artists, it really underscored for me how sharing knowledge can happen in so many different ways. And that getting lost in a medium. When students would tell me they were up for four days straight putting their exhibition together, that kind of experience. I envied, you know, to be so steeped in what you loved. Doing and doing it in an experiential way, not just reading and not just with your head, but with your entire body in many ways. I'm finding just the questions that you asked me Jen and finding that those are those are really profound influences on what I how I wanted to manage my my doctoral work. And then in 20,000, in 2010, when I finally had time to take some graduate work, I took a class with Dr. Corinne Gladney on qualitative research and data analysis. And poetry could be data, what? poetic transcription, drama, really all of these things, images, paintings could be data and analyzes data. So that really got me going. And things percolate for me. So all of these streams of artistic and arts based kind of methods and looking at data and graduate work is beyond just doing the scientific method data and collecting data, and then analyzing it and putting it into five chapters of a dissertation. I got the sense that I could do something much different. And so I did formally pursue the doctoral work and found people that were a bit left of conventional to talk with and, and also being situated in a school of Environment and Natural Resources, the nature connection, there are so many beautiful metaphors, and synchronicities, and, and learnings from that area of my work. It all kind of came together. So I think I might have lost the thread of what of your question, Jenny, but the journey, but there were multiple, multiple journeys, that because there's a time constraints on completing a dissertation, I needed to bring it all together, and brought it all together somehow, in questions about my own experience, in relationship with other people of color, relationship to land and sense of place. And I'm really grateful for the folks that pointed the way in terms of what qualitative research could be, and what I loved, I love the quotes from thin clendenen, that...if you're, if you're not asking more questions, after your research, you're doing it wrong. And that you fall in love with the people you are working with along the way and with the work. And I can sincerely say that this is this was a work of joy and love. It motivated me through the work. And it also compelled me to finish it in a way that honored and respected the contributions of my co researchers and everybody that was a part of, of this adventure. So all of that all of my experiences, all of the adventures and all the detours come up in this dissertation.Unknown Speaker  23:04  I love it. There's there's so much in higher education. That that encourages segmentation and encourages only bringing in a piece of yourself or a piece of your life or a particular storyline to your research. And for some people, that's fine, the segmentation works. What I like about you is that that there's a wholeness, even as you said, the story you're telling is partial or even the story you're telling has multiple lines, and there are multiple ways you could story are coming to the dissertation. There's a sense of fullness and wholeness. And you're bringing in so many experiences and so many values and so many emotions into the work and for you, it sounds like it wouldn't be satisfying. And we certainly picked up on that as a committee as we read it. Had you not done that. So I'm grateful for your work as an exemplar.Unknown Speaker  24:03  Thanks. And if I just add one thing, I just want to name that I had the privilege of doing this as part of it, it was it was a benefit to me as as a staff person at a university. So I mean, I do want to acknowledge that if it weren't for even some of the systemic privileges that I have in this space. I wouldn't I don't know that I would have been able to travel about and, and and move in circles with this. So I mean, there are tensions with that to that, you know, the creativity that that is part of this and the magnitude of of the connections might not have happened if I was compelled to complete it in five years because I needed to find a job afterward. So I think there are those other questions I have about just a system of doctoral work where you got to get it done and you and then you got to go on to the next thing. I think that's that can hamper some people.Unknown Speaker  25:05  No doubt. So following that, what advice or suggestions then would you share with graduate students who are writing a dissertation? like yours or otherwise?Unknown Speaker  25:20  Yeah. I was thinking about this question last night. And my head went immediately to Oh, bullet points and all of these things and you know, straight strategies and tips and people. And and then I remember that last summer, so june of 2020, I taught a course, to graduate students called epistemological plurality, or multiple ways of knowing. And, and I had 10, masters students masters in the leadership for sustainability at University of Vermont, and then 10 doctoral students from our college of education and social services. And because I was deep into writing my dissertation, I was all about relationality and authentic dissertation. And really, honoring that this body, our individual bodies are the site of knowledge and data and research as well. So I had no idea how I was going to conduct the class with 20 graduate students with Masters and PhD level students. But at the center of it was that each of them are crucial sites of knowledge and crucial sites of experience. So over the course of those six weeks, they were their primary teacher and learner in that experience, I, I shared my thoughts, I shared resources, I gave them prompting questions, but it was really up to them to engage their own learning, where there were no boundaries, there were there were expectations that they would engage with each other and engage with their work, but no particular deadlines to produce anything. And when you take off those, the if you when you offer that freedom, and to express their their exploration, and their their questions and learning in ways that showed up, like music, and drawing, and bookmaking and gardening, oh my gosh, the energy that comes out of that the synergies that come out of that. So my suggestion to graduate students would be to where you can find the the spaces that really strengthen your own internal muscles, engaging the work that you want to do. When you really honor that you do know what you need to do. And there are coaches along the way, but you you're driving the bus and find the Find the language that works best for you. If music is your language, find that if drawing is your language, find that poetry and images are my language. Those are the suggestions that I would make to graduate students. You know, a couple of the practical things. There's, you know, graduate writing centers, and other graduate students that can can inspire and also motivate if I didn't have our Graduate Writing Center as a space where I needed to really focus on my computer and write, I don't I think I might still be writing. So that dissertation, but um, but those are some of the things was there another part of the question about suggestions for reading was thatUnknown Speaker  29:11  Yeah, absolutely. I would be interested in for people who might be specifically interested in your focus area, your content area, as well as your methodological approach. What recommendations might you give to them for readings that really inspired you and your work?Unknown Speaker  29:31  Sure, um so you know, the default I'm looking at my my list of notes and the the people that I will name all have doctor in front of them. Before I get to that list of folks. There are there were there were so many people and and more than human folks that were resources for me. So you know, I want to acknowledge The land I want to acknowledge the, the elders indigenous and and others that graciously gave their time to me I want to I want to acknowledge the other other people that are devoted to these questions, but not in any educational or programmatic sense. And I am going to cite one article. And it's called how to cite like a badass tech feminist scholar of color. And the point of this is unsettling existing research practices by centering indigenous Asian and black feminist perspectives. And as resources I would encourage graduate students or anybody that wants to kind of go off trail for a little bit, is to look for the sources that have been historically erased or diminished. They're not going to show up in peer reviewed journals. They're not going to show up on the reading list of the majority of your professors. It requires a little bit more work and some deeper questions, but it makes the journey so much richer. So having said that, and I think the other programs that I look to look to are the masters of leadership for sustainability at UVM has a group of affiliates that span so many different disciplines and practices. They are inspiring and how they move in the world and ask these questions. Dr. Carolyn Finney, Gregory kahit de and Robin wall kimmerer. Lenny Strobel, who is a Filipino scholar in California and helped me connect to my own Filipino heritage. I mentioned Corinne Gladney, and Kelly Clark Keefe. And the books that I had on my desk all the time, where research is ceremony by Dr. Shawn Wilson decolonizing methodologies by Dr. Linda Smith, I see that on a lot of graduate student desks, and then the authentic dissertation by four arrows or Don Trent Jacobs, those really were inspiring. And it held me up when I thought that am I doing this right? Should I be doing this at all? Is anybody going to pay any attention? They really kept me on track.Unknown Speaker  32:39  Fabulous, I'm so glad this is being recorded. Otherwise, I'd be madly scribbling. So right now, I have many more videos. Oh, yeah. Well, you send them maybe we can attach them to the, to the podcast. So right now you are currently an assistant dean at the University of Vermont. Can you talk about your career path a little bit and your decision to get a PhD and maybe offer any tips to those who are seeking both academic and administrative careers in higher education?Marie  33:28  It's interesting, because I'm just thinking through what what my what my career path was, I shared a little bit about it. And I really, if I were to really encapsulate what my journey was, I just followed the the questions that I loved and the people that I loved. And that happened to land me in higher education. It happened to land me at places like Savannah College of Art and Design and the University of Vermont and, and the Rubenstein School of environment natural resources. I think the experiences that were most helpful it were learning how to get to know people, part of my graduate education at the University of Buffalo, which doesn't exist as a program anymore, is understanding higher ed administration. And there was also a component of that where we learned how to be counselors. And we understood or at least explored the psychology and different methods of understanding how people make meaning and move in the world. And I think for anybody that's pursuing a career career where you're working with people. And when you're working with minds, especially 18 to 27 year old, and I don't even want to bound that in a particular age group. being interested in people, and being interested in how people behave, and what's important to them individually and collectively, has been really important to me in my, in my work and in my career and how I interact with folks. So I think if I were to lay each of my jobs beside each other, that focus on people place in purpose has been the through line across all of those from the from the time that I was an admissions counselor as a graduate student on up now where I work with student services and advising and working with staff on how to staff development in terms of professional development and seeking strategies and opportunities to, to, to, to work better. In some ways, I feel like I want to open a bottle of wine and talk more collectively and in relationship with other people about what that what career means, what work means what it means to work in higher education. And I think higher education is changing so much now, that the path into higher education, I'm not quite sure the traditional ways are getting the degree and applying for the job and understanding the mechanics and the politics of higher education. But I think, and I'm going completely off script with what was my notes? I think, what, what the moment that we have right now is really asking ourselves, what is the value of learning? And is it learning at a university? Or is it learning in some other way that I can contribute to my community contribute to the challenges that face us, and those challenges are huge, their environmental, and their social, and from my perspective, people at the edges, people of marginalized identities are bearing the brunt of a lot of these changes right now. So I'm in this moment, I'm, I'm less interested in career in higher education, and more interested in a pursuit in life that actually will contribute to life and living. If that's how your education, that's great, if that's some other venue, go for it. And I think the possibilities, we are yet to be discovered.Unknown Speaker  37:52  I love that I'm going a little off script to I have the privilege and the honor to have met a doctoral student who I'm working with right now, who is a career current career counselor at a university and getting their doctoral degree. And they are very interested in the ways in which the university does or does not function as a compassionate or as a caring climate. And so, a lot of the things you're saying or resonating with me about it may not just be that learning can happen differently, or that higher education may not be the only path the most joyful path to learning. But that higher education in and of itself, needs to shift needs to make some shifts needs to do some deep reflection about the kinds of relationships that it currently makes possible. And the ones that it can and should and nurture and the ways in which that nurturing can happen.Unknown Speaker  39:01  Mm hmm. Yes. So and you know, that I, I talked with students about internal locus of control, that's a student affairs can kind of term and in heartwood is that the metaphor that I use where the the heartwood is the thing that actually keeps a tree, upright and upright doesn't necessarily mean stuck straight, but at least having that foundation within oneself that you know, that when you bend in the wind or in certain forces, that you're going to come back up in some measure. And I, you know, I'll say, you know, to kind of bring it full circle is the, when it was clear to me that qualitative research could provide the flexibility and the grounding and the integrity that I needed to ask the questions and make the Explorations that I wanted to It also demonstrated to me that if there are a number of us within the system of higher education, exploring these lines of thought, and conducting methodologies that are within integrity and relationship, that we might actually shift to the experience of higher education for a lot of people, whether we're explicit about it or not, exactly, you know, whether we're, yes, I like to use the word subversion, subvert the status quo and subvert the systems that aren't serving. Well. So nice.Unknown Speaker  40:38  Well the last thing I think people listening to this podcast would be really interested to hear is, what do you what are you engaging and thinking with now? What is your work look like now? And how can people get access to it?Marie  40:55  It's, I'm laughing, because when I was writing my dissertation, the last, you know, few years, I'd say, Well, I can't do that. Because I'm doing this dissertation. Like, I'll get to that after I'm done. And everybody was sort of, Okay, well, let's make sure Marie has time and space to do this. And then when I was done, like, okay, now that you finished, can you do this, this, this and this, and all things that I was really excited about. But ironically, I, I'm feeling like, Oh, where did all of my time go that I said, I would have after I finished writing. But so what I'm doing is them. Because the dissertation, the work of that I'm still in relationship with all of those core researchers, we keep in touch. And that work is so foundational integral and consistent with what I do at University of Vermont. Right now, in real time, where I'm working with the Rubenstein school, in asking questions about how to be a more inclusive place. How to look at the curriculum and make changes to the curriculum, how do we change processes for undergrad and graduate students so that they do feel more supported as they pursue their degrees. So there's that work and doing similar work with organizations that are environmentally related, like fish and wildlife, and our Vermont agency of natural resources. So there's that I'm getting more involved with the Masters for leadership and sustainability here at UVM, that I mentioned earlier. And that's a really liberatory radical, love centered graduate program. So anybody listening, please look at that. And you'll see a lot of what I'm talking about here. Talking with the CO researchers, because qualitative research, I think, in its best, in the best of times, has ripple effects, so that the CO researchers have taken the experience that we had a couple of years ago, and are finding themselves talking about it or learning from it even now, in their different contexts. So I'm curious about those ripple effects of that work. So I'm gonna convene those co researchers over tea and find out what's up with their lives. Leadership practices, and really interested in leadership practices, and facilitation, facilitating, learning and working spaces that are decolonizing, anti racist,and joyful. And then the last thing I'll say that it is immediate. I've been involved with three organizations over the last few years that I'd really love to spend more time with. And I attend an elders gathering each year, where elders from across the globe, talk about their wisdom, share their wisdom, so I'll be doing that this weekend. There's a center for Bobby lon studies based in California that is about Filipino indigenous spirituality. So I'll be spending more time with that. And people of the global majority in the outdoors Environment and Natural Resources is also a national organization that I'd like to spend more time getting to know. And then on the lighter side of things, playing on the water, tending to my garden, picking lots of berries, because it's that time of year. So and having wonderful conversations, I hope with with you, Jenny, again, and with anyone else who's listening to this podcast, I don't have a website. I need to create one. But please feel free anyone to reach out to me. I'm happy to share my dissertation and thoughts. I have conducted a few workshops and, and video videos that you can find on YouTube that I haven't consolidated into one place. But happy to share that too if you reach out to me, and then reaching out to me that isn't in integrity with building relationships. So I love to talk with people that are interested with this.Unknown Speaker  45:23  Fabulous Do you if someone were interested in reaching out to you, how would they do that? Marie  45:29  Yes, so you can email me at marie.vea@uvm.eduJenny  45:38  Thank you so much for your time today, Maria. It's been a joy and a pleasure. And I strongly encourage all of our listeners to engage your work because it was certainly transformative for me, as I am sure it will be for many others. Marie  45:59  Thank you so much, Jenny and I sincerely hope we'll talk again soon.

Karraker & Smallmon
2020 Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award Winner Joe Buck

Karraker & Smallmon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 16:05


info@podcastone.coma23e2a16-5398-461e-b3cb-caf0911e909fWed, 04 Aug 2021 08:50:02 PDT

RIMScast
Driving Legislative Change: Advocacy Update with Bland Memorial Award Winner, Lynn Haley Pilarski

RIMScast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 26:44


Welcome to RIMScast. Your host is Justin Smulison, Business Content Manager at RIMS, the Risk and Insurance Management Society.   This week on RIMScast, Justin Smulison is joined by the 2021 Richard W. Bland Memorial Award recipient, Lynn Haley Pilarski.   Lynn Pilarski is the Senior Risk Manager of General Motors. She's also one of the most enthusiastic members of the RIMS External Affairs Committee! As the recipient of the Bland Award, Lynn has been recognized for her outstanding performance and effort as a RIMS member in the area of legislation and/or regulation related to risk.   In this episode, Lynn speaks about the legislative developments impacting the risk management community, shares some RIMS Advocacy updates around autonomous vehicle legislation, updates about PRIA (and what RIMS members and risk professionals need to know regarding it), the opportunities available through the RIMS Legislative Summit, and more.   Key Takeaways: [:01] About RIMS's Global Membership. [:12] About the RIMS buyer's guide. [:47] About today's episode. [:59] Is your ERM program award-worthy? RIMS is currently accepting nominations for the 2021 ERM Global Award of Distinction. [1:29] Upcoming RIMS virtual offerings! [2:45] More about today's episode with  Lynn Haley Pilarski. [3:18] Justin welcomes Lynn Haley Pilarski to RIMScast! [3:45] Lynn shares about her role on the RIMS External Affairs Committee as well as her history with RIMS. [7:38] Lynn shares her enthusiasm for RIMS Advocacy and the RIMS Legislative Summit. [9:43] Justin congratulates Lynn on winning the Richard W. Bland Memorial Award and Lynn speaks about why receiving this award meant so much to her. [10:41] What led Lynn to become the Senior Risk Manager at General Motors. [13:22] Lynn provides a RIMS Advocacy update on what's new in the way of autonomous vehicle legislation. [18:02] Upcoming RIMS virtual workshops, volunteer opportunities, programs, and the RIMS Canada Conference. [20:04] Lynn gives an update on PRIA and what RIMS members and risk professionals need to know regarding it. [25:14] Lynn highlights some of the opportunities that are available through the RIMS Legislative Summit. [26:35] Justin thanks Lynn Haley Pilarski for joining RIMScast and shares some of the links to look out for in this episode's show notes!   Mentioned in this Episode: RIMS Events, Education, and Services: RIMS Canada Conference 2021: Register for early bird rates! RIMS ERM Conference 2021 will be held Nov. 11th & 12th in NYC — Submit a session today! RIMS ERM Global Award of Distinction 2021 – Nominate a program today! RIMS Buyers Guide RIMS Advocacy Upcoming Webinars: Aug. 5, 2021 | “COVID-19: The Long Haul and the Short of It” | Sponsored by Mitchell Aug. 12, 2021 | “One Year Later: Developing, Defining and Quantifying Your Risk Appetite” | Sponsored by Resolver August 26, 2021 | “Increased Dependencies on Third Parties: Addressing Cloud, Vendor, and Business Partner Relationships and Risk” | Sponsored by HITRUST Sponsored RIMScast Episodes: “What Could a CRO Do for Your Business?” | Sponsored by Riskonnect “Hard Reality: A Look at Rising Rates in Property & Excess Casualty” – Sponsored by AXA XL “Property Valuation Deep Dive” | Sponsored by TÜV SÜD “Property Loss Control Engineering” | Sponsored by Prudent Insurance Brokers  Virtual Workshops: RIMS-CRMP Exam Prep Virtual Workshops (July & August 2021) — Gain an edge with the RIMS-CRMP; the only internationally accredited risk management certification! RIMS Virtual Workshops: Claims Management — Register now for Aug. 23‒24th or Nov. 8‒9th Registration for the VIRTUAL Spencer & Gallagher Golf Tournament is now open! Visit SpencerEd.org for more information and to register through August 15th, 2021 (You choose the golf course and team all while continuing to support the Spencer Educational Foundation!) Spencer's Risk Manager on Campus Program — Volunteer Today! Previous RIMScast Episodes: “RIMS Advocacy in 2021” “Post-Election Update” “What the Reauthorization of TRIA Means for the Risk Management Community” “Dr. Daniel Kaniewski on FEMA Resilience” “AI and Autonomous Vehicles with Stephen S. Wu” Download any episode of RIMScast. RIMS Publications, Content, and Links: RIMS Membership — Whether you are a new member or need to transition, be a part of the global risk management community! RIMS Virtual Workshops Upcoming RIMS Webinars On-Demand Webinars RIMS Advisory Services — Ask a Peer Risk Management Magazine Risk Management Monitor RIMS Coronavirus Information Center RIMS Risk Leaders Series — New interview with RIMS 2021 Risk Manager of the Year, Michael Harrington! RIMS-Certified Risk Management Professional (RIMS-CRMP) RIMS-CRMP Stories — New interview featuring guests, Charles Vu and Steve Pottle! Spencer Educational Foundation   Want to Learn More? Keep up with the podcast on RIMS.org and listen on iTunes. Have a question or suggestion? Email: Content@rims.org.   Join the Conversation! Follow @RIMSorg on Facebook and Twitter, and LinkedIn.   Follow up with Our Guest: Lynn Haley Pilarski's LinkedIn   Tweetables (For Social Media Use):   “[Autonomous vehicle legislation] is a really important topic for the auto industry. … All of the auto industry is committed to an all-electric future.” — Lynn Haley Pilarski   “We need to move from that internal combustion engine to electric vehicles and autonomous [vehicles]. But to do that we need some support. It is a whole new world when it comes to automobiles.” — Lynn Haley Pilarski   “[The RIMS Legislative Summit] is open to all [RIMS] members. … The more broadly that we can get people involved, the better. … We also have opportunities for students.” — Lynn Haley Pilarski   “[PRIA] is really exciting for us because it's an opportunity that we, as risk managers and  RIMS as an organization, can actually give our input and … have a say into what that proposed legislation is.” — Lynn Haley Pilarski  

Writer's Routine
Random Routine - Irish Book Award Winner Liz Nugent takes us through her writing day

Writer's Routine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 8:57


Liz Nugent is an Irish Book Award Winner, whose 4th Novel is 'Our Little Cruelties', which is out right now.She came on the show back in 2018 to take us through a day writing her 3rd novel 'Skin Deep'.After working as a stage manager, running all over the place in a theatre, then being shackled to the desk writing for soap operas, Liz Nugent became bored with dull, desk-driven office work, and became an author. Well... became an author over 6 years of writing her first book 'Unravelling Oliver'. It won an Irish Book Award, became a bestseller and gave her a career of being a proper writer.If you like the chat, flick back in your podcast feeds to her full episode from back in November 2018.You can get a copy of 'Our Little Cruelties' here - https://amzn.to/3fm28PYPlease do support us at patreon.com/writersroutine.@writerspodwritersroutine.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

AHIMA HI Pitch
Meet AHIMA's 2021 Distinguished Educator Award-Winner

AHIMA HI Pitch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 8:56


What did you think of the podcast? Contact AHIMA's Matt Schlossberg at matt.schlossberg@ahima.orgLearn more about Dr. Williamson at the AOE21 BlogFrom the Journal of AHIMA... An Insider's Look at Contact Tracing Efforts in Hawai'i by Lynette WilliamsonAccess the AOE21 on-demand experience! Sign up by August 27 to watch all sessions on-demand through September 10 | Learn more at https://aoe.ahima.org 

Awesome Movie Year
Belle de Jour (1967 Venice Film Festival Award Winner)

Awesome Movie Year

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 52:40


The ninth episode of our season on the awesome movie year of 1967 features the Venice Film Festival Golden Lion winner, Luis Buñuel's Belle de Jour. Directed and co-written by Luis Buñuel (based on the novel by Joseph Kessel) and starring Catherine Deneuve, Michel Piccoli, Jean Sorel, Genevieve Page and Pierre Clementi, Belle de Jour won the Golden Lion and the Pasinetti Award at the 1967 Venice Film Festival. The post Belle de Jour (1967 Venice Film Festival Award Winner) appeared first on Awesome Movie Year.

Zero2Hired
How to succeed in today's Job Search with Nkechi Nwafor-Robinson

Zero2Hired

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 50:35


It's an honour and a privilege to bring Nkechi Nwafor-Robinson back to another episode of the podcast.  Nkechi Nwafor-Robinson is 2020 WXN Canada's Most Powerful Women - Top 100 Award Winner, a Technology Executive, CEO & Founder, Empowered in My Skin Inc., Podcast Host and Inspirational Speaker. In this episode, Nkechi shares insights on: What's happening in today's job market What it takes to succeed in the interview How the work environment is changing What to look for in company culture How to be memorable in the interview To learn about Nkechi Nwafor-Robinson, visit: http://www.empoweredinmyskin.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/nkechinwafor/ Want to get more responses to your online job applications? Register for our free 1-hour online training below to create a master resumé that converts job applications to job interviews? https://bit.ly/cjspwebinar If this episode resonates with you, then remember... SUBSCRIBE • COMMENT • SHARE this Podcast!!   

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 237: Whitley Award Winner Dr Kini Roesler on saving the Hooded Grebe in Patagonia

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 45:51


Dr. Kini Roelser is another amazing award winner from the prestigious Whitley Fund for Nature. Dr. Roelser is working hard to save the critically endangered Hooded Grebe and other wildlife on the Patagonia Steppe. The Hooded Grebe was only discovered in the 1970s and has suffered a dramatic 80% decline in their population over the last 20 years. Dr. Roelser shares with us his work and all the pressures this bird and other native wildlife in Patagonia are suffering from. He gives us great insight to what is happening in his part of the world in South America.  ** NOTE: If you hear occasional baby noises during the interview you are not going crazy. Angie did an amazing job interviewing Dr. Roelser while keeping her newborn Maddox happy. She is an amazing mother and dedicated educator** You can learn more about Dr. Kini Roelser and the Whitley Nature Fund by going HERE Show notes HERE

Winning Ponies
WP Welcomes DRF Brad Free and HRN Senior Writer Matt Shifman

Winning Ponies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 55:58


Brad Free will be our first guest. A 30-year veteran of the Daily Racing Form, he is based in Southern California covering Santa Anita, Del Mar, Fairplex, and Hollywood Park. He is the author of Handicapping 101: Finding the Right Horses and Making the Right Bets. Brad provides a daily analysis of the races. Each day during the meet, Brad Free offers his insight and analysis of the entire card. He will be joining John to discuss recent happenings on the west coast and handicap two contentious graded turf tests at Del Mar. The G2, $250,000 Eddie Read will feature a chance for redemption for millionaire United, who was upset as a heavy odds-on favorite last out by Award Winner who will be in the starting gate. Irish punters may want to be backing Going Global from the Emerald Isle. Since her debut in the U.S., she has reeled off four straight turf wins, three of them in graded stakes races Matt Shifman has been a devoted fan of thoroughbred racing and handicapping since childhood, going to the races with his father at Aqueduct, Belmont Park, and Monmouth Park from their home in Central New Jersey. Since 2011, Matt has been the New York and Monmouth Park Correspondent at HorseRacingNation where he is currently a Senior Writer. He also co-hosts the popular weekly video show HorseCenter, which can be seen on YouTube. You can follow Matt on Twitter @AndyScoggin. Matt is also a voter for the weekly NTRA Top Thoroughbred Poll and a partner in the NY Hot List which provides handicapping services to ADWs around the country. Matt Shifman was recently named the winner of the 2021 Bill Handleman Award for outstanding coverage of the Haskell Stakes. It will be most interesting to hear his take on last week's disqualification of Hot Rod Charlie in that Monmouth marquee event. Matt will join John to analyze several races from Saratoga including the prestigious G1 $500,000 Coaching Club American Oaks featuring the appearance of the undefeated Kentucky Oaks winner Malathaat.

Disrupting Distribution by MDM
Klaus Werner, Chief Marketing Officer, Global Industrial, and a Digital Innovator Award winner

Disrupting Distribution by MDM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 23:47


Klaus Werner, the chief marketing officer at Global Industrial Co., was named one of MDM's Digital Innovator Award winners because of the numerous initiatives he has helped drive at the industrial distributor in this last pandemic-plagued year. In addition to leading the company's rebranding efforts, including a website redesign, Werner oversaw the creation of a Knowledge Center that provides customers with expert advice and product info. He also managed a new social media campaign that saw Global Industrial venturing into the unlikeliest of channels for a distributor — TikTok. In this edition of the MDM Podcast, Senior Editor Eric Smith speaks with Werner about the busy year for him and his team, and how their initiatives resulted in measurable improvement for Global Industrial's bottom line.

Age is Irrelevant
Meet 55 yr old Martina Kwan! 3 X Champion Race Car Driver, Emmy and Telly Award Winner, Entrepreneur, Mindset Coach.

Age is Irrelevant

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 65:04


Martina Kwan is a busy woman! If she's not winning races in her Porsche 911 you may find her behind the helm at DK Racing School, running her high-end luxury outdoor furniture company or perhaps helping women reach their highest potential as a Mindset/Confidence Coach! Unhappily married and stuck in a rut, at age 50, Martina had an " ah ha" moment that would change her life and she's never looked back! Today, she's here to inspire and convey to people, especially women, that it's never too late to accomplish anything, at any age!

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
A Serial Duke Choice Award Winner

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 70:57


An airhacks.fm conversation with Mohamed Taman (@_tamanm) about: AMD PC in 1997 with 200 MHz hot AMD, exploring the DOS and QuickBasic, drawing sceneries, photography as hobby, assembling PCs from parts, AS-400 and RPG, QBasic and C++ on Windows 3.11 and Windows 95, to shutdown windows you had to push the start, Windows Millenium Edition, equations in QBasic, starting with Java 1.1, the Sun Certified Java Programmer certification was hard to pass, impressed with Java, Java hides the low-level boilerplate for convenience, catching up with J2EE 1.4 and Java EE, building mazes with OpenGL and Java, working for Silicon Experts, staring with Sun Enterprise Server, later BEA WebLogic, recreating Struts from scratch, the problem with early EJB, working on JD Edwards, Oracle and Siebel integration, using ADF at Oracle, Sun Microsystems was acquired by Oracle, starting at eFinance, efinance is private, but founded by the government, started a United Nations (UN) project for donations management, Java EE 7 with Glassfish was used as the stack, finding bugs in GlassFish, working with the latest versions in mission critical projects, presenting at JavaOne keynote, JBoss to quarkus migration on openshift, "Java EE: Future Is Now, But Is Not Evenly Distributed Yet" at JDD, scaling with hardware, Mohamed Taman on twitter: @_tamanm

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 234: Whitley Award Winner Pedro Fruet on conserving Lahille's Bottlenose Dolphins

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2021 41:20


Pedro Fruet was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. The endangered Lahille's Bottlenose Dolphin is only one of two subspecies of the Common Bottlenose dolphin.  They have an estimated population of only around 600 individuals left in world off the coast of Argentina and southern Brazil and Uruguay. Pedro is leading the effort to save these special animals. He is working with local fisheries and government officials to help reduce the amount of bycatch, which is responsible for nearly 40% of dolphin fatalities in the area. He is also focused on educating the locals on the importance of the dolphins, among many other efforts.  You can learn more about Pedro Fruet and the Whitley Nature Fund by going HERE Show notes HERE

Trials Australia
E78: Grant Morris - Multiple WA state champ and SSDT first class award winner

Trials Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 50:38


This week we are chatting with Grant Morris. Grant should be well know to our Australian listeners as he is multiple time West Australian state champion, and for a period also spent time riding on Australia's East Coast.   However what makes this chat with Grant have even more global appeal is Grant spent 10 years over in the UK based around Bury & Rochdale riding UK trials, including a total of 9 SSDT attempts which in his last one in 2009 gained him a long sought after First class award.   He also tells us of his time at the Scott trial, the chasing the Road National Series & event the French 4 day.   Grant also went on to a career in motorcycling first with Apico while in the UK and then KTM group when he returned to Australia. With KTMs recent acquisition of Gas Gas, Grant is now the unofficial DOT (Director of Trials) here in Australia.   I took this opportunity to asking him on his perspective of KTMs ambitions in the trials arena and did my best to get scoops on the plans for the Gas Gas trials bikes.   I hope you enjoy this chat with Grant Morris.   Contact the Podcast: Email: podcast@trials.com.au Facebook Group: Trials Australia Podcast Community Instagram: _davidgrice TikTok: @trials_aus_podcast

The Boone Podcast
Dwight Gooden joins the Boone Podcast

The Boone Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 56:21


Three-time World Series champion, Cy Young award winner, and Mets Hall of Famer, Dwight Gooden joins the podcast

Texas Business Minds
Dallas: Inspiring Leader Award Winner Dr. David Woody III

Texas Business Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 42:59


In this moving and insightful episode, Managing Editor Rob Schneider welcomes one of the DBJ's Most Inspiring Leaders of 2021, Dr. David Woody III, President & CEO of The Bridge Homeless Recovery Center. Woody and his team were well equipped to help the vulnerable and deal with the pandemic's significant impact on homelessness. And instead of hunkering down during the worst of times, Woody doubled down, setting aggressive financial goals and challenging his team, and his guests, to strive for better lives. 

Talk! with Audrey
Carrie Freeman, Founder and Co-CEO of SecondMuse and YPO Member: Celebrating Diversity and Sustainability Global Leadership Community of Extraordinary Chief Executives Announces 2021 YPO Global Impact Award Winner

Talk! with Audrey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 11:59


“Corporate sustainability” and “conscious capitalism” have become the new buzzwords for social good initiatives, but for Carrie Freeman, co-CEO of SecondMuse, social good is more than just a buzzword. Carrie has been named the 2021 YPO Global Impact Award winner, a prestigious honor that celebrates CEO impact that is both significant and sustainable, for her work with SecondMuse. She speaks with me about what it means to win the award and what employers can do to create diversity in the workplace.

Wrestling With Johners Podcast
Ep194 - 'The Harbinger of Truth' Jeremy Prophet (Jericho Award winner, PCO, WWE Try-Out, the Canadian wrestling scene)

Wrestling With Johners Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 57:33


We discuss winning the #JerichoAward & the promo that earned him the one-on-one training session with Lance Storm. Jeremy tells us his passionate beliefs about Pro-Wrestling in Canada, and who we should be keeping an eye on from the Canadian wrestling scene. Jeremy talks about the many legendary wrestlers he has fought in the ring during his 15 years in the business, as well as his abilities both in the ring and behind the mic, creating the total package we know today! We also discuss Jeremy's WWE experience/try-out, the feedback from William Regal & Johnny Ace and meeting Vince McMahon. We turn our attention to being a co-host on the JOFO in the Ring Podcast and the many interviews he has conducted with the likes of Sabu, PCO, D-Von Dudley, The Godfather. Plus, some of his personal highlights of being part of that show. (Duration 57 minutes) Part of the Johners Podcasting Network: https://wrestlingwithjohners.com/wrestling-with-johners/

Highlights from Off The Ball
VALERIE KEATLEY | Stable Staff award winner | Friday Night Racing

Highlights from Off The Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 38:50


Head girl for trainer Johnny Murtagh and recent award winner at the Stable Staff Awards, Valerie Keatley joins Ger Gilroy and Johnny Ward on Friday Night Racing. #EveryRacingMoment | @HRIRacing

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 232: Whitley Gold Award Winner Dr. Paula Kahumbu w/justice for people and wildlife in Africa

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 49:24


Dr. Paula Kahumbu is one of the most recognized woman working in conservation in Africa. She was recently awarded the incredibly prestigious Whitley Gold Award for all her hard work in preserving wildlife in Africa. Dr. Kahumbu was instrumental in helping to curb the ivory trade in Kenya. She hosts a television show, Wildlife Warriors, that is one of the most popular shows in Kenya. She is leading efforts to set up an Environmental Justice Desk to help solve human-wildlife conflicts. Her list of accomplishments and projects goes on and on. She is a true conservation hero and an inspirational leader to not only so many women across the world, but anyone with an interest in animal conservation.  You can learn more about Dr. Paula Kahumbu and her Whitley Gold Award by going HERE 

Goalie Hacks Podcast
GHP 69: The Keys to Staying In The Moment w/ 2021 Mike Richter Award Winner Jack LaFontaine

Goalie Hacks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 64:02


Hello everyone, and welcome back to the goalie hacks podcast, I'm super excited to be joined today by another active college goaltender, recently named the top goaltender in division1 college hockey winning the Mike Richter award, and that goaltender is Jack Lafontaine.We discuss about most important skill kids can start developing to make sure they are ready when they get there. Understand the contribution to personal success in BCHL and BIG10. Managing stress and staying focused during the final game – anchor techniques followed. Mental routine followed during game to avoid gametime and performance anxiety. Routine after scoring – accepting, figuring out and moving on. Three to four pillars the Goaltending philosophy is based on and their importance.Click here for full show notes: https://goaliehacks.com/ghp-69-w-2021-mike-richter-award-winner-jack-lafontaine/Goalie Hacks LinkTree:https://linktr.ee/goaliehacksSubmit Feedback/ Suggestion/ Applications:https://bit.ly/39Fdpsb**Join The Goalie Hacks Inner Circle*****Checkout Our Youtube Channel*****Sign-up For Our E-mail List****NeurotrackerX Details ***Send us a DM on Instagram*Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/goaliehacks)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/goaliehacks)

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 230: Whitley Award Winner Nuklu Phom in Nagaland saving the Amur Falcon

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 44:32


Nuklu Phom was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. Nuklu has been instrumental in leading efforts to preserve the Amur Falcon in Nagaland, India. The Amur Falcon is the world's longest migrating bird of prey and Nagaland is a critical stop along their long migration. Over a decade ago, Amur Falcons were being poached in the tens of thousands. However, Nuklu helped organize a grassroots effort to not only halt the poaching, but also preserve Nagaland's natural resources. His project that is being supported by the Whitley Fund for Nature is called "Establishing a biodiversity peace corridor in Nagaland." He is a true conservation hero and his story is one that needs to be told.  You can learn more about Sammy Safari and the Whitley Nature Fund by going HERE Show notes HERE

JFK35
Meet the 2021 PEN/Hemingway Award Winner

JFK35

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 29:45


In this episode, Hemingway Scholar-in-Residence Dr. Hilary Justice gives us the background on the JFK Library's collaboration with PEN America and Ernest Hemingway family's support of the PEN/Hemingway Award, and we speak with the 2021 PEN/Hemingway winner, Kawai Strong Washburn.

eTown
Richard Thompson / Sarah McLachlan / eChievement Award Winner Julie Weier (originally recorded in 1994)

eTown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 59:22


We're continuing our creation of shows with highlights from the 30 seasons eTown has been on the air.  But once again, while digging into the eTown archives, we came across this episode from 1994 that was just too stellar from start to finish to even consider not re-airing it in its entirety. Guitarist (and bird watcher) extraordinaire Richard Thompson joins us, as does gifted Canadian performer Sarah McLachlan (who was on her very first tour of the US at this time). And we hear from eChievement Award Julie Weier, of Wisconsin, cofounder of The Midwest Renewable Energy Association, which educates the public about energy conservation through a number of yearly events.

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 226: Whitley Award Winner Sammy Safari on conserving Sea Turtles in Africa

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 38:05


Sammy Safari was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. Sammy is leading an effort to help save sea turtles off the coast of Kenya. Sea turtles have been poached off Kenya for many years, with a dramatic increase seen with the Covid pandemic. The loss of tourism in Kenya has pushed locals out into the oceans to survive. Sadly, sea turtles have been targeted for poaching. Sammy and his team with Local Ocean Trust have been educating the masses on not only why sea turtles are important, but also working to preserve the Kenyan coastline and its mangrove forests. He is a true conservation hero doing his part to save these animals. Congratulations to Sammy and his team! You can learn more about Dr. Lucy Kemp and the Whitley Nature Fund by going HERE Show notes HERE

After Further Review
June 10, 2021 - Brennan Seehafer, 2019 Coolest Coast Champion Award Winner

After Further Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 29:38


June 10, 2021 - Brennan Seehafer, 2019 Coolest Coast Champion Award Winner

Beyond The Reef
29. Decide to be a DIVA (with Guest- 8x Nā Hōkū Hānohano award winner Natalie Ai Kamauu)

Beyond The Reef

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 50:22


In This Episode You'll Learn:Lessons of being the “backup” to her dadStarting BEFORE she was ready. THE moment she found HER VOICEOn her path to becoming Miss Aloha HULA Signing in Waikiki to survive to DECIDING she would become A DIVADiva Confidence and ConvictionOne of the 1st artist in Hawaii to create her OWN label How Nat and ʻIolani have kept their marriage solid all these yearsWhat success/awards FEEL like Grammy Night and Holding to her ValuesGet In Touch:Join the SISterhood: https://bit.ly/3pE3kCgEmail: alohauilani@beyondthereefpodcast.comInstagram: @uilanitevagaConnect With Natalie:Natalie On IG: https://www.instagram.com/natalieaikamauuofficial/www.natalieaikamauu.com

All Creatures Podcast
Episode 224: Whitley Award Winner Dr. Lucy Kemp on conserving the Southern Ground-hornbill

All Creatures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 42:48


Dr. Lucy Kemp was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. Dr. Kemp is leading a grassroots effort to help save and preserve the amazing Southern Ground-hornbill in Africa. Her story gives us so much hope for the future for not only the Southern Ground-hornbill, but all wildlife in Africa and beyond. Her project title is "A community-based approach to conserve the Southern Ground-hornbill." In our interview we discuss the issues that are driving this incredible bird towards extinction and what she and her team at the Mabula Ground Hornbill Project are doing to stop this from happening.  Congratulations to Dr. Kemp and her team!  You can learn more about Dr. Lucy Kemp and the Whitley Nature Fund by going HERE Show notes HERE

The BreakPoint Podcast
Bob Fu: Wilberforce Award Winner and a Man for Our Time

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 4:21


Jeff Knows Inc.
#110 - We Dive into the story of Knighted, Best Selling Author & Award Winner Marco Robinson

Jeff Knows Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 62:53


Jeff Knows Inc Podcast Hosted by Jeff Lopes - Episode 110 - Marco Robinson.  Marco 's Movie Legacy of Lies became #4 on Netflix, #1 Bestselling Author of two Books, an Award Winning Entrepreneur, Winner of the People's Choice Best Real Estate Investment Company 2015 & Winner Tatler’s Best Restaurants.Marco RobinsonFacebook: MarcoRobinsonInstagram: MarcoRobinsonJeff LopesWebsite: www.JeffKnowsInc.comEmail: Jeff@jeffknowsinc.comFacebook: www.facebook.com/jeffknowsincInstagram: www.instagram.com/JeffLopesThe Fastest Growing Community of Entrepreneur Dadshttps://www.Jeffreylopes.comPurchase your Copy of the #1 Seller Entrepreneur Dad#KeepMovingForward - Jeff LopesSupport the show (https://www.jeffreylopes.com)