Podcasts about Snoopy

Cartoon dog

  • 964PODCASTS
  • 1,515EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 10, 2022LATEST
Snoopy

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Best podcasts about Snoopy

Latest podcast episodes about Snoopy

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown
EPISODE 80: 100 OBJECTS IN THE 80TH EPISODE!

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 75:04


In episode 80, Peanuts historian Nat Gertler drops by to discuss the new book he coauthored, "Charles M. Schulz: The Art and Life of the Peanuts Creator in 100 Objects" and many other things. Some of which actually relate to Peanuts! We've also got This Month in Peanuts History, a "Peanuts by Schulz" review called "Get Lucky" and so much more. Happy birthday, Charles Schulz! So pile your plate high with pretzel sticks, popcorn and jelly beans and enjoy the show! Thanks to Kevin McLeod at Incompetech.com for creative commons use of his songs "Mining by Moonlight" and "Bass Walker".  Thanks to Sean Courtney for the "This Month in Peanuts History" theme. Thanks to Henry Pope for the use of "Linus & Lucy Remix".  Go to www.carnivalofgleecreations.com for all your IT'S A PDOCAST, CHARLIE BROWN needs, along with info about my other show ATARI BYTES, my books and so much more! Help keep the lights on in the doghouse at patreon.com here. 

I Don't Get It
EP301: Elevators, Cruise Pockets, and The Snoopy Story

I Don't Get It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 62:26


This episode starts with a little Halloween recap. Everyone was worried about people hiding drugs in our Skittles this year, but it turns out Skittles on their own are bad enough. Naz doesn't get why strangers want to touch you when you're in a public place, and Lauren wants you to stop saying your eyes change color because they just don't. The second half of this episode really has its ups and downs, as the I Don't Get It ladies get deep into all things elevators. Elevator etiquette, what makes elevators scary, what makes them sexy, and why cruise ship elevators are so nasty (hint: the dreaded cruise pocket). Of course, it wouldn't be I Don't Get It if there wasn't a ton of food talk. In our Google Moment of the Week (tm tm tm), Ashley doesn't get how meat stays safe in a can for so long. How does it last? If you had to get rid of one Thanksgiving dinner staple, what would it be? And why is a garden salad with Italian dressing so nostalgic? Lauren ends the episode with the sweetest childhood story about having the best big sister in the world. You'll never be able to look at Snoopy without thinking of Ashley again. Get 15% off plus free shipping on your first order at https://gladskin.com/getit Go to https://nutrafol.com and use code: GETIT to save $15 OFF your first month's subscription! Get $20 off your first purchase at https://rothys.com/getit Get 15% off your first order at https://thrivecausemetics.com/getit More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426

Ultra 64
Smurfs 2 / Penguins of Madagascar / Snoopy's Grand Adventure (with Ailish Collins)

Ultra 64

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 68:22


The cheapie movie-tie in genre thrived on the Wii U, but today we're playing our last batch of low-effort platformers based on cartoons! Obviously, our crappy game correspondent Ailish Collins had to return to help us do justice to games based on SMURFS 2, PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR, and SNOOPY'S BIG ADVENTURE (based on the 2015 PEANUTS MOVIE). Are these titles about the quality levels you'd expect, or are there some surprises? Find out now!  Hosted by Steve Guntli and Woody Ciskowski  Logo by Corinne Kempen  Theme song: "Truck" by The Octopus Project (theoctopusproject.com)  ultra64podcast.com  Twitter: @ultra64podcast  Email: ultra64podcast@gmail.com  Instagram: @ultra64podcast  Patreon: patreon.com/ultra64pod  Next week's episode: Warriors Orochi 3 Hyper / Hyrule Warriors 

Totally Rad Christmas!
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade '85 (w/ Anthony, Charlyn, and Manny)

Totally Rad Christmas!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 107:08


What's up, dudes? Happy Christmas Podcast Day! I've got a whole parade of All-Stars here talking the 1985 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade! Anthony from ‘Tis the Podcast, Charlyn from Take a Chic Peek, and Manny from Feliz Christmas, Merry Navidad join me to reminisce about He-Man, Garfield, Snoopy, and all the Super Bowl-style commercials of this Pat Sajak hosted mega event! So baste your turkeys, head to grandma's house, and dive into this episode!‘Tis the PodcastFB: @tisthepodcast Twitter: @tisthepodIG: @tisthepodcast Take a Chic PeekFB: @takeachicpeek Twitter: @TakeAChicPeek IG: @takeachicpeek Feliz  Christmas, Merry NavidadFB: @FCMNPodcastTwitter: @FCMNPodcastIG: @fcmnpodcastCheck us out on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Totally Rad Christmas Mall & Arcade, Teepublic.com, or TotallyRadChristmas.com! Later, dudes!

TrevTalks
ASMR Snoopy Dog Show and Tell Party

TrevTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 17:54


In this ASMR chat, I share my collection of Snoopy plushies, figurines, and miscellaneous dogs. Do you have a favourite plush toy? Video. Snoopy is my favourite cartoon dog. From my childhood onward, I love following along with the fun adventures of Snoopy, Charlie Brown, and the Peanuts characters. I hope this ASMR video will … ASMR Snoopy Dog Show and Tell Party Read More »

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown
79: YOU DON'T LOOK 35 EITHER, DEAR LISTENER!

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 81:14


NEW EPISODES ON THE 10th AND 20th OF EVERY MONTH. In episode 79, our ongoing celebration of Charles Schulz's approaching 100th birthday continues as we spend some time getting to know Sparky through his writings in the 1985 book "You Don't Look 35, Charlie Brown". We also have a "Random Strip of the Month", some news-y bits, and much, much more! So, find a super sincere pumpkin patch and give this episode a listen while you wait for the Great Pumpkin.  Thanks to Kevin McLeod at Incompetech.com for creative commons use of his songs "Mining by Moonlight" and "Bass Walker". Thanks to Nick Jones for the use of his song "25% Off". Thanks to Henry Pope for the use of his "Linus & Lucy" remix. Find out more about this podcast, my other podcast ATARI BYTES, and about books I've written - which can be yours! - at www.carnivalofgleecreations.com  Support the show at patreon.com

Classic Countdown Conversations
It's The Great Candy Compromise

Classic Countdown Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 71:19


A classic Classic Countdown Conversations conversation about candy that isn't chocolate. Join the CCC gang for a timeless adventure as Phillip and Daniel prep for a party, Snoopy sets his sights on the Red Baron, and Linus patiently awaits a pumpkin patch miracle. Wait.I mean...Listen to this episode to get hungry for candy. Like us so much you want to give us money? Become a member. https://plus.acast.com/s/classic-countdown-conversations. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

4 Brüste für ein Halleluja
Die Wut in mir

4 Brüste für ein Halleluja

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 58:10


Wenn Frauen sich prügeln, sieht es eben nicht so aus wie bei Bud Spencer, findet Paula und berichtet heute von persönlichen Erfahrungen mit dem Thema Aggression. Auch Sophia hat sehr einschlägige Beispiele mitgebracht, die sie hautnah miterlebt hat. Spotty und Snoopy lauschen still und leise, wenn die Ladies über ihre Wut im Bauch sprechen, denn (auch) die muss irgendwie raus. Angefangen von der kleinen schwarzen Liste, über die Frage, ob Masturbieren eine alternative Lösung ist, bis hin zu niedlichen Tiervideos vor dem Schlafen gehen, versorgen uns die Ladies mit kreativen Möglichkeiten. Du möchtest mehr über unsere Werbepartner erfahren? Hier findest du alle Infos & Rabatte: https://linktr.ee/4_brueste_fuer_1_halleluja

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown
78: GOOD GRIEF! SCHULZ MUSEUM CURATOR BEN CLARK IS BACK!

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 62:09


You may be noticing this episode showing up in your feed a bit earlier than usual. Good grief! What's happening? We're trying something new with the release schedule. Instead of one omnibus episode on the 15th, we're going to cut the fun into two parts and release them separately, on the 10th and 20th of the month. If we like it, we'll keep doing it. If we don't, we won't.  In episode 78, we've got Schulz Museum Curator Benjamin Clark back on the show to talk about the new book out in November, "Charles M. Schulz: The Art and Life of the Peanuts Creator in 100 Objects".  We've also got a "Peanuts by Schulz" review of the episode "It's Just No Good". And much, much more. Enjoy! Thanks to Kevin McLeod at Incompetech.com for creative commons use of his songs "Mining by Moonlight" and "Bass Walker".  Thanks to Sean Courtney for the Storytime Theme. Thanks to Nick Jones for his song "25% Off". Support the show at patreon.com here.  Go to www.carnivalofgleecreations.com for more info about this podcast, my other show ATARI BYTES, and about things written by ME that YOU can possess!    

Jeff Lewis Has Issues
Ass Patch

Jeff Lewis Has Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 45:23 Very Popular


Amongst the vaping, Jeff & crew revisit Jeff's score on wikiFeet, Lala's pants don't fit, and MJ can't keep up with the stories. Plus, Jeff revisits his childhood Snoopy trauma, Jamison analyzes Jeff's dream despite his overalls, and Shane shines with another Jeff Lewis Live Idol performance.  Oh, and Alyssa was there, too.

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Technology Empowering Entrepreneurs To Build Community AI Assisted Socials Posting

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 43:46


Arjun Rai is a serial entrepreneur, and Founder of HelloWoofy.com, a smart marketing dashboard. He holds fast in his mantra that every small business and entrepreneur should have an unfair advantage that allows them to compete with the unlimited marketing budgets of their corporate competitors. With HelloWoofy, he's used his skills to create a seamless, innovative, and efficient digital marketing experience that leverages the power of visualized data science and artificial intelligence—boasting more than 10,000 members and having raised more than $1.3 million in VC and crowdsourced funding. Arjun is on the forefront of the digital landscape and has been networking with some of the most influential entrepreneurs in the country since high school. His drive for helping the underdog began just a few weeks into his enrollment at the New York Institute of Technology with the startup fuelbrite, a social media agency specializing in supporting small businesses and startups. He has since been part of numerous ventures, collaborating with the creation of HelloWoofy. Arjun lives in New York City along with his dog Snoopy. Day-to-day, you can find him working from home, practicing carpentry, or zooming around the city on his e-scooter.https://www.hellowoofy.com

Unpacking Peanuts
1962 Part 1 - Schroeder's Big Break

Unpacking Peanuts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 67:15


Schulz continues to explore longer stories and more subtle emotions, as Linus (briefly) gets glasses, Lucy and Schroeder bicker, and Snoopy experiences a winter of loss. Luckily, it doesn't affect his appetite. Plus: It's time for an episode of Polka Pod! Transcript available at UnpackingPeanuts.com Unpacking Peanuts is copyright Jimmy Gownley, Michael Cohen, and Harold Buchholz. Produced and edited by Liz Sumner. Music by Michael Cohen. Additional voiceover by Aziza Shukralla Clark.  For more from the show follow @unpackpeanuts on Instagram and Twitter. For more about Jimmy, Michael, and Harold, visit unpackingpeanuts.com.   Thanks for listening.

il posto delle parole
Giancarlo Pauletto "Nice to meet you Charlie Brown"

il posto delle parole

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 21:57


Giancarlo Pauletto"Nice to meet you Charlie Brown"https://www.nuova-dimensione.it/Sui Peanuts, le creature nate dalla matita di Charles Schulz, si è già scritto molto ma c'è ancora spazio per il commento di Giancarlo Pauletto, critico d'arte ed estimatore di CharlieBrown e soci. In questo saggio brillante, caustico e venato di affetto, si risponde a queste e a molte altre domande: il vecchio Charlie, è sempre e solo Blah? Lucy sarà la prima Presidentessa degli Stati Uniti? Cos'è l'orribile Stomp? Chi ha scritto la toccata e fuga in Asia Minore? È vero che Linus soffia palloncini quadrati? Snoopy, è un miscredente? Woodstock pilota elicotteri? Sally è sorella o cugina di Charlie? Da dove sbuca Piperita Patty, chiedendo una salsiccia? Quanto pesa Secondo Conflitto Mondiale? Chi è Frittella? Con che macchina sene va, la Ragazzina coi capelli rossi? Solo chi legge, saprà.Giancarlo Paulettonato a Portogruaro nel 1941. Si è laureato in filosofia, ha insegnato nelle scuole superiori, ha organizzato e allestito circa trecento mostre d'arte. Ha pubblicato due libri di poesie. Inoltre ha corso in bicicletta - dieci Maratone delle Dolomiti portate a termine - e camminato in montagna. Per Ediciclo e Nuova Dimensione sono usciti, tra l'altro, Neiges d'antan, Amati giri ciclici, Il ciclista impenitente, Lo splendore dei funghi, Un alpinista qualunque.IL POSTO DELLE PAROLEAscoltare fa Pensarehttps://ilpostodelleparole.it/

Factz Ova Feelinz
Spider Loc and Big Court on Master P, Tech-9, Snoopy Bad Azz, his fitness journey and his recent interview with Mob James (EP8)

Factz Ova Feelinz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 78:39


In this Episode 8 of Factz Ova Feelinz podcast with Spider Loc, he has Kansas City native Big Court from the Holding Court podcast. In this episode their discussion covers:  Topics: -Moving to Los Angeles from Kansas CIty, Missouri, growing up on the Four Block, and starting off as a rapper and connecting with Master P and getting signed to No Limit    -   Tech-9 from Kansas City, Strange Music, and X-Raided from Sacramento signing with Strange 9. Rich the Factor is also from the city and he worked with JT the Bigger Figure. -Big Court's fitness journey and him starting his exercise journey at age 30. What does he eat, and how often does he work out.   - The fight among Houston rapper, Zero, and TRae the Truth, and J-Prince getting involved. -Snoop Dogg,  -Snoopy Bad Azz received a Death Row chain, but did he testify in a case (People. v. Doster)? -Clifford "TI" Harris snitchuation when he received only 1-year in prison with 20 years of guns and silencers found in his car.  -Spider Loc asks Big Court about his recent Mob James interview and how far did he go on the topic of snitching and working for the FBI.    Spider Loc Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/bangerzs23 Spider Loc Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/spiderlocmosteasty7 Factz Ova Feelinz video clips on Street TV: http://www.youtube.com/streetgangs If you want to advertise on Factz Ova Feelinz send a message to STEF (AT) StreetGangs.com

Gift Horse
Gift Horse 079: A Safe But Rad Cat / My Very Similar Approach to Dracula

Gift Horse

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 53:41


Mike has a question for you, but he's afraid to ask. Molly has a T-shirt she's wearing, but she's afraid of falling. And Tracy has T-shirts for everyone actually.

Minnesota Now
72 years later, we're still talking about Charles Schultz's 'Peanuts'

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:36


Comics are big business these days – Marvel and DC Comics rake in billions at the box office. Guest host Tim Nelson talked about a different type of comic today though that also made it to the screen, the Peanuts! On Oct. 2, the comic featuring Charlie Brown, his dog Snoopy and the crew turns 72 years old. The strip was the creation of St. Paul cartoonist Charles Schulz. Benjamin Clark, the curator of the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center in Santa Rosa, California, joined us. Use the audio player above to listen to the full conversation.  Subscribe to the Minnesota Now podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.   We attempt to make transcripts for Minnesota Now available the next business day after a broadcast. When ready they will appear here. 

The Vibes Broadcast Network
Her Heartbreaking Story Is An Inspiring One, This Is One Of The Most Important Messages You Need To Hear

The Vibes Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 61:07


Her Heartbreaking Story Is An Inspiring One, This Is One Of The Most Important Messages You Need To Hear#domesticabuseawareness #MSA #domesticviolence #physicalabuse #domesticabuse #inspirationalspeaker #author #book #UnexpectedMoments About the BookUnexpected Moments shares the trials and tribulations that Daisy Paige had to endure to make her into the person that she became. In her journey she had to go over speed bumps, jump over hurdles, cross broken bridges, and climb many rocky mountains with God at her side. She suffered emotional, spiritual, and physical pain. Many times she almost didn't or didn't want to make it through. If it weren't for God, she would not have made it, and this book would not exist to help those that are about to read it to know they are not alone. He may not answer your prayers like you want, but he knows which path to lead you down. Thy Word Is a Lamp Unto My Feet and Light Unto My Path. — Psalm 119:105About the AuthorDaisy Paige was born in August of 1973 and lives in a very small Texas town. Although she has tried to move away many times, she always finds herself back in this little town. She has three adult children, two daughters that live nearby and a son, the youngest, in the military. They have all made her a very proud parent. She resides with her husband. They have been happily married for twelve years and have a clever little toy rat terrier, Snoopy. Socializing with friends and relatives is her favorite thing to do. She is a member of a local church where her uncle is the pastor. She likes to begin her days thanking the one who has shown her that he has been there for her in all her experiences and carried her through the most difficult ones, that being God our Father in heaven above who has never left her alone.Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Daisypaige322Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100079216211002Buy the book: https://www.xlibris.com/en/bookstore/bookdetails/838618-unexpected-momentsEmail: daisy.paige.unexpected.moments@gmail.com Vibes Broadcast Network Thanks for tuning in, please be sure to click that subscribe button and give this a thumbs up!!Email: thevibesbroadcast@gmail.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/listen_to_the_vibes_/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thevibesbroadcastnetworkLinktree: https://linktr.ee/the_vibes_broadcastTikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMeuTVRv2/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheVibesBrdcstTruth: https://truthsocial.com/@KoyoteAnd Now!!! The Bandmates' club, Supporters of the channel: Matthew Arrowood Host of The ONLY Brocast podcast:https://youtube.com/channel/UCsfv1wWu3oUg42I2nOtnMTADon Hahn of In the Margins: https://www.youtube.com/c/InTheMarginsBukas Siguro: https://www.youtube.com/c/BukasS%C4%ABgur%C3%B8Will Scoville of Ranch Rehab DIY: https://www.youtube.com/c/RanchRehabDrew Lee Nicholas of DN-TV: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8TVqL9mn6NzPkXOLOZSX-A

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown
77: DUNCAN WATSON & MELANIE KOHN + "THE SNOOPY SHOW" S2, EP 5

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 129:07


The podcast is HUGE this month! We've got not one, but TWO, er...Peanuts? Peanuts kids? Peanuts gang members? Both Melanie Kohn, who was Lucy in several of the specials from the seventies, as well as the film "Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown" AND Duncan Watson who was Charlie Brown in that film and several specials are here. TOGETHER! I hid the footballs. Then we've got "The Snoopy Show", S2, episode 5, another "Random Strip of the Month" and a "Peanuts by Schulz" short titled "It's Just No Good". Thanks to Kevin McLeod at Incompetech.com for creative commons use of his songs "Bass Walker" and "Mining by Moonlight". Thanks to Nick Jones for the use of his song "25% Off". Support the show on the "It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown" page on patreon.com  www.carnivalofgleecreations.com is where you need to be for info about this show, my other show ATARI BYTES, and books by ME that can be owned by YOU, like "Misery Banana".   

Homework: The Podcast
Lesson 14 Chapter 4: Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown

Homework: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 68:17


Welcome to Lesson 14, Chapter 4. This week, we're goin over Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (And Don't Come Back!) Released theatrically in May 1980, this was the fourth feature-length Peanuts film, and directed by Bill Melendez, who has provided the squawky gibberish voices for Snoopy and Woodstock in every iteration of the series.The movie is about Charlie Brown, Linus, Peppermint Patty and Marcy going on a trip to France as exchange students. They are chaperoned by Snoopy, who can both rent and drive a car, and is a member in good standing at Wimbledon.Once again we're joined by Dan Jabcobvitz of the podcast Dan and Ian have Questions. Did you know YOU can talk to us? Crazy, right? Follow us on Facebook @HomeworkThePodcast, on Twitter @hwthepod and be sure to check out Dan's podcast Dan and Ian Have Questions.https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dan-and-ian-have-questions-podcast/id1587402809

Streets and Scholars
Did Arie Spears & Tiffany Haddish go too far on a skit & Snoopy Bad Azz tries to prove he never snitched (EP30)

Streets and Scholars

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 60:28


In this episode 30 of Streets and Scholars with Frank "FG" Thornton and Alex Alonso they discuss: 1. Fulton County District attorney Fani Willis believes that members of the Drug Rich gang admitted to their crimes in the lyrics to their songs.  2. Did comedian Arie Spear and Tiffany Haddish go to far on a comedy skit on pedophilia? In 2013 they did a skit with a seven and 14 year old siblings that are are now suing the two comedians in civil court.   3. Snoopy Bad Azz tried to defend himself in a case where it appears that he provided information to the police and actually testified in court. In 2005, defendant Doster shot and killed Snoopy's friend "Worm" Mabins at an In-N-Out in Moreno Valley. According to paperwork on the case, Snoopy gave up information, but in a recent video he claims that the defendant who killed his friend wanted him to testify to help him.  Read appeal by defendant Damiem Doster: https://casetext.com/case/people-v-doster-11 If you want to advertise on Streets & Scholars contact [STEF (@) streetgangs . com ] * Streets & Scholars Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/streets.and.scholars  * Street TV channel: http://www.youtube.com/streetgangs * Alex on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/alexalonso101  * FG Unleashed: https://www.youtube.com/c/FGUNLEASHED * FG on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fgeneral1/ * StreetGangs website: http://www.streetgangs.com

Escuchando Peliculas
Snoopy presenta: Por los Viejos Tiempos (2021) #Animación #Infantil #peliculas #audesc #podcast

Escuchando Peliculas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 38:26


País Estados Unidos Dirección Clay Kaytis Guion Obra: Clay Kaytis Sinopsis Tras enterarse de que su abuela no la visitará en Navidad, Lucy decide animarse organizando la mejor fiesta de Nochevieja. Mientras tanto, Carlitos intenta cumplir uno de sus propósitos antes de que el reloj marque la medianoche.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | Oxygen On Mars @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 38:19


Gridlock on 5 NB CALLERS // Homes drill their own well / Pilot protests / texting replacing emails // Peanuts get a stamp / Mars has oxygen / Over the counter hearing aids // Tik Tok challenge – stealing cars / Artemis Rocket Monday Launch

In the Moment
The history of child welfare in South Dakota, plus Snoopy and the Red Baron

In the Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 58:00


We speak with the granddaughter of South Dakota Hall of fame Inductee Grace Martin Highly. Highley was the first director of South Dakota Child Welfare and held that position for more than 2 decades.Plus, see artwork from Charles Schulz, the creator of the Peanuts up close in Aberdeen. This weekend is your last chance to see "Snoopy and the Red Baron" at the Dacotah Prairie Museum.

Lil Blood TV
The Snoopy Show Episode

Lil Blood TV

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 32:28


Lil Blood talks to Snoopy about Fast Life, Sideshows, LA Gang Culture,Supporting Your Homies Businesses & more

NY Giants Weekly
The Snoopy Bowl Finale

NY Giants Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 30:49


On the first episode of the week, Ethan and Weis discuss the Giants preseason finale against the Jets, the injury bug killing the Giants, Kenny Golladay's effort and why he has to be on the team for at least the 2022 season  Be sure to follow Ethan and Weis on Twitter Ethan: @EthanGSN Weis: @NYGDaily 

Origin Stories w JJK

I cannot overstate the importance of Cece Bell's EL DEAFO. For both us, as a society, and for the prestige that it brought to graphic novels with the citation of that Newbery Honor, the first graphic novel to earn that shiny silver sticker! Get to know how Cece Bell came to be in her Origin Story!Jarrett: Hello everyone. My name is Jarrett Krosoczka and I wanna say hello to my friend, Cece Bell. Cece: Hi everybody. Hi Jarrett. It's so nice to see you. Jarrett: Oh, it's nice to see you. You're I miss you. I haven't seen you in so long. Even... Before the pandemic, we hadn't run into each other on book tour. Cece: It had been a long time, I guess we probably haven't seen each other for four years. Maybe. Jarrett: It might be. Yeah, it might be. I always see your silly and goofy posts on Instagram. So I really feel like we, we haven't missed a beat because I've been following along, you made a beautiful drawing for your mom on her birthday. Cece: Oh, yes. I did. Yeah. I, yeah, we, I've actually been off of Instagram for a little while because I was finding that it was too much of a pull away from, my productivity. So I'm allowed to look at it every Sunday. Jarrett: Ah! Cece: Nothing for the rest of the week. It's hard. Jarrett: I feel like if I did that, my thumb would always be like, ah, I need to look and scroll and see things. That is some amazing willpower, Cece Bell. So I, we know your story somewhat from your book, El Deafo, and as a person who's also written a graphic memoir, you decide like what you're gonna put on the page, what doesn't make it to the page.And I've said this to you a bunch, and you've heard this a million times, but El Deafo is... Such a powerful book and it's a pillar in graphic novel history because your book was the very first one ever to get a Newberry silver sticker like that really pushed the whole medium of graphic novels forward.And of course, when you sat down to make that book, that was nowhere near in your head. And we'll get to that. But before we do, I'm interested in how Cece Bell became Cece Bell, the graphic novelist, the cartoonist, the author. What are your earliest memories of drawing and making and reading comics tell us a little bit more about what your house was like growing up in regards to like the creative sources you consumed and created.Cece: Okay. Wow. Let's see. I think I always like drawing and mark making and that kind of thing. And let's see. I do remember when I got very sick in 1975 when I was about four and a half which is where the book El Deafo starts, that I did a lot of drawing there in the hospital. And my parents think that I drew probably 100 drawings of the same thing over and over again.It was just a little girl with a green face underneath the rainbow. Her body was shaped like a triangle and I just drew that repeatedly over and over. And that was probably an early experience of drawing being therapy in a way. But I always drew that was basically the only book that I would check out of my school library every Friday, the same Ed Emberly book; Make a World. And I really wasn't interested in reading that much. I could read, I didn't have trouble with it, but I just wasn't interested. I wanted to be making things. so Ed Emberly was a major part of my life.And gosh, my... My home life, I was really lucky. My father was a doctor and my mother was a nurse. And I wasn't limited financially, basically. And it was a very supportive household, but in the book, there's this feeling that that my parents are fairly normal people and my siblings are fairly normal people.And if I had focused on my family instead of on just the story of me coping with my deafness in school and at home it would've been much, much stranger. My family is bonkers weird and they are very funny. Oh, my goodness. They are just so weird. My mom is so weird. My dad is... We're just weird.And so I, I tamped that down a lot because... The focus wasn't on that. It was on deafness and feeling isolated. So anyway, but my family was, yeah, there was my mom. There was a picture of my mom. Nuts, very dramatic and funny. And I think I get a lot of my storytelling abilities from my mom's side of the family and word play and nicknames and all that stuff comes into play.And then my father's side is very really talented with hand skills. My grandmother was an amazing seamstress and my great grandmother was an amazing seamstress, but she was also a sign painter. I always found that really cool. A sign painter. Wow. I think that sort of some of the mix of who I was growing up and a huge focus on weird and probably Ed Eberly and the fact that my father got weekly issues of the New Yorker were major influences the New Yorker cover and then the New Yorker cartoon in the inside.That's a little bit of, a little bit of what was going on around me. Jarrett: Okay. So I want to meet these people who are more cuckoo bananas than Cece Bell, because you are so wonderfully and beautifully... Goofy and fun. And you might be the only person I know who consistently uses the hot dog emoji in text messages, so... Cece: That's the best one ever!Jarrett: I imagine that must have been, yeah, I guess that makes such sense. What - may I ask? What did your siblings grow up to do? Cece: My siblings they struggled more than I did in terms of - this is gonna sound strange, but in a lot of ways, my hearing loss ended up being a real gift and the main way that it did that is I ended up getting attention from our parents.That... More attention from our parents than my older siblings did, which was extremely unfair, but that's just how it happened, how it played out. And so they really struggled. They struggled with that lack of attention and just, they are my sister is five years older and my brother is seven years older and they're growing up was very different from mine, even that slight not generational, but time period was different.And so they, they are probably the funniest, most creative people that I know, but neither one of them has found that lifelong dream career, which is something I struggle with them. That sense of guilt, even though what happened, wasn't my fault. I'm deeply aware of how much it changed things for them.And it's a, it's an interesting thing, but they are so funny. If you think I'm funny, spend time with them and you'll just think that I'm as dull as a brick because those two and when we all three get together, it is just, it's pretty magical. And I'm so grateful that we get along and that we're as close as we are.They're terrific siblings. Yeah. Jarrett: Wow. What that is a, what a beautiful testament of your love for them. And their love for you comes across so clearly in the book, in regards to you, the baby of the family and they're concerned for your health that's, and I connect to that as well, because I too was, the baby of the family, and there was a lot of trauma going on.And with that, I got a lot of attention. And I loved drawing as a form of escape. And I'm so touched to hear that your time in the hospital was spent drawing because that is a testament to the power of creating in the arts to get you through some hard times. Did you ever have an epiphany along the lines where you realized this thing could be a career for you?Like this drawing thing? Cece: That took a while. I was in school, in high school and the first part of college I was really super academic. And some of that was pressure from my own self, but also pressure from my dad. I think my dad wanted me to be a doctor like him, and I've have found that's a theme among a lot of cartoonists and illustrators that there was this parent who pushed, but pushed them to be something that they didn't want to be.And that child like me in my case I think [inaudible] has a similar thing. And the name is leaving me... American born Chinese? Jarrett: Oh, Jean Yang.Cece: Helped me. Yeah. Yeah. Just that, that pressure. And There was that, but in school I was really academic trying to fulfill this thing for myself and for my father and overcompensating for the deafness.I didn't want people to think of me as "that deaf kid". I wanted them to think of me, " that smart kid". And so I worked really hard and I never considered art as a career because it didn't seem like it was even doable. It wasn't doable. So when I got to college, I was an English major and I hated it.I hated it. I don't know what I was doing. Having to write papers and read books and but while I was in college, I met Tom Angelberger, who ended up becoming my husband and he was an art major and I did take some art classes. There he is! There he is. He's so smart. And we started hanging out and I think he recognized that I was pretty good at it.And I think he also recognized that I was unhappy as an English major. And so it was Tom who encouraged me to switch majors and just go for it. And I did, and suddenly I was happy and it was the best move I ever made, but it took a while longer to figure out what I was going to do with it. Jarrett: Wow. You know... I obviously I know that you and Tom really support one, one another artistically, but I didn't realize he was really such an integral part of your origin story of you becoming the Cece Bell that we all know, that we know is the name on the spine of the book, the name on the front cover with all of those shiny stickers. And, yeah. And so you were college sweethearts, and then you both got catapulted out into the real world. And so what happened from there? Did you graduate with an English degree?Cece: We, no, no. I got out of that as quick as I could. I keep saying I don't like reading and I do, but the book has to get me.Or it has to interest me from chapter one. And if it doesn't, I throw it out. So there were a lot of books that didn't interest me in chapter one in the English department, but I was out of there, but no, we I ended up getting a degree in fine arts and Tom did two, and we went to the college of William and Mary, which is in Williamsburg, Virginia, and which isn't really known for art. It's known for like business and physics and science. But we finished school and then we took a trip around the country together in an old Volkswagen van. And then we decided, because we survived that we could get married and survived that too. So we got married and I decided to go to graduate school at in Ohio. And so we got married right before that. And so at this point we were just 22. We were super, super young. And I decided I needed to, I wanted to become an illustrator. That I wouldn't have fit in with the whole fine arts crowd. I had this vision that I would have to go to New York city and drink champagne and talk about art and that just founded atrocious.So I thought; "Illustration!" And so I decided to go to a graduate degree in design and illustration, and Tom went with me and basically... He worked in a factory and juggled on the weekend, and that... And he paid for all of the time I was in graduate school. And then and then I finished and then we moved back to Virginia.He learned a lot from what I was learning. So it was neat. I would share my projects with him and talk about everything with him. And I think he picked it up through osmosis, but he actually, his path was really different. He was working in a factory, but then eventually ended up becoming a newspaper reporter, both in Ohio and then back in Virginia.And he was really good at it. And I think that's how he became a writer, was through newspaper writing. And his first book, which was about a group of kids exploring the local sewage department. That was based on a story that he wrote for the newspaper. Anyway he's a huge - Tom Angelberger is probably the reason I'm talking to you right now is because he put me through school.He was the one that, I think he understood me before. I understood me in a lot of ways. Jarrett: Wow. Wow. Wow. I, that's beautiful. I feel like that story you just told us could be... Like a limited series on a streaming service. That is just such a beautiful, that could be a romantic comedy or something, Cece, that's amazing. Wow. So you landed back in Virginia, you got hitched you got hitched and smart to travel across country together to see if you could survive that your relationship could survive that before marriage that's smart. That should be a requirement. So why, so he was writing for the newspaper.And were you like what were you hoping to do with your illustrations? Did you have books for kids in mind? Did you like what were you thinking? Cece: Gosh, when we moved back to Virginia, I was, we were both 25 and we moved back mostly because Tom was homesick for the mountains. I would've stayed in Ohio.And I actually applied for a job at American Greeting, which was, or I think it's still in Cleveland and did not get that job. What were they thinking? But I didn't get hired by American Greeting. And I was bummed cuz it was in a, that the office space was just beautiful and the employees would get these like every other year sabbaticals and it was beautiful.So I was pretty sad, but Tom wanted to go back to Virginia and I did. And so we did, and when we first came back Tom had trouble finding a newspaper job, but I got a job as an illustrator and designer for a small company. That made exotic pet supplies.So for three years I was making packaging and writing copy and doing all this stuff for this little company in Virginia. And the work was really great because it forced me to learn how to use Photoshop. And at the time it was called Freehand, like illustrator. You may remember Freehand.Jarrett: Yeah.Cece: And it forced me to learn to use the computer. I, my time in graduate school, the computer stuff was just starting. It was more, we were using a Xerox machine and cutting and pasting and using all that old, Ruby list kind of stuff. So the computer was still really new. So that job was good because it forced me to learn those things.But I was working for the devil. Satan himself was my boss and I had to get outta there. And so I don't know if you've ever seen this show, The Prisoner, the it's that British show and the beginning, the introduction has the prisoner is an FBI - not FBI, Secret Service agent. And he he quits his job and he like throws his keys down and storms out.I had visions that, that, that was how I was going to quit. But instead I got up like at 5:30 in the morning and I wrote a note and I put it in an envelope with the key. And I crept into my boss's office and put the envelope on his desk and it basically said I quit and don't contact me ever. And then I snuck out and I was at no two weeks notice.Ugh, I was pretty shabby, but I was so glad to get out in there. And then from that, I started freelancing at this crazy local paper... Paper product place that licensed stuff. Like I got to make folders that featured N-Sync and the, whatever those boys are called, those boy bands. Yes, I Want it That Way.And I got to make all these school supplies for N-Sync and with the Crayola stuff on there, and it was this crazy hodgepodge. It was the best job. And so when I was doing that, it freed me up to start thinking about kids books and my graduate thesis had been this wackadoodle children's book that will never is the light of day, but the illustrations are great.And the story's not so good, but I thought the illustrations were great, but anyway So then I started to think; "Maybe I can do this." And I finally had an idea that I felt like it was good enough to pursue, and I pursued it and I made this really polished dummy that I could that I could send out.And at the time Candlewick Press was accepting ,accepting work without an agent, unsolicited stuff. So I sent it to Candlewick and like three months later there was a message on the answering machine. Which of course I didn't understand because I don't understand that. I don't understand answering machine messages, but Tom was there once again, Tom did a rescue and he is; "Oh my gosh, it's Candlewick Press!".And So I didn't, I, that was it. That was my end. And the rest is history . Jarrett: And what book was that? Cece: That book was "Sock Monkey goes to Hollywood."Jarrett: Oh, yes. I remember the Sock Monkey books and, wow. That's right. Wow. So what and what year was that? Cece: Oh, my gosh, that came out.Oh yeah. So the, that was the year 2000 was when I got the message from Candlewick, but it didn't come out until 2003 because I didn't have an agent. And I had to get a lawyer to help me read the contract as those contracts are... It wasn't until later that I got an agent, and God bless agents because I never wanna read another contract ever again. But it just took a long time because it was my first and I didn't have representation at the time. So that came out in 2003. Jarrett: Yeah. Cece: Yeah. Jarrett: Yeah. And because now I'm connecting all of the dots, because then... It was maybe a few years after that is when I first met you and Tom at, we were in a gallery show together and I had just thought; "That's the famous Cece Bell, she's been around. "These books have been out for years now. And I don't know if I'm allowed to talk to the famous Cece Bell who makes the Sock Monkey books." And there, you were just getting started. Cece: Yeah. Oh, I really was just getting started and I wasn't famous at all. I remember Ashley Bryan was there and Grace Lynn was there.Jarrett: Yeah. Cece: And at the time I was a huge Grace Lynn fan, still am, but I think, I still think of her as this icon. She already felt iconic that all the way back then. And I was so in awe of her and that sensation that I had, then it's still there. Anytime I see her, I just turn a jelly like; "Oh, it's Grace Lynn! Baah!"And so she was there and I remember the book that you were talking about was the the animal punk rock band. Jarrett: Yeah. Cece: Book. Yeah. Jarrett: Yeah. Punk Farm! Cece: And you already had the JJK thing going on. You were like Mr. PR and... Jarrett: No, but I was only a few years in then too, that my first book was 2001 and Punk Farm was 2005, I think.Cece: Punk Farm.Jarrett: Still trying to get my stuff out there, and learning how to be on stage. Cause I used to have incredible stage fright. I hated performing. I hated going on stage. And then that became part of the job that I have. So I'm curious and because I know for me, I had been working on Lunch Lady that whole time.But the world wasn't quite ready for kids graphic novel. So you're plugging away on these picture books. How does El Deafo thread into that? I'm assuming that was something that was knocking around your head for, so for some years, right? Cece: It, in fact it was not knocking around my head at all.And honestly I was purposefully not writing about my experience on purpose and it's much like how I was in school. I don't want anybody to know this thing about me. And I want everybody to think I'm smart. And I had the same feeling about my picture books and early reader books. I just wasn't ready to talk about it in any way, not just in books, but in any and every way.There was an event that happened in which I had this really difficult interaction with a grocery store cashier. And she made me feel like the lowest person on earth. And it was all because I couldn't understand her. And I was so upset by that interaction and the person I was most upset at with myself, because at no point during that interaction, did I ever say; "I'm deaf!" Or; "I have trouble hearing." Or; "Could you please repeat that?"Because I had so much trouble saying those things. I still had not come to grips with a lot of it. And at that point I was 40 years old. 40! And I was so mad... At everything. And I was mad at hearing people for not understanding and just frustrated and mad at me. And so I started a website and the website was called, eldeafo.com.And El Deafo really was the nickname that I called myself, as a kid, but only to myself, nobody else knew about it. And I just started writing about it. And my post were more about more directed at hearing people like; "This is what you should do if you're talking to a lip reader." That kind of thing.But then I wrote a little, my, my origin story. I wrote that up and a friend of mine who was a wonderful writer named Madeline Rosenberg. She was reading it and she said; "Oh my goodness, you have got to turn this into something. Please turn this into something, please turn it into a graphic novel." And so we have Madeline Rosenberg to thank for this.And so it was her encouragement and I had just read Raina Telgemeier's Smile, and that thing's a masterpiece. And I could see, I could tell that Raina's methods would really work for a story like this. And I was really excited about it because from the word go, I knew that they were gonna be rabbits.And I knew that the speech bubbles were going to be... The most important part of telling the story of my experience with deafness. So that's how that all came to me. And I was ready. I was ready. I felt like this book is going to be my calling card. This book is going to tell the world for me that I'm deaf.And then sure enough, after the book came out, I was finally able to talk about it. It was like, it worked. Yay. Jarrett: Yeah. Cece: And it was such relief. Jarrett: And I, and again, I could understand that journey. So earlier when I was talking about I, I was making Lunch Lady I probably should have compared it more to Hey Kiddo in that for me too.When I was first getting published and news reporters would wanna ask, they ask; "Why were you being raised by your grandparents?"" And I thought, I don't want that to be, I don't wanna be labeled as the child of an addict. I wanna be the Jarrett, who's making the books and I wanna be the Punk Farm guy or the Lunch Lady guy.And, but then there's this thing that you've lived and you're processing it and it's trauma and you're an adult, but you're still dealing with it. And then suddenly this thing that you've wanted to put inside a box your whole life, you're gonna put in a graphic memoir, like a hundreds of pages for everyone to see what was the creative process like for you?And I love that you made them rabbits. That's it's so perfect cuz of the ears, but also because you're Cece Bell, it's just so silly. Like they could have been talking hot dogs and it's still would've worked, but could you tell us a little bit about... The creative process and how that intersected with the emotional journey you had.Cece: Wow. I was, when I decided to commit to it, I was really excited about it. And I think because I didn't have any experience with graphic novels. I knew that I had to do a little bit of studying up and probably like a lot of folks who were in this business. I started with Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, which is, probably the most important book about comics I've ever seen.And I read it three times. I was just amazed by the whole thing. I read it three times. Once I, after the third time I thought to myself, I'm ready. I'm ready to go. And the process was just, I basically did a a notebook dump. I just wrote down everything I could remember, but I limited myself to the moment that I lost my hearing to fifth grade, and I just wrote all my memories down all my experiences and then tightened that up into an outline.And it was the outline and a a chapter. I drew out a chapter and that's what I sent to Susan Van Metre at Abrams Books. She was at Abrams at the time and she was Tom's editor for the Origami Yoda series. And I was really impressed with her. I had met her a couple of times and something told me she was the right person for it.That's what I sent to her, but the process was just a lot of back and forth between doing just these little sketches for each page kind of blocking out what's supposed to happen and then writing out what people are supposed to say, and then just mushing it together. And the process felt very organic compared to picture books, the picture books, I always feel like you've gotta get the text absolutely perfect. And there was a lot less of that for me, with the graphic novel, it was so much looser and more fun, I think. And that's all I can, that's all I can say. It was just, it was a really good experience. Jarrett: That's and that, that book is such a gift. I still have. The advanced reader's copy that they handed out to promote the book.I'll never, that's maybe in 50 years, I'll sell it on eBay to get me through . But I think it's only with the medium of comics, like a prose novel would not have worked to tell this story as effectively, because with your visuals, you are able to play with the word balloons and the size of the text to really help me and hearing people understand your journey and, and that obviously that's a help to us with hearing, but for, the whole generation of kids who are growing up with hearing loss and who are deaf.Have you - that - I can't even imagine what this book has meant to them. And I'm assuming you hear from readers with hearing loss and deafness could you share a few stories like that must get emotionally overwhelming at times? Cece: Sure. There have been, the response was just so positive.The kids that I've heard from who have had experiences like mine, they just get so excited to see their story and to see something that's familiar to them. It's not exactly their story maybe, but they get it. And they're really happy to have something to show their families and their friends. "This is what it's like!"And... Also just a lot of kids have had the experience of hearing their teacher in the bathroom. And it's great to have that validated. "Yeah. I've been there too. Yay." That's probably, everybody's favorite part in the book. That's my favorite part in the book. That was the chapter that I submitted to Susan that yeah. Hearing teacher. Jarrett: That's perfect. Cece: Yeah. So the kids have been great. And, but somehow the more affecting stories for me were the adults who had grown up in a very similar way that I had with the same equipment, even the phonic ear and the microphone and many of them said; "This is the first time I have ever seen anything remotely, like my story in a book."And I ended up making friends with a lot of adults with hearing loss, which wasn't something I had a lot of, I'm very much in the hearing world because my family is all hearing. And I think for so long, I thought of myself as a hearing person. I am, I'm a hearing person when I stick my hearing aids in and I'm a deaf person when they're out, but I'm both of those things all the time I'm in between all the time.And so it was just really cool to get this new group of people who completely understood and just... Those are the ones that get me. But then in terms of the kids, probably my favorite story ever was a little girl who was struggling with having to get hearing aids. And she was very afraid of it all.And so she found my book and read it, and that helped her be less afraid. And she was at the audiologist office. And at that point she was very comfortable and okay with everything she was going through. But there was a little boy at the office who was crying and she happened to have her copy of El Deafo and she gave him her copy. Ugh. And that was just that really got me so...Jarrett: Wow!Cece: It was just neat. It's neat that it's being used in a helpful way. And I never thought that I would ever create a book that would help people, my other books that are just silly and funny and goofy. Sometimes I feel guilty for those books. I'm like; "Sure, maybe they help kids read, but what good are they doing?" So it's really nice to have this one book that I know helps people, Jarrett: Yeah. Yeah. And, that's something that I struggled to... Especially when we're seeing every awful, horrific headline in the news. And there have been times where I've worried; "But what does this silly story matter?"But they do, those silly stories do matter. I under- I understand that inner struggle because you have made something that connects with readers on this whole other level. So I'm curious, I'd like to know a little bit more about this Apple TV+ limited series of El Deafo. It, my kids requested to watch it because they had read the book and what you did with the visuals in El Deafo, the book to help hearing people understand your deaf experience.The sound scape in the TV show helped me understand on a, on an entirely different level. And it, I had to say Cece, it felt like a animated special we've had for decades. It felt like a Charles Schulz, Peanuts, Charlie Brown, Snoopy, special. Like it was that level of just beauty and taking the time to tell the story.How did that come about? Cece: Wow Jarrett. You just said the magic words to me. That was what I wanted. I wanted that peanut feel that Christmas special Peanuts feel. Where it's not exactly perfect, but the imperfections or what make it interesting, there's something really unusual about that Charlie Brown, Christmas special that on paper, it shouldn't work at all. It's a mess. Even some of the story doesn't make sense and yet you stick it all together and yay. It works. But so thank you for that. That means a lot. So that television show came about a he's my friend now, but back then, he wasn't my friend.He was somebody. Greatly admired and still admired, Will McRob who is one of the co-creators of one of my favorite TV shows of all time, the Adventures of Pete and Pete, which was on Nickelodeon in the 90s, he, out of the blue sent me an email and said; "I like your book. Let's turn it into a show!"And so that was how it got started, but it took him a long time to convince me because I felt like the book was I don't know, to me, at least it felt sacred and I didn't wanna mess that up. And I knew that there were a lot of fans of the book who also felt that love for it. And I didn't wanna mess that up, but I started to think, there's not many, if any characters on TV who are like me in that we are deaf people who have chosen or because of our circumstances, we have gotten through life with hearing aids, not without, but with, and you don't see very much of that on TV and in a movie. And in fact, when there are deaf characters in movies, at least, like back in the 70s and 80s, when we grew up not only was the deaf character made fun of, but the equipment was too, the actual hearing aid was somehow part of the... Was being made fun of, and, hearing aids are not perfect and they're greatly flawed little things, but they've really helped me and the phonic ear from the book I'm in... Once again, I would not be here talking to you without that piece of equipment. I don't think maybe I would've, but I don't think so, but anyway I just started to think, this kind of needs to be this could be really good for deaf kids and hearing kids to have a show like this. So that's how it came about.And I signed on once I I was very demanding. I had to put on those big girl pants and be like; "Ra ra ra!" Which is not my usual way. But anyway I said it can't be just a series that, goes on a, goes off on its own. It needs to be based on the book. And I want it to look like the book and it can't be 3D animation.I was like; "Absolutely no 3D, has to be 2D." And my other thing was; "We have to mess with the audio. The audio has to reflect the book in some way." So those were some of my demands. Also the main character had to be played by someone, a kid who also has hearing loss, but is using adaptive equipment to help her.And in that case, we got a lovely young lady, Lexi Finigan who uses cochlear implants a little bit different from what I do. But she was just fantastic. So I was very demanding. Jarrett: I I'm so glad that you were because, so often these animated adaptations of work the author of the underlying material is the last person they wanna work with. And I think that the work suffers from that cuz so it really, you went in there with, a limited amount of things that would really like you're quote-unquote "demands". And I, and I get it cuz you have to be assertive in these situations. To say; "Here's what's really important to me." And understanding like a book is a book and a and a TV show is a TV show. Like you're telling story with anything that's animated or film. You're telling stories with visuals and sounds, and time, which is different than a book. And you all just hit it right out of the park.I, when it comes to the Emmys, I hope you win all of the awards for this piece. It's an instant classic. It's just so perfect. And you narrat I could, I didn't know that. So I put it on and I, and my wife, Gina was in the other room she came and went; "Is that Cece? Cece's voice is coming from the TV?"Cece: Yeah, that was pretty neat. At first the director who is. From Lighthouse Studios in Ireland, a woman named Gilly Fogg, who was absolutely terrific, when she first heard that I wanted to narrate it. Oh, not that I wanted to narrate it, but just the idea of a narrator. She said; "Oh no, we don't want that. That's, no thank you." But Will, and I, when we were writing the script together, we realized that if we were going to mess with the audio, that it was going to be confusing and that we needed there to be a voice ex- kind of just explaining, giving kids a few clues that no, your TV isn't broken because the narrator's voice would come on and it would be clear.And and like I think every now and then the narrator says something like, everything was quiet and I think the audience needs that. Otherwise they're gonna be, hitting their TV. "What's wrong?" She did not like that idea. The director said; "No, no narrator." And so Will said; "What if Cece narrates it?"And then she just lit up and she said; "Aha, yes, that's what we need to do." Because it did need to be my voice. You've probably heard people talking about the deaf accent, where there are certain sounds that I don't hear very well. And so my voice is a little different and that was important.People need to hear what that voice sounds like, which is why one of the reasons why we cast a deaf actress, because we need to have that specific sound. And I used to be very ashamed of that deaf accent, but not anymore. I don't really, that's just how I talk. So that is how that came to be, but I had to take acting classes, Jarrett, I am now... That's the end. And the woman - I know I am acting.And she was fantastic. I think I had about three or four sessions with her and it was almost more like therapy. I don't know she was magical and she's a lovely woman. And just, it actually really helped just, it was more about "here's how to take direction and then use that direction and go with it."And this all happened during COVID. And so I recorded all of my lines in my bedroom. They sent me all this equipment and Tom and I set it up and I was pretty much in my closet. And that it was pretty neat. It was pretty neat getting to do the whole thing from home. Jarrett: You, but, okay. But you do deserve the limo.That's gonna bring you to the studio. So I hope that we get something more so that you can have a personal assistant that you throw your phone to, and if you don't like the food, they prepared, you just throw it against the wall in a fit of rage. I guess you could do that for Tom.I guess you could like Tom, could, he would do that for you. If that's gonna make you happy, like he would totally be game for that Cece: It was frustrating that I didn't get to have some of the experiences, like I was supposed to be able to go to Ireland and hang out with the animation studio for a couple weeks.Wow. So that got canned. And I was supposed to go out to LA to to work with the audio team. That didn't work. But the funny thing is that because we had all of our meetings on zoom, it was actually better because when I'm in a meeting, oh, like around a table in real life, I miss probably 70 or 80% of what's being said, because I lose the thread.If that makes sense. I can't, I can only do, one or two people. And then I'm lost because of their lip reading. But with everybody's face right in front of me, everybody's facing me, look at me, , they're all facing me. That makes me sound like they're looking at me, we have to look at our computers, right?You have to look at our computers when we do them. And so I didn't miss anything. And... That gave me a lot more confidence to help run the show. Oh yeah. So it was actually a benefit in a weird way that we were all stuck at home Jarrett: A as well. You should run the show Cece, wow. That all of your hard work as a team made for a beautiful animated program, and there's, as I said, it so reminded me of the Charlie Brown specials, cause it also took its time. There was moments of silence. There, there were moments where it wasn't just a lot of fast cuts and my five year old son who... Has a very short tension span. Loves video games. Like it, it actually was very calming to him. We'd watch it at the end of the day, as a treat, as a family watch and he would ask for Cece, he wouldn't call it El Deafo, he'd say, could we watch Cece?And so they all connected with you on this whole other level. So we're gonna wrap things up in a bit be before we do in the chat. So what I'll give you one audience question, cuz I don't wanna keep you too much longer. What are you working on Cece? Is there anything you can tell us about? What do we have to look forward to? Cece: Oh so I am working on of all things, an alphabet book. That's crazy, but so I love music and that's something that a lot of hearing folks are surprised by that.Deaf people can love music and my hearing aids are pretty good. And I grew up with my older siblings bringing in all this great music usually from thrift stores. And we had this fantastic turntable, that we used at home. That is mine now. Thank goodness. Great speakers. And so I really love music and I especially love the visuals that went with the music, the album covers.So this is an alphabet book of fake album covers that are animals playing different genres. And and all I'm making memorabilia and writing songs and smushing it all together in this book. So part of it is hopefully it'll be fun, but it's a very personal project because as I've gotten older, I am losing more hearing.And now it's a genetic hearing loss because my father and his grandfather and father, on down the line, they all had pretty significant hearing loss. So I'm starting to lose. My ability to appreciate music, which sucks in a big way. So this is my my outpouring of love visually for music.And it's been so much fun. I'm doing all the hand lettering. I'm doing weird paintings and it's been a lot of fun so far, but a lot of work because it's so personal, I'm taking my time with it. And my editor is Susan Van Metre, the same one who is working, who worked on El Deafo with me.And I just got an extension, Jarrett. Yay! The best thing ever to happen is when you tell your editor, "I need more time" and they give it to you. So that's what I'm...Jarrett: Awesome. Cece: Very personal and I just wanted to do something that didn't have so much of a story, just fun. And there's thought of a story that the story of my own personal relationship with music, but but that's what I've been working on.Jarrett: Oh we will be patient Cece Bell! It has been very challenging, challenging times and concepts lately, cuz of the pandemic deadlines have seemed like wonderful suggestions. I know my editors won't want to hear that, but it's been, to get that art out of you also need to be in a pretty decent enough Headspace.So I'm glad to know that. Yes, you're getting more time and we are gonna get more Cece Bell and the world and we're also, we're lucky to have you in this world. We're lucky that you make art. We're lucky that Tom Angelberger supported you and took you off that track and put you on a different track that you wanted to be on.And what a beautiful thing to have anyone in this world who would love you so much to show you your true self and what an amazing story from the exotic pet packaging to N-Sync. I did not think I would be able to run a thread between Cece Bell and N-Sync in this interview, but wow. Wow.That's very cool. I will think of you whenever I see an N-Sync lunch box at a thrift store or something like that. . Cece: Oh, please. Yeah. If you ever find school supplies like a notebook and folders, I should have sent you pictures. They're they're just I know everything about Justin Timberlake.Let me tell you, I know everything about, the way he looked and his signature, we got to use all this stuff that they sent us. It was great. Jarrett: Ah I'm gonna make...Cece: I would say a lot of the same things about you. Your work has been so important and inspiring and funny and and your support of other authors and illustrators is amazing. I think I'm a little bit more self-centered honestly, you're just like "everybody else is fantastic!" And I really appreciate that. You're really good about doing that. So thank you.Jarrett: I appreciate that your kind words, but in a way, what we all do is self-centered because we're scratching that creative itch we've always had.And, we're lucky enough that we love to make books and we didn't forget who we were as kids and kids find those really funny or entertaining, or they get to see themselves reflected in that true life experience. I...Cece: Yes.Jarrett: ... Cannot pass up a chance to make a really bad pun in this moment.Cece, I'm gonna sign off by saying... Bye bye bye. It was so bad, right? That was so stupid. That was such a bad joke. Ain't no bad joke. Ain't no lie. I say it. It might sound crazy, but it ain't no lie. Cece I appreciate you. And thanks for taking the time to chat with us today. Cece: Absolutely. Thank you, Jarrett.

Fireside Jets - A New York Jets Podcast
5 players to watch during the New York Jets Week 3 pre-season game | Snoopy Bowl!

Fireside Jets - A New York Jets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 14:45


Alex and Ryan discuss 5 players to watch during the New York Jets' final pre-season game of the season!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

About Space Today
Snoopy Returns To Space

About Space Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 5:18


Yes, the famous pouch Snoopy will be returning to space onboard the Orion spacecraft to launch on Monday.  Join Host Dawn Meyer as she recounts the Snoopy missions.

Und was machst du am Wochenende?
Ana Marwan spinnt täglich und fühlt sich wie Snoopy

Und was machst du am Wochenende?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 51:55


Die Gewinnerin des Ingeborg-Bachmann-Preises 2022 ist diese Woche zu Gast im Podcast "Und was machst du am Wochenende?": Die slowenische Schriftstellerin Ana Marwan, geboren 1980, lebt seit einigen Jahren in Wolfsthal, einem Dorf in Niederösterreich. Am Wochenende steht sie früher auf, weil ihr Mann dann auch zu Hause ist, unter der Woche lebt er in Wien. Ihr Mann bereitet ihr samstagmorgens immer ein Spiegelei zu, auf das er sehr stolz ist. Mit dem Gastgeber-Team Ilona Hartmann und Christoph Amend spricht Ana Marwan über ihre Hemmungen und ihre Sammlung von Zufällen, die sie in einem Buch notiert, ihr "Schlechtes-Gewissen-Zimmer", ihre vier Widder, ihre zwei Hasen und ihren Hund - und über das Dorfleben, das im Wesentlichen von einem Bier-und-Zigaretten-Automaten geprägt ist, in dem es früher auch Butter und Käse gab, aber jetzt nur noch, genau, Bier und Zigaretten. "Letzte Woche habe ich anfangen zu spinnen und zu weben", erzählt Ana Marwan, "ich spinne jetzt täglich." Außerdem lernt sie gerade Akkordeonspielen und hat sich ein Häuschen in dem Garten gebaut, damit sie sich abends auf das Dach legen kann: "Dann fühle ich mich wie Snoopy." In dieser Folge empfehlen Christoph Amend, Ilona Hartmann und Ana Marwan: spinnen beziehungsweise weben, Café Zartl (Kaffeehaus in Wien), Zum Schwarzen Kameel (Kaffeehaus in Wien), "The Worst Person in the World" (Film), "Westworld" (Serie) und Soda Zitron. Das Team erreichen Sie unter wochenende@zeit.de.

The Personal Computer Radio Show
The Personal Computer Radio Show - 08.24.22

The Personal Computer Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 54:00


Hank said: " The Personal Computer Show Wednesday August 24 2022 PRN.live Streaming on the Internet 6:00 PM Eastern Time IN THE NEWS o A Breakthrough with Fighting Auto-Warranty Robocalls o All Systems “GO”, Artemis 1 to Lift-Off with Snoopy o Streaming Viewership Surpasses Cable TV o Verizon Cuts Visible Internet Unlimited to $30/month o Changes in Forging Friendships at Work ITPro Series with Benjamin Rockwell o Concerns When You are a Consultant From the Tech Corner o TechCrunch Launches the TruthSpy Spyware Lookup Tool o Apple Releases iOS, iPadOS, and macOS Securiy Fixes o ZOOM Series of Security Flaws o New Google Nest Router with Wi-Fi 6E Technology Chatter with Benjamin Rockwell and Marty Winston o Barbasol Razor as Example of Promoting Product "

Which Game First: A Board Game Podcast
176: Dice Stars | Libertalia: Winds of Galecrest | Snoopy and the Red Baron

Which Game First: A Board Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 51:45


Welcome to Which Game First where we boldly explore the hilariously huge world of board games. Did we unearth any hidden treasures you've been missing out on? Let's find out! First: We light up the night sky with brilliant d6's in Dice StarsNext: We sail airships in search of fame and riches in Libertalia: Winds […]

Crime of the Arts
12. How to Murder Your Husband & Good Grief Indeed

Crime of the Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 60:12


How to Murder Your Husband: The Death of Daniel Brophy & Good Grief Indeed: The Life of Peter RobbinsHow to Murder Your Husband (Sources)https://www.sportskeeda.com/pop-culture/who-nancy-crampton-brophy-how-to-murder-your-husband-author-convicted-killing-spouse https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2022/06/14/how-to-murder-your-husband-life-sentence/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Daniel_Brophy https://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2018/06/former_students_friends_mourn.html Good Grief Indeed (Sources)https://time.com/4109337/charlie-brown-hitman/https://www.sportskeeda.com/pop-culture/why-peter-robbins-go-prison-charlie-brown-voice-actor-s-life-explored-dies-aged-65https://www.providencejournal.com/story/news/local/2022/01/26/peter-robbins-voice-actor-charlie-brown-struggled-with-prison-mental-illness-addiction/9224423002/https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-charlie-brown-threats-20151110-story.htmlhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/the-charlie-brown-assassination-plothttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3314862/The-voice-Charlie-Brown-pleaded-guilty-trying-assassinate-San-Diego-s-sheriff-just-two-years-confessed-stalking-ex-lover-plastic-surgeon-gave-breast-augmentation.html https://www.thewrap.com/charlie-brown-peter-robbins-criminal-threat

Origin Stories w JJK

Nilah Magruder is an absolute joy and an uber-talented author and artist. She was the first Black woman to write for Marvel, illustrated all of the Heroes of Olympus covers for Rick Riordan's books, and worked extensively in animation. Not to mention the books that she is the sole creator of, which have proven to be legendary in my home.Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:00:03] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:00:06] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:00:29] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:00:32] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:00:32] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:00:45] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:01:01] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:01:09] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:01:29] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:01:39] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:01:53] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:02:20] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:02:44] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:03:18] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:03:43] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:04:05] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:04:27] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:04:54] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:05:11] So... [00:05:11] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:05:14] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:05:22] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:05:23] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:05:32] Jarrett: Oh... [00:05:33] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:05:49] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:06:07] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:06:07] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:06:21] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:06:45] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:06:55] Jarrett: Oh. [00:06:55] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:07:11] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:07:19] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:07:19] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:07:34] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:07:50] Nilah: Yeah![00:07:50] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:08:10] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:08:35] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:08:38] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:39] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:08:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:45] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:09:01] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:09:11] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:09:21] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:09:27] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:09:39] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:09:44] Nilah: Yeah.[00:09:45] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:09:53] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:10:04] And that, that devastated me. [00:10:07] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:10:08] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:10:30] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:10:53] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:11:15] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:11:30] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:11:30] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:11:42] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:12:07] Jarrett: Yes! [00:12:07] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:12:11] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:12:44] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:13:05] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:13:10] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:13:27] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:13:29] Nilah: Yeah. [00:13:30] Jarrett: Right?[00:13:30] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:13:36] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:13:59] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:14:07] Jarrett: Wow. [00:14:07] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:14:30] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:14:49] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:15:02] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:15:03] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:15:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:24] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:15:39] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:15:47] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:15:48] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:15:51] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:15:53] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:15:58] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:58] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:15:59] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:16:04] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:16:16] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:16:19] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:16:41] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:16:57] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:17:00] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:17:13] You became the first... [00:17:14] Nilah: So... [00:17:15] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:17:16] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:17:16] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:17:42] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:18:06] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:18:26] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:18:26] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:18:58] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:19:43] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:19:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:19:58] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:20:13] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:20:31] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:20:52] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:21:15] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:21:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:21:27] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:21:37] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:21:59] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:22:24] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:22:49] And yeah.[00:22:51] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:23:08] Nilah: Yeah.[00:23:08] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:23:24] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:23:30] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:23:34] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:23:38] Yes... [00:23:39] Jarrett: No? [00:23:39] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:23:47] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:24:17] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:24:36] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:24:39] Nilah: Yeah.[00:24:40] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:24:44] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:25:06] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:25:25] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:25:28] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:25:29] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:25:31] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:25:35] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:25:43] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors. [00:25:45] Jarrett: Nilah Magruder. How are you? [00:25:49] Nilah: I'm doing pretty good. How are you? [00:25:52] Jarrett: Hangin', it in there Nilah, you will forever and ever be iconic in my home because your picture book, "How to Find a Fox" has been read so many times. So many times. In our home that it is held together by like scotch tape and like bubble gum.[00:26:14] Our son, we must have read that so many times. [00:26:18] Nilah: Oh my God.[00:26:18] Jarrett: Huge home run pal and I remember we met at Comics Crossroads in Ohio and we were tabling next to each other and, like we just were chatting the whole day and I'm always looking for something to bring home to the kids to make up for being gone.[00:26:31] And wow that book, man, I'm telling you like, iconic like that, that we will read that. I will read that to my grandkids, my wife and I will be reading that to our grandkids someday. So thank you for stop and a chat with us. But of course I what the show is all about of [00:26:47] course is about getting to know how creative people in comics got to be doing what they're doing.[00:26:54] And so I like to start at the very beginning cuz I, I love the idea and I also love the idea of imagine. A young author, an artist and getting to, to hear those stories directly from some of your favorite creators. My first question for you and it might really be the only question I ask and then we're gonna get into a conversation, but what was life like for you as a kid?[00:27:15] What was your home like? What was your family set up? What kind of art and stories were you consuming? What sort of laid the groundwork to create Nilah Magruder? [00:27:25] Nilah: My home life as a child, I grew up in a house in the woods in a small community back in a time where it was largely forest and largely rural.[00:27:38] And I think that had a lasting impact on how. I think visually in how I view story, the sort of stories that I'm interested in. A lot of the things I was interested at interested in as a kid were very pastoral and natural. I loved anything featuring animals and, honestly, I was isolated for a lot of my childhood.[00:28:05] This is something that you and I have in common. I had an alcoholic parent and as a kid, I didn't like to bring friends home because then they would see my dad and, whatever state that my dad was in, it was really unpredictable. I never quite knew what I was bringing friends into. So I didn't, bring friends here very much.[00:28:30] And I didn't go to friends' houses very much. And so a lot of my time was spent at home, but we were surrounded by this woodland, all of these trees and animals and so much nature. And that's really where I spent my time as a kid. Now, what I was interested in, like what I was ingesting, we had a small video rental store in the community, and this was long before Netflix.[00:29:04] This was even before Blockbuster. We didn't have a Blockbuster within driving distance. I'm not even sure if Blockbuster existed back then. And so we had this local mom and pop rental store and they would bring in videos from all over the world. A lot of imported... movies and television series.[00:29:29] And as a kid, I was interested in anything animated. If it was a cartoon, if it was drawn, I was there. And so like any cartoon that they had, I'd be like, mom, can we get this please? And I remember once I showed her one video that I hadn't watched yet, and I was like, mom, can we get this? And she looked at it, she looked at the cover and was like, no.[00:29:50] And she put it back and we never spoke of it again. and years later, like I was an adult on the internet and I saw this title called when the wind blows and I was like, oh, that's familiar. And I looked at the summary. I looked at the art from the movie and I was like, oh my God, that's it. That's that one movie that my mom wouldn't let me watch.[00:30:13] And so when the wind blows is a British animated film about nuclear fallout, And it's about it's about this couple. I think it's like a rural couple and there's this big catastrophe in England. And the government sends pamphlets out to everyone and is every, they're just like, don't panic everyone. It's fine.[00:30:40] Just stay at home. And so basically this couple they're older, they're very trusting. They're like the government knows what's best. So we'll just stay home. And eventually radiation reach reaches them and they get sick and die. [00:30:56] So... [00:30:57] Jarrett: what a prude! What a prude! What a...[00:31:00] Nilah: I know wouldn't let me. And then another time she was also a teacher and one day she brought home the animated Animal Farm.[00:31:08] Jarrett: Wow. Yeah.[00:31:09] Nilah: And, my thing is animals, of course. And she looks at me and she's do not watch this. And then she leaves it out. [00:31:17] Jarrett: Oh... [00:31:19] Nilah: And so one day when she wasn't there, I popped it in the VCR and watched it. And I think I was like nine or 10 at the time. And I loved it. So all that to say when I was a kid, I would just watch anything.[00:31:34] And so I was, and we had this rental store that would bring over anything. And so I was getting to watch animated movies from Japan and England and Russia and Canada, like Canada had a really great experimental animation program that was supported by the government. [00:31:52] Jarrett: Yeah.[00:31:52] Nilah: And so they were producing just like wild animated shorts and half the time, I didn't understand what I was watching, but because it was moving pictures, moving drawings, I was fascinated.[00:32:07] And a lot of the stuff that I look back on that I loved as a small child, it's very experimental and dark. And then I lived in this woodland that was also creepy, a lot of animals lived here and also a lot of people in the community were like fascinated cuz our home was situated secluded.[00:32:30] And so people would come drive through late at night just to, see the house or they'd, walk through, like it was a public park here. [00:32:41] Jarrett: Oh. [00:32:41] Nilah: So I had this experience as a child of just like constantly our space just constantly being invaded by strangers. And it was like scary, you're in bed at night....[00:32:57] And headlights reflected on your wall. Yeah. And you're a little kid and you're just like, oh my gosh. [00:33:04] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:33:05] Nilah: I have this, like I have this just this little, knot from my childhood, that's very, just creepy and wild and mysterious. And then I write children's books. [00:33:19] Jarrett: Yeah. It's not easy to be a creative kid who then you when you have worries, because then your creativity, which I've only realized now as an adult, like your imagination really creates scenarios in your head.[00:33:36] Nilah: Yeah![00:33:36] Jarrett: And I wanna point out to the listeners that it's remarkable. That you had access to VHS tapes of cartoons from other countries in that time period. Sometimes when I'm book touring and I talk to readers and they said; "did you love anime when you were a teenager?" And I didn't really have access to it.[00:33:55] I grew up in a suburban, urban area and my rental shop, which was another mom and pop rental shop. They didn't have that creative, curated collection. So how remarkable that, whoever it was that was down the street from you who had this, you know, who had an appetite for this flavor of creative cartoons, because otherwise you would've just been seeing like just Disney and nothing else.[00:34:21] That's, this kinda was the only game in town back then. [00:34:24] Nilah: Yeah. [00:34:24] Yeah. It is like looking back on it. I think that too, it's very odd. [00:34:29] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:34:30] Nilah: Like, how we had so many dubs at the time, but also that this little, this little spot in rural, Maryland was getting all of these videos and yeah, it was pretty, and this was before cable too.[00:34:47] Like we didn't have cable at the time, a lot of my access to animation was through this little rental shop. [00:34:56] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. And so did you love to draw before or after? Can you, or was it simultaneous love of animation and drawing for you? [00:35:06] Nilah: I think the animation came before and I always tell people that I was.[00:35:13] Bad at art at that age. And I'm talking about when I was in kindergarten, so five or six , who's good at art at that age? But it was this I was really bad at coloring in the lines. [00:35:25] Jarrett: Oh, that showed, that did show - sorry to cut you off - but all that did was show promise.[00:35:30] Nilah: Yeah.[00:35:31] Jarrett: All that did was show promise in your work. So it sounds like you had someone somewhere to say, no, you're supposed to color in the lines. And then you're like, oh, what?[00:35:38] Nilah: It was my peers, I remember sitting at a table in kindergarten and I'm coloring. And one of the little girls next to me was like, "Nilah, do you want me to do that for you?"[00:35:50] And that, that devastated me. [00:35:53] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:35:53] Nilah: And so from a very young age, I was like, wow, I have to get better at this cuz that's embarrassing. And so from five or six years old, I was just making this conscious effort to study and practice and be better at art. And my first subjects were animals cuz that's what I was interested in.[00:36:16] We had this magazine series called ZooBooks. And it was full of photos and illustrations of animals. And I would copy these, copy this art and learn animal anatomy from that. Later we got cable and I would watch discovery channel. And then I could see like animals in motion, and I love the Peanuts.[00:36:39] I love Charlie brown and Snoopy taught me how to draw animal toes. As a kid, I was, I would draw them wrong. And I knew they looked wrong, but I didn't know why. And so I would look at Snoopy's feet and how Charles Schultz drew Snoopy's feet. And I started drawing my feet more like that.[00:37:01] And... eventually, I came to understand why the way I was drawing feet before was wrong, anatomically and like that really, that really helped me take my drawings to the next level.[00:37:15] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:37:15] Nilah: And so it wasn't until much later that I really made the connection between animation and my own drawing, I just like watching cartoons and, I also love to draw.[00:37:27] And so as I got older, I, I did process drawing as a storytelling tool and would start drawing, drawing my own stories. And much, much later I got into anime, and... Also Disney started putting out those, like "Making-Of" specials [00:37:52] Jarrett: Yes! [00:37:53] Nilah: Where they talked about how they made animated films.[00:37:57] And that's when I started to learn; " Oh, people are drawing these movies." And that made, that kind of bridged things for me that you can, like that people make comics, people make animated cartoons, like people make children's books. And, I didn't understand where those illustrations came from or anything, but like seeing the process helped me connect the dots like; "Oh, I, as a person can also do this. I can, create stories with art."[00:38:30] Jarrett: And so growing, coming up then. You had art supplies you were drawing and what were your parents' reaction to that? Do they, they thought it was cute and then you'll outgrow it? Or what was that? What was that dynamic like for you? [00:38:51] Nilah: Oh, they thought it was real cute. My dad actually was known as an artist for a while.[00:38:56] He was in the military and I think... I'll have to ask my mom this. I think the story is that he actually considered going to college for art and he went into the military instead. And...[00:39:12] Jarrett: Those are two vastly opposite things![00:39:15] Nilah: Yeah. [00:39:16] Jarrett: Right?[00:39:16] Nilah: Yeah. And so he could draw as a kid, I found some of his some of his old sketches.[00:39:21] And he had a life drawing book, and he did a mural down in the basement that terrifies my nieces, now! It's this pirate face on this cinder block wall in the basement. And I guess when my nieces were growing up, this terrified them and they still don't like it. But so my dad drew and that's something I learned a little later.[00:39:45] It's not really people saw me drawing and they were like; "Oh, your father drew too." And so I learned about it that way. [00:39:52] Jarrett: Wow. [00:39:53] Nilah: My mom was a teacher, and so she would bring home reams of paper for me, and pencils, and drawing was a way to keep me quiet. So when we're at church or when we're out in public, she would just hand me and my brother like drawing supplies and we would go to town and, we would...[00:40:16] Be behaved. And so she, she liked that aspect of it. And then I got a little older and I would keep drawing and that fascinated small children. So it also kept other children quiet.[00:40:35] Everybody, everybody was like; "Yeah, Nilah! Keeping the peace, keeping everyone disciplined!" And that's all, it was for a long time until I was in high school. And I said; "Hey, I think I wanna go to art school." And then things took a turn [00:40:47] Jarrett: And they were like; "Wait a minute."[00:40:49] No, exactly. That's always the interesting thing, where it's supported. And then and it, what I've come to, to learn since years have passed since I was that age, that it comes from love. It comes from fear. Which is love for the kid of how is this kid gonna grow up to support themselves?[00:41:09] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:10] Jarrett: Especially if it's a world that the parent or caretaker doesn't fully understand or know. Where and maybe and could be read between the lines, but, I don't never knew your dad never didn't know his childhood, but he chose what you know, was more, would be a more practical path.[00:41:25] So while that, that, like history was echoing in you then getting to that age and you went to art school, did you went to college to study art? [00:41:33] Nilah: I did. Yeah. [00:41:34] Jarrett: What, and what was your study? What did you study when you were there? [00:41:36] Nilah: Computer animation. [00:41:39] Jarrett: Oh yeah. And so animation was your... animation was like, that was your goal then?[00:41:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:41:44] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:41:44] Nilah: Yeah. That was ever since I was 13. That was the end game for me. [00:41:50] Jarrett: And then, so you went to, you went to college and then you graduate from college and I'm sure your parents were like; "And now do you go to work at an office? Do you get a pension? Do you get a, do you get a 401k?" [00:42:02] Nilah: Yeah they didn't understand it for a long time.[00:42:04] And it didn't really materialize for a long time. And my mother was always very honest that she could offer me no advice. Cause vice cause when she was growing up, a black woman in the forties and fifties and sixties, she would say there were three options for us. Be a nurse, be a house cleaner or be a teacher.[00:42:27] And she picked teaching. Nowadays women and black women in particular have so many more options. And I would call home about my internal struggle about what I should be doing. And she'd be like; "Yeah, that sounds hard." [00:42:43] Jarrett: But she's, " I have nothing for you because I haven't walked that path,[00:42:46] other than, being a black woman who's dealt with society." And so... Right. Exactly. And so there, so yeah, there must have been so much fear. Obviously eventually... Oh yeah. You assuage those fears because you became very successful.[00:42:59] You became the first... [00:43:00] Nilah: So... [00:43:00] Jarrett: Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. [00:43:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. [00:43:02] The thing, so basically, my, my parents could never stop me. From doing what I was gonna do. And they both knew that. So they put the pressure on, but ultimately, the reason I ended up going to art school is... So we, we tried an animation, like an art trade school, art institutes, and that didn't work out.[00:43:27] And so I went with my mom's plan and did the whole four year college thing. I actually studied journalism and public relations. And when I finally went to Ringling College and studied animation, like I was an adult, I, at that point had a job. I had my own money. I had my own credit. And at this point my parents couldn't stop me.[00:43:52] So I went to art school under my own power and they just had to sit back and wait and see how things turned out. And yeah, there was a lot of fear and totally legitimate fear because we live in this culture that really doesn't support the arts as a career. [00:44:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:44:12] Nilah: Even now it's really hard to be an artist because, it's hard to get paid what we're worth. We're, we're still fighting this like societal image of artists as poor and free loaders and just an unnecessary expense. We're in a society where the arts in schools and arts foundations are constantly being defunded, and people don't really understand how much art and design impacts their everyday lives.[00:44:44] And and then, on top of that I think when you're a marginalized person, like your parents are always looking at where, what are the jobs? Where are the careers that people that look like us are thriving. And. That was not entertainment for black people. You don't see, you didn't see black people in those Disney specials. You... And nevermind that I was growing up on the east coast and we really didn't have an entertainment culture here, at least not in TV and film. Yeah. It's different in if you're growing up in California and you're surrounded by studios, who's working in those studios, but here, like there was no window to see where somebody with an animation degree could get a job.[00:45:29] Jarrett: And it's all, it is also, different when you're white, like growing up, I never had a search for characters that looked like me. I never had a search for seeing those specials. And so even though I was on the east coast, I was like; "Oh that's something I can do."[00:45:43] Nilah: Yeah. [00:45:44] Jarrett: But when growing up obviously that's ingrained if you don't see it. And because of your parents lived experience, there were, so there was, so the odds were so stacked against their daughter's favor and they want you to be happy and they want you to be healthy and they want you to succeed.[00:45:59] But you were UN you were unstoppable, you were just kept at it. And you had this love of art and story and you said, you, you said you studied journalism as well. So was like, what was your first paid gig as someone who put words on a paper? Was it journalism? Was it for a newspaper.[00:46:16] Nilah: It was journalism. It was, I think it was a food review. I think it was a restaurant review. Yeah. I worked toward the arts and entertainment department of a Western Maryland newspaper chain, which no longer exists sadly. But I got this job while I was in college. They were looking for interns and I got the internship.[00:46:38] And while I was interning the, the editor who hired me was like; "By the way, do you wanna do some writing?" And, looking back I'm like, what was the other part of this internship? Cuz all I remember is the writing. Like they, they definitely asked me to write in addition to interning, but I don't remember what the interning part was.[00:47:01] I do remember. The early writing gigs. And she was just like; "Hey, why don't you try doing a couple of food reviews?" And that was really cool. I got to go to restaurants and review, write a review. [00:47:12] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:47:13] Nilah: And then that summer there was there, was like a regime change at the paper and my editor rage quit.[00:47:22] And I was like; " I guess that's it for that job!" And so I was like that was fun. I worked for the newspaper for a few months. And then the editor who took our place called me and was like; "Hey, so I found your name on this list of freelance writers. Do you wanna keep writing for us?" And I was like; "Yeah, sure!"[00:47:45] and so he kept feeding me jobs and I didn't review restaurants again, but he would send me out to review gallery openings and to talk to local musicians and I speak to like local, owners of dance companies and theater companies and just this wide array of things. And I, my mom bought me a car cuz it was freaking her out.[00:48:10] I was basically walking around town at night to get to these jobs. And so she bought me a car. So I wouldn't do that. And so I was driving all around, Maryland, reviewing, like writing for this paper. And I did that for two years, through my junior and senior year of college. And then after I graduated and I did it up until the point that I got a full time job and just didn't have time anymore.[00:48:35] And yeah.[00:48:37] Jarrett: Moms are gonna mom forever. Never not gonna be your mom. Never not gonna be your mom looking out for you. And so you know that - granted you were pursuing degrees, but... it sounds like that was also like a whole other master's degree in, in learning about the arts. So you were studying... [00:48:54] Nilah: Yeah.[00:48:54] Jarrett: You were studying the stories of so many people who were you self-employed or making a go at, making a living via a non-traditional means. It's true. You must have met so many interesting people. I can't even, I'm sure that just yeah. Soaked into the fabric of who you became.[00:49:10] So what was your fulltime job? You said you had a full-time you said you had a full-time job. So you left that. What was your full-time case? [00:49:15] Nilah: I was a marketing writer for a health nonprofit. [00:49:20] Yeah. Sounds exciting. Was that super exciting? [00:49:24] Yes... [00:49:24] Jarrett: No? [00:49:25] Nilah: It was amazing. No, it was. So it was in like the DC Metro area and the commute was very long.[00:49:33] It was 70 minutes, one way. Ooh. On the DC beltway. And I'd have to leave home at, what, 4:30, 5 in the morning to get there before rush hour. And it was, it was a fine gig. This nonprofit runs a trade show. I think they do it every other year in Chicago. So while I was there, I got to go to Chicago and help coordinate this giant trade show which was actually that part was really cool.[00:50:03] It was, it was a fine job. It taught me, about the corporate space. It was pretty close to what I went to school to do. And they paid me well for a nonprofit. Like I had a competitive salary. It was, it was my first taste of money. [00:50:22] Jarrett: Yeah. Which is important to pay for things.[00:50:25] Nilah: Yeah.[00:50:25] Jarrett: like your basic needs and enjoyment for sure. [00:50:30] Nilah: And, at the time I was outlining this future and marketing and PR and that was gonna be it. But wow. I still, I still had this bug where I wanted to draw and write and working in marketing wasn't fully fulfilling it. And so I decided I wanted to give it another go.[00:50:52] I wanted to, I started just like poking at, looking at art programs, just, experimentally and ended up applying a lot faster than I thought I would and ended up going a lot faster than I thought I would. [00:51:11] Jarrett: And is that for a master's degree? Is that...[00:51:13] Nilah: No, a bachelor's. [00:51:15] Jarrett: For oh, for a bachelor's![00:51:16] Nilah: I have two bachelors and it feels so pointless.[00:51:21] Jarrett: Oh, here I am thinking like... Oh, I, my, like I'm always concerned. I'm not being a good listener... No, you went and got a second bachelors. [00:51:28] Nilah: I went and got a second. No one needs two bachelors.  [00:00:00] Jarrett: So hold up, you went and got a second bachelor's degree. Like...[00:00:05] Nilah: I went and got a second bachelor's.[00:00:07] Jarrett: And in what? So your first bachelor, your first bachelor's was in computer animation. [00:00:12] Nilah: My first bachelor's was in... Communications. [00:00:17] Oh...[00:00:18] Yeah.[00:00:19] Jarrett: I see. Then yeah. Two bachelors, but they're completely different.[00:00:22] Nilah: Completely different. [00:00:23] Jarrett: And what a different experience too, of being, an older student you're not fresh out of high school, you I'm sure you, your approach to the academics and what you were learning were so different, right? [00:00:35] Nilah: Yeah. Honestly, I was an older student both times.[00:00:39] I, I skipped a year when I when I graduated high school, me and my mom fought over the art school thing. And then I ended up not going to college that first year. And so I was older when I went to that first four year college, hood college. It was actually a women's college at the time.[00:00:56] So I was entering, I think at 19 instead of 18. And then when I went to Ringling, I was 25. So I was... Much, not the oldest adult student there, but I was older than all the 18 year olds coming in. Yeah. And it, it definitely, it's a different perspec- perspective for sure. This was not my first career attempt, it wasn't, at 18, like there's so much pressure to choose a career, choose it now and go to college for that career and stay in that career.[00:01:28] So you can pay back those student loans. And I didn't have that. I, animation was like I had my plan B already. I had my fallback career. Like I had my degree in marketing that I could always fall back on if the animation thing didn't work out. So animation was just like a fully like personal choice that I was making.[00:01:52] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:01:53] Nilah: Everything I did at that point, I, I did it as, a fully consenting adult. [00:01:58] Jarrett: And you, so then you had your second graduation and your family; "Didn't we do this seven years ago?" And... [00:02:05] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:05] Jarrett: So you're like launching into the world a whole second time. That's like a caterpillar becoming a butterfly twice.[00:02:12] Yeah. [00:02:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was very it was very interesting. [00:02:16] Jarrett: Yeah! [00:02:16] Nilah: But... [00:02:17] Jarrett: Yeah so you, but you wow, but amazing that you had the foresight to say; "Okay, let me reset. Let me really follow the passion." Like you...[00:02:27] Nilah: Yeah. [00:02:27] Jarrett: And you learned a lot in that corporate space too, because we're artists.[00:02:31] But we still have to deal with the corporations who publish the work or help promote the work. So what was your, so then what was your first paid gig after getting a degree in animation? [00:02:42] Nilah: My first paid gig was in publishing because I couldn't get an animation job. I entered Ringling at the start of the recession.[00:02:50] Leading up to 2006, 2007, all of the feedback coming out of Ringling was come to this school and you'll get a high paid job in animation and... [00:03:06] Jarrett: Speaking of marketing. [00:03:10] Nilah: Right. And then I entered Ringling that, that year, 2007, And like we're in school, we're just watching on the news, all the jobs dry up.[00:03:24] Jarrett: Oh. [00:03:24] Nilah: And so it was basically for all of us, it was like this three or four year, wait to see, will there be jobs when we get out. And for me there wasn't. So my first job out of Ringling, I graduated in 2010, was a publisher in Maryland. And I was falling back on my previous career for that, I had, because of my earlier experiences, I had the credentials for this job.[00:03:56] I stayed for seven months. It was, it was a position that ended up being, not as advertised. And... [00:04:06] Jarrett: Yeah, yeah. [00:04:07] Nilah: And during this year that I was home was, it was difficult. My aunt died that year. And so my family needed me at home, but also so it reignited that fear my mom had of me leaving.[00:04:24] And so I was really trying to stay in Maryland. And at the same time, like there was just this thought in my head that I hadn't given animation, like a full try. Like I was trying to find work while being at home. Cuz I, I had nowhere else to go knowing that all of the work was in California. And no one would hire me here in Maryland, because most places they wanted someone right away.[00:04:59] And like, why hire someone in Maryland and wait for them to move out when you can just hire one of these thousands of people hanging around LA looking for work. So I ended up just packing all my things into my car and moving to LA that summer 2000 that fall 2011. And so at this point I'd been out of school for over a year and still did not have a job in animation.[00:05:31] And I was writing completely on my savings and the savings. Once I got to LA the savings dried up very quickly, I was completely broke and I was applying everywhere. And getting, getting nowhere. I got so desperate that I was applying for retail and that wasn't working out either. I couldn't, it was so dry.[00:05:55] I couldn't even get a retail job. I applied for a, an unpaid internship and I didn't get that either. I couldn't even get a job where I worked for free. And I was ready to throw in the towel, but I didn't have enough money to afford to move back home.[00:06:20] Jarrett: You couldn't afford to even buy the towel to throw it at that point.[00:06:23] Nilah: Yeah. [00:06:24] Yeah. Like my mom start, my mom was paying my rent. [00:06:27] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:06:28] Nilah: And she could have barely afford that. Like my parents were both retired and in January, 2012, I... I happened to see a listing on Ringling's job website for a little company in Burbank. And I got an interview there. They were, they did mostly live action work, but they were hiring their first in-house artist.[00:06:58] And the company was run by Florida state alums. I think it's Florida state. I can't remember now wow it's been a while, but oh, that's embarrassing if they watch this. But they had this Florida connection. So they, when they were hiring for this position, they decided to put a listing on the Ringling job site because Ringling is also in Florida, and I got the job.[00:07:26] Jarrett: Yes![00:07:26] Nilah: And that was my first LA job. It was the company is called Soapbox Films. and at the time they were doing a lot of like marketing and live action production, mainly for Disney. So if you ever heard of like Movie Surfers in like the early two thousands, I think they, the Disney channel had this program called Movie Surfers and Soapbox, like back in that day, Soapbox was the one developing that.[00:08:01] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:02] Nilah: They do a lot of production with the Muppets. They're one of a handful of studios in LA that are equipped to work with the Muppets. [00:08:10] Jarrett: Whoa. That's not an easy thing to get.[00:08:13] Nilah: Yeah, and they do what is called toolkit for animated films. Toolkit is like just it's a package of assets that the studios will use to advertise their animated films and to develop toolkit.[00:08:32] You need a storyboard artist and that's what they hired me for. [00:08:39] Jarrett: That's fantastic. So now you're getting paid to draw pictures that tell stories. [00:08:44] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:44] Finally getting paid, just draw pictures. [00:08:47] Jarrett: You're on your way moving right along Fozzie and Kermit saying as they're driving across country. [00:08:52] Nilah: Yeah. [00:08:53] Jarrett: Oh man. And so that must have, that must have led to other things, right? [00:08:57] Nilah: It allowed me to stay in LA. [00:08:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:08:59] Nilah: They were, this was this was the conflict My time at Soapbox was great. I stayed there for three years, but it wasn't, it allowed me to tread water in Los Angeles, but it wasn't a stepping stone really to the next thing, because everything that I did there was so specific to what Soapbox did.[00:09:24] It didn't translate well to other jobs at other studios. So I couldn't use anything I was doing there in my portfolio. So if I wanted to, if I wanted to work in TV and film, which was still the goal, I had to develop my portfolio pieces outside of work. At this time I was, I had my day job at [00:09:50] Soapbox, but I was also still figuring out what is my career though.[00:09:55] Yeah. And there were times like I'd go through this cycle at Soapbox where I would try really hard to get out. So I'd be submitting my storyboarding portfolio to other studios and nothing would materialize. And I'd give up after six months and I'd say, you know what, let me just hunker down and focus on my time here at Soapbox.[00:10:17] And maybe this can become a long term career. And so I would really like put all of my energy into being like the best Soapbox employee I could be. And then after six months, I'd be like; "I can't take this. I can't do this anymore. I have to get out." And so I'd re-up and put all of my energy into storyboard portfolio stuff and try again.[00:10:43] And I did this for three years and meanwhile I fell into comics in children's books a little bit. Cause at this point, I was so desperate for money I was so desperate. Like I was just like clinging on by my fingernails. And I just needed something to work. And so I was, utilizing the skills I had, which were basically writing and drawing.[00:11:11] And I started a web comic and I started, I joined society of children's book, writers and illustrators, so I could learn how to make children's books. And I was doing picture book dumies and trying to write novels and looking for an agent and drawing this web comic in my spare time outside of Soapbox.[00:11:34] And, also, putting storyboard portfolios together. And so I did this for three years and then finally in 2015, everything changed. I submitted my web comic to the Dwayne McDuffy award for diversity and won that. I... [00:11:55] Jarrett: And hold on. You were the inaugural winner too! [00:11:58] Nilah: I was the inaugural winner.[00:12:00] Jarrett: You were the first person ever to win that award. [00:12:02] Nilah: It was bonkers. Yeah. I, and I was so used to losing at that point that and the competition was so stiff. I was like, I got nominated. And I was like that was a fun experience, but I'm never gonna win a little web comic with a very small following is not gonna win against all these like actual comics.[00:12:28] I was up against Ms. Marvel, and I believe Shaft by David Walker, and Hex 11. And I was just like, that's the end of the road. And, but it won MFK one. [00:12:41] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:12:41] Nilah: And it, it was the start of a very different... It was the start of things for me. [00:12:47] Jarrett: Yeah. Yeah. And and I do think film, and graphic novels, they do have a lot in common.[00:12:53] I look to film to inspire how I, I write my graphic novels and yeah. I have to say so a couple months ago, I was just, just binge watching some shows on Disney plus and they have this show that's about the history of Marvel. And then there was one episode about the women of Marvel and the women who've written for Marvel and how certainly they were there in the beginning, but they weren't necessarily writing the stories.[00:13:18] They were, they, it was everything back then in the world of comics, like most of the world too, and most of the country was, chauvinistic. And so I'm just watching and I'm so fascinated hearing these stories of these pioneers. And then you pop up on the show. I was like, wait a minute.[00:13:36] I don't need to see the, I didn't need to see the little name at the bottom. Like I know that's Nilah. And you became the first black woman to write for Marvel comics. [00:13:47] Nilah: Isn't that bonkers, like... [00:13:50] Jarrett: It is bonkers! Tell me about that. Tell me about your mom's reaction because there is something you said in something you'd said in the show was something about your back in the day.[00:14:05] Was it like your mom's was your mom's friends giving her flack or something? [00:14:09] Nilah: Oh yeah. [00:14:10] Yeah. I don't even know if I've told my mom that I'm the first black writer for Marvel, because some things I say about my career just mean nothing to her. [00:14:18] So... But... [00:14:21] Jarrett: Like I said: moms are gonna, mom.[00:14:23] Nilah: Moms are gonna mom.[00:14:24] Jarrett: No matter what.[00:14:26] Nilah: But, I didn't realize the extent of this coming up, but when I decided to go down this path like my mom's older black lady, friends in, Maryland middle class, Maryland were really judgey about it. And like one of them once asked me because I, the art school thing had not yet materialized.[00:14:46] And she was like; "Oh, so are you finally over that art hobby yet?"[00:14:51] Jarrett: Oof. [00:14:53] Nilah: And I, I didn't realize this either, but there's this other family friend that we don't speak to anymore. And I thought that we just drifted apart, but turns out like going to art school was like a point of contention for her.[00:15:08] Jarrett: Wow. [00:15:08] Nilah: And. And it's such a weird thing to think about that she would distance herself from our entire family over, over a personal choice that I made. [00:15:17] Jarrett: It's not witchcraft! It's not witch... I mean like sacrificing rabbits on the full moon or something. I don't...[00:15:24] Nilah: Right.. It's, yeah, but... [00:15:27] Jarrett: Wow. Wow. [00:15:29] Nilah: So like my mother, wasn't telling me about this.[00:15:33] She wasn't telling me that like her friends were coming down hard on her and she had to defend me [00:15:41] Jarrett: Wow![00:15:41] Nilah: And defend my choices. But when I started working for Dreamworks and Disney, she finally got her vindication, cuz she would say; "Hey, my kid works at Disney now." And they understood that. [00:15:55] Jarrett: Yes they, they certainly did.[00:15:57] Nilah: Yeah. [00:15:57] Jarrett: And run us through some of your credits of, cause I know you from the book world and I know that you've done stuff for Dreamworks and Disney, but what kind of jobs have you done over these years? [00:16:07] Nilah: So I was a storyboard revisionist on Dino Trucks at Dreamworks, and Dino Trucks is a Netflix show.[00:16:17] You can watch it on Netflix. It's just what it sounds like. It's dinosaur trucks. And it's based on a children's book.[00:16:23] Jarrett: And it's based on a children's book. You can't escape now. We're bringing you over just the same. You're in this publishing game too! [00:16:32] Nilah: At Disney, I hopped onto Tangled, the series. [00:16:36] Jarrett: Oh.[00:16:37] Nilah: Which is based on the movie. [00:16:38] Jarrett: Yeah. We love that show in my house. What did you do then? [00:16:41] Nilah: Yeah. [00:16:41] Jarrett: What did you do on the show? [00:16:43] Nilah: I was also a storyboard revisionist there. And so storyboard revisionists... They're basically the support team for storyboard artists. So they, the storyboard artists do their thing and storyboard revisionists help make sure that the storyboards are ready for the next process in the pipeline.[00:17:04] Jarrett: Okay. [00:17:05] Nilah: So we it's a lot of drawing. It's a lot of support drawing just to, to tighten things up for the animators. God what happened next? I was a writer for Cannon Busters produced by LaSean Thomas. [00:17:21] Jarrett: Wow.[00:17:22] Nilah: I was a writer for Polly Pocket.[00:17:27] Jarrett: Nice. [00:17:27] Nilah: Which is based on... [00:17:29] Iconic!. [00:17:30] Yeah. Yeah. Poly pocket is still around [00:17:33] Jarrett: Iconic. That's wild. Yeah. And you illustrated the Rick Riordan and Heroes of Olympus books too. [00:17:42] Nilah: Yeah![00:17:43] Jarrett: Goodness like that is huge. For you, you don't get bigger in publishing than Rick Riordan. [00:17:50] Nilah: It's true. Yeah.[00:17:52] Jarrett: And, And animals and fantasy. And you illustrated the covers for our friend Daniel Jose Older, the Dactyl Hill Squad books.[00:18:01] Nilah: That was my first time drawing dinosaurs in my life. [00:18:05] Jarrett: Really? I, would've never known that. I had never known that. [00:18:08] Nilah: Aside from Dino Trucks, but that was a very different thing. [00:18:11] Jarrett: Yeah. Those are more trucks than dinosaurs, right? Yeah. [00:18:13] Nilah: Yeah. It was wild. Like I had to learn dinosaur anatomy. [00:18:18] Jarrett: And so where in, where did all of that did Marvel come calling? [00:18:21] Nilah: So back in 2016, I think it all happened very fast. This was after the Dwayne McDuffy award and I never got a clear answer on how they found me. It might have been Twitter, but an editor from Marvel reached out one day and said; "Hey, would you like to write a short story for us on this new series called the Year of Marvels?" And they pitched a Rocket Raccoon -Tippy-Toe Squirrel team up and of course animals.[00:18:59] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:00] Nilah: So...[00:19:00] Jarrett: It's your wheelhouse! [00:19:01] Nilah: Yeah. Yeah. So I took it of course. And that kind of got things rolling. Once you're, once you write for a Marvel you're in the Marvel family. So...[00:19:09] Jarrett: Yeah. [00:19:10] Nilah: I didn't, I did that and didn't, work with them for a long while after that. And so it just so happened. I didn't know this at the time I was completely unprepared. But that ended up being their first writing credit by a black woman. And so 70 years into Marvel's history and it was just this little short di

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown
76: LUCY'S SCHOOL & THE SNOOPY SHOW S2, EP4

It's a Podcast, Charlie Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 110:10


It might still be summer, but SCHOOL IS BACK IN SESSION in episode 76!  Yay....? This month we've got the BRAND NEW Apple TV+ special just released on August 12 - LUCY'S SCHOOL. The kids crave an Endless Summer. Can Lucy deliver? Then because numbers are hard, we skip over episode 3 of THE SNOOPY SHOW and watch episode 4 instead. Guess I should have gone to Lucy's School.  Plus, we've got a "Peanuts by Schulz" episode and another Random Strip of the Month.  Do we have any other capitalized segment titles? You'll just have to listen and find out.  Thanks to Kevin McLeod at Incompetech.com for creative commons use of his songs "Mining by Moonlight" and "Bass Walker".  Thanks to Henry Pope for the use of his "Linus & Lucy" remix. Thanks to Nick Jones for the use of his song "25% Off". Thanks to Sean Courtney for the use of his "This Month in Peanuts History" theme. Support the podcast at patreon.com here. Find more about IT'S A PODCAST, CHARLIE BROWN, my other show ATARI BYTES, and books I've written that you can possess for your very own at my website here. 

The Attractions Podcast
Holidays at Universal Orlando will be a destination-wide celebration, and more news! - The Attractions Podcast - Recorded 8/14/2022

The Attractions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 49:54


Join hosts Seth and Carly as they bring you news and discussion about all things theme parks, as well as their thoughts on the latest movies, television, and video games on The Attractions Podcast. This week on The Attractions Podcast, Seth and Carly discuss: Holidays at Universal Orlando will be a destination-wide celebration Universal Orlando says thank you on Passholder Appreciation Days Sip and savor at SeaWorld San Antonio's Bier Fest Howl-O-Scream Williamsburg returns with new houses and host Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park unveiled the highest looping roller coaster in the country Adventureland Resort will open two Viking themed rides in 2023 Carowinds announces ‘50 years of Carolina fun' in honor of its 50th anniversary Worlds of Fun celebrates 50 years with season-long fun and a reimagined roller coaster Canada's Wonderland adding two new rides, including a Snoopy coaster and first-in-the-world attraction Cedar Point ramps up the nostalgia with a new themed area and a new ride 2023 will bring new Fiesta Village and reimagined coaster to Knott's We welcome your suggestions and want you to be a part of the discussion. Please send your comments to info@attractionsmagazine.com with the subject line “The Attractions Podcast.” Statements or opinions herein are those of the hosts and advertisers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the producers, Dream Together Media LLC, or staff.

Your Favorite Blockhead's show
Episode #248: Snoopy Surfs the Beach as the UFC Comes to San Diego

Your Favorite Blockhead's show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 24:52


All links, sponsors, networks, and notes for this episode can be accessed via the blog page below:https://yourfavoriteblockhead.com/2022/08/13/episode-248-snoopy-surfs-the-beach-as-the-ufc-comes-to-san-diego/

A Special Presentation, or Alf Will Not Be Seen Tonight
A Special Presentation 149: Snoopy's Reunion

A Special Presentation, or Alf Will Not Be Seen Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 84:50


It's Snoopy's Reunion! All the Snoopies are reuniting... that means Snoopy, Spike, Marbles, a bunch of other who-cares Snoopies, and Belle. Learn the dark secret of Snoopy's parentage and stay tuned for sexy sexy V O R E.

Boys' Bible Study
Voodoo Academy (2000) feat. Trans Regret Snoopy

Boys' Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 74:48


Six strapping young male virgins enroll in a mysterious, exclusive Bible college led by the intimidating Rev. Carmichael. His sect, the “Neurocystic Christianity Church”, preaches that advanced technology will bring the human race closer to God consciousness. His pièce de résistance is an electromagnetic confessional that doesn't just forgive sins — it harvests soul energy for an insidious purpose. It's a very ambitious exposition considering most of the film is just long shots of the boys writhing around in matching white designer underwear. This cinematic vision could only come from the mind of one man — director David DeCoteau, who has 177 directing credits to his name in genres such as gay softcore porn, straight softcore porn, kids' movies, and Lifetime movies. The range! Here to help us try to make sense of the theological backbone of Neurocystic Christianity is none other than Trans Regret Snoopy, a regularly appearing guest of ours who really knows her scripture and usually does not go out of her way to watch smut. Listen to Trans Regret Snoopy Presents the Bible podcast: https://soundcloud.com/trspresentsthebible View our full episode list and subscribe to any of our public feeds: http://boysbiblestudy.com Unlock 2+ bonus episodes per month: http://patreon.com/boysbiblestudy Subscribe to our Twitch for monthly streams: http://twitch.tv/boysbiblestudy Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/boysbiblestudy Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/boysbiblestudy

Your Favorite Blockhead's show
Episode #247: Snoopy's Original Owner and Dustin Poirier's Original Reasoning

Your Favorite Blockhead's show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 27:09


All links, sponsors, networks, and notes for this episode can be accessed via the blog page below:https://yourfavoriteblockhead.com/2022/08/07/episode-247-snoopys-original-owner-and-dustin-poiriers-original-reasoning/

Kottke Ride Home
Wed. 08/03 - Cheese Baths

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 17:03


Cheese baths––a nineteenth century fad coming back in style. Plus, Shaun the Sheep is officially going to the moon later this month, alongside 10,000 other trinkets. And a volcano has erupted near the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik, but all seems to be under control.Sponsors:Kolide, Got Slack? Got Macs? Get Kolide: Device security that fixes challenging problems by messaging your users on Slack. Try Kolide Today! https://l.kolide.co/3aVdR90 Links:Bathtub Full Of Cheese Is Meant To Soften Skin (Insider, YouTube)The Return of Swiss Cheese Baths (Atlas Obscura)European Space Agency recruits Shaun (the sheep) for Artemis 1 moon mission (Space.com)Apollo 11 relics among 10,000 mementos flying on Artemis I to the moon (collectSPACE)NASA's 'Moonikin' mannequin boards Orion spacecraft for Artemis 1 moon mission (Space.com)Snoopy to Fly on NASA's Artemis I Moon Mission (NASA)Webcam from the eruption (RÚV)Huge demand for helicopter volcano tours (RÚV) Deja vu as volcano erupts again near Iceland capital (Phys.org)Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sports Daily
The Chiefs trying to beat the training camp heat

Sports Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 41:48


Hour 2 - The Chiefs in camp, and we are very lucky to be joined by Chiefs Radio Network Executive Producer Dan Israel.  A scary moment for Mahomes and the Snoopy camp.  Plenty of Chiefs to discuss on a Tuesday, and Dan will be with us every Tuesday through the end of the season.

The Comics Canon
Episode 166 – The Sandman: World's End

The Comics Canon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 82:26


(Explicit content warning: A swear word slips through.) A couple of Americans on a road trip find themselves caught in a summer snowstorm and are forced to seek shelter in a bigger-on-the-inside inn peopled with faerie folk, a centaur and other strange customers in The Sandman Vol. 8: World's End by Neil Gaiman and a host of artists, published by Vertigo/DC Comics! Our assemblage of travelers from diverse worlds and time periods waits out a "reality storm" by swapping stories about dreaming cities, sea monsters, a boy president and other wonders -- until they witness a heavenly funeral procession of ominous import! Can these Canterbury-inspired tales score a reservation at that Restaurant at the End of the Universe known as ... The Comics Canon? In This Episode: Verisimilitude in Snoopy vs. the Red Baron Douglas Adams and Clive Barker (Super) Power to the People A Canterbury Tale Drowning on Dry Land Highlander FFast Times in Comic Book Editing on Kickstarter The Nazz on Indiegogo Join us in two weeks as we switch gears for a date with She-Hulk: Single Green Female! Until then: Impress your friends with our Comics Canon merchandise! Rate us on Apple Podcasts! Send us an email! Hit us up on Twitter or Facebook! And as always, thanks for listening!

KQED’s Forum
Family Heirlooms — Unexpected and Traditional — And What They Mean to Us

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 55:31


For New Yorker staff writer Hua Hsu, they're cardboard cutouts that decorated his parents' wedding, “each the size of a 45-r.p.m. single: an orange Snoopy and two Woodstocks, one white and one light blue.” For artist Ari Bird, it's a tree pompom that her grandfather painted gold and gave to her as a child. Whether it's a portrait, a wedding dress, an album or a Snoopy cutout, the objects we inherit speak to who our families are, who we were, and what we value. We want to hear from you: what's a family heirloom passed down to you — or that you hope to pass down to future generations? What makes it valuable? Guests: Hua Hsu, staff writer, New Yorker magazine; professor of Literature, Bard College; author, forthcoming memoir "Stay True" Ari Bird, visual artist based in Oakland and San Diego

Those Who Aunt
Hostile and Intentional with Will HInes

Those Who Aunt

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 66:46


Pat and Mags leave no chops unbusted this week with Uncle Richie as we tackle a bird named Snoopy, Butthole Beach, getting fully cocked, hollowed out Celicas, the Richieolympics, 22 & 1/2 1 liters, making your doctor look bad, and the mouth Hulk. TW: ass threats Aunt Pat - Colleen Doyle Auntie Mags - Dana Quercioli Uncle Richie - Will Hines Artwork - Jordan Stafford Mauntras - Carol Doyle Editor - Colleen Doyle Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-babymakers/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-babymakers/support

Your Favorite Blockhead's show
Episode #244: Snoopy's Typewriting, Pigpen's Dishonesty, and UFC Championship Accessibility

Your Favorite Blockhead's show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 24:20


All links, sponsors, networks, and notes for this episode can be accessed via the blog page below:https://yourfavoriteblockhead.com/2022/07/17/episode-244-snoopys-typewriting-pigpens-dishonesty-and-ufc-championship-accessibility/

It's Happening with Snooki & Joey
Snoopy's Sassy Lounge

It's Happening with Snooki & Joey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 60:47


This week on It's Happening: Joey's partying too much, Snooki bails on The Flight Attendant, Emmy nominations, NASA news, Love is Blind drama, and much more! This episode is sponsored by: KiwiCo - Promo code: SNOOKI Hungryroot Stamps.com - Promo code: SNOOKI Thrive Causemetics

The Wake Up Call
Katie Gets Snoopy on Facebook

The Wake Up Call

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 5:41


Critical Nonsense
179! Childhood Media

Critical Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 37:56


How has our childhood media affected our adulthoods? This week, special guest Dylan Fowler joins Aaron and Jess to talk about Sesame Street, Ren & Stimpy, Disney, Don Bluth, The Lion King, and The Muppets. They don't talk about vulgar Snoopy. references HuffPost: 11 Moments On 'Sesame Street' That Championed Diversity And Inclusion On the famous Mister Rogers pool scene How Divine inspired Ursula The Sea Witch John Kricfalusi: An Open Secret Ren, Stimpy, & John K: The Art vs. the Artist The Disney/Don Bluth Animation War All Dogs Go to Heaven The Land Before Time Vanity Fair: Inside the Tragedy and Triumph of Disney Genius Howard Ashman "dress in drag and do the hula" Why Animators HATE The Lion King (2019) Eureeka's Castle 

It's Happening with Snooki & Joey

This week, Snoopy and Joey talk about their thoughts on Jersey Shore 2.0, Abby Lee Miller's offer to teach Snooki's daughter dance, and Joey's busy schedule of big events and Pride parties. This episode is sponsored by: BetterHelp Hungryroot