Podcasts about Medical college

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Professional organization for medical professionals

  • 378PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Medical college

Latest podcast episodes about Medical college

Evolved Caveman
Episode 143: Jerks At Work And How To Deal With Them

Evolved Caveman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 31:36


The majority of our adult hours are spent in the workplace. What is one of the biggest contributors to unhappiness and dissatisfaction at work? Coworkers! The main reason employees leave a job is the degree of jerkiness of their supervisor. What's more, coworkers might have a touch of narcissism, or emotional volatility or anger or dishonesty. Any of these lead to a more stressful and conflict-laden workplace. How do you spot these jerk-holes and how can you best deal with them? Topics covered: How do I deal with an angry or deceitful or attention-grabbing coworker? What are some of the behaviors at work that lead to conflict, difficulty or disruption? To what extent are people even aware of their problematic behaviors? You break people down into personality types to help readers make sense of the jerks at work. What are a few of the problematic personalities at work? What tells or clues should we look for to spot them early? And what are some of the best tools or ideas to deal with these personality types? Dr. John's Distinguished Guest: Jody J. Foster, MD, MBA is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Assistant Dean for Professionalism in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Pennsylvania Hospital and Chair of the Penn Medicine Academy of Master Clinicians. After receiving her medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in a combined and accelerated BA/MD program with Lehigh University, Dr. Foster completed both a residency and a chief residency in psychiatry and a fellowship in clinical psychopharmacology and mood disorders at The Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital.  She also attained her masters of business administration, with a concentration in finance, from the Wharton School. Dr. Foster serves as the Executive Clinical Director of the Professionalism Program at Penn Medicine and leads the Professionalism Committees at the member hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania Health System. She also serves as Senior Advisor to the Wharton Executive MBA Program. Dr. Foster is a noted educator and has received numerous awards for clinical excellence and teaching. She has been named a “Top Doc” by Philadelphia Magazine and in her Professionalism role has consulted not only within healthcare but also with legal and venture capital firms, corporate entities, education, the arts and major league sports. She is author of the excellent book, The Schmuck In My Office: How To Deal Effectively With Difficult People At Work. If you like what you've heard at The Evolved Caveman podcast, support us by subscribing, leaving reviews on Apple podcasts. Every review helps to get the message out! Please share the podcast with friends and colleagues.Follow Dr. John Schinnerer on| Instagram | Instagram.com/@TheEvolvedCaveman| Facebook | Facebook.com/Anger.Management.Expert| Twitter | Twitter.com/@JohnSchin| LinkedIn | Linkedin.com/in/DrJohnSchinnererOr join the email list by visiting: GuideToSelf.comPlease visit our YouTube channel and remember to Like & Subscribe!https://www.youtube.com/user/jschinnererEditing/Mixing/Mastering by: Brian Donat of B/Line Studios www.BLineStudios.com

The Covert Narcissism Podcast
Removing Trauma from the Body

The Covert Narcissism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 22:18


Midweek special episode!! Dr. Melissa Kalt, M.D. specializes in removing the trauma of narcissistic abuse from the body. She brings so much insight to the topic, and I thoroughly enjoyed interviewing her for our audience. This interview is extremely informative and helpful. To further pursue work with her, visit here. Dr. Melissa is a graduate of the Medical College of Wisconsin – triple-board-certified in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Lipidology. She was voted to the US Best Doctors™ list by her peers year over year 2009-2018. While single parenting five children, Dr Melissa was promoted from staff physician to Assistant Clinical Professor to Medical Site Director of three clinics at Froedtert and Medical College of Wisconsin, an academic medical institution. By 2012, Dr Melissa had achieved every goal on her over-achiever to-do list yet was miserable. She began an extraordinary journey that solved her most unsolvable problem. It all started with the question - What if life doesn't have to be this way? The answer - Connect to the truth of who you are. Dr Melissa got really clear about who she was, who she needed to be, and what needed to change. She identified, then extracted herself from several narcissistic relationships and committed to healing her family's trauma. By extracting the illusion and getting clear about the truth of who she was – everything changed. In 2018, Dr Melissa made the leap to expand beyond the limits of traditional medicine and left her 20+ year medical career to follow her Why. That same year, she found her forever partner in love and business, whom she married in 2019. Check out her program here!! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/covertnarcissism/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.04.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 62:06


Can cocoa consumption help us age better? Medical College of Georgia, Sept. 14, 2021 Whether consuming cocoa, known to be packed with powerful antioxidants that protect our cells from damage, helps us age better, is a question scientists want to definitively answer. The COSMOS Trial (COcoa Supplement and Multivitamin Outcomes Study), led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, gathered data from 21,444 men and women looking at the impact of a cocoa extract supplement and/or multivitamins on common health problems, most of which increase with age. Dong and his colleagues will be looking specifically at aging, including so called “inflammaging,” and epigenetic aging, both considered good indicators of our biological age. Rather than just looking at the year you were born, biological age also takes into account key factors that impact your function and health, like genetics and lifestyle. He also has more standard aging measures on these individuals, like blood pressure and cognitive function tests. (NEXT) Psychobiotics as a novel strategy for alleviating anxiety and depression Jiangnan University (China), September 10, 2021 As an important ‘microbial organ', the gut microbiota directly participates in nutrient metabolism and peripheral immune regulation and even distantly affects brain functions and behaviours. This review provides an overview of recent discoveries regarding how the gut microbiota influences anxiety and depression and aims to establish the key signalling pathways between the gut microbiota and the brain. Finally, the psychobiotic strategy for treating mood disorders is discussed, covering both pre-clinical and clinical studies. Psychobiotic treatment could provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat anxiety and depression. In recent years, the gut microbiota has been viewed as a physiological control centre that is linked to the host's immune system, hormonal system, nervous system, or other physiological pathways. Until now, many studies have revealed the inextricable relationship between the gut microbiome and the brain, especially its participation in the regulation of memory, mood, and behaviour (Cryan et al., 2019b). (NEXT) Further evidence that vitamin D might protect against severe COVID-19 disease and death Trinity College (Ireland) and University of Edinburgh, September 16, 2021 New research from Trinity College and University of Edinburgh has examined the association between vitamin D and COVID-19, and found that ambient ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation (which is key for vitamin D production in the skin) at an individual's place of residence in the weeks before COVID-19 infection, was strongly protective against severe disease and death. Researchers, for the first time, looked at both genetically-predicted and UVB-predicted vitamin D level. Almost half a million individuals in the UK took part in the study, and ambient UVB radiation before COVID-19 infection was individually assessed for each participant. When comparing the two variables, researchers found that correlation with measured vitamin D concentration in the circulation was three-fold stronger for UVB-predicted vitamin D level, compared to genetically-predicted. (NEXT) Study: Eating yogurt can help older adults with high blood pressure University of Maine, September 13, 2021 Yogurt consumption can help lower blood pressure in older adults with elevated levels, according to a new study led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Maine. The MSLS team examined the relationship between yogurt consumption and bloodpressure among older adults with and without high blood pressure. Statistical analyses revealed modest but statistically significant reductions in systolic blood pressure among those with high blood pressure who consumed yogurt. (NEXT) Comprehensive review of antioxidants and common arterial condition University of Connecticut, September 13, 2021 Nutritional science graduate student Chelsea Garcia and associate professor Christopher Blesso recently published an article in Free Radical Biology and Medicine outlining the research to date on a type of antioxidant called anthocyanins and its impact on atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis occurs when fats and cholesterol build up along the artery walls. This can restrict blood flow and cause blood clots. This condition is associated with oxidative stress, a process our bodies undergo throughout our lifetime as they encounter free radicals. These oxygen-containing molecules are highly reactive and unstable. They occur when a molecule gains or loses an electron. The unpaired electron on the free radical can react with other molecules and cause age-related harms in the body. (NEXT) Blueberry and soluble fiber improve serum antioxidant and adipokine biomarkers and lipid peroxidation in pregnant women with obesity University of Nevada, September 10, 2021 According to news originating from the University of Nevada research stated, “Pregnancies affected by obesity are at high risk for developing metabolic complications with oxidative stress and adipocyte dysfunction contributing to the underlying pathologies.” We conducted an 18 gestation-week randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of a dietary intervention comprising of whole blueberries and soluble fiber vs. control (standard prenatal care) on biomarkers of oxidative stress/antioxidant status and adipocyte and hormonal functions in pregnant women with obesity (* * n* * = 34). Serum samples were collected at baseline (

Ch Sushil Rao
Ragging in medical college, student files police complaint in Telangana

Ch Sushil Rao

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 5:04


In alleged ragging incident in Suryapet medical college, student reportedly stripped and assaulted. The first year medical student was confined to a room for several hours and the seniors also allegedly tried to shave his head with a beard trimmer at the men's hostel in the Government Medical College at Suryapet. The government has ordered an enquiry into the incident. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chsushilrao/message

The PathPod Podcast
PathPod Quiz Show: Bears, KITTENS, and Pathology ABCs!

The PathPod Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 52:41


Test your pathology knowledge with our next Quiz Show! Join hosts Dr. Christina Arnold (@CArnold_GI), Dr. Mike Arnold (@MArnold_PedPath), Dr. Kamran Mirza (@KMirza), and Dr. Sara Jiang (@Sara_Jiang).  Our guests, Lauren Miller, (@LJMiller_MJ), fourth-year medical student at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Dr. Brett Kurpiel, (@basophil_brett), PGY2 at  UVA Pathology, and Dr. Kossivi Dantey, Assistant Professor, Drexel University College of Medicine, play our games and attempt to win an exclusive PathPod clear ruler!  What do you do when faced with a bear? Who can get KITTENS? And relearn your ABCs in pathology with us! Featured public domain music by The U.S. Army Blues

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color
E144: Hannah Mary Tabbs

Fruitloops: Serial Killers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 85:17


(note: time stamps are without ads & may be off a little) This week, Beth and Wendy discuss the case of Hannah Mary Tabbs, a black American woman who lived in Philadelphia during the late 1800s. Tabbs, along with an accomplice, participated in the murder and dismemberment of her alleged lover, Wakefield Gains. This subject was suggested to us by William, and it was researched and written by Minnie, who is also our special guest today! We dive into the setting (09:07), the killers early life (19:50) and the timeline (25:24).  Then, we get into the investigation & arrest (33:00), "Where are they now?" (01:05:49) followed by our takeaways and what we think made the perp snap (01:06:57).   As usual we close out the show with some tips on how not to get murdered and our shout outs (01:13:41).  Thanks for listening! This is a weekly podcast and new episodes drop every Thursday, so until next time... look alive guys, it's crazy out there! Sponsors Better Help https://www.betterhelp.com/Fruit Best Fiends https://apps.apple.com/us/app/best-fiends-puzzle-adventure/id868013618 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Seriously.BestFiends&hl=en_US&gl=US Shout Outs The Harder They Fall https://www.netflix.com/title/81077494 Kali Gross https://aas.emory.edu/people/bios/gross-kali.html http://www.kalinicolegross.com/bio Todrick Hall https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Todrick_Hall https://www.todrickhall.com/ Passing https://www.netflix.com/title/81424320 Harsh Reality: The Story of Miriam Rivera https://wondery.com/shows/the-story-of-miriam-rivera/ Where to find us: Our Facebook page is Fruitloopspod and our discussion group is Fruitloopspod Discussion on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod/ We are also on Twitter and Instagram @fruitloopspod Please send any questions or comments to fruitloopspod@gmail.com or leave us a voicemail at 602-935-6294.  We just might read your email or play your voicemail on the show! Want to Support the show? You can support the show by rating and reviewing Fruitloops on iTunes, or anywhere else that you get your podcasts from.  We would love it if you gave us 5 stars! You can make a donation on the Cash App https://cash.me/$fruitloopspod Or become a monthly Patron through our Podbean Patron page https://patron.podbean.com/fruitloopspod Footnotes Articles/Websites Wikipedia contributors. (05/04/2021). Hannah Mary Tabbs. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_Mary_Tabbs Gross, K. (02/22/2016). Hannah Mary Tabbs: A black murderess in racist 1800s US. BBC News. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-35616529 Riley, S. (03-22-2018). Kali Nicole Gross. Mixed Race Studies. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from http://www.mixedracestudies.org/?tag=hannah-mary-tabbs History Wikipedia contributors. (11/16/2021). American Civil War. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War Wikipedia contributors. (11/09/2021). Slavery in the United States. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States Wikipedia contributors. (11/20/2021). Philadelphia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/26/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia Wikipedia contributors. (11/26/2021). Lenape. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/26/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenape Wikipedia contributors. (10/11/2021). Treaty of Shackamaxon. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/26/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Shackamaxon Wikipedia contributors. (11/23/2021). History of Pennsylvania. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/26/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Pennsylvania Wikipedia contributors. (10/12/2021). History of African Americans in Philadelphia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11/29/2021 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_African_Americans_in_Philadelphia Maillard, K. (04/12/2008). The Multiracial Epiphany of Loving. Fordham Law Review, Vol. 76, p. 2709. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/assets/pdfs/Vol_76/Maillard_Vol_76_May.pdf Mandell, M. (n.d.). Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Retrieved 11/16/2021 from https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/womans-medical-college-of-pennsylvania/ Books Gross, K. (2016). Handle With Care. In Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso: A Tale of Race, Sex, and Violence in America. (p. 1-25). Oxford, New York. Oxford University Press.  Crighton, J. (2017). Chapter 7. In Detective in the White City: The Real Story of Frank Geyer. (p. 53-74). Murrieta, California. RW Publishing House. Podcasts Wilson, Tracey V.; Frey, Holly (Hosts). (04/04/2016). Stuff You Missed in History Class. Interview: Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso. [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved 12/02/2021 from https://www.iheart.com/podcast/stuff-you-missed-in-history-cl-21124503/episode/interview-hannah-mary-tabbs-and-the-30207544/ MaRah and Taz (hosts). (5/21/2021). Sistas Who Kill: Hannah Mary Tabbs. [Audio Podcast]. Retrieved on 12/2/2021 from https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy81MDc2MDIzYy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Video Who was Hannah Mary Tabbs? Oxford Academic (Oxford University Press) https://youtu.be/gaxWrp1EXEw Music "Abyss" by Alasen: ●https://soundcloud.com/alasen●https://twitter.com/icemantrap ●https://instagram.com/icemanbass/●https://soundcloud.com/therealfrozenguy● Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License "Christmas Rap" by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3791-furious-freak License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ "Christmas Trap Beat" by Pradigy Musicman https://youtu.be/_NOIGDVctQw "Trap Beat 6" by Arulo Mixkit Stock Music Free License https://mixkit.co/free-stock-music "Hip Hop Christmas" by Twin Musicom http://www.twinmusicom.org Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Connect with us on: Twitter @FruitLoopsPod Instagram https://www.instagram.com/fruitloopspod Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Fruitloopspod and https://www.facebook.com/groups/fruitloopspod

CalPsychiatry Presents: Mindstories
Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder | Flora Zaken-Greenberg, Ph.D.

CalPsychiatry Presents: Mindstories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 20:30


Dr. Zaken-Greenberg graduated with a Ph.D. In Counseling Psychology from the University of Florida in 1985. She completed a Post Doctoral Fellowship in Neuropsychology in 1986 from The Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute of the Medical College of Pennsylvania. In 1987, Dr. Zaken-Greenberg completed a Post Doctoral Fellowship in Cognitive Therapy at the Center for Cognitive Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania. She was co-owner and clinical director of the Florida Center for Cognitive Therapy from 1987 through 2019 and is now a staff psychologist at Cognitive Behavior Associates in Beverly Hills.   Cognitive Behavior Associates ------ Instagram Facebook LinkedIn  

Rx for Success Podcast
81. The Maven: Jill Einstein, MD

Rx for Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 45:27


Jill is a graduate of Stanford University and the Medical College of Wisconsin. She completed her internal medicine residency at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco where she ran her internal medicine practice until shifting her focus to projects that draw on her medical background, while leveraging her organizational and community building skills. Jill is the immediate past president of the Mount Zion Health Fund in San Francisco, which makes grants in patient care and research to projects at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Mount Zion campus. After serving on the board for nine years, she currently co-chairs their Strategic Planning Task Force. In 2011, she organized the “Celebrating 100 Years at Mount Zion” event, which included a UCSF community health fair. Unlock Bonus content and get the shows early on our Patreon Follow us or Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Amazon  | Spotify --- Show notes at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/81 Report-out with comments or feedback at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/report Music by Ryan Jones. Find Ryan on Instagram at _ryjones_, Contact Ryan at ryjonesofficial@gmail.com

Circulation on the Run
Circulation December 7, 2021 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 23:20


Please join Guest Host Mercedes Carnethon along with first author Connie Hess and Guest Editor Gregory Lip as they discuss the article "Reduction in Acute Limb Ischemia With Rivaroxaban Versus Placebo in Peripheral Artery Disease After Lower Extremity Revascularization: Insights From VOYAGER PAD." Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, associate editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, associate editor, director of the Poly Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Greg, our feature discussion is on a really important topic, peripheral artery disease. So important, so rampant, not talked about enough. And it's really insights from the VOYAGER-PAD trial telling us about the reduction in acute limb ischemia with Rivaroxaban versus placebo in peripheral artery disease after lower extremity revascularization. But before we get into all that, I want you to get your coffee while I tell you about my picks of today's issue. Should I start? Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Okay. So the first paper deals with the residual ischemic risk following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. We know that despite advances, patients following CABG still have significant risk. So this paper refers to a subgroup of patients from the REDUCE-IT trial with a history of CABG, which was analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of icosapent ethyl treatment in the reduction of cardiovascular events in this high risk patient population. Now, as a reminder, the REDUCE-IT trial was a multicenter, placebo controlled, double blind trial, where statin treated patients with controlled LDL cholesterol and mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia were randomized to four grams daily of icosapent ethyl or placebo. They experienced a 25% reduction in risk of a primary efficacy endpoint, which was cardiovascular death, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Now the current report tells us about the subgroup of patients from the trial with a history of CABG. Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, Carolyn. So what did they find in this subgroup of patients? Dr. Carolyn Lam: So of the 8,179 patients randomized in REDUCE-IT, 22.5% had a history of CABG with 897 patients randomized to icosapent ethyl and 940 to placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar between the treatment groups and randomization to icosapent ethyl was associated with a significant reduction in the primary endpoint, as well as in key secondary endpoint and in total ischemic events compared to placebo. This yielded an absolute risk reduction of 6.2% in first events with a number needed to treat of 16 over a median follow up time of 4.8 years. So, Greg, I think you'll agree, icosapent ethyl may be an important pharmaco-therapeutic option to consider in eligible patients with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. What an excellent summary. So Carolyn, for my first paper... And this study comes to us from Professor Judith Haendeler from the Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine. So Carolyn, this is a new type of quiz question. And as you listen to the presentation, help us predict the clinical implications. Okay, here we go. Dr. Greg Hundley: All right. So Carolyn, telomerase, also called terminal transferase, is a ribonuclear protein that adds a species dependent telomere repeat sequence to the three prime end of telomeres. And Carolyn, just to refresh our memories, a telomere is a region of repetitive sequences at each end of the chromosomes of most eukaryotes. And telomerase was discovered interestingly by Carol Greider and Elizabeth Blackburn in 1984. And together with some others, including Jack Szostak, they were awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine for discovery. Dr. Greg Hundley: So Carolyn, telomerase is active in gamuts and most cancer cells, but is normally absent from or at very low levels in most somatic cells. And the catalytic subunit of telomerase called telomerase reverse transcriptase or trt has protective functions in the cardiovascular system, particularly in regard to ischemia reperfusion injury. And interestingly trt or telomerase reverse transcriptase is not present in the nucleus, but also in mitochondria. However, for us in cardiovascular medicine, it is unclear whether nuclear or mitochondrial trt is responsible for the observed protection. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, fascinating. So what did today's paper find? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Carolyn. So it was mitochondrial, but not nuclear telomerase reverse transcriptase that was found critical for mitochondrial respiration during ischemia reperfusion injury. And mitochondrial telomerase reverse transcriptase improves complex 1 subunit composition. And trt is present in human heart mitochondria and remote ischemic preconditioning increases its level in these organelles. Also, Carolyn TA65 was found to have comparable effects ex vivo and improved migratory capacity of endothelial cells and myofibroblast differentiation. So Carolyn, with this summary, can you help speculate on the clinical implications of this paper? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Oh, Greg. You set it up so nicely. So I would speculate that the clinical implications are that an increase in the mitochondrial telomerase reverse transcriptase or trt would be able to help with cardioprotection in ischaemic reperfusion injury, or at least that's what we hope and that's where we should be going with this. Am I right? Dr. Greg Hundley: Absolutely, Carolyn. So in the future, this research showing that trt and cardioprotection... Maybe we increase this and it could serve as a therapeutic strategy. Excellent job, Carolyn. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Thank you, Greg. All right. My next paper is a preclinical paper. I will spare you of difficult quizzes and maybe... This is just so neat. Let me tell you about it. So the study really provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation that contributes to the development of vascular diseases like renal atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. So very important. Dr. Jiliang Zhou from Medical College of Georgia and colleagues basically used an in silico approach to probe unbiased, proprietary, and diverse, publicly available bulk RNA-Seq and scRNA-Seq datasets to search for smooth muscle cell specific long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs. Dr. Carolyn Lam: The search ended up identifying CARMN, which stands for cardiac mesoderm enhancer-associated non-coding RNA, CARMN. As a highly abundant, highly conserved smooth muscle cell specific lncRNA, CARMN was recently reported to play roles in cardiac differentiation and was initially annotated as a host lncRNA for the microRNA, the MIR143145 cluster, which is the best characterized microRNAs in regulating smooth muscle cell differentiation and phenotypical modulation. Dr. Carolyn Lam: But in the current study, the authors confirmed the expression specificity of CARMN using a novel GFP knock-in reporter mouse model, and discovered that CARMN is downregulated in various vascular diseases. They further found that CARMN is critical for maintaining vascular smooth muscle cell contractile phenotype, both in vitro and in vivo by directly binding to the smooth muscle cell specific transcriptional cofactor known as myocardit. Dr. Greg Hundley: Okay. Carolyn, what a beautiful summary here. So what's the take home message here? Dr. Carolyn Lam: So these findings collectively suggest that CARMN is a key regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype, and therefore represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of smooth muscle cell related proliferative diseases. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Well, Greg, thanks for letting me to tell you about that one. But let me tell you also about other papers in today's issue. There's an exchange of letters between Dr's Lee and Chew on high rates of coronary events in the rapid troponin T0 one hour protocol. Is it a reality or illusion? There's an ECG Challenge by Dr. Liu on “Acute Inferior Wall Myocardial Infarction. What is the Culprit Artery? In Cardiology News, Bridget Kuehn writes on persistent heart effects of COVID-19 and how that emphasizes the need for prevention. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. Well, I've got a Research Letter to tell you about from Professor Huang, entitled “High Prevalence of Unrecognized Congenital Heart Disease in School-Age Children in Rural China: A Population-Based Echocardiographic Screening Study.” Well, Carolyn, what a fantastic issue. And how about we get onto that feature discussion now and learn more out lower extremity revascularization and insights from the VOYAGER-PAD study? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go, Greg. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Good morning, everyone. Welcome to this episode of Circulation on the Run podcast. I'm Mercedes Carnethon, Professor and Vice Chair of Preventive Medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and associate editor of the journal. Really excited today to hear from one of our authors of a particularly interesting piece that we'd like to discuss today about peripheral artery disease after lower extremity revascularization. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: And we have with us today, the lead author, Dr. Connie Hess from the division of cardiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. And we have Dr. Gregory Lip with us. So welcome to the both of you. Professor Gregory Lip: Hello there. Dr. Connie Hess: Thank you for having me. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Thank you both for joining us. This is really exciting. I know that when I read this piece, I was really excited to think about the implications that these study findings from this clinical trial will have for a very important clinical problem of peripheral arterial disease and those complications. So, Connie, would you be willing to start by telling us a little bit about what you found in this study? Dr. Connie Hess: Yeah, absolutely. I think maybe a good place to start first is, if that's okay, is just a little bit of the background and why we looked at this and thought to look at this. I think as you're both probably aware, peripheral artery disease is a very highly prevalent condition. It affects a lot of people, but there's not a lot of awareness about it. It's in some ways the forgotten manifestation of atherosclerosis. And so acute limb ischemia in particular is a very feared complication of peripheral artery disease. And unlike things like ST elevation, myocardial infarction, and stroke about which patients and providers have a lot of knowledge and understanding, many people don't know about acute limb ischemia. And in particular ALI, acute limb ischemia, is a complication of peripheral revascularization that many of us as proceduralists are very concerned about. Dr. Connie Hess: And so what we wanted to do was use this very unique clinical trial and dataset to look at acute limb ischemia, to describe it, to better understand it, especially after a peripheral revascularization. And then also to look at the effect of Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on this feared outcome. We're lacking therapies to effectively prevent ALI. Dr. Connie Hess: And so if I just briefly review the trial, VOYAGER-PAD randomized 6,564 patients undergoing peripheral revascularization, both surgical or endovascular to Rivaroxaban, 2.5 milligrams twice daily versus placebo on top of aspirin. And then providers could use prochidagril for up to six months per their discretion. Now, the primary outcome for VOYAGER-PAD was very unique. This was a five point composite that looked at acute limb ischemia, major amputation of vascular etiology, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death. Dr. Connie Hess: And so in this trial in the primary results, Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone was highly effective in reducing the primary endpoint, that five point composite I just described. And so we were excited to look specifically at the effect of this combination therapy on acute limb ischemia alone. What we found to begin with, I think in terms of describing acute limb ischemia is important. So the three year cumulative incidence in the patients assigned a placebo was about 8% for ALI. So this is not an uncommon problem. And in fact, we found that there was incidents of ALI occurring quite early after the procedure and that the risk persisted, even three years out. Dr. Connie Hess: And Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone was very effective in reducing ALI by about 33%. Beyond that, we also looked at ALI in terms of severity of these complications. And we found that about a third of patients had a very severe ALI event that we defined as ALI followed by death, major amputation, or requiring a prolonged hospitalization with time in the intensive care unit. And for those patients, Rivaroxaban plus aspirin was even more effective with almost a 55% reduction. Dr. Connie Hess: Lastly, I think we also looked at just the patients who are at risk for ALI after peripheral revascularization. And we did identify some patient and procedural factors that might help us identify these patients. For example, having a prior lower extremity revascularization, having more severe PAD as indicated by a low ankle brachial index, undergoing surgical revascularization, and having longer target lesions. So I think we were able to describe ALI in a way that some other trials and datasets have not been able to do. And then also beyond that to provide some evidence for effective therapy to prevent this complication. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: All of that is so exciting. And for somebody coming to this outside of the initial field, I can certainly see a lot of innovations that you describe in what you've done and the importance to the population of people who experience this very debilitating illness. So it's really wonderful to see this in print. So tell me, Greg, what excited you as the editor about this particular paper? So what made it really stand out in your mind? Professor Gregory Lip: Thanks, Mercedes. And firstly, congratulations to Dr. Hess for a really nice paper. And I think that it's really important because many cardiologists tend to neglect looking at and managing peripheral artery disease, especially with the medical therapies. And I think VOYAGER-PAD was an important advancement of how we can have... You could say, dual blockade, both with low dose anticoagulation plus antiplatelets should improve the outcomes. Professor Gregory Lip: So I think it really brings to the forefront how we should optimize medical therapy and peripheral disease. It's not simply a matter of surgery or just intervention with stenting. And I think maybe the other important aspects in regard to this study, this trial is when you combine an antiplatelet with an anticoagulant, it's worth flagging up the potential for added risk of bleeding. And it's therefore the fact that your analysis included to identify the patients at high risk of acute limb ischemia, then we will actually facilitate risk stratification so that we can perhaps target the very high risk patients where that balance in terms of the net benefit for the combination therapy compared to aspirin alone would be there because you're balancing the thrombotic and limb ischemic outcome versus the potential for bleeding. Professor Gregory Lip: We are also using of course, in VOYAGER-PAD low dose Rivaroxaban, which is not the stroke prevention dose of Rivaroxaban in everyday clinical practice. And that's worth emphasizing. So we translate peripheral disease dosages or regimes versus what we see in other prothrombotic situations like atrial fibrillation, which leads to stroke. And that's probably worth emphasizing. And I think really what is most important is that we can hopefully identify the high risk subset of patients with peripheral artery disease at risk of acute limb ischemia, where they're going to particularly benefit from combination therapy. So an important advance for medical therapy for peripheral disease. So congratulations on this paper as well. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: Yeah. I really echo that. One of the things that when we write original research papers, we are always encouraged not to speculate beyond the data that we're presenting. But one of the values of this podcast is that we get a chance to really needle the authors and challenge them to speculate about what does this mean? What does this mean for the field? And Connie in particular, what do you think the next steps are for patients and providers based on what you found today in this excellent study? Dr. Connie Hess: Mercedes, that's a great question. Certainly we always want to know what next? What are the implications of these findings? And so to me, I echo both of you. I'm personally very excited as someone in the field. And as a proceduralist, I'm very excited that for the first time, we actually have data to support a medical therapy post intervention. Although there's a lot of use of things like dual antiplatelet therapy and even anticoagulation, there's not a lot of data to support it after peripheral revascularization. So this really is the first large scale, high quality data to support a strategy. And so I do think that this is something that we should adopt. Dr. Connie Hess: I think what I didn't mention before is that actually, when you look at the cumulative incidence curves for ALI in the Rivaroxaban versus placebo groups, not only do you see that there is early risk for ALI after the procedure... And typically we think of this as potentially technical failure that we can't modify, but you saw a very early benefit for Rivaroxaban plus aspirin versus aspirin alone here, suggesting that the sooner you start, the better. Of course, it has to be when it's safe from a bleeding perspective and when the proceduralist feels comfortable with this. But I do think that the implications are that we should... We proceduralists, especially in this population and as professor Lip mentioned the high risk patients in particular, should be starting this therapy as soon as we feel safe. And so I think the data are there. The next step to me is really increasing awareness, in particular among providers who are treating these patients, but even among our other colleagues or cardiovascular colleagues who may not treat these peripheral artery disease patients primarily, but do see them in their clinic. Dr. Connie Hess: A lot of them have cardiovascular disease and other cardiovascular problems, but to increase awareness that this dual pathway inhibition with low dose factor 10, anticoagulation inhibition and low antiplatelet therapy is a viable and favorable combination and to continue this so that when they see this, they're not surprised and not questioning whether to stop it. Dr. Connie Hess: I think also of course now that we are getting more data to understand how morbid and bad ALI is, I do think we also need to educate patients. You both probably recall all the tremendous efforts that were made to increase awareness in the patient population about myocardial infarction and stroke. You have all those campaigns and understanding the importance of timely intervention and reperfusion. I think that actually should be done for acute limb ischemia as well. We need to have providers aware about this complication and understanding emergent treatment. We also need patients to understand it so they can come in sooner so that they're not having delayed presentation for which primary amputation is the only treatment option. So I think there's a lot of work to be done, but certainly very excited that we have a better understanding of ALI as well as preventive therapy. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: I really appreciate that final word. And I really can't think of a better way to wrap up than the final words that you provided, Connie. Both the context that you provided around this piece and your thoughts as well, Greg, about what makes it innovative and exciting for our readership at Circulation are really invaluable. So I just really want to thank you for joining us as an author and thank you for selecting this, Greg. This is a really great piece. I've learned a good deal. Dr. Mercedes Carnethon: This is me, Mercedes Carnethon, wrapping up this addition of Circulation on the Run, following an outstanding discussion with Dr. Connie Hess from the University of Colorado and Greg Lip, the handling editor for the piece. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit ahajournals.org.

The Pain Beat
The Pain Beat (Episode 8) – Studying and Understanding Sex Differences in Pain: The How and the Why

The Pain Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 51:23


For its eighth episode, The Pain Beat gathered together a group of pain researchers with expertise in the study of sex differences in pain. The group discussed their own discoveries of sex differences in pain in the course of their research, why pain investigators should pay attention to sex differences and how they should go about examining them, and much more. Podcast participants include: Gregory Dussor, PhD, University of Texas at Dallas, US Jeffrey Mogil, PhD, McGill University, Montreal, US Anne Murphy, PhD, Georgia State University, Atlanta, US Kate Sadler, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, US (moderator)

South Carolina from A to Z
"B" is for Banov, Leon

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 0:51


"B" is for Banov, Leon [1888-1971]. Physician. Public Health Official. Born in Poland, Banov immigrated to Charleston at the age of eight. He received his pharmacy degree from the Medical College of South Carolina and returned to the College and obtained his M.D. In 1920 he was appointed Charleston County's first public health officer and instituted routine medical examinations of schoolchildren, enforced existing laws requiring smallpox vaccinations, and advocated vaccination against typhoid. Charleston had the nation's highest infant mortality rate, an alarming number of TB cases, and incredibly sloppy birth records. Thanks to Banov's tireless efforts, these situations improved dramatically. In 1926 Leon Banov was also appointed Public Health Officer for the City of Charleston and in 1936 combined the city and county offices into one and remained as director until his retirement in 1962.

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
123: Stress, PTSD, Chronic Pain, and a Potential Solution with Dr. Robyn Tiger

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:23


“So when we can relieve the stress in our bodies, relieve the stress in our minds, we can feel better in our bodies and relieve that chronic tension.” -Robyn Tiger MD   In today's episode, Dr. Jen Barna has an informative conversation with Dr. Robyn Tiger. Robyn Tiger, MD, is a physician & trauma-informed self-care coach. She founded StressFreeMD, a wellness practice that provides freedom through self-care education. In this conversation, Dr. Tiger shines a light on the importance of self care for the physician community and explains two of the types of therapies that she uses with her clients. The first is somatic yoga and the second is iRest meditation. Dr. Tiger has seen tremendous results in her work and if you have been suffering with pain or anxiety, we hope you'll find inspiration and a potential solution in this episode.    You can find Dr. Tiger at www.stressfreemd.net and robyntiger@stressfreemd.net or find her on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/robyntigermd/ on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/robyntigermd and on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/stressfreemd/ and check out her Podcast here https://www.podpage.com/the-stressfreemd-podcast/   Robyn Tiger, MD, is a physician & trauma-informed self-care coach. She founded StressFreeMD, a wellness practice that provides freedom through self-care education. Dr. Tiger utilizes her unique combination of trainings in medicine, yoga therapy, meditation and life coaching to educate others in stress management, burnout prevention and relief. Her teachings focus on complete physical, mental, and emotional well-being and resilience. Dr. Tiger's innovative CME accredited program, Rx Inner Peace, was created at the request of several busy physicians seeking an accessible self-paced online self-care program. It contains the most effective evidence-based self-care methods compiled from several years of providing physician education. At the request of other healthcare professionals and the general public, she created the Self-Care Shop which houses six additional accredited self-care programs open to everyone. Dr. Tiger is a Western Carolina Medical Society Healthy Healer Partner, Surge-On App Key Opinion Leader for Self-Care for Surgeons, faculty for Trauma Informed Yoga Therapy, Advisory Council member of Yoga Therapy Today & yogatherapy.health, and is an O2X Human Performance Specialist for first responders. She received her BS degree in Natural Science and Psychology from Muhlenberg College. She earned her MD, completed an Internal Medicine internship and Diagnostic Radiology residency at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and also completed a fellowship in Body Imaging at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Her deep passion to fully help her physician colleagues and patients grew out of her many years in medical practice experiencing and witnessing firsthand the need for self- care education. Dr. Tiger's distinctive combination of qualifications makes her best suited to fill the gap in physician education and successfully guide individuals to become the best versions of themselves and live their most fulfilling lives! Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  How many coaches do you think your favorite actors and athletes have worked with over the years in order to achieve such extraordinary success?   What if you had a team of trusted thinking partners, experienced coaches who have helped hundreds of physicians overcome obstacles and who know what works?    What if you were part of a community of like-minded physicians from across the nation, across specialties and career stages? Your collective brain trust, sharing ideas and experiences, so you would no longer feel like an island, surrounded by people yet alone?   What if you had small group coaching sessions, could interact with your coaches and community as often as you wish, and had virtual courses at your fingertips 24-7 that could help you with things like time and stress management, resilience, and mapping out your future to achieve what matters most to you?   What if you could have all of this for less than the cost of a single 1:1 coaching session per month?   DocWorking THRIVE is the Physician Coaching and Community Subscription Package that Guides You as a Doctor to Embrace Life in the way that is most meaningful to you, integrate that with your work so you can truly thrive, and be a valued member of our growing private community of doctors from across the nation. Join the DocWorking mailing list by clicking here.   At DocWorking, our specialty is Coaching Physicians to achieve the best in life and medicine.    Doctors devote their lives to caring for others. But does that mean they must sacrifice their own health and wellbeing? Absolutely not!   At DocWorking, we have developed a unique way to embrace it all.   The caring for others that you do so selflessly AND the caring for YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY that you crave in order to bring it all into the perfect balance specific to YOU.   What if we told you that you CAN have it all? The career you dreamed of when you decided to become a doctor AND the life outside of medicine that you desire?   DocWorking empowers physicians to get back on the path to achieving their dreams.   Ace the Boards and Max Your CME Preparing for your board exam or looking for a quick and convenient way to earn CME? Study for your board exam and fulfill your CME requirements with BoardVitals. BoardVitals is the leading online board review platform, with question banks and CME activities available in more than 50 medical and healthcare specialties.   Save Money Now: Refinance Your Student Loan Debt   Take Back Your Time: Get a Virtual Assistant Working in the medical field is fulfilling but it can also be exhausting. Physicians often sacrifice their personal time to carry out their duties. They want to go on vacations, start passion projects, or start side businesses but finding the time seems impossible. Recently, more and more physicians are giving outsourcing a try. Outsourcing allows you to delegate tasks to virtual assistants so you can free up your time and finally do whatever it is you've been wanting to do.   Become a Medical Legal Consultant We at DocWorking are excited to collaborate with Dr. Armin Feldman to bring you this opportunity to develop a side income or even a full time income while using your clinical skills!   Achieve Financial Independence with a Financial Planner/Advisor Change your trajectory: build financial independence and strength by working with our trusted resources. Working with a trusted financial planner and/or financial advisor can help you to create a specific plan that works for you. The right advisor can help you stay on track to reach your financial independence goal and your next vision.   Protect Yourself and Your Family with the Right Insurance Doctors and their families need many types of insurance–and inadequate coverage can cost you dearly. Connecting with trusted insurance professionals in your area is recommended to be sure you're appropriately covered.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered. And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast! Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

The Clinical Problem Solvers
Episode 210: Clinical unknown with Dr. Kushal, Dr. Saman, and Dr. Brandon

The Clinical Problem Solvers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 35:53


  Dr. Kushal, Dr. Saman, and Dr. Brandon discuss a case of worsening dyspnea and fever. Schema Dr. Kushal Vaishnani Dr. Kushal Vaishnani is a Hospitalist at Atrium Health. He finished his medical school at B.J. Medical College, Ahmedabad, India. He completed his transitional year at Brandon Regional Hospital and Internal Medicine residency at LSUHSC… Read More »Episode 210: Clinical unknown with Dr. Kushal, Dr. Saman, and Dr. Brandon

The LDN Radio Show About Low Dose Naltrexone
Dr Sakina Davis - Hashimotos and LDN

The LDN Radio Show About Low Dose Naltrexone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 31:18


D R . S A K I N A D A V I S B i o i d e n t i c a l H o r m o n e S p e c i a l i s t A fellowship-trained physician, Sakina Davis MD, FAARM, ABAARM, provides outstanding care to her patients. At Woodlands Wellness and Cosmetic Center in The Woodlands, Texas, Dr. Davis delivers a wide range of medical spa services. She takes pride in helping patients achieve each of their medical and aesthetic goals. Dr. Davis graduated from the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, Georgia. She completed her internship in internal medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine –Jacksonville. Later, Dr. Davis performed her residency in family medicine at St. Vincent's Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. For many years, Dr. Davis specialized in family medicine and general practice. But she always held a passion for functional medicine and anti-aging care. In 2005, she established Woodlands Wellness and Cosmetic Center so that she could help patients prevent illness and achieve optimal health. Dr. Davis believes that hormone balance is the key to wellness. At Woodlands Wellness and Cosmetic Center, she specializes in hormone optimization like hormone pellet therapy. Hormone-balancing treatments can help stimulate weight loss and boost energy levels. Dr. Davis is also proud to offer a wide range of weight-management services to help patients feel their best. Dr. Davis takes pride in delivering a cutting-edge approach to functional medicine and healthy weight management. She's fellowship-trained in metabolic and nutritional medicine and board-certified in anti-aging and functional medicine. Dr. Davis has also developed her own skin care line, available at Woodlands Wellness and Cosmetic Center. Sanavi skin care products use natural, botanical ingredients to deliver exceptional results. When she isn't assisting patients, Dr. Davis enj oys spending time with her family and giving back to the Woodlands community. She is involved in the Montgomery County Food Bank, Interfaith of The Woodlands, and CASA Advocates for Children. She has also chaired the American Heart Association Luncheon. Please visit our website https://www.ldnresearchtrust.org which is packed with information on Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) for Autoimmune Conditions, Cancers, Chronic Pain, Women's Health, Children's Health etc, plus we have a very active FB Closed Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/LDNRT/

Plenary Session
4.31 Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma with Dr. William Hall

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:49


Today we interview Dr. Bill Hall, Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Surgery at Medical College of Wisconsin, on his new paper out now in the Journal of Clinical Oncology titled "Value of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy in the Management of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma". Neoadjuvant: doi.org/10.1200/JCO.21.01220 Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession

Biohacking Superhuman Performance
Episode #70: How an Endocrinologist Uses Peptides and Why Peptides Might be Banned by the FDA

Biohacking Superhuman Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 77:27


My guest this week is Dr. Edwin Lee Co-Founder of Clinical Peptide Society. In this episode, Dr. Edwin Lee and I discuss peptides, his book, and the many ways to heal the body without surgery. We also discuss stem cells, growth hormone secretagogues, and his passion project saving peptides from being taken away by the FDA. You can learn more about that here. Thank you to our sponsor Oxford HealthSpan. Primeadine is the best formulated Spermidine supplement on the market!  What makes it stand out – it includes Spermine & Putrescine two other Polyamines that work hand in hand with Spermidine PLUS FOS, a prebiotic to feed the bacteria in your gut that make Spermidine!  I take Spermidine daily as do my family and my clients – it has become a solid member of my “foundation stack”.  Research has shown that Spermidine upregulates autophagy, helps the immune system to rejuvenate and it protects DNA – visible benefits experienced by myself and my clients include better sleep, hair, skin, and nails!   Sponsor offer: If you haven't tried it yet go to Primeadine.com and use promo code BIONAT15 to save 15% at https://oxfordhealthspan.com/products/best-spermidine-supplement Dr. Lee Bio:Dr. Edwin Lee is an endocrinologist, author, and international speaker. Dr. Lee founded the Institute for Hormonal Balance, Orlando, FL in 2008, is board-certified in Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, and has completed special training in Regenerative and Functional Medicine.  He is a graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania and finished his fellowships of Critical Care Medicine and Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at the University of Pittsburgh. Follow Dr. Edwin Lee Save Peptides Website Peptide Study   Episode Timestamps: [05:20] How Dr.Lee got to where he is now… [10:49] Turning a patient's life around with peptides, exosomes and stem cells… [13:55] The difference between stem cells and exosomes… [20:35] Kisspeptin-10, does it actually help with testosterone? [23:50] Studies on knee pain treated with BPC-157… [41:30] Bioregulator peptides for prostate issues… [43:52] Growth hormone secretagogues: do they work, how do you monitor them, ect… [47:00] Are you a mouth breather?.. [50:41] Study on regeneration of the thymus gland using DHEA, metformin and growth hormone… [54:14] Do you see people whose bodies do not like secretagogues?.. [56:30] Thoughts on senolytics? What are the best senolytics… [67:45] How to save peptides and why does the FDA want to take them away?..   Follow Nat: Facebook Facebook Group  Instagram Work with Nat: Book Your 20 MInute Optimization Consult    

Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast
JCO After Hours: A Discussion With Kirsten Beyer and Jennifer Griggs

Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 26:09


Dr. Shannon Westin, Dr. Kirsten Beyer and Dr. Jennifer Griggs discuss how mortgage lending bias and residential segregation intersect with cancer disparities and survival outcomes.   TRANSCRIPT [MUSIC PLAYING]   SHANNON WESTIN: Hello, everyone. My name is Shannon Westin, and I'm an Associate Professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine. And I currently serve as the Social Media Editor for the Journal of Clinical Oncology. And we're starting a brand new podcast series to try to bring really exciting research that's being published in the JCO to you, and I'm so excited to kick off this series with a group of very accomplished women who are covering something that I don't think a lot of us don't know very much about. So I'm really excited to learn a ton over this next few minutes. So it's my pleasure to introduce Dr. Kirsten Beyer, who is an Associate Professor in the Division of Epidemiology in the Institute for Health and Equity as well as the Director of the PhD program in Public and Community Health at the Medical College of Wisconsin. We are also joined by Dr. Jennifer Griggs, who's a Professor the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, as well as a member of the Institute of Health Care Policy and Innovation at the University of Michigan. She does predominantly practice taking care of women with breast cancer. Welcome, doctors. JENNIFER GRIGGS: Thank you. KIRSTEN BEYER: Thank you very much. SHANNON WESTIN: So we're talking today about the manuscript "Mortgage Lending Bias and Breast Cancer Survival Among Older Women in the United States" that Dr. Beyer published just this month in the JCO. In addition, Dr. Griggs and her colleague Dr. Pleasant were invited to participate in an editorial called "Contemporary Residential Segregation and Cancer Disparities." So let's get into to what was covered. So I think for me, the lowest hanging fruit here, Dr. Beyer, is understanding what exactly is redlining, because that was one of the critical exposure that you were assessing amongst these women with breast cancer. KIRSTEN BEYER: Thank you, Dr. Westin. Yes, redlining-- I think most people think about redlining as being a historical practice, where mortgage lenders would essentially draw red lines around particular neighborhoods and then not lend mortgages in those areas, regardless of whether or not the applicant for that mortgage was otherwise qualified. So it's generally thought of as a historical practice. But what we've done in this study is to look at some more contemporary data and create a new measure that we think represents contemporary redlining, maybe not in the legal sense in terms of housing discrimination. But this measure represents essentially the odds ratio of denial of a mortgage application for a property in a local neighborhood as compared to the metropolitan area as a whole. So we're really looking to see which areas of our US cities are systematically denied mortgage applications. By denying those mortgage applications, they are suffering from disinvestment, and I would argue structural racism is guiding a lot of that practice. SHANNON WESTIN: So can you explore that a little bit more with us? And how do you find that type of data? Where do you get this information about these denied mortgages? How do you get into the different covariates like race, ethnicity, things like that? KIRSTEN BEYER: Sure. So I think a little history lesson is important first. Between the historic practice of redlining and today, there have been a number of major laws that have been passed in the United States really to try to overcome housing discrimination. Some of the most important ones are-- in the Civil Rights Act of 1968, there was something called the Fair Housing Act, and that act prohibited discrimination in the sale, rental, and financing of housing based on race, religion, and national origin. And since then, they've added a few more protected categories. And then right after the Civil Rights Act of 1968, there was something passed called the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act. And this act was essentially to bring transparency to mortgage lending in this country. The idea was that we were requiring public disclosure of loan-level information about mortgages that were lent in the country. And the goal was to shed light on lending patterns, including those that could be discriminatory. And so the HMDA data-- it's commonly referred to as "hum-duh." That HMDA data has been collected then since 1975. And that database evolves over time, but we use that data for 2007 to '13 to really try to understand what are the mortgage lending patterns in our US cities in terms of their spatial distribution. And so there are a number of covariates that we were able to control for there. There are some things that we're not able to control for. I'm excited that the HMDA database has recently improved, and there are some new variables that are going to become available in the coming years. So what we did with the HMDA database was to calculate an index of redlining, so an odds ratio of denial of a mortgage application for a property in a specific neighborhood compared to all the properties across the metropolitan area. And so it's an area-level measure, a neighborhood-level measure. And then we put that measure into a statistical model to see what happens to women diagnosed with breast cancer if they live in redlined areas compared to if they live in other areas. And so we were able to control for a number of other factors, including race, including tumor characteristics, age, stage at diagnosis, and then to see what is the added effect of redlining over and above the things that we already know impact survival. So what we found was that women living in redlined areas in the United States were more likely to die faster after breast cancer diagnosis than women living in other areas. We also found that among people living in redlined areas, there was a discrepancy in terms of the race and ethnicity of those women. So 79% of Black women, 57% of Hispanic women, and 34% of white women lived in redlined areas in our sample. SHANNON WESTIN: That's so interesting, because I think we've all read and seen across a number of different cancer types how race and ethnicity can be associated with worse outcomes. So I think you're starting to scratch the surface of why that might be. Now, do we think that is there an association with other factors like socioeconomic status or insurance or anything like that? KIRSTEN BEYER: Yes, I think those are really good questions. Not all databases contain all of the information we would like. But in SEER-Medicare, which is the database we use, we know that all of the women have health insurance because it's a linked database with cancer registry data and then Medicare claims data. So health insurance wasn't a factor here, but we certainly know that it could be a factor in a larger sample of women across the age spectrum. And I think when you get into questions of socioeconomic status, you also have to think about, as opposed to statistically controlling away the effect of socioeconomic status, what is the mediating effect? Or what is the explanation? What factors explain the relationship between redlining and breast cancer survival? So I think that's where we'll see a lot of the important explanations for how does redlining contribute to survival. SHANNON WESTIN: Thank you. I think you nailed it right there, because finding a problem is, of course, important, but then what do we do next? Dr. Griggs, I thought your editorial was just so great at providing context for this issue, and I was wondering if you could expand a little bit more on this idea around residential segregation and how it impacts outcomes for these patients. JENNIFER GRIGGS: Thank you very much, and thanks for including me on this great podcast. It's so important to understand that place matters more than race, and we've known this for quite a while. So that area-level factors are associated with environment-- for example, pollutants, safe water, safe places to play, safe places to exercise, transportation fragility, for example, a robust public transport system. We know that neighborhoods that are in redlined areas are more likely to be policed in different ways, which takes children from school being suspended at higher rates. There's less educational investment, but Dr. Beyer mentioned this disinvestment in neighborhoods basically has shutters all the way down. It shutters from childhood all the way to how we age and access to healthy food. We know redlined areas are associated with poor markers of diabetes control, and if you take somebody from an area that's a poor neighborhood that's segregated and give them a voucher to live in a more affluent area, that markers of diabetes improve and weight goes down. So just to think about this, that the impact of where we live affects things that we think of as personal behavior-- like, what we eat or how we control our diabetes. There are, of course, implications for access to high-quality health centers when we think about people sort of locked into certain neighborhoods, all that goes along with that, including wealth. Wealth is probably one of the biggest predictors of health and not being able to have the wealth associated with home ownership decreases economic stability. And we know these things like allostatic load or stress, sometimes called wear-and-tear effects, are associated with things like tumor biology and breast cancer. We see more triple-negative breast cancers in areas where there's more allostatic load. So imagine, we think about race as this fixed-- sometimes people even construe race as a biologic construct, when really, of course, it's a social construct that has systematically-- our systems have been put in place so that even the legislation, Fair Housing Act, can't be overcome, as shown in Doctor Beyer and colleague's paper. In other words, despite legislation, we continue to see mortgage lending bias, which we've termed contemporary redlining. Yet, we think of race as this fixed, deterministic way of describing people and explaining differences and outcome. So this kind of work is really important when we can show the effect of place independent of race and if we can show that there has been systematic construction of something so important as residential segregation. What this does is it drives us to really a call to action. A lot of ideas in there, but basically, showing where people live being associated with their outcome in breast cancer-- and this has been shown in other cancers, as well-- through pathways like economic stability and wealth, wear and tear on the body, and then to acknowledge the sad truth that things have been intentionally constructed structures. SHANNON WESTIN: I mean, I think this is really in line with a lot of what we're learning about our society and our country, the way we were educated when we were younger was that we did not always hear the truth about what really went down as this country was built. I think that you really touched on a lot of very critical points. And I think for me, a lot of times when we read about these racial and ethnic disparities, I feel like it often comes down to where people are like, oh well, it's just access to care, or lack of insurance, or they're just not focusing on these things. They're not educated. They don't know that these things are important. But what I hear the two of you saying is, it goes much deeper than that. So Dr. Beyer, I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on that with these areas. Should we be working on improving what is available to people in these areas? Or should we work on breaking down or both? KIRSTEN BEYER: Yeah, thanks, Dr. Westin. That's a great question, and it's a complicated one. I think Dr. Griggs mentioned housing vouchers. And so for example, when we are giving someone a housing voucher to move from a more vulnerable neighborhood, let's call it, to a less vulnerable neighborhood, that can improve health outcomes for sure. But we also know that there's a downside to that. Sometimes there are impacts on social support or mental health. And then on the flip side, if we are trying to improve neighborhoods themselves so that the people living in them can benefit from those enhancements, we often see that what happens is gentrification, when people who are living in those neighborhoods get displaced, and newer people, wealthier people, move in and take those amenities. So I think it's something that really requires close management with housing policy. And then I think another thing that I would add is that, as you mentioned, we're really scratching the surface. I think that's an important thing to emphasize. This is one aspect of housing. There are other aspects that are very important, like quality of housing and stability of housing, which is what Dr. Griggs mentioned. And I think it's also important to note that even if a person is denied a mortgage application because of a credit score, that credit scores, wealth, income, and many other things that are considered in the mortgage lending process are also affected by structural racism, as are things like home appraisals, mentorship, and eviction, something that we've certainly seen during the COVID-19 pandemic. SHANNON WESTIN: Wow, so thoughtful. I feel like I'm trying to take notes as fast as I can because I'm learning so much. I think we didn't hear about anything like this in our medical school and your PhD training. I don't know if you all got any type of background in this. Dr. Griggs, did you-- I mean, we never even scratched the surface with the impact of structural racism. And in fact, I think a lot of our medical education was founded in that structural racism. JENNIFER GRIGGS: I couldn't agree more, and I couldn't agree more with what Dr. Beyer said about things like housing vouchers, so I just want to acknowledge that it's not as simple as giving people a voucher, obviously. No, we are calling for structural competence. There are multiple calls that we teach medical students and current practicing clinicians and scientists the structures that have been put into place and that persist. So again, that intentionality that these systems were put in place through deliberate efforts, and it's only going to be through deliberate efforts that they're dismantled. And teaching people that individual behaviors are not predetermined or, frankly, learned. They cross multiple generations, and they reside within a place and the way not just a person, but an entire people, have been treated. And I do just want to say, although this may be new to a lot of us, that the lived experience of people who live in vulnerable neighborhoods and their life experience and their family's experience going back many generations make this not new news, right? This is old news. This is stuff people have known for generations that they're being systematically cut out of opportunities for advancement and for accumulation of wealth. So I think we just want to be-- I just want to be careful when I'm talking with my colleagues, my team, my research colleagues that this is not new knowledge. And we want to also be careful not to be parasites in a way on other people's suffering, that we want to be careful not to glorify our own ideas because number one, they're not our ideas. And number two, this type of work is the lived experience of people for many, many years, not just our neighbors and friends and colleagues. So there's so much harm that's been done, and we can celebrate advances and new knowledge, but I also think we want to focus on cultural humility and do a lot of deep listening and less talking and build trusting relationships with communities that are not about our career advancement but are really about fairness and justice. SHANNON WESTIN: I think that needs to be shouted from the rooftops, and I think it is a very careful balance, because we want this research to get out. We want to make sure people understand this. You're right. It's not new knowledge, but I think it's something that hasn't necessarily been highlighted in academic fields up until, like, the last few years, where I feel like we've started to see this. But you're exactly right. We can't just do the research and find the association. Now it's time for the next steps. And I'd be interested to hear from both of you, because, to me, there are several levels of steps that we can take. There's the local level, right? So what can we do for the patients in front of us? And then I'd be interested to hear what you all think about what do we do on the more institutional-- and by institutional, I mean, our entire country. Like, what can we do? How do we advocate for policies that will help to reverse these practices? I don't know Dr. Beyer, if you want to start. I know that was a really big question. What can we do when we're seeing patients in the clinic? Are there ways, or are there things we can offer or things that we can do on the local level that could help to address some of these disparities? KIRSTEN BEYER: Yeah, thank you, Dr. Westin. I'm not a medical doctor, but I work a lot with medical students. We have some pathways at the Medical College of Wisconsin, one on urban and community health and one on global health. And in those pathways, we do try to put forth a lot of this type of content and learning. But again, that's just a select number of students who end up getting that training. I think that structural racism is a fundamental force in our society, and therefore, it justifies a position in the core medical curriculum. I think since the murder of George Floyd, there has been a national consciousness that's been raised around this issue, that we should take advantage of that and try to push forward some core learning on structural racism for medical students. And then beyond that, I think as a patient, I can use the patient perspective. As a patient, I would want my physician to take into account my life context when providing clinical care. How hard is it for me to get to my appointment and to get there on time? How hard is it for me to find child care? How hard is it for me to obtain the prescriptions I need and maintain them with any significant cost at hand? So I think that awareness for physicians is really a first step. And then the last thing I would say is that doctors have power, and so I think it's the responsibility of those with power who are in the know about structural racism to leverage and use that power to make social change. JENNIFER GRIGGS: I really appreciate what you said from education to practice. I would add that an integrated health system would be able to think from prevention all the way up to health care. I feel like by the time people are accessing health care, a lot of other things have gotten in the way of their health, right? That's why we talk about social determinants of health. So I think we need to think about elevating the role of other people in the health care system. So even if you're in an individual practice, do you have access to a social worker? Are you including patient and family voices when you build your new office? We have transportation initiatives being made all over this country, and I know in Europe as well. So cities are being designed to undo transportation fragility and vulnerable neighborhoods. I can't emphasize enough the importance of asking communities what they need. It strikes me that the ivory tower is just that, right? It's very rarefied where we work. And to go into a community and say, this is what you need, feels-- which is not what you were suggesting, Dr. Beyer or Dr. Westin, but to start by listening and ask the communities what they need and then to provide it and to listen and not leave once the, quote, "problem is fixed." And I think the same is true nationally. We need to make sure that the administration's priorities actually bear fruit and soon, that we not kick things down the road and make compromises at the level of national policy. And as physician clinicians, those physicians who are listening, we should be going to the city council meetings when a new building is being erected. Is there going to be a consequence for neighborhoods in terms of things like gentrification? Cities have been constructed intentionally to isolate people, and we need to start undoing that, and cities are doing that. They're taking down freeways that divide the rich from the poor. I think we need to make sure as clinicians that we are speaking up about equitable and high-quality education for young people because we know your early life experiences and education are associated with health. Publishing work like Dr. Beyer's work, ASCO has a heavy advocacy arm. And as Dr. Beyer said, we have power. Inequities in power is what got us to where we are. So really, the burden is on those with power to speak on Capitol Hill and other places, local level, statewide level, to make change and to insist on it for the health of our patients and our communities. SHANNON WESTIN: That is so thoughtful and such a great call to action. And I do think there's a huge opportunity for members of ASCO to get involved. The advocacy is extremely strong. There are Capitol Hill days and committees, and now we even have their own political action committee, where we can work to lobby for patients and their health care. So I think that is a perfect place for us to end this conversation. I would like to give Dr. Beyer last opportunity to one-liner to sum up where we are and what we need to do next for those people that tend to fade in and out of these types of things. KIRSTEN BEYER: Sure. Thank you, Dr. Westin. I would say, to summarize, that the housing sector is actively revealing structural racism. This isn't a historic practice only. We are seeing structural racism in housing right now, and it's actively revealing both structural racism and economic disinvestment. And it's a very actionable policy target, so that we can mitigate those upstream determinants of health for the benefit of patients with cancer and with other diseases. And then I think as a final, I would say that there's a great quote from Matthew Desmond, who's a housing equity writer and scholar and activist. And he says, "A stable home functions as a secure foundation on which to build holistic and cost-effective health care." And so I think that's a great way of thinking about it from a practical standpoint. Housing is primary. It's an important foundation on which we build all the other things that we can do to improve people's health. SHANNON WESTIN: Perfect. Thank you both so much. Thank you, Dr. Beyer. Thank you, Dr. Griggs. And thank you, all of the listeners. We'll be back soon with a new podcast coming to a ear near you. JENNIFER GRIGGS: Thank you so much. KIRSTEN BEYER: Yeah, thank you very much. [MUSIC PLAYING] SPEAKER 1: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. For more original research, editorials, and review articles, please visit us online at jco.org. This production is copyrighted to the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Thank you for listening.

Dr. GPCR Podcast
#56 with Dr. Adriano Marchese

Dr. GPCR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 60:06


For more details, visit #DrGPCR​​​ Podcast Episode #56 page: http://www.drgpcr.com/episode-56-with-dr-adriano-marchese/ ------------------------------------------- Adriano Marchese is a Professor of Biochemistry at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Adriano received his Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacology in 1991 from the University of Toronto. He continued his graduate studies at the University of Toronto where he earned his MSc (1994) and Ph.D. (1998) in Pharmacology. He then moved to Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, PA, for his postdoctoral training in Jeff Benovic's laboratory studying the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor trafficking and signaling. In 2004 Adriano joined the faculty of the Department of Pharmacology at Loyola University Chicago. In 2016 he decided to move his lab to the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI. Adriano's research has contributed to our understanding of the role that ubiquitin plays in GPCR signaling and trafficking. His laboratory is interested in understanding the mechanisms that govern spatial and temporal regulation of GPCR signaling by -arrestins and post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. His lab has shown a role for -arrestins and PTMs in GPCR trafficking and signaling and has leveraged this knowledge to reveal the spatial and temporal requirements for GPCR activation of signaling pathways related to cell survival, proliferation, and migration. The ultimate goal of Adriano's research is to target novel aspects of GPCR signaling for therapeutic development. ------------------------------------------- Imagine a world in which the vast majority of us are healthy. The #DrGPCR Ecosystem is all about dynamic interactions between us who are working towards exploiting the druggability of #GPCR's. We aspire to provide opportunities to connect, share, form trusting partnerships, grow, and thrive together. To build our #GPCR Ecosystem, we created various enabling outlets. For more details, visit our website http://www.DrGPCR.com/Ecosystem/ ------------------------------------------- Are you a #GPCR professional? - Register to become a Virtual Cafe speaker http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/ - Subscribe to our Monthly Newsletter http://www.drgpcr.com/newsletter/ - Listen and subscribe to #DrGPCR Podcasts http://www.drgpcr.com/podcast/ - Support #DrGPCR Ecosystem with your Donation. http://www.drgpcr.com/sponsors/ - Reserve your spots for the next #DrGPCR Virtual Cafe http://www.drgpcr.com/virtual-cafe/

Dr. D’s Social Network
365. Paul Martino - What Would You Write to Your Younger Self?

Dr. D’s Social Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 45:09


Paul Frank Martino was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1971, the eldest of two boys born to Italian immigrant parents, one of which came to the United States of America from the Molise Region of Italy, and the other came to the United States of America from the Naples (Campania) Region of Italy.  Paul was raised as a practicing Roman Catholic in the town of Ronkonkoma, on Long Island, in the state of New York, and graduated from Connetquot High School, in Bohemia, New York in 1989.  He graduated from Dowling College, in Oakdale, New York with a B.A. in Natural Sciences and Mathematics in 1993.  He earned his Master's in Exercise Physiology from the Human Performance Laboratory at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana in 1996, and later earned his Ph.D. in Physiology from the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2006.  After earning, his Ph.D., Paul moved on to a two year American Heart Association, post-doctoral fellowship at Wright State University at the Boonshoft School of Medicine in the Department of Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology, studying the neuro-physiological effects of carbon dioxide regulation in the brain. After his fellowship, he moved on to a short stay in the biomedical/pharmaceutical industry as a study director designing research studies for evaluating and understanding potential new drugs. During his stay in industry, he also simultaneously managed and mentored a small group of laboratory research technicians.  He learned a great deal about managing and mentoring people in his short stint in industry.  He also learned that the business side of research is very different from research in the academic world. Since 2009, he has been a full-time tenure-track faculty member in the Biology Department at Carthage College, a small Lutheran affiliated liberal arts college in Kenosha, Wisconsin.  He was awarded the prestigious “Teacher of the Year Award in 2017,” for his outstanding teaching of Anatomy and Physiology to upper-classmen from across the Carthage campus. He currently leads the Carthage Biology Department as an Associate Professor and Chair.  In addition, he also holds several other academic positions, which include Associate Adjunct Professor of Physiology at Medical College of Wisconsin, as well as a faculty member of the Stress and Motivated Institute (SMBI).  He loves teaching and mentoring college students (Nate was one of my students.) to help them find their way in life, and has mentored 80 plus undergraduates in his active and collaborative research lab at Carthage.  He has co-authored 21 peer-reviewed scientific articles on strength training, glucose metabolism, respiratory neurophysiology, sleep, antioxidants, and behavioral inhibition. His current research, which is in part a collaboration with Justin Miller and several other Carthage colleagues' focuses on the physiology of college age students who have the behavioral temperament, called behavioral inhibition.  This book signals a new stage of his professional life and one where he hopes to help even more people navigate the struggles of life and to succeed. opphysiology@gmail.com    Doktesinc@gmail.com   https://www.facebook.com/LettersToOurYoungerSelves   https://www.amazon.com/s?k=letters+to+our+younger+selves&crid=16EJYQS95FCKS&sprefix=letters+to+our+younger+%2Caps%2C187&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_1_23  https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/letters%20to%20our%20younger%20selves

Curious Vedanth
Meet Dr. S. Kumar, The Chancellor Of A Medical College

Curious Vedanth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 32:19


Season 4 Episode 11: In this episode, I interview Dr. S. Kumar, the Chancellor of Sri Devraj Urs Academy of Higher Education & Research. He is also a trustee of an organisation called Spandana. We talk about how fascinating the human body is, and about how we can help differently-abled children. Follow my Facebook page to get updates on the upcoming episodes. https://www.facebook.com/curiousvedanth/To listen to earlier episodes visit curiousvedanth.comTo listen at leisure on your phone and get notified about future episodes, subscribe by searching for 'Curious Vedanth' wherever you get podcasts such as Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Podcast, Spotify, etc.

Voices of Experience®
1000 Perfect Weekends

Voices of Experience®

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:54


1000 Perfect Weekends, A Medical College on a Mission and Paying College football players with Art Thiel

Zakir Naik
Can a Muslim Woman Study in a Medical College which has Co-education?

Zakir Naik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 5:33


WTMJ Conversations & WTMJ Features
11-1-2021: Medical College of Wisconsin Body Donation

WTMJ Conversations & WTMJ Features

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 6:45


Before You Kill Yourself
Dr. Cecily Havert: Menopause, micro-meditation and how to relax on the go

Before You Kill Yourself

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 43:14


Dr. Havert shares: how to improve connection with your kidsprioritizing what brings us joyhow overscheduling contributes to anxietygames to reduce anxiety in children and adultsmicro-medititationantidote to the flight/flight responsesuggestions for vaccinating your childconsiderations for women going through menopauseBIO: Cecily D. Havert, M.D., is a physician at Northern Virginia Family Practice Associates (NVFP), a family medicine practice that offers full-service concierge health care in the Northern Virginia area. With an impressive background in preventive health care, mental health support and outpatient medicine, Dr. Havert specializes in women's health with an emphasis on the LGBTQ+ community. She has a passion for nurturing patients' emotional and mental health needs, with a goal of providing the utmost in quality, personalized medical care and a safe environment for all.Dr. Havert has extensive experience in healthcare policy and communication, public speaking and education. She trains future medical professionals as a clinical assistant professor of family medicine at Georgetown University, and she also speaks about major public health issues such as anxiety, menopause, women's cardiovascular health and the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, Dr. Havert regularly contributes to The Second Half Podcast, which shares people's stories about the challenges and joys they experience, especially in the second half of life. Prior to joining NVFP, Dr. Havert served as a physician at General Internal Medicine Group and Springfield Family Medicine. She has been an advocate for the National Research Center for Women and Families and continues to remain active in shaping healthcare policy on behalf of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Havert has received many awards throughout her career, including the Washingtonian Magazine Top Doctor Award for four years, Northern Virginia Magazine Best Doctor Award, Patients' Choice Award for four years, and Washington D.C.'s 2012 Top-Rated Primary Care Doctor Award.Dr. Havert holds a Bachelor of Science degree in medical microbiology and bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She earned her Doctor of Medicine from the Medical College of Wisconsin and completed her residency in family medicine at Fairfax Family Practice-VCU. In her spare time, Dr. Havert enjoys playing tennis, hiking, painting and traveling. She currently lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with her college sweetheart, two sons, and a menagerie of pets: two cats, two bearded dragon lizards, and a dog. For more information, please visit www.nvafamilypractice.com.If you want go from feeling hopeless to hopeful, lonely to connected and like a burden to a blessing, then go to 1-on-1 coaching, go to www.thrivewithleo.com. Let's get to tomorrow, together. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline800-273-TALK [800-273-8255]1-800-SUICIDE [800-784-2433]Teen Line (Los Angeles)800-852-8336The Trevor Project (LGBTQ Youth Hotline)866-488-7386National Domestic Violence Hotline800-799-SAFE [800-799-7233]Crisis Text LineText "Connect" to 741741 in the USALifeline Chathttps://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/chat/International Suicide Hotlines: http://www.suicide.org/international-suicide-hotlines.htmlhttps://www.nowmattersnow.org/skillshttps://sobermeditations.libsyn.com/ www.suicidesafetyplan.com https://scaa.club/

Project Oncology®
Exploring Treatment Approaches in CLL Management

Project Oncology®

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


Host: Charles Turck, PharmD, BCPS, BCCCP Guest: Elizabeth A. Brem, MD Guest: Ehab L. Atallah, MD Dr. Elizabeth Brém, an Assistant Professor in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine and Dr. Ehab Atallah, a Professor of Medicine and Section Head of Hematological Malignancies in the Medical College of Wisconsin's Division of Hematology and Oncology join Dr. Charles Turck to explore collaborative approaches and share best practices in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Imagine America Radio
Why I Chose To Become A Medical Assistant with High Desert Medical College

Imagine America Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 20:44


On this episode of Imagine America Radio, we discuss the reason students are choosing to enter the field of medical assisting. What drives someone to want to enter this field? What education is needed to enter medical assisting? What should you consider if you're thinking of becoming a medical assistant? And so much more!

Admissions Straight Talk
Are you rushing to Attend Rush Medical College?

Admissions Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:04


Get to know Rush Medical College [Show summary] Built on the tenets of community service and community engagement, Rush Medical College strives to graduate empathetic physicians. In this episode, Dr. Cynthia Boyd, Associate Dean for Admissions offers a closer look into the program.  What makes Rush Medical College unique? A flipped-classroom model of learning and an unwavering dedication to community service [Show notes] Thanks for joining me for the 441st episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Will you be ready, next spring, to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's med school admissions quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz, complete the quiz, and you'll not only get an assessment, but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus, it's all free. Now, let's move to today's interview. I'm delighted to have on Admissions Straight Talk, Dr. Cynthia Boyd of Rush Medical College. Dr. Boyd earned her MD at George Washington, where she also did her residency in internal medicine, and later an MBA from Chicago Booth. She joined Rush Medical Center in 1998, and has served in a variety of roles, including Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs, Director of Medical Staff Operations, and Chief Compliance Officer. She moved over to Rush Medical College, full-time, in 2019, and is now the Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, as well as Associate Dean for Admissions and Recruitment. Dr. Boyd, thank you so much for joining me on Admissions Straight Talk. Can you give us an overview of the Rush Medical College program, focusing on its more distinctive elements? [2:07] Sure, I'll be speaking primarily about the medical school. At Rush University Medical Center, we have four colleges dedicated to the health sciences: the College of Nursing, Health Sciences, Graduate College, and the Medical College. It has been in existence since about 1837. It was the first medical school established, actually, in Chicago. It is very focused on clinical care, outstanding clinical care, integrating that with education, research, and community partnerships. We are located on the west side of Chicago, about five miles from the downtown area, the Chicago Loop, as it is called. Our community is a very diverse community, ranging from very wealthy, to the very poor. More recently, our curriculum was changed to become what is described as a flipped classroom, where the students do the learning. The teacher is not in front of them doing didactics, students do the learning, and then they come to class in a group of their peers to share what they've learned, to ask questions. It puts the focus on them as their learners, versus the faculty putting out all of the information. That's changed within the last five years. Probably, one of the newest innovations has been our curriculum. What does the faculty do in a flipped classroom context? [3:45] There are specific courses, so to speak, that the students will learn and focus on for anywhere from four to six weeks like gases, nutrition, etc. But they are given readings and articles and videos, and a variety of ways to learn on that topic. Then when they come to class, there is both clinical faculty, as well as basic science faculty, at the same time. So we combine both the normal and the abnormal, in this case, both anatomy for example, as well as pathology, etc. The students learn on their own, and they interact with each other. It is very important for them to have those oral communication/interpersonal skills to be able to have these discussions. The faculty are there to facilitate that, facilitate the learning, and also to be able to provide individual learning, if that is necessary. But it puts the focus on the student to actually review and learn the concepts.  When I went to medical school, we didn't have that. But when you start seeing patients,

Voices of Misery Podcast
Harvard educated children‘s author, Bracha Goetz joins the show and spreads her infectious positivity.

Voices of Misery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 84:53


Bracha Goetz graduated from Harvard University, attended the Medical College of Virginia, and went on to study at Ohr Someyach Women's Division in Jerusalem. She is blessed with a bunch of beautiful children and grandchildren, is the author of several children's books, an editor of books for women, a frequently published poet, and the Mentoring Coordinator of the Jewish Big Brother and Big Sister League in Baltimore. @BrachaGoetz https://www.amazon.com/Bracha-Goetz/e/B001KCI086 Twitter: @voicesofmisery mewe: @voicesofmisery Parler: voices of misery Gmail: voicesofmiserypodcast@gmail.com Instagram: voicesofmiserypodcast Discord server: voices of misery podcast https://tinyurl.com/VoMPodcastTees

Curious Vedanth
Meet Dr. M. Ramani - The Academic Dean of a Medical College

Curious Vedanth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 27:41


Season 4 Episode 6: In this episode, I interview Dr. M. Ramani, a Professor of Pathology and Academic Dean of Mallareddy Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad. She was also the Principal of Osmania Medical College and the Director of Medical Education, Telangana. We talk about the medical infrastructure in India, and the improvements it needs. She also shares first aid tips to help anyone who has met with an accident.Follow my Facebook page to get updates on the upcoming episodes. https://www.facebook.com/curiousvedanth/To listen to earlier episodes visit curiousvedanth.comTo listen at leisure on your phone and get notified about future episodes, subscribe by searching for 'Curious Vedanth' wherever you get podcasts such as Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google Podcast, Spotify, etc.

Route 51
Oct. 8, Preventing Suicide

Route 51

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Every day, about 130 Americans die by suicide, the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. National surveys show the number of people who have seriously considered suicide in the past 30 days has increased dramatically since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, with veterans and farmers among the hardest hit. "Route 51" host Shereen Siewert welcomes Sara Kohlbeck, director of the Division of Suicide Prevention at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Brian Michel, director of prevention services at Mental Health America of Wisconsin and Bertrand D. Berger, Mental Health Division manager at the Zablocki VA Medical Cener, for a discussion on suicide prevention strategies for children and adults, with a special emphasis on farmers and veterans coping with suicidal thoughts. Resources: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 Available 24/7 The Crisis Text Line: Text "HELLO" to 741741 Available 24/7 Prevent Suicide Wisconsin Veteran Task Force on Suicide Prevention Reach Out Wisconsin Mental Health America of Wisconsin

Realfoodology
59: Food is Medicine and Information for the Body with MD Dr. Aaron Hartman

Realfoodology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 61:18


On todays episode I speak with MD Dr Aaron Hartman,  MAR, FAAFP, DABFM, DABIM, DAIHM, IFMCP.  The medical system didn't offer much hope for his daughter's medical condition and he was forced to explore alternative treatments. We talk about this journey he went through and the improvement he saw in both his daughter and son once they started focusing on real food and alternative treatments. We talk about COVID long haulers syndrome and what he's seen in his practice.  We also talk about the current medical system, the changes we need to actually help people and the importance of real food. Food is medicine and food is information. We need real food with real information for our bodies to self regulate and heal. Dr. Hartman graduated Summa Cum Laude in Biology from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1995, earned his MD from Medical College of Virginia in 2000, and then completed his residency in Family Medicine at the Hanover Family Practice residency program at the Medical College of Virginia in 2003.  In 2012 he formalized his commitment to exploring new and advanced treatment opportunities through his membership with the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine and then the Institute for Functional Medicine. In 2015 he received his second board certification in Integrative and Holistic Medicine through the American Board of Physician Specialties and in 2016 earned the recognition as a Certified Practitioner in Functional Medicine from the Institute for Functional Medicine. Show Note/Links: https://richmondfunctionalmedicine.com/about/aaron-hartman-md/ Free Gift: https://go.richmondfunctionalmedicine.com/brguide-pod -Resilience has become the key concept in 2021 for health and wellness. In this free eBook, Dr. Hartman addresses the foundations of functional medicine and how they can change your health trajectory today. Sponsored By: www.organifi.com/realfoodology Code REALFOODOLOGY gets you 20% Off Get 40% off your first order at http://www.magicmind.co with code COURTNEYFRIENDS

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.05.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 59:41


Red onion effective at killing cancer cells, study says University of Guelph (Ontario)  If you're looking for a flavorful way to help fight and prevent cancer, add red onion to your shopping list.  It will be worth the effort … as you will soon see why. In the first study of its kind, University of Guelph researchers looked at how the Ontario-grown red onion and several others affected the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Their findings indicate that all onions are not created equal. The Canadian researchers looked at five different kinds of onion in total from the province of Ontario. They assessed the onions in terms of their effects against cancer cells and their ability to prevent cancer. Of the five species tested, the Ruby Ring red onion was the most effective. Few people are aware that onions are somewhat of a superfood. Hopefully, studies like these will help to change that. Onions in general have very high concentrations of the flavonoid quercetin. However, the Ruby Ring Ontario red onion has particularly high levels of these compounds as compared with other species. In the study, colon cancer cells were placed in direct contact with quercetin that was extracted from the five onion varieties studied. It was found that all of the onion types created an unfavorable environment for cancer cells and initiated cancer cell death, or apoptosis. Communication between the cancer cells seems to be disrupted by the compounds in the onions, and this can help to fight and prevent cancer. The study also showed that the Ruby Ring red onion was high in anthocyanin, a compound that helps to enrich the scavenging properties of quercetin. This in turn supports quercetin in fighting cancer cells and helping to prevent cancer. Anthocyanin is the molecule that gives vegetables like red onions their rich, deep color. This is in keeping with the general increased healthbenefits that can be gained from other dark or brightly colored vegetables and fruits. The recent onion study results were published in the journal Food Research International. While all of the onions studied showed the ability to inhibit cancer cells, red onions were particularly effective. Their beneficial compounds blocked the production of both colon cancer cells and breast cancer cells within the controlled conditions of the study. The next step is to complete human trials to further explore the cancer fighting effects of onions. Researchers are also working on an extraction technique to isolate the quercetin in onions so that it can be administered as a cancer therapy. In the meantime, finding ways to include more of this cancer-fighting superfood into your diet can allow you to experience many health benefits. Enjoy red onions in salads, on sandwiches and cooked into soups, stews and stir-fry dishes.     Age and aging have critical effects on the gut microbiome   Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, October 4, 2021 Researchers at Cedars-Sinai have found that aging produces significant changes in the microbiome of the human small intestine distinct from those caused by medications or illness burden. The findings have been published in the journal Cell Reports. "By teasing out the microbial changes that occur in the small bowel with age, medication use and diseases, we hope to identify unique components of the microbial community to target for therapeutics and interventions that could promote healthy aging," said Ruchi Mathur, MD, the study's principal investigator. Research exploring the gut microbiome, and its impact on health, has relied predominantly on fecal samples, which do not represent the entire gut, according to Mathur. In their study, investigators from Cedars-Sinai's Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program analyzed samples from the small intestine–which is over 20 feet in length and has the surface area of a tennis court–for examination of the microbiome and its relationship with aging. "This study is the first of its kind to examine the microbial composition of the small intestine of subjects 18 years of age to 80. We now know that certain microbial populations are influenced more by medications, while others are more affected by certain diseases. We have identified specific microbes that appear to be only influenced by the chronological age of the person," said Mathur, an endocrinologist and director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment & Education Center. The 21st century has been referred to as the "era of the gut microbiome" as scientists turn considerable attention to the role trillions of gut bacteria, fungi and viruses may play in human health and disease. The microbiome is the name given to the genes that live in these cells. Studies have suggested that disturbances in the constellations of the microbial universe may lead to critical illnesses, including gastroenterological diseases, diabetes, obesity, and some neurological disorders. While researchers know that microbial diversity in stool decreases with age, Cedars-Sinai investigators identified bacteria in the small bowel they refer to as "disruptors" that increase and could be troublesome. "Coliforms are normal residents of the intestine. We found that when these rod-shaped microbes become too abundant in the small bowel–as they do as we get older–they exert a negative influence on the rest of the microbial population. They are like weeds in a garden," said study co-author Gabriela Leite, Ph.D. Investigators also found that as people age, the bacteria in the small intestine change from microbes that prefer oxygen to those that can survive with less oxygen, something they hope to understand as the research continues. "Our goal is to identify and fingerprint the small intestinal microbial patterns of human health and disease. Given the important role the small bowel plays in absorption of nutrients, changes in the microbiome in this location of the gut may have a greater impact on human health, and warrants further study," said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the MAST program and a co-author of the study. This research is part of Cedars-Sinai's ongoing REIMAGINE study: Revealing the Entire Intestinal Microbiota and its Associations with the Genetic, Immunologic, and Neuroendocrine Ecosystem.   Study finds no association between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk University of Buffalo, September 28, 2021 Researchers from the University at Buffalo conducted a study of nearly 80,000 postmenopausal women in the U.S. to determine whether caffeine consumption from coffee and tea has any association with invasive breast cancer. The average age when U.S. women reach menopause, 51, also happens to coincide with the age group—50- to 64-year-olds—that has the highest reported caffeine consumption. In addition to that, the average age of breast cancer diagnosis in the U.S. is 62. This overlap of age at menopause, age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high caffeine consumption gave greater weight to the importance of clarifying whether caffeine intake impacts breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. It does not, according to the UB researchers' findings, published in August in the International Journal of Cancer. "From our literature review, many studies have found significant associations between coffee and/or tea consumption and reduced breast cancer incidence whereas a few studies have reported elevated risk. Our study, however, found no association," said study first author Christina KH Zheng, who worked on the study while completing her master's in epidemiology at UB. She is now a surgical resident in the MedStar Baltimore general surgery program. "About 85% of Americans drink at least one caffeinated beverage a day. It is important for the public to know whether consumption of caffeinated beverages has beneficial or harmful effects on breast cancer, the most common type of cancer and second-leading cause of cancer death for U.S. women," said Lina Mu, MD, Ph.D., the study's senior author, who is an associate professor of epidemiology and environmental health at UB. "The overlap of age at diagnosis of breast cancer and age with high consumption of caffeine, and the inconsistent findings from previous studies motivated us to study whether this lifestyle factor could affect breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women," said Kexin Zhu, a study co-first author and epidemiology Ph.D. student in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions. Researchers looked at a sample of 79,871 participants in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Participants have for decades now completed yearly health questionnaires that help researchers learn more about diet and exercise habits, as well as disease, and any possible linkages. After a median follow-up of 16 years, there were 4,719 cases of invasive breast cancer identified. At first glance, women who reported drinking two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day had a 12% higher risk of invasive breast cancer compared to non-drinkers. But that association was not statistically significant after adjusting for lifestyle factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. "Seeing null results after adjusting for lifestyle, demographic and reproductive factors informs us of the complexity that is the relationship between caffeine intake and invasive breast cancer risk," Zheng said. "Some lifestyle factors, like drinking alcohol and physical activity, might be associated with both coffee intake and breast cancer risk," Zhu explained. "Therefore, they might confound the initial positive associations. After we took the lifestyle factors into account, the results suggested that regular coffee drinking might not have an impact on invasive breast cancer risk." The risk of invasive breast cancer was even higher—22%—for women who reported drinking two to three cups of decaffeinated coffee each day. It was slightly lower when adjusted for lifestyle variables (smoking history, alcohol consumption, physical activity, etc.), and the association was not statistically significant when further accounting for reproductive variables such as family history of breast cancer and number of children The researchers were unable to determine if the elevated risk is due to the decaffeinated nature of the coffee, the amount consumed, or another factor unique to this population that was not accounted for in the study. The researchers did not observe a significant association between overall tea consumption and invasive breast cancer. Additional research needs to be done in order to understand whether different types of teas have different effects on breast cancer risk, Zhu said.   Liver function improves with the consumption of Broccoli sprout extract Tokai University Tokyo Hospital (Japan), October 5, 2021 A Japanese study of broccoli sprouts and liver function has found the sulforaphane-rich food to be highly beneficial. An extract from broccoli sprouts given to male participants was shown to improve hepatic abnormalities and overall liver function significantly. For the study, the researchers conducted a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial of males with fatty liver disease. The subjects received either extract of broccoli sprouts in capsule form, or a placebo. The capsules contained glucoraphanin, a precursor for the sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts. A number of key liver function markers were measured before and after the trial. It was determined that dietary supplementation with extract of broccoli improved liver functioning by decreasing alkali phosphatase activity and oxidative stress markers. Broccoli sprout extract was also found to prevent NDMA-induced chronic liver failure in rats. The researchers believe the antioxidants in broccoli sprouts are effective in suppressing the mechanisms of liver failure at a cellular level. The reduction of oxidative stress is crucial in protecting the liver and improving its health, and broccoli is loaded with health-supporting antioxidants. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is also reaching epidemic proportions, with nearly 30 percent of Americans (90 million people) having some level of the disease. Like hep C, NAFLD can result in liver failure and cancer of the liver in the most severe cases. Exposure to environmental toxins exacerbates liver conditions as well, with the glyphosate found in weed killers, like Roundup, particularly harmful. The good news is that liver conditions are preventable by embracing a healthy lifestyle. Eating plenty of organic fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes can do wonders for liver health. As evidenced by the recent research out of Japan, sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprouts can be a key component in supporting healthy liver function. Milk thistle, vitamin E, black seed oil and dandelion root have also shown effectiveness in supporting and detoxifying the liver.       How cannabis-like substances keep the brain in balance   Utrecht University (Netherlands), October 4, 2021 Whenever we learn, remember or forget something, a surprisingly active role is played by cannabis-like substances in the brain. Researchers at Utrecht University found that the substances actively balance connections in the brain that allow cells to either activate or inhibit each other. The discovery reveals how brain cells influence each other, and how psychiatric disorders can arise when this process goes wrong. Although wisdom comes with age, our brain does not store every single experience or lesson learned. In addition to learning and remembering, our brains are also equipped to forget irrelevant things or drop unused skills. In order to find a balance in this, brain cellsconstantly communicate with each other through connections that activate or inhibit the cells. Researchers from Utrecht University discovered that brain cells can form new, inhibitory connections via so-called endocannabinoids. They reported their discovery in Journal of Neuroscience. Counterbalance Endocannabinoids derive their name from the cannabis plant, which contains similar substances. The researchers discovered the role of endocannabinoids when they induced brain cells of mice to strengthen activating connections. In response, the brain cells also started making new inhibitory connections. The researchers found that endocannabinoids kickstarted the new connections. Surprisingly active role The researchers were surprised to find that these substances play such an active role. "Nobody expected this from endocannabinoids," says research leader Dr. Corette Wierenga, neurobiologist at Utrecht University. It was already known that endocannabinoids can influence the functioning of our brains. But until now researchers assumed that the substances were merely involved in adjusting existing connections. "Now it appears that the system of endocannabinoids can actively push the production of new inhibitory connections, with which brain cells actively regulate the balance." Psychiatric disorders caused by imbalance The discovery could help scientists to better understand how psychiatric disordersand other abnormalities in the brain develop. In many of these disorders, the balance between inhibitory and activating connections is disturbed. During an epileptic seizure, for example, this balance is seriously disturbed. Although in many other disorders the disturbance is more subtle, for example in schizophrenia, the impact can still be equally profound. Cannabis-related unbalance The balance between activating and inhibiting connections in our brain is constantly being adjusted in response to our experiences. Whenever we experience something, the connections change, and the brain must restore the balance. Cannabis use can disrupt that balance. "Occasional cannabis use will not seriously disturb the balance," says Wierenga. "But if the balance is disturbed for a longer period, it can cause problems. For example, children of mothers who smoked marijuana during pregnancy can experience problems with neurological development." Early stages of life The balance is especially important in early stages of life, Wierenga says. "During our development, brain connections are constantly changing. Especially during that period, it is important that inhibitory and activating connections remain coordinated. If the coordination is malfunctioning or disturbed, you can imagine that the system becomes disrupted. And unfortunately, disruptions that occur so early cannot be easily repaired later in life." According to Wierenga, such disruptions can lead not only to loss of memory, but also initiate more serious consequences. For example, the brain might grow out to less adaptive to stressful situations. "When this happens, things get out of hand more easily in the brain, because inhibition and activation are out of balance. That could lead to learning and behavioral problems." Predicting and preventing disorders Creating a deeper understanding of the role endocannabinoids play in the brain, could lead to psychiatric disorders being more predictable or even prevented in the future. The publication in Journal of Neuroscience now sets out a new direction in which more knowledge can be built up. Wierenga: "Ultimately, as a researcher, we want to understand how brain cells coordinate the balance and what happens when that balance is disturbed.   Glycerin is safe, effective in psoriasis model Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, October 4, 2021 Patients with psoriasis have reported that glycerin, an inexpensive, harmless, slightly sweet liquid high on the list of ingredients in many skin lotions, is effective at combatting their psoriasis and now scientists have objective evidence to support their reports. They found that whether applied topically or ingested in drinking water, glycerin, or glycerol, helps calm the classic scaly, red, raised and itchy patches in their psoriasismodel, Dr. Wendy Bollag, cell physiologist and skin researcher at the Medical College of Georgia and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center and her colleagues report in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences. The studies also provide more evidence of the different ways glycerin enables the healthy maturation of skin cells through four stages that result in a smooth, protective skin layer. Psoriasis is an immune-mediated problem that typically surfaces in young adults in which skin cells instead multiply rapidly, piling up into inflamed patches. "We have experimental data now to show what these patients with psoriasis are reporting," says Bollag, who nearly 20 years ago first reported in The Journal of Investigative Dermatology that glycerin, a natural alcohol and water attractor known to help the skin look better, also safely helped it function better by helping skin cells mature properly. Bollag's early report led to many anecdotal reports from individuals and their reports ultimately led to the newly published study. Topically, glycerin is known to have a soothing, emollient effect. But another key part of its magic, which Dr. Bollag has helped delineate, is its conversion to the lipid, or fat, phosphatidylglycerol, which ultimately regulates the function of keratinocytes, our major skin cell type, and suppresses inflammation in the skin. Glycerin gets into the skin through avenues like aquaporin-3, a channel expressed in skin cells, and the MCG scientists have shown that once inside, aquaporin 3 funnels glycerin to phospholipase-D-2, an enzyme that converts fats in the external cell membrane into cell signals, ultimately converting glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol. In 2018, Bollag and team reported that topical application of phosphatidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin patches in a mouse model of psoriasis. This time they decided to look at the impact of its widely available precursor glycerin. For the new studies, they used imiquimod, which is known to produce psoriasis-like plaques on humans using it for problems like genital warts and some skin cancers, to produce an animal model. The mice either drank the sweet natural alcohol or the scientists applied it topically. Either way, glycerin helped reduce development of the characteristic skin lesions, the scientists report, a finding which helps underline that glycerin works in more than one way to improve the skin condition. Externally, glycerin showed its action as an emollient because even in mice missing phospholipase-D-2, it was beneficial. Additionally, topically it appears to compete with hydrogen peroxide for space inside the aquaporin 3 channel. Hydrogen peroxide is commonly known as a mild antiseptic but we produce it as well and at low levels it's a cell signaling molecule. But at high levels, hydrogen peroxide produces destructive oxidative stress, which can actually cause psoriasis. The scientists found that topical glycerin reduced the levels of hydrogen peroxide entering skin cells. When they added glycerin and hydrogen peroxide at the same time directly to skin cells, they found that glycerin protected against the oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide. "Glycerol is basically outcompeting the hydrogen peroxide in getting in there and preventing it from being able to enter and increase oxidative stress," Bollag says. Oil and water don't mix, so yet another way glycerin may be helpful is by supporting the skin's major role as a water permeability barrier so that, as an extreme, when we sit in a bathtub the bath water doesn't pass through our skin so we blow up like a balloon, she says. On the other hand, when glycerin was ingested by the mice missing the phospholipase- D-2, which converts fats or lipids in a cell's membrane to signals, it simply did not work, Bollag says, which confirmed their earlier findings that internally anyway, glycerin pairs with the enzyme to produce the signal essential to skin cell maturation. Some of their other most recent work is detailing more about how phosphatidylglycerol decreases inflammation.  Bollag would like next steps to also include clinical trials with dermatologists and patients and is working to find a formulation scientist who can make what she thinks will be the optimal combination: glycerin and phosphatidylglycerol in the same topical cream. The addition of phosphatidylglyerol itself, rather than just the glycerin that makes it, is essentially a backup since there is some evidence that in psoriasis the essential conversion of glycerin to phosphatidylglycerol is not optimal. Bollag's lab and others have shown reduced levels of aquaporin 3 in psoriasis, which likely means less phosphatidylgycerol, so making more glycerin available may help, albeit not as efficiently, raise the availability of this lipid essential to normal skin cell proliferation. Moving quickly into clinical trials should be comparatively easy since, as with glycerin, there already is experience with the use of phosphatidylglycerol in humans. For example, it's a component of some high-end cosmetics, Bollag says.  She suspects that this sort of two-punch combination, could help keep early signs of psoriasis at bay and, with more advanced disease, use existing psoriasis treatments to get the skin condition under control then start applying glycerin to help keep it that way. Bollag and her colleagues reported in 2018 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology that in a mouse model of psoriasis, phosphtidylglycerol reduced inflammation and the characteristic raised skin lesions of psoriasis.  While its exact cause is unclear, psoriasis is an immune-mediated condition and patients have higher levels of inflammation, as well as too many skin cells being produced then maturing abnormally. The heightened inflammation also puts them at increased risk for problems like heart disease. Biologics used to treat psoriasis work different ways to stem this overactive immune response but in addition to their high cost, can put the patient at risk for problems like serious infections and cancer. The only side effect she has seen in about 20 years of working with glycerin and the clinical and cosmetic use already out there, is it can leave the skin feeling slightly sticky. Our bodies can make glycerol from the carbohydrates, proteins and fats that we eat or already have in our body.    

Rx for Success Podcast
71. The Self-Care Doctor: Robyn Tiger, MD

Rx for Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 69:15


Robyn Tiger, MD, is a physician & trauma-informed self-care coach. She founded StressFreeMD, a wellness practice that  provides freedom through self-care education. Dr. Tiger utilizes her unique combination of trainings in medicine, yoga therapy, meditation and life coaching to educate others in stress management, burnout prevention and relief. Her teachings focus on complete physical, mental, and emotional well-being and resilience. Dr. Tiger's innovative CME accredited program, Rx Inner Peace, was created at the request of several busy physicians seeking an accessible self-paced online self-care program. It contains the most effective evidence-based self-care methods compiled from several years of providing physician education. At the request of other healthcare professionals and the general public, she created the Self- Care Shop which houses 6 additional accredited self-care programs open to everyone. Dr. Tiger is a Western Carolina Medical Society Healthy Healer Partner, Surge-On App Key Opinion Leader for Self-Care for Surgeons, faculty for Trauma Informed Yoga Therapy, Advisory Council member of Yoga Therapy Today & yogatherapy.health, and is an O2X Human Performance Specialist for first responders. She received her BS degree in Natural Science and Psychology from Muhlenberg College. She earned her MD, completed an Internal Medicine internship and Diagnostic Radiology residency at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and also completed a fellowship in Body Imaging at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Unlock Bonus content and get the shows early on our Patreon Follow us or Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Amazon  | Spotify --- Show notes at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/71 Report-out with comments or feedback at https://rxforsuccesspodcast.com/report Music by Ryan Jones. Find Ryan on Instagram at _ryjones_, Contact Ryan at ryjonesofficial@gmail.com

After Further Review
September 30, 2021 - Steve Little, President and CEO of HFM Froedtert and The Medical College of Wisconsin

After Further Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:19


September 30, 2021 - Steve Little, President and CEO of HFM Froedtert and The Medical College of Wisconsin

After Further Review
September 30, 2021 - Steve Little, President and CEO of HFM Froedtert and The Medical College of Wisconsin

After Further Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:19


September 30, 2021 - Steve Little, President and CEO of HFM Froedtert and The Medical College of Wisconsin

OHBM Neurosalience
S2 Ep4: The world according to AFNI

OHBM Neurosalience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 78:34


Peter talks to Bob Cox, Ph.D., Gang Chen, Ph.D. and Paul Taylor, Ph.D. about AFNI. AFNI is a major processing package used by brain mapping groups all over the world. It is nearly as old as fMRI itself, and has been steadily growing in functionality. Here we discuss the history of how it all started as well as a few of the challenges of fMRI processing that have arisen over the years. Importantly, time is spent discussing more of the philosophy of data analysis and visualization. A key tenet that AFNI has always encouraged is the ability to drill down and look directly at the data. This ability to flexibly and efficiently visualize the data at all processing steps not only guards against problematic data and hidden artifacts but is also a catalyst for new analysis ideas. We discuss a bit of the future of analysis and the bottleneck for clinical implementation. Guests: Bob Cox, Ph.D. is the creator of AFNI and still leads a team, the Scientific and Statistical Core, at the NIH which helps users and continues to develop AFNI. Bob received his Ph.D in Applied Mathematics from Caltech, and after several industry positions and a short stint at Indiana University and Purdue University, he moved to the Medical College of Wisconsin where he began to create AFNI. He moved to the NIH in 2001 where his work accelerated as he was allowed to grow a team of programmers to further advance AFNI. Gang Chen, Ph.D. joined the AFNI team at the NIH in 2003. He is a staff scientist and the chief statistician for things fMRI and related. He received his PhD. from the University of Arizona, Tucson and has been recently pushing our understanding of variability in large N datasets. Paul Taylor, Ph.D. joined the AFNI team in 2015. He received his D. Phil in Astrophysics from Oxford University, and performed post docs at the University of Cape Town and with Bharat Biswal in New Jersey. He has been leading the effort to incorporate diffusion imaging and tractography into AFNI For more info on the Neurosalience podcast and the guests, visit: ohbmbrainmappingblog.com Keywords: #brain #imaging #software #data #fMRI #research #clinical

In Focus by The Hindu
The govt is planning to fortify our rice by 2024. But what is food fortification? | In Focus

In Focus by The Hindu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 34:59


There's been a lot of talk of and concerns raised, about food fortification recently -- which is the adding of one or more nutrients to a staple food, aiming to compensate for deficiencies in large populations. In in his Independence Day speech this year, Prime Minister Modi said that all rice distributed in the government systems, including in the public distribution system and for midday meals, would be fortified by 2024. Considering the burden of anaemia in India, iron is to be one of the nutrients added to rice. The government has already launched a pilot programme in 15 districts, using fortified rice for distribution. But does all our rice need to be fortified? Is iron deficiency the only cause of anaemia? How big is our anaemia burden? And is there evidence to show that iron fortification will work, or are there other steps that policy-makers could try? Guest: Dr Anura Kurpad, professor of physiology and nutrition at St John's Medical College, Bengaluru Host: Zubeda Hamid Write to us at socmed4@thehindu.co.in

Pedia Pain Focus
#79. Pain Amongst Neonates, Infants and Young Children

Pedia Pain Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 67:43


There's no better way to kick off September as the Pain Awareness Month than bringing you a conversation with Dr. Kanwaljeet S. Anand, whose research took the medical world by storm, even risking his license, as he sought out to answer the question of; what if we give children anesthesia and analgesia?  I truly believe that he is the reason why my career as a pediatric pain and palliative care physician exists today and serves as an available path for many healthcare professionals. In this episode,  Dr.  Anand, a professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, describes his groundbreaking research back in the 80s, when a popular held belief was that babies don't feel pain!  With the findings  and intervention offered in his RCT, they were able to cut down the infant mortality rates by half.  It is the work of doctors like him that paved the path for someone like me to practice pediatric pain management as a specialty-- hoping to save and improve the lives of many more children by debunking the fallacies that still surround children's pain and its management.   Takeaways In This Episode   What fueled Dr. Anand's desire to research perioperative care for infants His hypothesis around morbidity and mortality of neonates and infants undergoing surgeries, relationship to anesthetic management  Conducting the randomized controlled trial study and its results that changed the history and trajectory of childrens pain and perioperative management Sometimes it's worth picking the fights How his study gained momentum and changed how the healthcare world approaches pain management for children and infants When and how infants develop the ability to feel pain The long-term consequences of poorly or inadequately  managing children's pain Changing the minds of colleagues who perpetuate the belief that children are “hardy” and will “get over it” Dr. Anand's message to the audience   Links Connect with Dr. Kanwaljeet S. Anand: Stanford Profile LinkedIn Love, Pain, and Intensive Care. K.J.S. Anand, Richard W. Hall Clinicians' Pain Evaluation Toolkit Proactive Pain Solutions   About the Guest    Kanwaljeet S. Anand, MBBS, MD, D Phil, FRCCM   He is currently the professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He directs the pain and stress neurobiology lab, the Jackson Vaughan Critical Care Research Fund, and he serves as the Editor of the journal Pediatric Research and is the Division Chief for Pediatric Critical Care at the Department of Pediatrics at Standford School of Medicine. He graduated from M.G.M. Medical College, Indore (India). He received the D.Phil. degree as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, followed by a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School, a categorical Pediatrics residency training at Boston Children's Hospital, and a Critical Care Medicine fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He is the recipient of innumerable awards, including the Dr. Michael Blacow Award from the British Pediatric Association in 1986, the Pediatric Resident Research Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the inaugural Young Investigator Award in Pediatric Pain from the International Association for Study of Pain in 1994, the Jeffrey Lawson Award for advocacy of children's pain relief, the highest recognition in pediatric pain medicine in the United States. He's also been awarded many awards across Europe in many countries such as the Nils Rosén von Rosenstein Award from the Swedish Academy of Medicine and the 2015 Journées Nationales de Néonatologie Address at The Pasteur Institute to name a few. For his dedication and work in the field of pediatric pain management, he is considered a world authority on pain and stress in newborns and pain management in infants. 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.06.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 59:02


The Covid Vaccines and Pathological Evidence of Harm   Dr Ryan Cole is a trained medical physician who has worked as a board certified dermatopatholoist since 2004. He is the founding CEO and Medical director of Cole Diagnostics in Garden City, Idaho -- the state's largest independent medical laboratory using cutting edge technology to specialize in pathology and clinical services. He has become one of the more outspoken opponents to the current national pandemic policies within the medical community, and has testified before a New Hampshire legislative session. Earlier Dr. Cole gained expertise in immunology while working as a chief fellow of pathology at the Mayo CLinic, a chief fellow of surgical pathology at the Medical College of Virginia and received his medical degree from Virginia Commonwealth University.  Ryan's website is ColeDiagnostics.com

Why in the World
Episode #15 - Dr. Karen Maroda - Therapists Are Human Too

Why in the World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 61:22


EPISODE #15 - Dr. Karen Maroda - Therapists Are Human Too Every once in a while, as a psychotherapist you come across an author who's work really resonates with you. It challenges, inspires, and makes a mark on your own way of practicing. For me, Dr. Karen Maroda is one of those authors. Dr. Maroda is a psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice in Milwaukee, WI. She is the Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin and is the author of four books including: The Power of Countertransference Seduction, Surrender, and Transformation Psychodynamic Techniques The Analyst's Vulnerability, which was just released earlier this year I first read her work in 2005 while in Grad School to become a therapist and was immediately drawn in. I have returned to her books countless times throughout my career and almost always recommend them to therapists I supervise or consult with. Throughout her work, but particularly in her new book, The Analyst's Vulnerability (Great Title, BTW) there is a consistent call to therapists examine our own motivations for being therapists, to let go of the need to be perfect, to embrace our own humanity, and to show up with our patients in a deeply authentic, courageous and relational way. She often pushes against whatever the current popular fad in our field happens to be, and points out that we therapists are prone to avoid conflict by hiding behind our theories, techniques, and tools. In her new book she writes, “We have never focused on the natural conflicts that arise in any relationship, including the analytic one, in part because it would necessitate the examination of our own needs, desires, and shortcomings” (Maroda, 2022, p. 102). In my opinion, this book is a must read for any psychotherapist who takes seriously the idea that our patients are far more than symptoms, thoughts, behaviors and who believe that our role in the work is far more dynamic than simply providing advice and solutions.   I hope you enjoy my conversation with Dr. Karen Maroda as much as I did! Thank you for listening. Links for Dr. Maroda LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/karen-j-maroda-ph-d-abpp-b1679263 Website: https://www.karenmaroda.com/   Why in the World Podcast on Instagram Bryan Nixon is a psychotherapist and the founder and clinical director of Mindful Counseling GR in Grand Rapids, MI. He is also a teacher and facilitator in Relationally Focused Psychodynamic Therapy, a post-grad continuing education program for therapists. 

Master The Pause
Mastering Bliss from The Breath Observation, Dr. Dale Buegle Psychiatrist, and Yogi

Master The Pause

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 40:23


Dr. Dale Buegel has practiced and taught yoga for 40+ years. Dr. Buegel continues the work of Swami Rama's dream to integrate the ancient teachings of yoga with modern science and culture. Students around the world have appreciated Dr. Buegel's clear instruction and explanation of the fine points of yoga practices. He is ERYT-500 certified and serves as faculty for a number of Yoga Alliance certified teaching programs.Dr. Buegel received his medical training from the University of Minnesota, with post-graduate training from Northwestern University Medical School and The Medical College of Wisconsin. While practicing complementary medicine and psychiatry for 25 years in both outpatient and inpatient settings, Dr. Buegel integrated his knowledge of yoga, bodywork disciplines, energetic healing modalities, homeopathy, and nutritional science with traditional treatment offerings. Dr. Buegel's energetic healing training in the disciplines of Esoteric Healing, Reiki.The current release of "Practical Samāyā Tantra" follows the prior release of "Practical Yoga Sūtras". Like the previous text, "Practical Samāyā Tantra" is a revisiting of the path of yoga originally outlined by the ancient sagesvitalitymatters.org--------DisclaimerAll content found on Master The Pause podcast, including: text, images, audio, or other formats were created for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or heard on this podcast.Donate to Master the PauseThis podcast is run in part from the generous donations from listeners like you. Thank you for supporting me & the podcast.Maryon MaassNamaste

Talk2MeDoc
Second Victim Syndrome and Mental Fitness with Susan Wilson, MD

Talk2MeDoc

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 26:56


Join your host Andrew Tisser with his guest Dr. Susan Wilson as they talk about maximizing our mental fitness and maintaining a sustainable shift in mindset. In her 25 years as a board-certified Emergency Medicine physician, Susan has seen the evolution of medical practice and the impact of these changes on her colleagues. Through her knowledge as a certified physician peer coach, she provides the tools necessary to navigate these challenging times in modern medicine. And with the rapidly increasing cases of burnout and job dissatisfaction, Dr. Wilson believes that professional coaching is needed now more than ever.  In this episode, you will learn:●      What “Second Victim Syndrome” is and why peer support is essential among medical professionals●      The difference between resilience and mental fitness, and ways to improve the latter●      How to use the power of empathy in learning how to show self-compassion●      The value of “mindfulness” when going into another encounter after a difficult one●      How mental fitness and mindfulness can be applied even outside of professional life●      And much more! ~ About Dr. Susan Wilson: Dr. Susan Wilson has been practicing Emergency Medicine since 1994, after completing her residency at The Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. She also attended the Loyola-Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. However, Dr. Wilson retired from clinical practice in June 2019.  Wanting to maintain involvement in Medicine, Susan became a certified physician peer coach, providing guidance and support to other physicians. Her 25 years as a hospital-based, board-certified physician has afforded great insight into the challenges of medicine. Having seen the evolution of medical practice and witnessing firsthand how these changes have impacted her colleagues, Dr. Wilson sees coaching as an essential tool to address job satisfaction, work/life balance, and burnout among physicians.  So now, Susan uses “mental fitness” as the framework for her coaching, helping her clients shift their mindset from negative to positive. She also has a particular interest in “Clinician Distress Syndrome” (also known as “Second Victim Syndrome”), offering peer support for those suffering acute, traumatic events.  You can find Dr. Susan Wilson on... Website: https://www.sjwprofessionalcoaching.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/susan-wilson-md-cpc-2492681a4/  Connect with Talk2Medoc on: Website: https://www.andrewtisserdo.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewtisserdo/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andrew.tisser Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/talk2medoc_llc/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Talk2MeDoc YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0O_Sf3aYLavYaJ_hg7bM8g

Mile High Endurance Podcast
Adrian Mcdonald Wins Leadville

Mile High Endurance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 68:19


Last weekend was the Leadville 100 Trail Run and we have Adrian McDonald who won Leadville with a time of 16 hours, 18 minutes and 19 seconds in his first attempt at a 100-mile race was the fifth-fastest in the race's 38-year history. Show Sponsor: VENGA CBD Last weekend was the Leadville 100 Trail Run and we have Adrian McDonald who won Leadville with a time of 16 hours, 18 minutes and 19 seconds in his first attempt at a 100-mile race was the fifth-fastest in the race's 38-year history. As you know, we're huge fans of Venga CBD. It really helps us recover more quickly from our workouts, have less soreness, sleep better and reduce inflammation.   We've been taking CBD for a long time now, but if you're new to it - or haven't yet tried it - you might be confused about where to start.   Venga is now offering personalized CBD plans. All you have to do is take a simple quiz to get you started! Answer a few questions and, voila - there's your personalized CBD recommendation! It's all based on YOU - what CBD YOU need right now to meet your goals.   Guys, it's super easy to go take this quiz on their website. Just go to vengacbd.com/quiz and (you didn't hear it from us but…) there's a freebie in it for you just for taking the quiz.   We trust these guys 100% and they'll make it really easy for you to get started with the RIGHT CBD.    Just go to https://vengaendurance.com/303podcast to order yours today. First-time order is 30% off with code (303PODCAST).  We've also added 50% off your first month's subscription with code (303SUBSCRIPTION).   In Today's Show Feature interview - Adrian McDonald Endurance News - Collin's Cup, Paralympic Games What New in the 303 - Leadville 100, Triple Bypass Video of the Week - Other Topics Tim Hola who won his AG at Boulder 70.3 TriDot PhysiogenomiX – Predictive Fitness   Interview Sponsor: UCAN Take your performance to the next level with UCAN Energy and Bars made with SuperStarch®  UCAN uses SuperStarch instead of simple sugars to fuel serious athletes.  UCAN keeps blood sugar steady compared to the energy spikes and crashes of sugar-based products.  Steady energy equals sustained performance!   You put in the training, so don't let nutrition limit your performance.  Use UCAN in your training and racing to fuel the healthy way, finish stronger and recover more quickly!  Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co   Use the code 303UCAN for 20% off at ucan.co/discount/303UCAN/ or ucan.co,      Interview with Adrian McDonald Adrian Macdonald at the age of 32 won the famed Leadville Trail 100 run. His winning time of 16 hours, 18 minutes and 19 seconds in his first attempt at a 100-mile race was the fifth-fastest in the race's 38-year history and more than 40 minutes better than runner-up Matt Flaherty of Bloomington, Indiana — one of the most-accomplished ultrarunners in the nation.   Earlier this year Adrian won the Antelope Island Buffalo Run 50 Miler in March.  And pre-pandemic, Adrian finished 56th overall at the 2018 Boston Marathon in a time of 2 hours, 35 minutes and 48 seconds.    Let's get into Leadville and ultra running with Adrian McDonald.     Our News is sponsored by Buddy Insurance. It's big time training and racing season.  Buddy Insurance is the kind of peace of mind so you can enjoy your training and racing to their fullest.  Buddy's mission is simple, to help people fearlessly enjoy an active and outdoor lifestyle.  You can now get on-demand accident insurance to make sure you get cash for bills fast and fill any gaps between your current coverage.  Go to buddyinsurance.com and create an account.  There's no commitment or charge to create one.  Once you have an account created, it's a snap to open your phone and in a couple clicks have coverage for the day.  Check it out!   Endurance News:   Chartier to step in for virus-stricken Von Berg at Collins Cup Von Berg has been suffering with the effects of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as mononucleosis virus, which he is believed to have contracted following his victory at IRONMAN 70.3 Switzerland earlier this month.   The 27-year-old lost 4.5kg in body mass and was unable to train for almost two weeks, and although he is on the road to recovery, he is far from elite level competitiveness.   Von Berg was hoping to join up with Team US – against his doctor's advice – but was ultimately unable to return to full fitness in time, and will now face an uphill battle to return for the IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in St. George, Utah in three weeks time.   Team US Captain Mark Allen revealed that Von Berg, who was geared up for a showdown with Jan Frodeno and Lionel Sanders, is not in condition to race this weekend and will be replaced by Chartier.   “It is an absolute privilege to be able to race for Team US at the inaugural Collins Cup and I look forward to competing against the best athletes from Team Europe and Team Internationals,” he said. “I have big shoes to fill but will give it my all for Team US.”   Fantasy Football, Why Not Fantasy Triathlon at the Collins Cup, Great Prizes Professional Triathletes Organisation (PTO) today announced the Collins Cup Fantasy Competition that will take place in the run up to the Collins Cup in Samorin, Slovakia on August 28th, 2021.   The Collins Cup Fantasy Competition follows the well-received Tokyo fantasy game and utilises the PTO's pioneering Race Data and Statistics site, which has given fans of the sport unrestricted access to current and historical racing data like never before. It is the next step in enhancing fan engagement and will be a fun way for Triathlon fans as well as all sports enthusiasts to follow the race.   The Collins Cup Fantasy Competition will feature the races of the inaugural Collins Cup where fans can predict which Team Europe, International and USA PTO Professionals will come 1st, 2nd & 3rd in each race match on 28th August 2021. The Collins Cup is the PTO's flagship event and is a new race format modelled after the Ryder Cup, which will see teams of European, International and USA athletes pitted against one another and put on display the excitement, rivalry, drama, and personalities of the sport of triathlon.   The Collins Cup Fantasy Competition will start on August 25th as soon as Captains unveil their picks for the race matches at the Collins Cup Opening Ceremony, which will be broadcast on the PTO YouTube Channel, Collins Cup app and Collins Cup website beginning at 5pm BST/ 6pm CEST/12 noon EST.   The Grand Prize is an all-expenses paid trip for two to the 2022 Collins Cup. Second and third place finishers will receive a TAG Heuer connected watch with GPS, compass, accelerometer, gyroscope and heart rate sensor. In addition, there are many more prizes to be won courtesy of Wahoo, a premier partner of The Collins Cup, including Wahoo KICKR Bikes, Wahoo KICKR Smart Trainers and Wahoo ELEMNT RIVAL multisport watches, giving fans the chance to snag some fabulous triathlon merchandise as well as displaying their knowledge of triathlon by correctly predicting race outcomes. Sign up to play at protriathletes.org/fantasy.   Media Fantasy Competition Bill from 303 Mike Reilly Belinda Granger Triathlon Taren Broadcast information Broadcast Information - The Collins Cup (protriathletes.org)     USA Triathlon 2020 U.S. Paralympic Triathlon Team At the Paralympic Games, triathletes will cover a 750-meter swim, non-drafting 20-kilometer bike and 5-kilometer run. All races will be held at Tokyo's Odaiba Marine Park, the same venue as the Olympic triathlon competitions.   The Paralympic triathlon events will take place Friday, Aug. 27, and Saturday, Aug. 28, at 5:30 p.m. ET in the U.S. (Saturday, Aug. 28, and Sunday, Aug. 29 at 6:30 a.m. in Tokyo). Paratriathlon medal events in Tokyo include PTWC men and women, PTVI men and women, PTS4 men, PTS2 women and PTS5 men and women. Athletes whose classifications are not included in the Tokyo Games are permitted to “class up” and race in a higher category against athletes with less severe impairments, provided they meet qualification and selection criteria.   Elizabeth Baker (Signal Mountain, Tenn.), guided by Jillian Elliott (Gig Harbor, Wash.), Women's PTVI 2016 U.S. Paralympian Baker competed in paratriathlon's debut at the Paralympic Games Rio 2016, placing fourth. She is a seven-time World Paratriathlon Event medalist and fourth-place finisher at the 2019 World Paratriathlon Championships in Lausanne, Switzerland. Baker is a 1996 graduate of the University of Georgia and earned her master's from Medical College of Georgia in 2001. She is coached by USA Triathlon Level III Coach Christine Palmquist. Elliott, Baker's guide, is a former U.S. National Team triathlete who raced in World Triathlon Series, World Cup and Pan American Cup events. She is coached by USA Triathlon Level III Coach Mark Sortino.   Jamie Brown (Oceanside, Calif.), Men's PTS4 Brown is a two-time World Paratriathlon Championships bronze medalist (2012, 2017) and six-time World Paratriathlon Event medalist. He took bronze at the 2019 Tokyo ITU Paratriathlon World Cup, sixth at the 2019 World Paratriathlon Championships and is the 2019 U.S. National Champion. He is a 2003 graduate of Chapman University in Orange, California, where he played on the NCAA men's baseball team. He is a member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team in Colorado Springs, coached by USA Triathlon Level II coach Derick Williamson.   Kyle Coon (Colorado Springs, Colo.), guided by Andy Potts (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Men's PTVI Coon is a two-time World Triathlon Para Series medalist who earned his first international victory on May 15 in Yokohama, Japan. He is a two-time World Cup medalist, the 2019 Paratriathlon Nationals runner-up, and placed second at last month's Americas Triathlon Para Championships Pleasant Prairie. Coon lost his vision at age 7 due to retinoblastoma, a rare form of eye cancer. He is now a member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team in Colorado Springs, coached by Williamson. Coon is a 2013 graduate of the University of Central Florida. His guide, Potts, is a 2004 U.S. Olympian, 2007 Pan American Games gold medalist, decorated IRONMAN and IRONMAN 70.3 athlete and an ambassador for the USA Triathlon Foundation. Potts is coached by Mike Doane.   Hailey Danz (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Women's PTS2 2016 U.S. Paralympic silver medalist Danz won silver as part of a U.S. podium sweep with Seely (gold) and Stockwell (bronze) at the Paralympic Games Rio 2016. She is the 2013 World Paratriathlon Champion, a six-time World Championships medalist, and winner of the 2019 Tokyo ITU Paratriathlon World Cup and the 2021 Americas Triathlon Para Championships Pleasant Prairie. She is a 2013 graduate of Northwestern University and is a member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team coached by Williamson. Danz is a cancer survivor and had her leg amputated due to osteosarcoma at age 14.   Amy Dixon (Encinitas, Calif.), guided by Kirsten Sass (McKenzie, Tenn.), Women's PTVI Dixon is a 2019 U.S. National Champion, 2016 Aquathlon (swim-run) World Champion, nine-time World Paratriathlon Event medalist and six-time World Paratriathlon Cup medalist. In February 2020, she earned a silver medal at the World Triathlon Para Series event in Devonport, Australia. Dixon is a 1999 graduate of the University of Connecticut and is coached by USA Triathlon Level II Coach Ken Axford. Her guide, Sass, is a decorated amateur triathlete with 10 age-group world titles across the disciplines of triathlon, duathlon (run-bike-run) and aquathlon. She is coached by USA Triathlon Level III Coach Suzanne Atkinson.   Kelly Elmlinger (San Antonio, Texas), Women's PTS5 (classing up from PTS4) U.S. Army veteran Elmlinger served for 10 years as a U.S. Army medic, with three back-to-back deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. She had her leg amputated in 2016 due to synovial sarcoma, a rare form of soft tissue cancer. She won the 2018 USA Paratriathlon National Championships in just her second triathlon since becoming an amputee. She is the 2019 World Championships silver medalist and won gold this year at World Triathlon Para Series events in Yokohama, Japan, and Leeds, England. Elmlinger is a 2010 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is coached by USA Triathlon Level III coach Shelly O'Brien.   Kendall Gretsch (Downers Grove, Ill.), Women's PTWC 2018 U.S. Paralympian (biathlon, cross-country skiing; 2 golds) Gretsch is a multi-sport talent in both paratriathlon and Nordic skiing, having won two gold medals in biathlon and cross-country skiing at the Paralympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018. She is the 2014, 2015 and 2016 World Paratriathlon Champion, 2019 Worlds silver medalist and was undefeated in elite paratriathlon competition from June 2014-July 2018. She is a 2014 graduate of Washington University in St. Louis and a member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team in Colorado Springs, coached by Williamson.   Chris Hammer (Elkins, W.V.), Men's PTS5 2012 U.S. Paralympian (track & field), 2016 U.S. Paralympian (triathlon) Hammer competed at the 2016 Paralympic Games in triathlon, placing fourth, and in track & field at the London 2012 Games, placing ninth in the 1,500m and 10th in the marathon. He is a three-time World Paratriathlon Championships bronze medalist and 12-time World Paratriathlon Event medalist. Hammer earned his bachelor's degree from Grand Valley State University in Michigan, where he competed on the NCAA track and cross-country teams. He earned master's degrees from Eastern Washington University and the University of Utah, and his Ph.D. from the University of Utah. He is currently head coach of the NCAA women's triathlon team at Davis & Elkins College in West Virginia. He is coached by USA Triathlon Level III Coach Wesley Johnson.   Eric McElvenny (Pittsburgh, Pa.), Men's PTS4 U.S. Marine Corps veteran McElvenny had his right leg amputated after stepping on an IED while serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in Afghanistan. In 2019, he placed second at the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon National Championships runner-up and won the Sarasota-Bradenton CAMTRI Paratriathlon American Championships. He earned his first World Triathlon Para Series medal earlier this year in Leeds, England, and took the win at the Americas Triathlon Para Championships Pleasant Prairie. McElvenny is a 2006 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, where he competed on the men's rugby team.   Grace Norman (Jamestown, Ohio), Women's PTS5 2016 U.S. Paralympic gold medalist (triathlon), 2016 U.S. Paralympic bronze medalist (track & field, 400m) Norman won a gold medal at the 2016 Paralympic Games in paratriathlon and added a bronze in track & field in the 400m. She is a six-time World Championships medalist, including two golds, a silver and two bronzes. Norman's resume also includes 10 World Paratriathlon Event medals and two U.S. national titles. She is a 2020 graduate of Cedarville University in Ohio, where she competed on the NCAA track and cross-country teams. She also represented Cedarville at the USA Triathlon Collegiate Club National Championships, placing 26th overall. Norman is coached by USA Triathlon Level III Coach Greg Mueller.   Allysa Seely (Glendale, Ariz.), Women's PTS2 2016 U.S. Paralympic gold medalist (triathlon), 2016 U.S. Paralympian (track & field) Seely won a gold medal in paratriathlon's debut at the Rio 2016 Games. She also competed in track & field in Rio, placing sixth in the 200m. Seely is the 2015, 2016 and 2018 World Paratriathlon Champion, and took silver at Worlds in 2017 and 2019. She is a 12-time World Paratriathlon Event gold medalist, and she won an ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete with a Disability after going undefeated for the entire 2018 season. Seely is a member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team in Colorado Springs, coached by Williamson. She is a 2013 graduate of Arizona State University, where she competed on the club triathlon team. She serves on the USA Triathlon Board of Directors.   Brad Snyder (Baltimore, Md.), guided by Greg Billington (San Francisco, Calif.), Men's PTVI 2012, 2016 U.S. Paralympian (swimming; 5 golds, 2 silvers), U.S. Navy veteran Snyder is a U.S. Navy veteran who lost his eyesight in a 2011 IED explosion while serving in Afghanistan. One year to the date of losing his vision, he won a gold medal in swimming at the Paralympic Games London 2012. Now a five-time gold medalist and two-time silver medalist in swimming from the London 2012 and Rio 2016 Games, he made the switch to paratriathlon in 2018 and earned his first elite victory at the 2021 Americas Triathlon Para Championships Pleasant Prairie. Snyder is a Team Toyota athlete and a 2006 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, where he was captain of the NCAA men's swim team. Snyder's guide, Billington, is a 2016 U.S. Olympian in triathlon, placing 37th in Rio.   Melissa Stockwell (Colorado Springs, Colo.), Women's PTS2 2016 U.S. Paralympic bronze medalist (triathlon), 2008 U.S. Paralympian (swimming); U.S. Army veteran Stockwell won a bronze medal in paratriathlon's debut at the Rio 2016 Games, completing a U.S. podium sweep with teammates Seely and Danz. She is the 2010, 2011 and 2012 Paratriathlon World Champion and a five-time World Championships medalist. She also represented the U.S. at the Paralympic Games Beijing 2008 in swimming. Stockwell is a U.S. Army veteran who became the first female American soldier to lose a limb in active combat while serving in Iraq in 2004. She is a Team Toyota athlete and member of the Toyota U.S. Paratriathlon Resident Team coached by Williamson. Stockwell also serves on the USA Triathlon Foundation Board of Trustees. Stockwell is a 2002 graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder.     What's New in the 303: The Triple Bypass, Colorado's Most Epic Ride Event? Maybe and Here's Why What makes the Triple Bypass ride so epic? Other rides like the Copper Triangle traverse three mountain passes? Rides like the Steamboat Gravel are longer, gorgeous, and well is on gravel after all. Each is epic, an overused word probably, each is well run and organized, but there is just something unique about the Triple.   One is history. Cyclists have been climbing those three passes between Evergreen and Vail (it used to finish in Avon) since 1988. Until the bike path connecting Bakerville to the Loveland ski area was built in 2010, riders had to ride on I-70. Only participating in the Triple Bypass made it possible to complete the voyage as cyclist were prohibited on I-70. Today you can do the ride unsupported thanks to the bike path, but it won't be nearly as much fun, or as safe.   Riding the Triple requires a fair bit of planning, logistics, agility and flexibility. But it offers great rewards in scenery and most of all camaraderie. Somehow the 110 miles mesh into remembrances of conversations on the bike and in the aid stations separated by head down periods of quiet climbing and sharing the work with others in the same boat.   How Many Times Have You Ridden Lookout Mountain? Can You Top 7,915? Chuck Haraway and Rick Brune, who between the two have ascended Lookout around 6,000 times have started to bring more awareness to all things Lookout. Their good friend Ray Bolton climbed it 7,915 times before he passed away in 2020 due to Covid. Chuck and Rick have dedicated a website, https://cyclinglookoutmountain.com/ in Ray's honor. The website has some great history about the mountain and lots of interesting facts and information.   The group also included Megan Hottman of Hottman Law and Charlie Myers, the head of Bike Jeffco. One of ideas kicked around was hosting an open gathering at the coffee shop on top once a month, or maybe quarterly to build more community with neighbors, cyclists, walkers, hikers, skateboarders and anyone who loves and cares about the experiences on Lookout Mountain.   We discussed the need for “3 feet to pass” signs, talked about how important it is for cyclists to not pass cars on the downhill going the speed limit, how we wish maybe there were restrictions on cars passing cyclists on corners like on Flagstaff. We dreamed of having car free days like what happens in the Garden of Gods once in a while. But we know there are a lot of users of the road and we emphasized the need to play well together–thus the coffee idea.   Video of the Week: 2021 Leadville 100 Run Men's Finish | Adrian Macdonald, Matt Flaherty, Anton Krupicka & Ian Sharman   Closing: Thanks again for listening in this week.  Please be sure to follow us @303endurance and of course go to iTunes and give us a rating and a comment.  We'd really appreciate it! Stay tuned, train informed, and enjoy the endurance journey!

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CURE Talks Cancer
92: Recognizing Advancements and the Individuals Who Made Them in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

CURE Talks Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 13:04


In this special edition, CURE spoke with Dr. Laura Michaelis, a specialist in hematology and oncology at Froedtert Hospital and Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and also a recipient of the 2019 MPN Heroes Award.  Michaelis has a mission statement to live up to when she's treating patients: “deliver superb care in a compassionate, individualized manner.” As an MPN Hero, Michaelis has gone above and beyond to offer outstanding healthcare in and outside of the clinic, regularly speaking to MPN patient support groups to provide important information and answers in a more personal setting.  She spoke with CURE about how far we've come in the MPN space, how we can address current challenges moving forward, and what being an MPN Hero means to her. CURE® is now accepting nominations for its ninth annual MPN Heroes Awards! CURE and Inctye are proud to honor heroes who have made a significant impact in the lives of those affected by MPNs. For more information or to nominate your hero today, visit, www.curetoday.com/award-events.

The Smart Thinking Podcast
Episode 197: A Conversation With A Physician About All Things Covid In 2021 (Reflection)

The Smart Thinking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 45:11


Join me for a conversation with David C Brousseau, MD - professor and chief of emergency medicine, at the Medical College of Wisconsin as we discuss how to approach this school year. Hear his advice around protecting ourselves, what he is seeing and what he believes will happen as we move into the fall and winter.

Ruth Institute Podcast
How the American Academy of Pediatrics Abandoned Kids for Politics

Ruth Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 59:37


Quentin Van Meter, MD, FCP, president and longtime member of the American College of Pediatricians, graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1969 and received his M.D. in 1973 from the Medical College of Virginia. While in medical school, he entered the Navy through the Health Professions Scholarship and went on to a pediatric internship and residency at the Naval Hospital in Oakland. He subsequently completed a fellowship in Pediatric Endocrinology in 1980 at Johns Hopkins. He completed 20 years of service in the Navy Medical Corps, retiring as a Captain in 1991. His final tour of duty was back at the Naval Hospital in Oakland where he was Pediatric Department Chairman and director of the Pediatric residency program. After the Navy, he moved to the Atlanta area to join a multi-specialty private practice, providing general pediatric and pediatric endocrine services, as he had in the Navy. He has maintained academic affiliations throughout his career, at LSU, UC San Diego, UC San Francisco, Emory, and Morehouse Schools of Medicine. Since 2003, he has been practicing full-time pediatric endocrinology in private practice and is actively involved in clinical research with growth hormone, novel insulins, and GnRH agonists. This is an audio podcast of The Dr J Show. Full video episode is available here.

Healthcare Unfiltered
Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma: Monitor or Transplantation?

Healthcare Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 57:11


For another lively debate, Chadi brings on two lymphoma experts to talk about what to do with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) patients after an achieved remission: Barbara Pro (@bpromd), MD, Northwestern University, and Mehdi Hamadani (@MediHumdani), MD, Medical College of Wisconsin. The two doctors share how they counsel and treat patients in uncertain situations, including the “right” circumstances to watch-and-wait, autologous transplant, allogeneic transplant, or maintenance chemotherapy.

Audible Bleeding
Getting Started using the VQI for Research

Audible Bleeding

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 39:22


Matt Chia and Andy Lazar sit down with Drs. Leila Mureebe, Jeff Siracuse, and Philip Goodney for a panel discussion introducing the VQI and some practical tips on getting started with vascular health services research. Dr. Leila Mureebe (@leils) is an associate professor of surgery in the division of vascular and endovascular surgery at the Duke University School of Medicine.  She completed her medical degree and general surgery residency at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, a vascular research fellowship at Harvard Longwood, and her vascular surgery fellowship at Yale.  She also holds dual master's degrees in public health from the UNC and in management and clinical informatics from Duke. Dr. Jeff Siracuse is an associate professor of surgery and radiology at the Boston University School of Medicine.  He completed his medical degree at the New York Medical College, followed by a general surgery residency at Beth Israel Deaconess, a vascular research fellowship at Harvard Longwood, and a vascular surgery fellowship at the New York-Presbyterian programs.  He also holds an MBA from Boston University and has extensive experience with the VQI data, including being the medical director and regional RAC chair for the Vascular Study Group of New England. Dr. Philip Goodney is a professor of surgery and the associate chair for research at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical center.  He received his medical degree from the University of Connecticut, followed by a general surgery residency and vascular surgery fellowship at Dartmouth.  He completed a special fellowship in outcomes research with the VA Outcomes Group in White River Junction, Vermont, while also receiving a Master's Degree in Evaluative Clinical Sciences.  Among the many key positions he holds in our field, he is the current chair for the national VQI Research Advisory Committee or RAC. Previous Episode - Dr. Jack Cronenwett with the origin story of the VQI Relevant Links: Current SVS Regional Quality Groups Previously approved VQI projects Submit a RAC Proposal + Deadlines JAMA Surgery guide to the VQI SVS Research Opportunities in Vascular Surgery Host Introductions:  Dr. Lazar (@Lazar_surgery)  is a general surgery resident at Morristown Medical Center in New Jersey and completed his second year of vascular surgery research at Columbia University, where - among other projects - he has focused on using the VQI to look at insurance and health disparities.  Dr. Chia (@chia_md) is in his 5th of 7 years in the integrated vascular surgery program at Northwestern University.  He obtained his medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and also holds a Master's in Health Services and Outcomes Research at Northwestern.  Follow us @audiblebleeding Learn more about us at https://www.audiblebleeding.com/about-1/ and #jointheconversation.

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Fallible: Why Focusing On Physician Mental Health Helps Everyone with….

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2021 34:02


Kyle Bradford Jones, MD, FAAFP is an Associate (Clinical) Professor in Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He graduated from the Medical College of Wisconsin in 2009, and completed his residency in Family Medicine at the University of Utah in 2012. Since then, he has worked at the Neurobehavior HOME Program, a clinical program for individuals with a developmental disability, where he leads the Primary Care and Utilization Management Teams. He is author of the best-selling and award-winning book Fallible: A Memoir of a Young Physician's Struggle with Mental Illness.  We started with how he realized that he was struggling with his mental health, how it has become an asset in his patient care (and caring for his colleagues and trainees), some surprising data about the frequency of mood disorders and suicidal thoughts in our trainees, and how we need to give ourselves some grace in light of all of the paradoxes we are forced to grapple with in healthcare. Are you too busy to build the professional digital presence your business needs? Then reach out to Advice Media at www.doctorpodcastnetwork.com/advicemedia

Thrive University
Health Care, Communication, and Childhood Trauma with My Dad, Dr. Scott Abramson

Thrive University

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 76:04


Today, I am blessed to have Dr. Scott Abramson join the show. Dr. Scott Abramson was a neurologist in Point Richmond, California and is affiliated with Kaiser Permanente San Leandro Medical Center. He received his medical degree from Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine and was in practice for more than 40 years. In this episode, Dr. Scott opens the show by talking about his work as a neurologist. During his career, Dr. Scott realized how amazing it is that you can impact people's lives without even realizing it. Then, Dr. Scott reveals some of the biggest lessons he has learned over the years. Later, we dive into health and what you can do to keep your brain healthy and live a longer and happier life. Lastly, we chat all about communication, and Dr. Scott gives his thoughts on a new therapeutic medication for Alzheimer's.As always, if you got value from today's conversation, please let us know by subscribing and sharing the show. It goes a long way in allowing us to impact more lives. Also, if you really feel called to impact the Thrive Tribe, you can leave a review for the show here.Master Your Nutrition hereFollow Jeremy on Instagram hereApply for 1 on 1 Coaching hereGet your Ultimate Shrooms hereGet your CBD here (use code COACHJEREMY)Get your Purity Coffee here (use code COACHJEREMY)Disclaimer: This podcast is for information purposes only. Statements and views expressed on this podcast are not medical advice. This podcast including Jeremy Abramson disclaim responsibility from any possible adverse effects from the use of information contained herein. Opinions of guests are their own, and this podcast does not accept responsibility of statements made by guests. This podcast does not make any representations or warranties about guests qualifications or credibility. Individuals on this podcast may have a direct or non-direct interest in products or services referred to herein. If you think you have a medical problem, consult a licensed physician. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.