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Sign language used predominately in the United States

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Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 80 – Unstoppable Bridge Builder with Peter DeHaas

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 57:59


Peter C. DeHaass will tell you he has been a builder of bridges for people in many disenfranchised communities for most of his life. I learned about Peter from AccessiBe's nonprofit partnerships manager, Sheldon Lewis. Peter does not come directly from a family with any person with a disability. However, his family has produced many educators including Peter.   On this episode, you will learn about Peter's journey West from Pennsylvania and how he eventually landed in San Francisco where he had to utilize his entrepreneurial spirit just to survive and put food on the table. Most recently, in 2020, Peter formed the San Francisco Disability Business Alliance. This organization is focused on empowering individuals with disabilities to secure economic independence through self-employment and small business ownership.   I think you will find Peter's story inspiring and his mission important to many   About the Guest:   Peter C. DeHaas is a mission-driven professional with a lifelong track record of building pathways to academic, housing, and economic sustainability for diversely abled individuals from He is leading the charge to expand how we think about “diversity” to include individuals with diverse abilities (disabilities) and the businesses and organizations they engage with. Peter's career has spanned economic development, housing advocacy, education inclusion, and direct human services for a wide range of diverse clients, including veterans, the formerly incarcerated, youth, adults, immigrants and their families. Peter has experience building pathways to economic and academic inclusion for the deaf and hard of hearing, intellectually and developmentally disabled adults, individuals struggling with learning differences or mental illness, and physical disabilities. Currently, Peter founded and leads the San Francisco Disability Business Alliance (SFDBA), the first organization of its kind in the country focused on empowering individuals with disabilities to secure economic independence through self-employment and small business ownership. Through his work at the SFDBA, Peter has built partnerships between the growing community of disability-owned small businesses in San Francisco and major local corporations including Kaiser Permanente and Bank of the West. Peter is also fluent in American Sign Language (ASL) and, over the past 9 years has taught ASL to more than 1000 future educators, social workers, nurses, and community advocates as a lecturer at San Francisco State University. In his previous role as Director of Disability Resources and Academic Inclusion, Peter built pathways to academic success for more than 2000 diverse students at Golden Gate University – the majority of whom were women, people of color, veterans, and often all three-across the University's Law and Business programs. In Colorado, Peter spearheaded community engagement across a number of successful direct-serving programs including launching the Bridges to Boulder Community Sign Language program and cultivating the non-attorney advocacy program between Denver University and the Colorado Cross Disability Coalition. Above all, Peter is a builder of bridges and is skilled at finding ways and mustering resources to connect deeply with diverse people and communities, resulting in lasting partnerships and positive economic, social, and community impact.   Link for the San Francisco Disability Business Alliance :   http://www.sfdba.org/     About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. today. Our guest is Peter DeHaas who to right now is operating the San Francisco Disability Business Alliance. But there's a whole lot more to Peter than that, and we're gonna get into it as we as we go forward. So Peter, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Peter DeHaas  01:40 Thanks for having me, Michael.   Michael Hingson  01:42 Well, I really appreciate you being here. And I'm jealous because as you can tell San Francisco diversity Business Alliance, you know where Peter is. We lived in the San Francisco Bay Area in Novato, which is in what's called the North Bay for 12 years, and missing greatly. We lived in an area called Bell marine keys. And we actually had ducks that came up to our back door every day, begging for food. So yeah, it was a lot of fun. When we were when we first were moving in, we had a contractor had to modify the house for my wife who uses a wheelchair. And he made the mistake of seeing some of the ducks on the patio and opening the door. He was eating a doughnut and he gave them a part of the doughnut. And he said after that if he didn't have something for them, they'd go for the throat. So there's a lot of fun. So yeah, we were we were spoiled. Well, tell me a little bit about your background, you know yourself, where your what you what you did, how you got into school and beyond and all that sort of stuff, if you would?   Peter DeHaas  02:46 Well. I started out I was born and raised in Pennsylvania on the East Coast and lived for several years in Connecticut as well until I started making my way west. I come from a family of educators and builders. So I come by my my connection to being in education and advocacy and building bridges. Honestly, two of my sisters are special educators. And that's how I got my start learning the manual alphabet in American Sign Language. And I remained curious from from third grade is when I learned the manual alphabet all the way through middle school, I had a dear friend who was deaf. And then fast forward to 1992 I moved to Boulder, Colorado, in started working for a little organization at the time called Developmental Disability Center. Now it's called Imagine and I was working for their Supported Employment Department called labor source, serving individuals who had previously been institutionalized in the state of Colorado and deemed unemployable by by the Department of occupational rehab there. And we were kind of a renegade organization that built employment services for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities proudly in the Boulder County in Broomfield county areas. And that's really where I got my start working in the field and and simultaneously started really learning American Sign Language because I recognized that many of the clients that we serve were nonverbal, several were deaf, some were hard of hearing, and many of them utilized Sign Language As a means to communicate. And I noticed that many of my co workers tried to utilize signs like more and please and thank you. But then there were just lapses and gaps in communication. And, you know, being that I was earning a whopping $5.50 an hour at the time, I saw a great opportunity to learn ASL and the organization that I was working for, paid for all of my ASL instruction up until the point that I launched into my master's in linguistics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Because I really was intrigued by the intersectionality of, of the deaf community and the the language of ASL and how the two were really inseparable with the goal of teaching at the post secondary level. And so I graduated with my master's degree, I believe it was in 2009. And then, in 2013, I made my westward journey a little further here to San Francisco to support my youngest son Thelonious who moved out here in 2010. And my oldest son, Hans, came along with me and I landed here in San Francisco working for San Francisco Recreation and Parks, inclusion program, supporting young adults with disabilities, in particular, their ASL intensive program here and the mission, as well as some of their their summer camps. And then soon after that, I was offered a position at San Francisco State University as a lecturer in American Sign Language, which I've taught over 1000 students there at San Francisco State from such a diverse background of of not only focus of study, but but most of my students are first generation college participants, and it's really intriguing work. And you may find it hard to believe, but I then got a third position. It takes a lot to live in San Francisco, I got a third position working at Golden Gate University, as their coordinator for Disability Resources and academic accommodations. And over a period of seven years, I grew that program into kind of a unified program. There were two siloed Disability Resource Centers when I got there, one for the law school, and one for the non law programs. And in my seven years there, I brought the programs together and developed my position into a director's position. And I guess it was the summer of 2019. I started planting the seeds for the SF DBA. And we launched in March of 2020. And I stepped down from my role at Golden Gate University shortly after that, and I still teach at San Francisco State and oversee the SF DBA. And that's, that's where I'm at today.   Michael Hingson  08:42 Oh, by the way to answer a question you asked in an email, we do make transcripts of the podcast and when the podcast goes up, they will go up as well. Excellent. I'm assuming you're not signing while you're talking since we can put up videos but I don't know how   Peter DeHaas  09:02 to do I do sign a little bit when I talk but it's not my preference to try to it   Michael Hingson  09:07 is it is probably a major challenge because that's speaking in two languages at once.   Peter DeHaas  09:13 It's it's doable, but in all fairness, I mean, in a perfect world, I'd have a little ASL interpreter at the bottom of my screen. Do you remember? I remember as a kid, we, on Sundays there would be certain evangelists on television and they would always have an ASL interpreter signing in the bottom left hand corner. And that was in the 1970s and I'm thinking, why can't we why can't we do that again? You know, it was doable then why can't you know and I'm sure that they paid for it. You know, it was privately paid for wasn't provided by the network or anything so we know where that goes. But   Michael Hingson  09:59 well, I turned it on. Have, mainly because we're still going to have the conversation and it will, we'll, we'll fix it. But I use a service called otter otter.ai. And what what otter does is real time recording and transcription of conversations, and when it's operating a person who is in a meeting or whatever, with me, can read real live transcriptions of what's happening. But what we do is just provide the transcription, because we'll go through and clean it up. Got it, or we put the podcast up. So it goes out as a really high end transcription. That's excellent. And it should be that way. Right? And makes perfect sense to do that. Well, for you, you, you started the SF DBA? And are dealing with a lot of obviously, different kinds of people. So kind of what what made you decide that this was something worth beginning? And how did you really get to the point of starting it?   Peter DeHaas  11:07 A great question? Well, as you know, San Francisco is a place that really prides itself on being innovative, diverse, there's lots of venture capital here. And people are well educated. And there's lots of opportunities for networking, after hours. And I found myself getting more and more involved with the Chamber of Commerce here and other nonprofits. And going to a lot of after hours events. And I would tell people what I do, you know, at the time, I was at Golden Gate and teaching ASL and people were intrigued by the work that I do, but but systematically, it seemed like, disability was excluded from just about every conversation that I was having with people relating to diversity, equity and inclusion. And that bothered me. However, I took that that I was just kind of baffled, to be honest with you. And I took that kind of baffled feeling and transformed it into something that I'm passionate about. I said, you know, this is a place of opportunity, and it welcomes innovation and creativity. I'm a very creative person. I'm also a musician, an artist. I said, if nobody else is going to represent small business as it relates to individuals with disabilities, well, I'm going to take a try. And I had a lot of support from not only local business leaders, but educators and advocates and even local politicians. So that was really the genesis of the SF DBA, in when I started planting seeds in 2019. And by the end of 2019, I had a fiscal sponsor, through social good Fund, which is a little umbrella organization out of Richmond, California, they do really great work for organizations doing community benefit work, really through the pilot phases. And we had Kaiser Permanente foundation come on board at the end of 2019. And, yeah, then we launched in March of 2020. Right before everything shut down.   Michael Hingson  13:48 Yes. Isn't that the way of it?   Peter DeHaas  13:51 It was very, very fortuitous that, you know, because people were just starting to whisper about maybe you should postpone the event, maybe you should, you know, and if we had waited, we would have lost that whole audience of over 100 people they were just starting to put hand sanitizer up in the in the room and nobody got sick at the Marriott you know, from from our launch event, fortunately. But we had over 100 people at the Marriott Marquis downtown. So I was just blessed that that that many people showed up. My event organizer who I hired, you know, was doing all of that worked behind the scenes. I had no idea who was going to going to show up. I was too focused on the programming for the day and whatnot. And when I looked out into the audience, Michael, I was just astounded at not only not only entrepreneurs with disabilities and small business owners with disabilities, but like I said, educators, advocates, business leaders, corporations. It just it really really moved me that that this was an important venture that I was I was embarking upon,   Michael Hingson  15:06 and rightly so. But you've said something that really prompts a question. You mentioned that you notice that is diverse as San Francisco is and so on, there wasn't a lot of discussion, especially in the business world and in the entrepreneurial world, about disabilities and so on. Even though San Francisco clearly is an incredibly inclusive city in a lot of ways, why do you think that is that disabilities weren't really part of the mainstream?   Peter DeHaas  15:39 You know, it's an interesting question. I don't know that I want to go too far down that rabbit hole, but But I posit that there's still a lot of fear and a lot of around disability. And, and I've come in contact with that before. You know, when I, when I first started working with individuals with developmental disabilities, and I was very young, I used to take offense to people staring at at the people that I worked with many times we'd be after we would work on one of our supported employment contracts, we would maybe go have lunch on the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder, and people would stare and I took offense to that when I was young. But as I matured, I realized that not everybody had the upbringing that I did. Not only, you know, surviving some, some disabilities that I had early on, when I when I was born, that I that I outgrew fortunately. But but but having the exposure at such an early age, to innovate individuals that my sisters were working with who had disabilities. And so I had that, that luxury of being kind of matriculated into that community early on. So for me, it was no different than any other community that I've been a part of in my lifetime. And I think that there's just a lot of maybe education that still needs to occur. And, you know, sometimes, as you know, Michael, it's about money. And people don't want to, or they don't know how to develop a budget or line item in their budget, to provide the appropriate accommodations. So there's that fear of the unknown? I think I could.   Michael Hingson  17:36 I agree with you, though, I think it is largely about fear. I think we we fear what we don't know. And we fear things that are different than us. And unfortunately, especially with visible disabilities, people tend to really fear it, because they don't understand it, and they haven't been taught, which is exactly what you're pointing out. And the other part about it is that until someone really starts to drive the conversation, the fear isn't going to go away. I think people don't hate persons with disabilities. I think that we, I suppose you can look at it in several ways. And in one sense, we haven't been as visible and maybe we're not elevated to the point where people hate peers, persons with disabilities, like they seem to do race things and so on. But I think mainly, it's fear that people just don't know.   Michael Hingson  18:37 And there's fear on both sides of the equation. Yes.   Peter DeHaas  18:40 You know, let's the elephant in the room. We know that disability discrimination has occurred over over the years. And there are specific laws in place that they protect individuals with disabilities in a lot of regards. I see the disability community is kind of the last frontier in terms of coming out, as it were, in celebrating their disability. I spoke with a young entrepreneur last week, who found her way to SF DBA, just through the the internet and and we met in person, you know, post COVID It was so exciting. And she was just thrilled to share her story with me in a way that she could readily self identify and not have to worry about being excluded or shamed. And this is somebody this is somebody who went to Stanford University and faced and I'm not trying to bash Stanford because, again, there's a steep learning curve and everybody's doing their best to try to, to get educated as to how to do the right thing. But she faced certain opposition in her program at Stanford when she was trying to navigate how to get accommodation hands. And there's plenty of work to be done. So again, I'm not trying to bash anybody but that's the gift that I share to the world is to help people solve problems and come up with creative solutions. We had a student, matriculating at Golden Gate University when I was there, who was deaf. And she had gone to just about every other private university in the Bay Area. And they had told her that they were not equipped, or they did not have the funding to provide ASL interpreters for her. Her pursuit. She came to me at Golden Gate University, and I was excited as soon as she landed on my doorstep. You know, obviously, I have a very close affinity to the deaf community, but it could have been any disability type, honestly. But when when she came, and she said, Peter, would you be able to provide ASL interpreters for my HR cohort program? I said, You bet you will figure out a way. And of course there were some people scratching their head on the other side, like, how are we going to do this? We created a budget, we developed a partnership with Department of occupational rehab, she already had a case with occupational rehab. We met them halfway, we paid 50%. Oh, Dr. Paid 50%. And they were quite shocked. Dr. turned to us and said, We've never had a university pay 50%. And I said, Well, that's that we're doing it because it's the best practice and it's the right thing to do. And that's, that's really, you know, a broader part of my mission, Michael is helping institutions develop best practices. It's not the specific mission of the SFDBA per se, but it, it comes with, it's a benefit that people get in associating with the SFDBA is that, you know, I believe that, that we're on the cusp of a giant wave, and you know, that working for excessive B, I think that this is just kind of, we're just at the tipping point where people are starting to recognize Oh, yeah, we are having more conversations now about disability inclusion, and I'm like, shamila Hi, this is the time, now's the time.   Michael Hingson  22:23 Well, and to be real clear, I don't think in any way you're bashing anyone, and no one should interpret it. as such. When you talk about the fears, when you talk about what organizations haven't done, it isn't really so much a question anymore, I think of what organizations haven't done, it's more important to explore, what are you going to do? Do you recognize there is an issue? And are you willing to explore addressing it, which is what you did with the young lady who was deaf. And it's something that we should all do, what we haven't yet really gotten to the point of recognizing is providing reasonable accommodations should just be considered part of the cost of doing business. Just like providing computers, providing lights, for all of you light dependent people who don't get around in the dark, we pity you, or coffee machines, or whatever. The fact is providing and having the ability to provide reasonable accommodations ought to be part of the cost of doing business. And so that does get down to a budgetary issue and being aware and putting it in right from the outset. through that. And it is something that we haven't done nearly as much of. And so it, it really helps to have the conversations like we're having, and I hope people will listen to this and take it to heart as well. But we do face still a situation where persons with disabilities are in an environment where the unemployment rate among employable people is in the 60 to 70% range. And it's not because people can't do the work. It said others who are different than we don't think we can do the work.   Peter DeHaas  24:22 Correct. And that's what I in in some of the early research for SF DBA. Michael, I uncovered a statistic that suggests that individuals with disabilities are starting a rate starting small businesses at a rate almost double that of individuals who don't have disabilities. And I really attribute that to one. Individuals with disabilities are very creative, and they're very resilient. And there's a lot of autonomy in starting your own business and who doesn't have a side hustle in the Bay Area. There are at least one side hustle, right? Frequently starting a small business, impede can be a pathway to, you know, just the success in the small business, or it could be a leveraging point to your next gig. So there's a lot of a lot of fruitful things, I think that come out of entrepreneurship.   Michael Hingson  25:23 Why do you think that so many people, though, are starting what's caused them to take that path, as opposed to other things they could do?   Peter DeHaas  25:32 Well, again, you know, even if you have one job here in San Francisco, likely doesn't pay the rent, right. Um, so I attribute it largely to, you know, the need to survive. But, you know, several young entrepreneurs that I've spoken to also say that, that it's out of necessity, because they haven't been able to land a job. And, and some people are still hesitant to even readily self identify as a result of that.   Michael Hingson  26:05 And I think that's a an extremely valid point, I remember the first time I was confronted with some of that I had been working for a company and was let go in June of 1984, at the end of June, mainly because not doing a good job, but rather the company purchased a company was actually Xerox purchased the company I was working for, because they wanted the technology and not the people. And I happened to be the last person in the sales force for their major flagship product to be let go. So at least I was there a week or two longer than others. And they decided that they just did not want any of us because they just Xerox just one of the technology. So I was looking for a job for six months, wow, couldn't find one. I even had an interview we were living in, in Mission Viejo, California, at the time. And I continued to look, and even got a call from an executive recruiter who said, gee, we see your resume, we, we really think you're very qualified for the job that we had, which I was. And everything went well, until the night before the interview, the recruiter called and said, I was just looking at your resume again. And I see that you do a lot of work with blind people. How come is that? Is there somebody in your family who's blind? And I said, Yeah, I am. I didn't mention it before. There was no need to write. But immediately, oh, my God, I don't know whether the recruiter the company is going to want to talk to you, you're blind. I said, What does that have to do with it, you liked my resume, but you're blind, doesn't matter. You didn't know that until 10 minutes ago, I already had the airplane ticket that they sat down. Anyway, the next morning, the interview was canceled. So I never flew up to San Jose to do the interview. And that happens way too often. So eventually, I and a couple of other people started a company to sell the new concept of PC based CAD systems to architects and engineers, and so on. And of course, a blind guy selling graphic technology. I was the president of the company, but who had to work the machine, I didn't need to work it, I needed to know how to work it and needed to know all about it to talk intelligently about it. But I'd rather sit an architect down in front of the machine and talk them through making it work, rather than me having to work it because then they're involved with it. So I did that for four years. And then I went back into the regular workforce. Right? But the reality is that it happens today, almost as much, but you're right. There are a lot more entrepreneurial opportunities than there used to be. And there are tools to help. So if you're a blind person, for example, and you start your own business, there, there are tools that can help. Are you familiar with a company called IRA? Ira I'm not Hi Roz AI are a it's a what's called a visual interpreter. They Ira has people who they hire because they demonstrate an aptitude for describing and they give them more advanced training on being able to describe. The idea is that you activate Ira by opening an app and you call one of their agents. Their agents are hired, trained and put under extreme non disclosure and confidentiality restrictions. So literally what happens in Ira stays an IRA. But the point is that blind people who use the service and have things described or deal with tax forms or whatever, know that whatever they do, won't be divulged. Because it's all incompetence, which is the way it should be. Well, IRA, and some companies including Quicken, have established a program where if you have a your own business, you can get free Ira services, at least at an hour or half hour at a time. But you can get free service to use their system, when you need to interact with something that requires someone to describe it to you or interact with something that's too visual to use. And there are a lot of those kinds of tools out there that are helping make it more practical for blind people to start their own businesses. And I think that in one way or another, it goes across the board. But you're right, we do it because of necessity.   Peter DeHaas  30:38 Yep. Yep. One of the partners that, in addition to accessibe that we've developed a partnership with is a company called Eva Aava. That was launched by two graduates of UC Berkeley, and it provides captioning for zoom calls and in other applications that way. So that's a very unique partnership that we've developed.   Michael Hingson  31:08 Well, that's, you know, that's pretty cool. How's accessibe worked out for you guys? I have to ask, of course, don't I?   Peter DeHaas  31:14 Well, I still I have a few organizations that I need to follow up with. I've, I've told a lot of my partners about it. And you know, it's still, it's still, you know, I say we're on the cusp of a wave, but but people are still not, you know, biting full heartedly for me. I'm excited about it. I, you know, in the fact that Judith human gets behind it, and in and I can show people that that widget, just yesterday, I was meeting with somebody, and she was talking about, you know, the advances of technology as it relates to accessibility. And she, I just noticed that she had our website open. And I see I said, Do you see that widget there? I said, Put your finger on it. And she did. And she was like, Oh, my gosh, there's so it's it's a process. But I long and short. I haven't, you know, one of my goals is to get other companies on board with excessive B as well. You know, for for a multitude of reasons. First and foremost, because it's the right thing to do. And, and there's an opportunity for SFDA as well, if, if somebody decides to go with the product? Well, the thing   Michael Hingson  32:36 about using accessibe, just generalize it, the thing about internet and website accessibility, is that most people don't know that it even exists. But they also just haven't taken the leap to recognize that they're leaving out an incredible amount of potential business for their own sites, or an incredible amount of interaction. You know, the CDC talks about up to 25% of all people having some sort of disability. And a lot of those people are left out because we can't use websites. And when you have a, you have a product like accessibility that changes that not only the widget, but then excessively has a full service department to help remediate what the widget can. But the bottom line is that today, if you talk to people with disabilities, they're going to tell you that they are incredibly loyal to companies that have made their websites usable, because then we don't have to go through all the struggle of trying to find an accessible site.   Peter DeHaas  33:46 That's true. And I'm sure you know, the state of Colorado just is the first state to mandate that all of their state websites need to be fully accessible.   Michael Hingson  33:57 Yeah, and I know one of the people who is very much involved in having architected that and gotten the legislature to do it just like they've they've been taking sort of a lead and making sure of accessible voting as well. And it makes perfect sense to do. But it it is, well, the Nielsen Company did a survey in 2016. And there's actually a report that that will talk about how much brand loyalty counts to people with disabilities and how much more website owners get because of persons with disabilities if they make their stuff accessible. But you interview awesome. Go ahead. No, go ahead.   Peter DeHaas  34:41 I lost my train of thought. Okay.   Michael Hingson  34:43 Well, so another aspect of all that, is that with you said something earlier about and starting businesses, blind people or people with disabilities tend to be very creative and so on. The real All of us were forced into that there was a guy, Dr. Jonathan Lazar, who used to work for Towson University. And I heard him speak at a National Federation of the Blind convention. And he observed that this, of course, was about blind people and internet access. He pointed out that blind people, because we are so used to being left out and work so hard at trying to find accessible sites, we also tend to be more resilient when we can sort of make something work. And it may not be that it's totally accessible, but we figure out as many workarounds as we can, to try to be able to interact directly with it. And I think that goes back to what you said, we're forced to be more creative, and it isn't just blind people is people across the board with disabilities. Yeah, it's true. So it is, it is an issue that we need to clearly address and and work on. But I hope that there will be ever increasing conversations about it, because people need to learn that there's nothing to fear. And you're right, they worry about expense, or, gee, do we have to buy special insurance for these people or whatever. And they don't recognize the other aspect of it, which is that if you hire a person with a disability, and you're fortunate enough to be able to do that, the odds are and there are studies that are starting to show this, you will have an employee who will be much more loyal and likely to stay with you, then most other employees, because we recognize how hard it is to get that job in the first place. And I'm sure you've experienced that. Yep. Yep. So it's a it is a challenge, and it is something that we need to deal with. Well, so having started the diversity, Business Alliance, and so on, what kind of an impact are you starting to see in the Bay Area? How, how has it been?   Peter DeHaas  37:17 It's the San Francisco disability Business Alliance disability   Michael Hingson  37:21 Business Alliance. I'm sorry, I don't talk good. That's, but just wanted to clarify for our No, you're right. You're right. So how is how's the impact been in terms of overall what you've been able to accomplish? And what have you been able to measure?   Peter DeHaas  37:35 Well, as I said, we launched in March of 2020. So everything shut down literally a week or two, I think it was a week or two later. And I got a text from one of my keynote speakers. And he said, Peter, you better get ready, because small businesses are going to need you more than ever. And sure enough, we started consulting with businesses on how to access PPP, reorganizing their staffing patterns, creating resources in tandem with the SBA and getting those up online. So really changed our focus, our impact, through the pandemic was really continuing to help businesses through this unprecedented time. But then continuing conversations with future entrepreneurs who are curious about how to start a small business. So we launched our future entrepreneur training program, and we've seen a lot of interestingly enough, a lot of women of color are with disabilities participating in our programs. And I can't say why that that that demographic specifically, has been so high, but it's been quite fascinating for me. So we've we've had that educational piece, we've created several mentoring opportunities, connecting entrepreneurs with with members of the broader business community to get some mentoring. Just an example of that we had a young African American who grew up here in the Bayview district of San Francisco who is recently just got his real estate broker's license. And he wants to be investing in properties. And this is the youngest of I believe, 11 children and connected him with a successful investor here, and he's well on his way. We've also worked with a film student from SF State and connected him with one of the producers of crip camp. Which I'm sure that you've you've experienced. So really building bridges, and helping individuals get connected to not only educational opportunities, but mentoring opportunities, helping individuals get access to capital. Early on, we got contacted by the State of California regarding small business certification. So we're in, we've been in conversation with the state of California over the past couple years, as well as many entities here in the Bay Area, about how they can diversify their supply chain by hiring individuals with disabilities. So but as you know, getting a small business certified is no small feat. So we're working with UC Berkeley now, in in, they have a program there that helps get small businesses certified. And I'm very excited about that. And we have our second annual Bay Area, disability Entrepreneurship Week, coming up in October, which runs in tandem with national disability, Employment Awareness Month. And we're going to have interactive panels, which will be online, and then we will have, we're going to visit several businesses here in the city, as well as have a networking event. And we're going to have one of our future entrepreneur trainings, hopefully, in concert with one of the Bay Area leaders in in entrepreneurship, as well.   Michael Hingson  41:47 It's early, of course, to to a large degree, because you're you're only operating the disability Business Alliance for three years. But are you seeing how do I ask this more successes than failures? Do you see that it is really taking off and that if you were to compare it with people outside of what you're doing at who start businesses, then maybe you're seeing more success because you're able to provide more proactive mentoring and so on.   Peter DeHaas  42:22 It's it's been, I feel like I recognized early on, as I said, at the launch, that there's certainly up there there. And with every conversation that I have, Michael, I recognize that the importance of what we're doing, it's unprecedented. My mind, I've had one of my advisory board members meet with the Department of Rehab here in the city and I know that there's a bridge to entrepreneurship for individuals with disabilities in terms of getting support through Dr. But it's not very well defined in their their website. If you're blind, it's there's a specific program for entrepreneurship but beyond that. So I see a lot of potential I would say the success is in the contacts that I make that people are coming out of the woodwork in the community that we are building, we are at a tipping point with our capacity building, where we are currently working with an attorney to get our own 501 C three status and build real capacity. I'd like to hire somebody within the next year. Right now I'm doing everything with the exception of some some assistance from volunteer that I have who was my assistant at Golden Gate University previously I'm doing it all myself and you know that that that that's sustainable to a point and I'm very excited about embarking on the venture of getting our own 501 C three status and taking it to the next level. So as you know these things take time and that's one of my one of my greatest mentors several years ago when I started planting seeds for this said it's going to take some time you know, the but it's the potential is there and and I would say that there's there's many more doors opening than being slammed in my face if that if that makes any sense. I most people are very excited to talk to me and there's there's plenty of work to be done.   Michael Hingson  44:37 Well, you're in a great place to do it of course as we discussed earlier because it there's there's a lot more openness to the idea of people who are different and being able to support that. But getting a 501 C three status is going to help a great deal I would think.   Peter DeHaas  44:55 Yeah, like I said, I'm very grateful to be operating under social good fun. And it's been very useful through the pilot phases. But it's time for us to, you know, it limits us to go after bigger contracts with the city, the state or the federal government or even bigger foundations. So this has been perfect for us. And it's really my journey as an entrepreneur really mirrors for everybody that I've been working with, you know what it takes, it's no small feat to really, you know, start a venture as you know, on your own. And it's really about not only expanding your network, but having lifelines that you can call when you're in a potential crisis mode. So I've enjoyed every step of the journey. And really, as my 91 year old dad would say, Peter, it's about the people. It's about the people and every relationship that I build, I really tried to nurture along and in leverage on that, you know, maybe it's me introducing that person to somebody else, or vice versa. They're introducing me to somebody, but it's, it's, it's fascinating to me about how much of this work is about telling stories and sharing stories. And yeah, I, I'm very excited about the next year in particular, to see see the next chapter of the SF DBA.   Michael Hingson  46:27 I have to say, me as well, I'm really excited to hear how this is going. And you're right, it is about the people in your 91 year old dad is absolutely correct. And as people on both sides, it's not just the individuals that you serve, because they happen to have a disability and and you're trying to work with them. But it is also the more substantial or or larger population of all the people who could help in that process by providing jobs or mentoring skills, or funding or whatever, to help bring people out and give them the opportunities to grow that clearly you're looking for. And your passion does make all the difference in that though.   47:18 Well, thank you I you know, when people talk about all the dividends, and what what's my difficulty dividend going to be investing in your, your startup, you know, there's lots of conversations here in the Bay Area. And I proudly say the dividends and investing in the disability community or hiring somebody with a disability, or allowing giving somebody the opportunity to start a small business with a disability, I'll tell you what the dividends are, there's less reliance on public assistance. And there's more money flowing into our local economies, people with disabilities want to spend their hard earned money, they don't want to be limited by whatever SSDI pays these days, 900 to $1,200 a month, they don't want to be limited by that. They want to be contributing members of our society. And many people don't know that the disability communities, are the third largest market in the world. So put that into perspective. You know, if people with disabilities are thriving, everybody is going to be thriving.   Michael Hingson  48:28 Sure. And again, one of the dividends is that if you are hiring a person with a disability, you are very, very likely hiring someone who is going to be a lot more loyal to you, and wanting to help make you more successful because they know how hard it was to get a job in the first place for them. Right. And we really need to deal with that. As I said, we interviewed on this podcast, Kirk Adams, who is the about to retire director, he maybe now has retired as the director of the American Foundation for the Blind. He's the one that talked about the fact that there are now now an increasing number of studies, talking about the whole loyalty and brand issue regarding disabilities that specifically bind blind people. But it goes across the board of the fact that if you hire someone there, they're going to be very appreciative of that. And they're going to want to do a good job. And that spiral can only go up because the better job they do, the more successful you are. And the more successful you are, the better their job will be. And the happier everyone is.   Peter DeHaas  49:38 And it's about creating a culture that that understands it and embraces it. I'm currently doing some important curriculum development for a biotech company here in the Bay Area as it relates to employees with disabilities and it's it's it's so exciting for me, this is the kind of stuff that excites me to see companies coming full circle and saying, Oh, we really need to put some more thought into this and not just have a policy in the HR department as it relates to disability accommodations, that's important too. But creating a culture that that includes disability in the DEI equation.   Michael Hingson  50:21 Right? The the inclusion has to start taking hold a lot more than it does diversity, generally speaking, as I think you pointed out, has left disabilities out of it. But they, the fact is, you can't do it if you're gonna call yourself inclusive, because you are, you're not correct. And there are a number of us who are of the opinion that we're not going to let you change the definition of inclusion to say, well, we're inclusive, we just don't do anything with disabilities, then you're not inclusive, great. can't have it both ways are gray. How can people become involved in and working in helping with the disability Business Alliance?   51:07 Well, they can go to our website@www.S F D B A  dot ORG and, and get contact us there, if they'd like to make a contribution there. If they'd like to volunteer, or, you know, at some point we're going to be, like I said, building capacity. I'm excited about the potential of hiring somebody to start and you know, over time hiring several people. So get in touch with us, and we'd love to have a conversation.   Michael Hingson  51:46 I hope that people will really be excited about it and be excited to help. Obviously, anyone listening to this, especially in the San Francisco area that is now willing to explore hiring persons and so on should get in touch with you. Yes, they can do all of that through the website.   Peter DeHaas  52:08 They can get in touch with us through the website. But in terms of me, I mean, if they set up time to chat with me, I'd be happy to chat with anybody about developing strategies around hiring individuals with disabilities as well, or, or figuring out how to make their business more inclusive.   Michael Hingson  52:30 If they want to set up a time to chat with you. How do they do that?   Peter DeHaas  52:34 They can email at info at SF DBA dot o RG just make a query that way?   Michael Hingson  52:42 And odds are you're gonna see it because you're the main guy doing it all right.   Peter DeHaas  52:47 Yep. Yeah, my volunteer gets those emails in. She forwards them to me immediately.   Michael Hingson  52:56 Well, I hope that people will do that. And that we can help make the program successful and even more so. And if there's anything at anytime that I can do and anything that I can do to help bring resources to assist you, needless to say, excited to do that as well.   Peter DeHaas  53:17 Michael, it's always a pleasure chatting with you. I learned something new every time that I talk with you and I don't see our conversation stopping here.   53:28 Hope not by no means there's always more to talk about. Well, Peter, again, thank you very much for being here. And I hope people will reach out. Go to www.sfdba.org and reach out to Peter info at sfdba.org. We'd like to hear from you. I'd love to hear your thoughts about this podcast. So feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessible A C C E S S I B E .com. And you're also welcome to go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. Michael Hingson is m i c h a e  l h i n g s o n slash podcast and wherever you're listening to this, please give us a five star rating. But most of all, whether you're in the San Francisco area or not reach out to Peter, he would love to hear from you. And I'm sure there are ways that that we can help establish more relationships outside San Francisco because what Peter is doing is going to have to expand anyway right? Yes,   54:31 yes, I'd sky's the limit. I'd like to my goal is to brand SFDBA or an organization like SFDBA in Colorado. Next. I did. Some of my my work that I didn't mention in this podcast was with the Colorado cross disability coalition, one of the nation's leaders in disability accessibility kind of related topics and, and one of my greatest mentors, Julie risking is at the helm there at CCDC. And when I told her I was launching SFDBA, she said, Peter, we need something like this in Denver. So I promised her once I got my footing here that I would try to establish something in Colorado as well. But yeah, I'm excited about the possibility of one day growing beyond the Bay Area.   55:31 got to start somewhere, though. That's right. Well, Peter, again, thanks for being here. And I want to thank everyone who is listening, I want to thank you for listening to us and putting up with us for an hour. But please reach out to Peter, we really appreciate it. And we'll probably have another podcast where we get to talk more about all the progress that Peter is making. So again, Peter, thanks very much for being here. Thank you, Michael.   Michael Hingson  56:01 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

I Hate Green Beans with Lincee Ray
IHGB #284 -- Reba McEntire with Lara

I Hate Green Beans with Lincee Ray

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 35:07


Hello everyone! I went to see Reba McEntire with Lara, and it was exactly what we hoped it would be. The concert had EVERYTHING. Multiple costume changes, a fun-loving crowd, an execution of "Fancy" that still gives me chills, and an American Sign Language interpreter who I want to be my new best friend. Oh, you don't like Reba? Well, I still love you, even though I don't understand how greatness has escaped your musical repertoire. But for those of you who do stand in awe of Reba, this podcast is for you! Episode Notes HERE is my Spotify playlist featuring Reba! SHOW NOTES: Subscribe to Podcast: iTunes or Android Follow Me: Facebook and Instagram and Twitter Buy My Books: It's a Love Story and Why I Hate Green Beans

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik
Roberta “Bobbi” Cordano: President of Gallaudet University

The Caring Economy with Toby Usnik

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 54:08


Roberta “Bobbi” Cordano is a values-driven leader focused on sign language equity in education, economic opportunity, innovation, and belonging as president of Gallaudet University, the only birth-PhD education entity in the world that uses American Sign Language in every aspect of its daily education and operations. Always curious, President Cordano is guiding Gallaudet as it transforms to meet the demands of the 21st century. Being deaf is part of human diversity and President Cordano is a fierce advocate for deaf people being embraced in all facets of society. Showcasing the value, contributions, and innate innovation of deaf people, as well as the power of sign language, is at the heart of President Cordano's leadership. Knowing that true transformation can only happen if a multitude of perspectives and experiences are welcomed, President Cordano is vigilant in infusing equity, diversity, and inclusion into all aspects of Gallaudet. She is focused on creating a welcoming and engaging experience for all students, and strengthening efforts to ensure they are active citizens at Gallaudet and in the community, nation, and world. With wide-ranging, extensive experience from her roles as a Minnesota assistant attorney general, vice president of the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, educational administrator at the University of Minnesota, and a founder of two charter schools, President Cordano knows the critical importance of education and access to opportunities and systems, particularly for marginalized communities. She is honored to be the first deaf woman and openly LGBTQ president and excited for the continued transformation and impact Gallaudet will have on deaf lives throughout the nation and across the globe. Education Juris Doctorate, University of Wisconsin, Madison Bachelor of Arts, Beloit College Honorary Doctorate, Beloit College --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/toby-usnik/support

Quilt Buzz
Episode 070: Theo of @fiberartisantheo

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 35:58


Show Notes:0:31 and 0:40 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)0:50 - Grand Rapids, Michigan1:20 - Crochet1:51 - Free motion quilting2:20 - Traditionally pieced2:23 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)2:24 and 2:42 - Traditionally pieced3:04 - Applique3:27 - Theo's Instagram @fiberartisantheo3:33 - An example of Theo's pet portraits4:29 - Wendy's pet portrait of her dog, Truffle.5:40 - Medieval tapestry5:42 and 6:19 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)7:28 - Quilt Assistant7:45 - Microsoft Paint7:52 - Quilt Assistant7:56 - EQ87:58 - Adobe Illustrator8:44 - Seam allowances10:08 - Procreate10:13 and 12:03 - Adobe Illustrator12:35 - EQ812:55 - Gen Z13:08 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)13:17 - Keep Abortion Legal FPP pattern by Theo13:30 - Ouija Board FPP pattern by Theo15:14 - Tie dye15:36 - Theo's pet portrait FPP services 16:15 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)18:08 and 18:19 - Komodo dragon18:30 - Komodo Dragon FPP pattern by Theo18:37 - Horse portrait by Theo18:50 - Bearded dragon18:51 - Gecko20:25 and 20:27 - Kona Cotton21:32, 21:43 and 21:49 - Free motion quilting22:04 - Jazz II Babylock sewing machine22:06 - Throat space23:30 - Kansas City Quilt Museum 23:22 - Kansas City23:40 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)24:11 - Polite frogs FPP patterns by Theo25:03 - American Sign Language25:26 - Grand Rapids, Michigan25:43 - Love Patchwork & Quilting Magazine 26:35 - The New York Times26:39 - New York Times article on how American Sign Language has evolved 27:42 - Theo's three cats (scroll to bottom of page)27:47 - Juvia, Theo's cat27:55 - Michigan28:16 - The Good Doctor28:26 - Morbid 29:31 - Theo's big group FPP portrait29:44 and 29:47 - Kona Cotton30:23 - ADHD30:55 - Art Gallery Fabrics31:09 - Calliope Quilts31:36 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)32:13 - Quarter inch presser foot32:18 - Seam allowance32:34 - Quarter inch presser foot32:44 - Jazz II Babylock sewing machine32:49 - Free motion quilting32:51 - Necchi 33:14 - Gutermann thread33:39 and 33:45 - Foundation paper piecing (FPP)34:35 - Stitches by Alex (@stitchesbyalex)34:45 - Crochet34:54 - Meghan the Quilts (@megandthequilts)35:02, 35:07 and 35:11 - Improv quilting35:18 - Theo's baby blanket for her cousin36:23 - Manga36:37 - Meghan the Quilts (@megandthequilts)36:51 - Mr. Bones Sews (@mr.bones_sews)Follow Theo:Instagram - @fiberartisantheoTikTok - @fiberartisantheohttps://fiberartisantheo.com/Follow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

Nightside With Dan Rea
Not "Feeling the Love" on Broadway... (10 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 40:20


An American Sign Language interpreter is suing Broadway for allegedly firing him based on the color of his skin. The Theatre Development Fund Accessibility Programs wrote a letter to the White ASL interpreter saying, “it's no longer appropriate to have White interpreters represent Black characters for ASL Broadway shows.” Dan heard listeners' thoughts on this case.

Wilson County News
Magik Theatre presents 'The Velveteen Rabbit'

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 1:36


The holidays are all about family, love, hope, and a little magic. Magik Theatre's production of “The Velveteen Rabbit” takes place from Nov. 19 through Dec. 24. Margery Williams's classic tale about a child's favorite toy comes to life during the theatre's special rendition. Opening night will kick off with festive holiday happenings including hot cocoa, and interactive experiences with themed arts and crafts. To create a welcoming environment for all, a selection of special performances will be offered: •American Sign Language interpreted —Saturday, Nov. 26, 2 p.m. •Sensory friendly —Saturday, Dec. 3, 10:30 a.m. •Pay what you wish —Nov....Article Link

The Howie Carr Radio Network
It's All Hakuna Matata Unless You're a White ASL Interpreter - 11.14.22 - Grace Curley Show Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 38:42


Grace talks the most recent employment discrimination that's going viral. The Theatre Development Fund, who supplies Broadway shows with American Sign Language interpreters, is facing a lawsuit after firing an interpreter allegedly because he is white. If woke policies are affecting talking lions now, what could possibly be next?

Louisiana Considered Podcast
The Louisiana School for the Deaf is in trouble. Today, we discuss it – in American Sign Language

Louisiana Considered Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 24:29


The Louisiana School for the Deaf is not up to standards. Not only is enrollment declining, but over the summer, the superintendent of Louisiana's schools for the deaf and visually impaired, Ernest Garrett III, was dismissed. And more recently, the director and principal of LSD, Heather Laine, was dismissed as well. Both for unclear reasons.   To learn more about this turmoil and turnover, we speak to Jay Isch, Executive Director of Deaf Focus for the Louisiana Association of the Deaf. He was joined by American Sign Language interpreter Sylvie Sullivan. This Wednesday, November 16 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of two Southern University students at the hands of police, Leonard Brown and Denver Smith. The college students were killed during protests at Southern's campus, which implored then-Governor Edwin Edwards to send in the national guard. But despite the murders, no officer was ever charged with a crime.   Drew Hawkins, a graduate student at LSU and Brittany Dunn, a Southern University Law Student, have been investigating this case with the LSU Cold Case Project as part of a four-part narrative series. They join us for more on what they've uncovered in their reporting.  Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Alana Schreiber. Our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz and our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh.  You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts.  Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kids These Days Podcast
The BASICS of using sign language with Infants and Toddlers

Kids These Days Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 18:52


On today's episode, Sarah is covering the BASICS of using sign language with infants and toddlers. Resources to check out: https://babysignlanguage.com/https://babies-and-sign-language.comhttps://baby.lovetoknow.com/Hand Talk App: Automatically translates text and audio to American Sign Language and Brazilian Sign Language through a FUN robot. It can be used in the classroom by teachers, at home, by anyone wanting to learn sign language or translate. Baby Sign and Learn App: Inspires babies to sign! Animated characters making a signing so much fun! Video demonstrations that are fun and engaging for children. Kids These Days is a co-production of the KCCTO-KITS Infant Toddler Specialist Network (ITSN) and KCCTO Workforce Development (WFD) programs.The KCCTO-KITS Infant-Toddler Specialist Network is a program of the Kansas Child Care Training Opportunities, Inc. (KCCTO) and the university of Kansas Life Span Institute at Parsons. The Workforce Development Project is a program of KCCTO. Each program is supported through a grant from the Kansas Department For Children And Families' Child Care And Early Education Services. However, information or opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the agency and no official endorsement should be inferred.To learn more about the Infant Toddler Specialist Network, please visit: http://kskits.org/technical-assistance-0.To learn more about KCCTO and Workforce Development, please visit: https://kccto.org/Contact us via email at – kidsthesedayspod@gmail.comFollow and tag us on Instagram & Facebook @kidsthesedayspod & Twitter @ktdpodMusic credit: Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/3843-hackbeat License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast
Reflections on the End and Beginning of Life by David Mitchell (Sunday, November 6, 2022)

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 35:41


Sunday, November 6, 2022. Welcome to St Joe Community Church. Today's message is entitled Reflections on the End and Beginning of Life and was delivered on Sunday, November 6, 2022 by David Mitchell. For more information visit www.StJoeCommunityChurch.org, click on the Sermons tab, and find today's broadcast. St Joe provides its worship services in American Sign Language and closed captions. For more information visit http://www.stjoecommunitychurch.org/sermons/category/enhansed-asl-american-sign-language.

The Faika Podcast
Hutch Mauga

The Faika Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 31:12


Entrepreneur Hutch Mauga talks about his journey and inspiration in creating his companies, learning American Sign Language, cooking Samoan dishes, playing the piano and SO much more.

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast
Trust God Completely by Greg Byman (Sunday, October 30, 2022)

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 41:46


Sunday, October 30, 2022. Welcome to St Joe Community Church. Today's message is entitled Trust God Completely and was delivered on Sunday, October 30, 2022 by Greg Byman. For more information visit www.StJoeCommunityChurch.org, click on the Sermons tab, and find today's broadcast. St Joe provides its worship services in American Sign Language and closed captions. For more information visit http://www.stjoecommunitychurch.org/sermons/category/enhansed-asl-american-sign-language.

Young, Black & Opinionated
Oh Now Y'all Care

Young, Black & Opinionated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 43:34


On this episode of YBO, Christina puts y'all on to American Sign Language, discusses the latest pop culture news—including her favorite scary movies—and speaks her piece about Kanye's latest antics. • Follow YBO on social: @TheYBOPodcast • Follow Christina on social: @misschrisdee • For all things YBO, click here: https://linktr.ee/ybopodcast

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast
Full of Grace and Truth by Greg Byman (Sunday, October 23, 2022)

St. Joe Community Church Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 42:44


Sunday, October 23, 2022. Welcome to St Joe Community Church. Today's message is entitled Full of Grace and Truth and was delivered on Sunday, October 23, 2022 by Greg Byman. For more information visit www.StJoeCommunityChurch.org, click on the Sermons tab, and find today's broadcast. St Joe provides its worship services in American Sign Language and closed captions. For more information visit http://www.stjoecommunitychurch.org/sermons/category/enhansed-asl-american-sign-language.

Blackout Podcast
Kaytee Mullins - Entrepreneur/Owner of The Change Room

Blackout Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 24:28


Kaytee Mullins is a young entrepreneur from Cape Breton, who moved to Halifax in 2016 for College but fell in love with the City and now calls it home.  Before starting The Change Room, Kaytee completed programs in American Sign Language and Veterinary Medicine, and although she loved both, neither were the right fit. Having always dreamed of being her own boss and after countless jobs in retail, restaurant, and hospitality industries that left her unhappy, she took the leap, after the business she worked at closed down. With the pandemic just starting, she started on a wild journey, trying to navigate the entrepreneurial space and start a business in a world where businesses were shutting down every day. Starting The Change Room, not only gave her the freedom to make her own schedule, which allows time to visit her family in Cape Breton (and snuggle with her cat), it also gave her a sense of purpose. Helping the environment, reducing waste, saving people money, and finding really cool pieces, are just some of the reasons running this business is fulfilling for her. When she's not thrifting and sourcing colourful clothes, she likes to listen to podcasts, crochet, explore new places, and spend way too long on the phone with her Mom and Niece.  Kaytee hopes that if there's anybody out there who feels stuck in what they're doing that they too, find something their passionate about because life is too short to do anything that steals your joy.  https://www.instagram.com/thechange.room/ (Find out more @thechange.room)

WKXL - New Hampshire Talk Radio
Capitol Closeup: The Wind in The Willows

WKXL - New Hampshire Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 42:52


Paul speaks with Karen Braz, award-winning director of the Concord Community Players' production of The Wind in The Willows. They cover Karen's remarkable career in theater and as an American Sign Language interpreter and talk about the show, a new adaptation for young performers based on the 2017 West End production. This show marks the kick off of the Community Players 95th season, and harkens back to the very first Concord Children's Theater Project inaugural show 27 years ago. Performance details: Friday, October 14 at 7:00 pm Saturday, October 15 at 2:00 pm Performance at Concord City Auditorium 2 Prince Street, Concord, NH Tickets $15, Reserved Seating Purchase online at www.communityplayersofconcord.org, or at the box office! Box Office hours: Oct. 9th 1:00-5:00 pm; Oct. 13th&14th 4:30 – 7:00 pm; Oct. 15th 12:00-2:00 pm Box Office phone: (603) 228-2793 For more information, contact box office chair David Murdo at nhdm40@comcast.netor (603) 344-4747 The Concord City Auditorium is fully open. Check our website for current COVID protocols.

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin
Dr. G Recap: How to Create Resilience

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 9:33


How to Create Resilience with Dr. GResilience expert Deborah Gilboa, MD, aka “Dr. G” works with families, organisations, and businesses to identify the mindset and strategies to turn stress to an advantage. Renowned for her contagious humour, Dr. G works with groups across multiple generations, to rewire their attitudes and beliefs, and create resilience through personal accountability and a completely different approach to adversity.She is a leading media personality seen regularly on TODAY, Good Morning America and The Doctors. She is also featured frequently in the Washington Post, The New York Times, Authority Magazine, and countless other digital and print outlets. Dr. G is board certified attending family physician and is fluent in American Sign Language. She lives in Pittsburgh with her four sons.  Visit Dr G here - https://askdoctorg.comBuy a copy of her book here - https://www.amazon.com/dp/1633375951?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/askdoctorg/  Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborahgilboamd/  Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2HQQm1qa-SbFIjfdFuuoiA ----Full Transcript, Quote Cards, and a Show Summary are available here:https://www.jjlaughlin.com/blog

The Lucky Few
182. A Day In the Life of Our Friend Jeremy (self-advocacy, independent living, + more)

The Lucky Few

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 42:28


When it came time for Jeremy to move away from home, he soon realized that the housing options available didn't suit him. That's until his older brother Nathaniel (who you may recognize from episode 122) started Cohome, an inclusive housing program in Morristown, New Jersey. Today, Jeremy lives independently at Cohome and spends his time working at a restaurant, ballroom dancing, and book writing. He also happens to be Micha's neighbor (we're jealous!) which means he has become her son Ace's unofficial mentor.. and his perspective on being a role model might just surprise you! Join us for this episode as we chat about learning American Sign Language later in life, Jeremy's dreams of becoming an interpreter, and the day to day life of an adult with Down syndrome.. the future is bright. -- SHOW NOTES Learn more about Cohome! Website Instagram Facebook LET'S CHAT Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com with your questions and Good News for future episodes. HELP US SHIFT THE NARRATIVE Interested in partnering with The Lucky Few Podcast as a sponsor? Email hello@theluckyfewpodcast.com for more information! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theluckyfewpod/support

Capitol Closeup
The Wind in The Willows

Capitol Closeup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 42:52


Paul speaks with Karen Braz, award-winning director of the Concord Community Players' production of The Wind in The Willows. They cover Karen's remarkable career in theater and as an American Sign Language interpreter and talk about the show, a new adaptation for young performers based on the 2017 West End production. This show marks the kick off of the Community Players 95th season, and harkens back to the very first Concord Children's Theater Project inaugural show 27 years ago. Performance details: Friday, October 14 at 7:00 pm Saturday, October 15 at 2:00 pm Performance at Concord City Auditorium 2 Prince Street, Concord, NH Tickets $15, Reserved Seating Purchase online at www.communityplayersofconcord.org, or at the box office Box Office hours: Oct. 9th 1:00-5:00 pm; Oct. 13th&14th 4:30 – 7:00 pm; Oct. 15th 12:00-2:00 pm Box Office phone: (603) 228-2793 For more information, contact box office chair David Murdo at nhdm40@comcast.netor (603) 344-4747 The Concord City Auditorium is fully open. Check our website for current COVID protocols.

FORGED BY TRUST
30| From Stressed to Resilience w/ Dr. Deborah Gilboa, MD.

FORGED BY TRUST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 49:06 Transcription Available


From Stressed to Resilient Stress is created by change in our lives and it can pose a great challenge. But, when we Face our Challenges and Overcome them, we become even Stronger. Therefore, check out this episode and discover the Life Skills used to Transform your Stress into Resiliency. What We Discuss with Dr. G:⁃       The Impact of Stress⁃       Three Steps to Manage a High Tempo of Change ⁃       Eight Skills to Navigate Change⁃       Tools for Managing DiscomfortAbout Dr. G:“Dr. G” is a resilience expert and works with families, organizations, and businesses to identify the mindset and strategies to turn stress to an advantage. Renowned for her contagious humor, Dr. G works with groups across multiple generations, to rewire their attitudes and beliefs, and create resilience through personal accountability and a completely different approach to adversity. She is a leading media personality seen regularly on TODAY, Good Morning America and The Doctors and author of the upcoming book From Stressed to Resilient. She is also featured frequently in the Washington Post, The New York Times, Forbes Magazine, and countless other digital and print outlets. Dr. G is board certified attending family physician and is fluent in American Sign Language. She lives in Pittsburgh with her four sons. Thanks, Dr. G! Reach out, connect, and follow Dr. G across her social platforms:-       LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborahgilboamd/-       Twitter: https://twitter.com/AskDocG-       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/askdoctorg/-       Website: https://askdoctorg.com/ Resources mentioned in the podcast:-       Dr G's Book, “From Stressed to Resilient” https://www.amazon.com/Stressed-Resilient-Guide-Handle-More/dp/1633375951/ref=sr_1_1?crid=9IZQNZS0NBD3&keywords=from+stressed+to+resilient&qid=1665080677&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjA3IiwicXNhIjoiMC42NiIsInFzcCI6IjAuNDgifQ%3D%3D&sprefix=from+stressed+to+resilient%2Caps%2C69&sr=8-1 -       Tools for managing stress: www.stressedtoresilient.comContact Dr. G: contact@askdoctorg.com Like the episode and leave a review HERE. Take my FREE Keys to Communication Online Course HERE.

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin
How to Create Resilience with Dr. G

Lead on Purpose with James Laughlin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 69:02 Transcription Available


How to Create Resilience with Dr. GResilience expert Deborah Gilboa, MD, aka “Dr. G” works with families, organisations, and businesses to identify the mindset and strategies to turn stress to an advantage. Renowned for her contagious humour, Dr. G works with groups across multiple generations, to rewire their attitudes and beliefs, and create resilience through personal accountability and a completely different approach to adversity. She is a leading media personality seen regularly on TODAY, Good Morning America and The Doctors. She is also featured frequently in the Washington Post, The New York Times, Authority Magazine, and countless other digital and print outlets. Dr. G is board certified attending family physician and is fluent in American Sign Language. She lives in Pittsburgh with her four sons.  Visit Dr G here - https://askdoctorg.comBuy a copy of her book here - https://www.amazon.com/dp/1633375951?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/askdoctorg/  Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/deborahgilboamd/  Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2HQQm1qa-SbFIjfdFuuoiA ----Full Transcript, Quote Cards, and a Show Summary are available here:https://www.jjlaughlin.com/blog

Modern Love
How to Learn My Love Language

Modern Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 17:49 Very Popular


When Ross Showalter turned 18 and began dating hearing men, he found himself communicating with them on their terms: using spoken language. Years of speech lessons and lip-reading practice forced Ross, who is Deaf, to conform to a society that favors sound. All of these men made the same promise: to learn sign language, only to never follow through.Then, on a spring day in the midst of the pandemic, Ross met Will. Will vowed to shatter the pattern of false promises that had haunted Ross's dating life.Today, we invite you to carefully listen to Ross's story, read by the Deaf actor Joshua Castille. Then, stick around to hear host Anna Martin catch up with Ross. Ross explains why it's so powerful for him to communicate in his own language — American Sign Language — and he shares an update on him and Will.To access a transcript of this episode, click here. 

The Heumann Perspective
Disability Inclusion in the Workplace with Meg O’Connell

The Heumann Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 42:53


The transcript for this episode is available here. October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and our first episode of this month is with Meg O'Connell. She is the founder and CEO of Global Disability Inclusion working with companies on improving their disability inclusion efforts. About Meg O'Connell  Meg is the CEO & Founder of Global Disability Inclusion; she is an internationally recognized disability employment and inclusion expert with over 25 years of experience in human capital management, talent acquisition, performance management, disability inclusion, employee engagement, marketing, and customer service programs. Meg and her team has worked with some of the world's most recognized brands and provides strategic program design, development, and implementation of disability employment and inclusion programs for Global 500 companies, US Federal Contractors, colleges and universities, non-profits, and foundations. Her work has received numerous accolades including the Society of Human Resource Management's (SHRM's) Innovative Practice Award. She has been quoted in Huffington Post, Science Magazine, Diversity Executive, DiverseAbility, and numerous trade magazines for her insights on the employment of people with disabilities. She keynotes and presents at international conferences regularly. Meg holds a certificate in ADA Mediation and she is also conversationally proficient in American Sign Language. Related Links: Global Disability Inclusion Website The State of Disability Employee Engagement Report Employing Abilities at Work Certificate with SHRM Amplify Disability Culture & Climate Survey This episode's Ask Judy question came from @kylakeenan on Instagram. If you'd like to submit a question for Ask Judy, send it to media@judithheumann.com or DM Judy on Instagram or Twitter. Check out the video version of this episode on Judy's YouTube channel.  Intro music by Lachi. Outro music by Gaelynn Lea.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 62 – Unstoppable Writer and ASL interpreter with Kelly Brakenhoff

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 75:46


Kelly Brakenhoff is an author of six books and an ASL interpreter from Nebraska. She has served as an interpreter for deaf and hard of hearing persons now for over 30 years. You can tell how much she likes her chosen professions by listening to her as you get to do in this episode.   Kelly is especially excited by a series of books she has started involving Duke the Deaf Dog where she introduces readers to ASL, American Sign Language. She is working to help readers, especially children, better understand the deaf and hard of hearing community. On top of everything Kelly has done, she has used the crowdfunding program, Kickstarter, to help fund her newest book. It turns out that another famous author also used this program to fund their efforts. You get to hear all about it.   I very much hope you enjoy our episode this time and that you will give us a 5 rating. Thanks for listening.   About the Guest:   Kelly Brakenhoff is an author of six books and an ASL interpreter from Nebraska, US. She divides her writing energy between two series: cozy mysteries set on a college campus, and picture books featuring Duke the Deaf Dog.  Parents, kids, and teachers love the children's books because they teach American Sign Language using fun stories. And if you like a smart female sleuth, want to learn more about Deaf culture, or have ever lived in a place where livestock outnumber people, you'll enjoy the Cassandra Sato Mystery series.   Social media links:   kellybrakenhoff.com and follow her social media or blog by using this link: https://kellybrakenhoff.com/quicklinks/   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes* Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Hi, and here we are once again with unstoppable mindset, the podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected me. And the unexpected, as always, is the fun part of the podcast. We love to carry on different kinds of conversations with people learn about them. And you know what I'm going to say once again, for any of you listening out there, I'd love to have conversations with you. I'll bet you have stories that we should talk about. So definitely reach out. Michael hingson.com/podcast or Michaelhi@accessibie.com. And I'd love to chat with you. But for now, we have Kelly Brakenhoff, who is here with us. She is an author, and ASL interpreter, and a Kickstarter campaign runner par excellence. But does that elevate you are what Kelly Welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Kelly Brakenhoff  02:18 Hi, I'm great. Thank you for having me. today. I'm really excited to be talking to you.   Michael Hingson  02:24 Well, I'm really excited to have a chance to chat with you and learn all about you and and learn why you're unstoppable. When I started this podcast, because we think that everyone has a story to tell, we all have had challenges in our lives and, and we've overcome them. And it doesn't need to be a huge challenge. But still a challenge is a challenge. And when we overcome it, that's great. And when we recognize that we did something that we didn't think we can do, then I think we fall into this concept of being able to move toward a mindset of unstop ability. And so we started unstoppable mindset, and we have a lot of fun with it. Well, why don't we start with your story a little bit? Why don't you tell us about you kind of growing up or anything about that that you think we ought to know?   Kelly Brakenhoff  03:12 Well, sure. Um, yeah, I'm a fan of your, your mindset, your your podcast, I think this is just the coolest thing. So like I said, just super excited to be here today. Um, I've been an ASL interpreter for more than 30 years, and an author for just over three years. So although I'm a veteran interpreter, I'm still a baby author and publisher. I learned new things every day. So I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks. I guess. I've moved around. One thing that's interesting about me as I've moved around quite a bit. I grew up in Connecticut. I've lived in Nebraska, Boston, Hawaii, Seattle. And then now we've been in Nebraska for quite a while since Austin. Last Boston, Boston. Yes.   Michael Hingson  04:01 So can you say it pack your car and have a yard? Of course.   Kelly Brakenhoff  04:07 My uncle is from South Boston and so he married my aunt who's from upstate New York and listening to the to talk was so fun. I lived with them for a summer in college. And and I just had such is such a fun time, especially if they like had a little discussion or something you know, and they they get the voices raised and they'd start going in their accent they revert.   Michael Hingson  04:35 I lived in Winthrop, Massachusetts for three years and spent some time in the in the Boston area before then and back a little bit but I love the accent but I love Massachusetts. I love New England in general. And my wife and I have a story about Mr. Connecticut. We were going there for something and And I don't even remember what it was. And we were we were traveling the right way but we were traveling a lot further than we thought we needed to to get to Mystic So ever since I've been saying that one of the things about mystic is it moves around and doesn't stay in one place. So I'm sticking   Kelly Brakenhoff  05:17 to memory of mystic is going there on probably a sixth grade field trip. And you know afterwards, the field trip they take you through the gift shop and I bought a little pewter whale. Yeah, sure. I still have it somewhere in the bookcase somewhere in my house.   Michael Hingson  05:39 We stopped at a restaurant there. The second time we went to mystic and I'm still convinced it wasn't in the same place. It was the first time we went to a restaurant and sat right along the river and watch the drawbridge coming up, which was   Kelly Brakenhoff  05:55 that is really fun. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  05:57 definitely. Yeah. We love New England. And I hope that we get a chance to go back there. I have all sorts of stories about Boston. We went I went a lot over to Daniel hall into Quincy Market and ADA Durgan. Park. Have you ever eaten there?   Kelly Brakenhoff  06:13 I have it in there. Yes, I love Faneuil Hall.   Michael Hingson  06:16 I don't know whether Durgin Park is still open. I've heard it. I've heard that it is. But I'll have to tell you. Well, I'll tell you the story about Durgan Park. It's a Durgin Park, for those who don't know, is a restaurant that if it's still there, serves food family style, and they have tables along the side. That will seat for people. But you have to have four people, if you want to sit at one of those tables. If you have three, you sit at the long tables in the middle. If you have too long tables in the middle. They're very snotty about it. In fact, waitresses and waiters are hired to be snots. It's all an act, but they're supposed to be absolutely obnoxious. They're just what some people would say the typical clothes New England style of of being, if you will, but anyway, we go into the restaurant one night, and it was me and two other people and my guide dog Holland, who is a golden retriever with the most luscious eyes in the world. And the hostess said, you know, I'm just going to let you guys sit at one of the tables for four. So she seats us and the waitress comes over. And she says what are you people doing here? You can't sit at this table. And I said, well, the host has put it put us here. No, she didn't you just snuck in here. You can't sit at this table. And she yelled at us. And we said no. We got to sit be seated here because we have a guide dog under the table. No, you don't I don't believe that. You're not going to fool me with that. You can't sit here and she just went on. Then she goes away. And she comes back and she said you can't sit here I said, look under the table. Finally she looks. There's these eyes just staring back at her. And she just melts. And the next thing we know she goes away. One of the things about Durgin Park is that they serve a when they serve prime rib. It's a huge piece of prime rib that takes the whole plate. She comes back with this plate. She said somebody didn't eat much of their prime rib. Can I give it to the dog? And oh, it was great. But it's just fun memories of all over Boston. So I'm glad you had a chance to be there. Well, enough about me in that. So you've lived all over?   Kelly Brakenhoff  08:29 We have we've moved a lot and you haven't moved a lot recently. But when when I was younger, I moved quite a bit.   Michael Hingson  08:35 Yes. What caused you to be moving around. Um, we   Kelly Brakenhoff  08:39 grew up in Connecticut. And then in high school, my parents decided my mom's from Nebraska so and my dad's from upstate New York. So when I was in high school, we moved our family moved to Nebraska. And then when my husband and I first got married, he worked for a construction company who moved us to Hawaii for five years that works. That worked. That was a great honeymoon, We'd only been married six weeks. And so that was that was a five year honeymoon. That was awesome. Our first couple of kids were born there. And we decided that we after a year or so they really didn't get to see their grandparents very often. So he decided to move back to the mainland and we made a stop first in Seattle and then we came back to Nebraska. So we've been in here for quite a while but I really enjoyed getting to experience all the different cultures and all the different places and I also have a very soft spot in my heart for New England to   Michael Hingson  09:35 Well, it's great to live in various parts of the US shows what a wonderful and just incredible country we are with all sorts of different cultures that can really blend and meld together to form what we get to experience if we only keep the culture going as as really we are the melting pot and that just makes it so Great when we get to see that,   Kelly Brakenhoff  10:01 I totally agree i Yeah.   Michael Hingson  10:04 So how old are your kids now?   Kelly Brakenhoff  10:07 They are grown up. We have four kids, three boys and one girl. And so the oldest is 21 going to be 29. And our youngest just graduated from college last year. So he's 22 in Nebraska, and Nebraska. Huskers everybody's a Husker.   Michael Hingson  10:28 Go Huskers Go Big Red. Yep.   Kelly Brakenhoff  10:31 So um, but we have four grandkids too. So that's a lot of fun. And we're really lucky. They all live in town, so I get to see them quite a bit.   Michael Hingson  10:38 That works. So you see you fix it up. So you now have this this Braden half ghetto, if you will,   Kelly Brakenhoff  10:45 yes, my Twitter handle is actually in Brockville. Because one of my friends quite a while ago used to tease me that I was trying to create my own village. So we call it in Brock anvil.   Michael Hingson  10:59 There you go, that works. Nothing wrong with that. Well, so I know you're an author. And I know that you are an ASL interpreter, and so on, tell me how you got into being involved with ASL. And a little bit more about all that.   Kelly Brakenhoff  11:16 Sure. Um, I in high school, I volunteered at a camp for deaf kids. My parents wanted me to do something in the summer and stay out of trouble. So they kind of sent me to go volunteer. And at this camp. In the end, I didn't know any sign language. So I got a book. And I started trying to figure out a few signs before I first went to this camp. Of course, the first few weeks I was there, I had no idea what anyone was saying, because they were all using sign language. And I didn't know it. But by the end of the summer, I had learned quite a bit and I had made some really good friends. And I just kept learning during the school year, when they went when they were all gone. I kept taking classes and reading more books. And it actually turned out to be my, the language that I took when I was in college, it counted as my foreign language. And I just kept learning and hanging around with Deaf people. And eventually, my mentors in ASL, the deaf people that I was friends with, invited me to try interpreting for them. And I didn't, if I had known, I wasn't very good, but they were very kind. And they they asked me to interpret so I did and it just ended up kind of something I fell into. It wasn't something I intended to do. But it's become my whole life's work, and I really like it.   Michael Hingson  12:40 So is that kind of a full time job? Or are your vocation then?   Kelly Brakenhoff  12:43 Yeah, I would say it, it's my Well, it's hard to say what's my vocation because I also really love being an author, even though I haven't been published until recently. But I've been a writer my whole life in college, I actually majored in English. And I always wanted to be a writer, it just, I guess the interpreting thing just kind of was a very long detour. But I always wrote even when I was interpreting and so in raising my family and stuff, so once my kids started getting into high school and college, and I started looking around for something to fill some of my empty hours. That was when I really got serious about finishing my first book.   Michael Hingson  13:27 Well, from from an ASL standpoint, and interpreting it certainly is something that's, that's a little bit different. What have you learned about deafness and disabilities and so on from being involved in all of that,   Kelly Brakenhoff  13:41 oh, my goodness, we don't have enough there's not enough time in the day to talk about it's just changed my whole mindset, like, like, you've talked about that. I think it's just a way of looking at the world. Like a lot of people think that people who are deaf and hard of hearing, it's about your ears being broken, but it's really just a different way to move through life. So instead of a hearing world do like they have a visual world, so everything is visual. So it's like the opposite of what you experience now. So it's, it's just a way of moving through the world, you know that. And so instead of being like broken and something that needs to be fixed, it's just kind of a way of life. I guess. I just have a lot of respect. I've worked a lot in at the University of Nebraska. So I work with a lot of college students. And I've over the years done just Gosh, 20 Something different majors. I sit in on all the classes. I interpret what the teachers seen at the front of the class, and the discussions that the students do. And so I've gotten to learn a lot of things just by osmosis over the years and I have a really deep respect for the students because you know, their classmates sitting in the same room with them, they can listen to the lecture, write notes, you know, go online and do stuff all while this is all going on, whereas the deaf student has to sit there and watch me. If they want to take their own notes, they kind of have to look down and take their own notes, but then still keep an eye on me. And then if there's a PowerPoint, they're trying to watch that. And if there's a video, they're hoping that it has good captions, and so like, there's so many things going on, that it's amazing that they can get as much as they do out of the classes. And then of course, they have to study so much more afterwards, because a lot of times, they have to go back over the notes or back over the reading to see what they missed, because they were just, you know, a lot of their attention during the class is on me. So it's just given me a really healthy respect for how intelligent and how hard workers the students are. And I've just kind of seen that in all walks of life. I've interpreted for a lot of different situations, and different businesses and all kinds of things. And I just, I'm always in awe of how, how hard workers, the deaf students and just deaf adults in their job, or   Michael Hingson  16:13 how did the students then really get the job of notetaking done? Do they oftentimes have people who take notes for them? Or are they successful enough at taking notes themselves,   Kelly Brakenhoff  16:26 it really depends on the student and their preference. You know how some people don't mind having someone else take the notes, because then they can pay more attention to the interpreter and the PowerPoint and the teacher. But then other people maybe don't, you know, when you take notes, we could listen to the same speaker and your notes would be different than mine. And so some students don't really trust that another student is going to write down the same things that they would have written down if they were taking their own notes. So it really is a personal preference. But luckily, now, with the technology, I have a couple of students who, so they're deaf, and they use ASL and they use interpreters, but they also use cart, which is the captioning service. And so they'll have a laptop, or they also use like an otter, which is an app that the teacher wears a microphone and then it, it makes a transcript of everything that the teacher has said, and then they can save it. So I have a few students who even though they're, you know, pretty much dependent on the sign language for comprehension, they still use the transcript, because then they can go back later and like highlight the parts that they thought were important. And then it's kind of I think more in their control. Or if sometimes, like an English word has, you know, five different signs for it. And so if I do a sign, and they want to know what the exact English word was, they can look at the transcript and see oh, okay, that's the word that, you know, I need to remember or that's the word that I want to know. So I think it's great that they have all these tools. Because, gosh, back in the day, when I first started, none of that existed. And a lot of times, they would just have someone else take notes for them. And if that person wasn't a good note taker, they were kind of out of luck.   Michael Hingson  18:25 We use otter actually to do the transcribing of all of these podcasts. So that one unstoppable mindset is published. There's a written transcription as well. So we use otter to do that. And oftentimes, I will use otter to transcribe a meeting, or make it possible, make it possible for for people to come into the podcast, and listen and watch if you will in real time, which makes a lot of sense. So I found that otter works really well.   Kelly Brakenhoff  19:00 Yeah, I've tried several different apps and different services, because I have a thing to like you, I really want to make my website as accessible as possible, and my appearances as accessible as possible. So I get transcripts made of all the podcasts that I do whether the provider does or not. And so I've tried several different services, and I do agree that I think otter is a it produces a good product, and the price is good, too. So   Michael Hingson  19:33 I certainly right, you're right, the price is certainly right. But also, it does a good job and it's improving over time. Some people have said they're better systems than otter and I haven't really tried other services. And the people who help with the podcasts have looked at various things and we all end up settling on otter it really works well.   Kelly Brakenhoff  19:54 That's good to know. That's good to know, because a couple of years ago I tested several and I haven't read rechecked back into it. And the last six months, it's great. I think the one of the good benefits of the pandemic has been, how everyday people have realized that speech to text. And other, just things that we used to think of as being accessible for people with disabilities are now helpful for like everyone. And people have just come to realize that with all the Zoom meetings, and all of the the work from home solutions, so things that used to be just in the realm of special are now every day and they're all getting better, because we all demand that they get better. So the AI captions and everything are so much better than they were even just a few years ago.   Michael Hingson  20:47 Well, and then look at that you bring a very good point to light, which is that oftentimes, there are things that we use, that when other people start to use them first of all makes them much, much more affordable. But also, that will cause them to improve a lot more than otherwise they would have look at Dragon Naturally Speaking that started out as Dragon Dictate and did okay. And now Dragon is a lot better. I don't think that it transcribes as well as otter does in terms of plugging in punctuations, and so on. But I'm not surprised or wouldn't be surprised if that improves over time. But when you look at what otter does, it's pretty incredible.   Kelly Brakenhoff  21:31 It is it really is. And the What's incredible to me is the the short amount of time that it's gotten better. So I think that's great. But like you said, I think I guess it's sad to me that it takes it took a pandemic for enough people to use the tools that we've all been using for years to you know, demand a higher quality and a lower price. But I guess you know, if that's one good thing that comes out of all this, and that's great.   Michael Hingson  22:02 I think we tend to just get locked in to doing things one way and we, for whatever reason tend to be very slow at looking at other options. And you're right, the pandemic has made a significant difference and look at how many people are using zoom as opposed to pre pandemic, yet, Zoom has been there. The other thing that we've noticed along the way with Zoom is that they have deliberately and absolutely focused on accessibility and inclusion. So when a person who is blind encounters a problem with zoom in something is working right. There is a process to report that and we find that very quickly, it gets resolved, because they have a whole team working on issues to make sure that Zoom continues to be very inclusive.   Kelly Brakenhoff  22:55 Yes, I agree. Because I think when we first started with Zoom, the there was no, the only way you could have captions was hiring a person to do the captions. And then once they started making them automatic and everything that that was huge. That was that was huge. That's I'm glad to hear that they have a team doing it. And I agree, their improvements have have been amazing.   Michael Hingson  23:23 I don't want to put zoom on the spot, but have you compared otter with, if you compare it to otter with the zoom, automatic closed captioning,   Kelly Brakenhoff  23:31 um, I have, I guess if I just stop and think about it, I think they're pretty similar. What's actually kind of funny is when I will do a large meeting on Zoom, where I'm one of the interpreters. So I'm one of the little heads in the Brady Bunch group of people on Zoom. So I'll interpret for some of the deaf people in the meeting. And what I'll do sometimes is I'll turn on the captions because, you know, occasionally I might have a hard time hearing someone talking, or I might miss something or whatever. And so I can look at the captions and see if you know try to correct myself or, you know, check my accuracy. And yeah, so I have seen some pretty bad interpretations on our transcript on on Zoom and on otter, where things just don't come out. Right. It's, it's definitely for people who speak like standard slow American English once you have any kind of an accent or any kind of, if you speak too quickly, then the captions pretty much everywhere are a lot harder to understand. But they like I said, I still think they've gotten a lot better, which   Michael Hingson  24:48 I only asked that just out of curiosity because I know that the service is there to do automatic transcription or captioning. And I've never, never asked anyone exactly how well it does, except I've heard that it does a good job, but I've never compared it to like otter or something. And I bought otter for teens. And the reason I did that is so that it is now set up and integrated with Zoom. So it automatically starts when I opened a Zoom meeting. And what I do usually is unless there's a need to I will stop it. But it automatically starts when I come into a meeting that I that I initiate, and that's great, because then I don't even have to think about it. And it's a an effort of volition if I want to stop it.   Kelly Brakenhoff  25:42 Oh, yeah, that's great. I didn't realize you can set it up that way. That's awesome.   Michael Hingson  25:45 Yeah, the otter for teams. Home, I think, unless the price has changed, it was like $240 a year. And if you're a nonprofit, or whatever, it's half that. So it's not even a lot of money to do it, which is what's great.   Kelly Brakenhoff  26:00 That is That's awesome. Well, thank you. So the more users that use things, then the cheaper the price for everyone. And I think that's what we're seeing now with a lot of these tools.   Michael Hingson  26:12 It is ironic that we have to go through something like a pandemic to see things become more available, and for people to start to see that maybe some of the tools that say a person who is blind or low vision, or a person who is deaf or hard of hearing uses might very well be relevant for the rest of us. I'm still amazed that in driving with people using cell phones, we don't find more automatic use of the verbal technology voiceover for Apple and talkback on an Android, I'm surprised that we don't see more use of those verbal systems. In the driving experience, there's no reason not to do that, and do more to keep people's eyes on the road. Unfortunately, we're going the other way, we're getting more driving experiences with touchscreens, which means somebody's got to watch the screen, or look down and then quickly look back at the road. Why should that even have to happen today? Because we have such good voice technology. And we can also have good voice input technology to go along with it.   Kelly Brakenhoff  27:21 That's an excellent point. That's, that's so true. Yes, there's definitely you know, all the fancy touchscreens. But when I got my latest car, I had to sit in the driveway with the owner's manual for an hour just to figure out how to reprogram the clock. So you definitely don't want to be doing any of that while you're on the road. Well,   Michael Hingson  27:42 if you and I, I love Tesla's and I think that the technology is great, it is demonstrating the state of the art technology that's out there. But it's all controlled by a touchscreen, which means a blind passenger, I can't even do what a passenger would do to tune the radio or turn on a podcast or turn on whatever the services are available, much less anything else, because it's all touchscreen. And there's no reason for that today, we should be able to keep people's eyes more on the road. Even if you have the Tesla copilot function, which can take over a good part of the driving experience. It's not an autonomous vehicle software, but it can help with the driving experience. People should be keeping their eyes on the road not watching a touchscreen. And I'm still amazed that we're not seeing more people recognize the value of audio input and output.   Kelly Brakenhoff  28:36 I did not realize that I wrote in my first Tesla just a few months ago, and it was really neat, but I didn't I guess I just assumed that they had voice input things. I mean, wow, that's that's really shocking. as fancy as that whole system is that is very surprising. Well, let me let me rephrase that Ilan and say, hey,   Michael Hingson  28:59 well, let me rephrase it a little bit. There is availability of voice input for some things, but it's not an automatic process. So you have to invoke it, then you have to do something, I think to make it work every time you want to use it. What I'm saying is, it should be as much a part of the driving experience as anything else. And I'm saying it should be more part of the driving experience than using a touchscreen, it should be automatic. And we don't do that. We're too young to eyesight and we think that eyesight is the only game in town. Just like I'm sure that people who are deaf and hard of hearing would say that most people think that hearing is the only game in town. And in the in reality is neither is true. Exactly. I've said for years that I've said for years that people with disability, well, people who have eyesight, have their own disability and that is their light dependent. They can't do things without light Thomas Edison as the Americans with Disabilities Back would define it developed a reasonable accommodation for light dependent people when he created the light bulb. Let's get real, and I and I don't have the stitches. Lee it's true. You know, it's it's unfortunate that people are so locked into doing things one way that they're missing opportunities to make driving safer. But there you go.   Kelly Brakenhoff  30:22 I love that. I love that idea. I love that idea. I think that should be used to make that a thing as a political movement. I love that.   Michael Hingson  30:31 Yeah, well, we got to get Elon to go along with it.   Kelly Brakenhoff  30:34 Well, you know, he's kind of busy with Twitter right now. So maybe that all wrapped up, then he can he can focus his brain power on this?   Michael Hingson  30:43 Well, once he gets it set up, and if he's gonna do Twitter, then we'll start doing tweets. Oh, there you go. There you go. What a world we live in right now. So you said that you've done a lot of writing, you've been very much involved in writing, since college and so on. Why do you like writing so much?   Kelly Brakenhoff  31:07 Honestly, I don't know. I think it's just how I think how I process things. It's communication, talking to people talking to people like you. That's just kind of how I think it's just, just what I do is is who I am. That's a pretty simple answer.   Michael Hingson  31:26 We'll put Hey, it works. It works. So you said you just pretty recently got involved in starting to actually write books?   Kelly Brakenhoff  31:36 Yeah, I think it was 2014. I joined NaNoWriMo for the first time, which for people who haven't heard of that, it stands for National Novel Writing Month, and it's in November, where, gosh, by this day, by last year, I think it was around 750,000 people around the world, try to write 16 167 words a day for 30 days, and you come up with a 50,000 word manuscript by the end of the month. And that was signing up for that challenge was because I'm kind of competitive. So if I sign up for a challenge like that, I'm gonna do it. So that was like the thing that broke the barrier for me of just having ideas and just wanting to write and whatever and actually finishing a manuscript for the first time. That's what kind of gave me that push to actually do it.   Michael Hingson  32:33 So what did you publish your own books? Are they published through a publisher or what?   Kelly Brakenhoff  32:38 Yes, they are. They're self published, I tried for about a year to publish my firt, or to find an agent and all of that for my first one. And then at the same time, I was also checking into self publishing. And I don't know I think just a lot of factors kind of all converged. And I just decided at the end that self publishing was was the way to go. I'm kind of a control freak. And I like to, I like to have the my input into how to make you know, I hire my whole team. So I have an editor and a cover designer and and proofreaders and all of that stuff. And I get to decide what the finished product ends up to be. And it turns out that, yeah, I'm kind of bossy I guess.   Michael Hingson  33:23 You have a publicist who helps with the PR, and all that. I do.   Kelly Brakenhoff  33:27 I do. It's a it's called creative edge is the one that I use. And, and they've really, I've really enjoyed being part of that group.   Michael Hingson  33:37 I met Mickey a couple of months ago, actually, for the first time, he was introduced to me by someone else that we interviewed on the unstoppable mindset podcast. And she said, you know, he works with a lot of authors who might very well have interesting stories for you. And so that's how we met him. And we've actually started working with him as well. We're just getting started. But having written thunder dog, which was, and we're blessed by the fact that it was a number one New York Times bestseller, and then was published by Thomas Nelson part of HarperCollins. Now, but then we self published our second book, which was called running with Roselle, which was kind of more for youth, but more adults by it than then kids do. And it's the story of me growing up and Rozelle growing up. And then how we met after she became a guide dog in training, and she became my guide dog, and you know, kind of went from there, but I love writing, but I haven't done that much of it. We are starting to work on a third book, and that'll be a lot of fun. And we just got a book contract for that as well. So that's pretty exciting.   Kelly Brakenhoff  34:46 That's great. Congratulations. I didn't know that. That's awesome.   Michael Hingson  34:51 But But I'm curious. You've written I guess basically what two different kinds of books children's books and mysteries. How do you do mystery How do you come up with a plot? And how do you? Do you make it all come together? Because I think mystery writing has to be if you do it well, it has to be a real challenge to come up with a not only a plot, but create all of the scenes, do all the things that you need to do. And essentially, keep the solution hidden until the end of the book unless there's some value in presenting that earlier. And it's really how you get there.   Kelly Brakenhoff  35:30 Yeah, that's a funny question. Because I definitely write in extremes. I mean, I write 70,000, word mysteries, and then I write 500, word picture books for the children's books. So very different, very different approaches. But yeah, the mysteries and thrillers are kind of the things that I have always read my whole life. So I thought when I wanted to do that first NaNoWriMo challenge, I decided to kind of mash up all of my experiences. Like I said, I've lived in Hawaii and Nebraska, the East Coast, Seattle. So I kind of took all of those different elements working at a college and I put them all together into this murder mystery. And I got about two thirds of the way through and realized exactly what you said that writing a mystery is hard. It's actually one of I think, the most difficult genres to do because exactly for the reason you said, you want to make that mystery puzzle complicated enough that it can't be solved too early. Mystery readers are very smart people. And so it's very challenging coming up with enough suspects and clues to keep people guessing until the end. I guess I just love a challenge. I think it's it's fun, but it's also just what I love to read and write. So a read so it was kind of the most natural thing to write.   Michael Hingson  36:59 I think you just hit on it. Essentially. mysteries are puzzles and puzzles are as good as it gets. Who are your favorite mystery writers?   Kelly Brakenhoff  37:10 Oh, I have so many.   Michael Hingson  37:12 Yeah, me too. Yeah.   Kelly Brakenhoff  37:15 I think like my, you know, the ones I kind of grew up with was like Sue Grafton. So that letter A is for those Jana Ivanovic. There's Stephanie Plum Siri   Michael Hingson  37:27 plum. Hey, come on. We all love diesel, but that's another story.   Kelly Brakenhoff  37:30 Oh, yeah, diesel's awesome, too. Well, I'm sure being you live. You said you live in New Jersey, right? Oh, yes. Yeah. So you're very familiar with tenants. Definitely. Trenton definitely fun. And then I also just love like John Grisham and James Patterson and Michael Connelly. I mean, gosh, I just, that's all. I haven't really met very many mysteries that I didn't like.   Michael Hingson  37:54 Yeah. My my favorite still is Rex Stout with the neuro wolf series. Oh, yeah. Yeah, they I've never solved any of his books before the end. And I worked at it. I love Mary Higgins Clark. But I was able to basically figure out all of the, the mean people in that before the end of the book, still, they were fun to read   Kelly Brakenhoff  38:20 is fun, right? I mean, as long as it's a good story, even if guests are having an idea of did it by the end, as long as the character still keep you in it. And a lot of times this setting is kind of a character to then I don't mind, you know, reading to the end to confirm that I was right. I think what's funny since I became a writer, and I don't know, you can tell me if this is true for yourself. But since I became a writer, an author, I kind of ruined for reading, like I read a lot. But I read now to learn and to see what when I read a really good book, I love to pick it apart and and see why it's good. And not just the structure of it. But like if I if that paragraph was beautiful, I'll go back and read that paragraph several times and try to figure out what is so great about that paragraph, or when someone throws a twist or a turn in or I thought I knew who it was. And then at the end, I find out it was someone else. I just love that. That thrill of like, oh, you fooled me, you know, and I really like to think about all of that. But that means that a lot of times I'm not really enjoying the book. I'm like studying the book. And so I have found that if if I really get so sucked into a book that I am not doing that, that means that it's a really, really good book because if it took me out of my analysis into just enjoying it, then that's a me that's the mark of a very good book.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Sue Graf passed away from cancer did her last book ever get published? Because I don't think she finished it, did she?   Kelly Brakenhoff  39:59 It did not odds are one of those.   Michael Hingson  40:01 Zero Yeah,   Kelly Brakenhoff  40:03 yeah. The sad things. Is it never it's, it's not finished. I don't even know how far she got in it. But it wasn't finished enough to be published. Yeah,   Michael Hingson  40:12 yeah, I guess that's kind of what happened. But her mysteries were definitely some of the best. And we read them all. And some twice, which is always fun if I if I want to read a book a second time. And I don't have that many hours in the day that that's easy to do. But if I want to read a book a second time, then I know that there is something about it that I must have enjoyed. And we read here, a lot of books on audio, audible and other sources. The reason we do is that instead of watching TV, we pipe books through the house, my wife has learned to listen to audio. So we listen to books together. What I've been occasionally finding are editor mistakes where they said something and then later on referring back something, they say something different. Somebody messed up in editing it, and I don't see it often. But I do occasionally see it and I always find them. Which is a fun.   Kelly Brakenhoff  41:15 It is it's i It's funny, because, you know, even though my books are self published, I work really hard not to have those kinds of errors. Yeah, they go through an editor, at least one editor, numerous BETA readers, numerous proofreaders. And then, you know, six months after I published it all open it up, and I see a typo. And it's like, at first I used to get so frustrated at that. And then now I saw something one time on Facebook, it was like, cheers to you, you typo you made it through three rounds of editing, 10 proofreaders and you still made it you you go, you know,   Michael Hingson  41:58 I when I was in college, we used in freshman and sophomore physics, a series of books called the Berkeley physics series, because it came out of there. And I had a dorm mate, who looked in detail at every single book, looking for a mistake, because he said a lot of books, there are editing mistakes. And he said he finally found one in one of the Berkeley physics books, but he said it was so fun looking just to see any error. And he couldn't find them in the Berkeley physics series. It was just incredible that he spent that time. On the other hand, he was an excellent student. So I guess he learned from it as he was reading.   Kelly Brakenhoff  42:43 Have a niece who's a doctor and they actually some textbook company paid her. I don't know if she just got free books. Or if she actually got paid her last year of med school, they they paid her to go through the as she was going through the textbook to note down any errors that she found.   Michael Hingson  43:03 See, it's always good to to read as much as possible and proofread as much as possible. And you're right. There's nothing like a good editor to help.   Kelly Brakenhoff  43:12 Right, exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  43:14 So how hard was it to write your first mystery? Oh, must have a lot   Kelly Brakenhoff  43:22 of courage. And it was a lot of it was a lot of I think I must have gone through 10 or 15 jobs. It took me five years to finish it, it was ugly, there was a lot of tears. But you know, you just learned so much I kind of consider it like getting a master's degree. I just did it at home with my, my own process. But you know, I just had to learn a lot. You have to be humble, you have to be willing to accept criticism and advice from other people. But I feel like it taught me a lot. And of course, then the second book teaches you even more and the third and you know, each one you do, I think you just learn more, either about yourself or about writing. I'd love to read books about writing craft and how to do better. You know, I want every single book that I write to be better than the last. I think most authors are that way.   Michael Hingson  44:15 They get easier the more you write. That's a   Kelly Brakenhoff  44:18 funny question, because I'm right in the middle of writing my fourth mystery right now. And I've been stalled for quite a while. And what it's taught me is just about myself and my process and what I thought my process was versus what I'm finding. I thought I could speed it up, but it's actually making me slow down. So that means that I was not speeding it up correctly. If that makes sense.   Michael Hingson  44:46 Yeah. Well, and I don't know whether it becomes easier or not. I have been very blessed when we did thunder dog. I had someone to collaborate and help with it Susie Florrie And that happened because she actually found Me, because she was writing a book called Dawn tales, which was 17 stories about dogs who had stories. And she wanted to include Roselle in that. And she did. But as we discussed my story, she said, You should really write a book. And so we got started down that road. And I met her agent who became my agent, Chip McGregor on thunder dog. And we, we had a good time and collaborated well. And I think that there was a lot of value in that for me, because I know that I don't have the writing experience as such. But I know what's good when I read it. And I also know that I can add value. So we really had a very collaborative process of writing thunder dog, a lot of it is hers, and a lot of it is mine directly. And we blended the two which was great. Now with the third book that we're getting, which is getting ready to do, which is going to talk about fear and controlling fear and people learning that they can overcome fear and not let it blind them, if you will, to being able to make decisions. The working title is a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, and I'm doing that with a friend of Susie's Carrie, Carrie Wyatt can't. Because Suzy is in a Ph. D. program. Yeah, we love the title. We'll see what the publisher does. We've got a contract for it. We'll see what the publisher does with it over time. But so far everybody likes it. That was a carry creation, because I was going to call it blinded by fear, which was more accurate in some senses. But I think a guide dogs Guide to Being brave is a lot better title.   Kelly Brakenhoff  46:35 Yeah, it reminds me of that one. Is it the Art of Racing in the Rain? Yeah, yeah, it kind of reminds me of something like that, where it's it's a little off of what the theme of the book is, but it's still engaging, and it makes you want to know more about it.   Michael Hingson  46:54 It was a good book. And so   Kelly Brakenhoff  46:57 you said something that really resonated with me, you said, I know, it's good when I read it. And I think that's a big obstacle for beginning writers. And is that usually, if you're a writer, you're a reader first. And so I've read tons and tons of great books, and I know what great literature is, and I know what a great story is. And then when I write my first one, it's not very good. So you kind of have that, that huge gap between what you know is good and what you've produced. And so it's, it's, it's hard, you have to overcome that, that feeling of, of my stuff is really bad, you know, and then you have to work really hard to make it as good as, as you want it to be, you know, as good as it is to be able to actually share with the world, you know, to get up to that level of what your your bar is the bar that you've set. And so I think that's something that stands it's a barrier to a lot of people. And that's where I think a good editor comes. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  48:05 Yeah. Well look at John Grisham. You mentioned earlier the first book he wrote If I recall was a time to kill but it was the third one published the first one that he wrote, and it was published was the firm and then I'm trying to remember what the second one was. Was it the Pelican Brief the Pelican Brief right? And then A Time to Kill, which was the Jake Brigantes initiator, if you will. But if you look at all of them, you can see how the the books evolved over time in his writing style. So it's it is a natural progression. And I mentioned Rex Stout, a Nero Wolf, if you go back and read fair to Lance, which was his first book, and you compare it with especially much later writings, you can see changes, but you can see where everything is starting from and you get engaged in in fact, fair Lance was not the first mirror wolf book I read. by a longshot. It wasn't the first, but having gone back and read it. Even though everyone in the book all the characters developed a fair amount and since then, and his writing style improved. It was engaging. Mm hmm. Well, tell me about your mystery series,   Kelly Brakenhoff  49:26 sir. Um, it's about a college administrator named Cassandra Sato and she lives in Hawaii. She gives up her her life in Hawaii to move to Nebraska because she wants to accept her dream job at a tiny college called Morton college in the middle of nowhere in Nebraska. And she and her eventual goal is to become a college administrators or college president. So she thinks this is you know, the Path is gonna get her there. But of course, moving from Hawaii to Nebraska is a very, very large cultural, cultural shift. And so she encounters all kinds of problems, discrimination, barriers, everything. And a few months into her job, a student turns up dead on campus and see has to be part of the group of people who figures out what happened to the student and then find justice.   Michael Hingson  50:28 Yeah, come on. Cassandra really did. And she's been hiding a whole series. Yeah, that's   Kelly Brakenhoff  50:33 the end of the series. It was Cassandra.   Michael Hingson  50:35 That will come later on about the hundreds book, right. That's awesome. When Karen and my wife and I are talking about who did it in various books, we, we usually do things like that. We've been reading a lot of the JE NACHA as well, we read a chance to but the JD Robb books, the in depth series, have you read those. And so I read very many of those now, we we oftentimes will spin a story how Eve Dallas really did it. Or Roark did it and had just a lot of fun with it. But again, a great series of books is there's a lot of sex in those books, but they're still taking Ross. Yeah, they're great mysteries.   Kelly Brakenhoff  51:20 Yeah, a lot of times people like the ones that I write well, obviously, I have four kids and grandkids. And my kids would cringe if I if they had to read a sex scene that I wrote. So, you know, my kids were like, high school and college age when I started writing. So I decided all the sex in my books, there's gonna be behind closed doors, and yeah, nobody, nobody wants to have their mom. Yeah, no.   Michael Hingson  51:46 I've, I've talked to several authors who say that who, one who said I would never any more, I would never let my daughter or my wife, wife read the books, or I changed the sex so that they could read them. But the value of having them read them as they're great critics, and so it's worthwhile. But yeah, it is fun to to see how people react. But, you know, a mystery. Doesn't need to have all the violence thrown at you right out in the open, which is why puzzles are so great. At James Patterson tends to be a little bit more violent, but not nearly as violent as he could be. So we we've always enjoyed Of course, the Alex Cross series.   Kelly Brakenhoff  52:33 Yeah, it's there's such a huge variety in Yeah, the violence level and all that stuff. I myself, I have a pretty vivid imagination. I don't really need people to spell some of that stuff out for me. My mysteries are technically like cozy mysteries, which kind of means that there's no like blood on the page. There's no swearing, there's no sex. So like, even you know, high school kids can read them and, and that kind of thing. So I guess that's just, I just write what I like. So that's only because I like to read. So that's what I like to write.   Michael Hingson  53:12 Come on. That's only because Cassandra is trying to hide everything, but we know the truth.   Kelly Brakenhoff  53:18 That's right. She's really Voldemort.   Michael Hingson  53:21 Yeah, she's really Voldemort. Speaking of another good series of books   Kelly Brakenhoff  53:28 that's that's a whole different ballgame.   Michael Hingson  53:30 But but you know, looking at the Harry Potter books, again is another one where going from Book One through Book Seven, just how it evolved. And they're so fun.   Kelly Brakenhoff  53:42 They are they're definitely one of my I, I like all genres. So yeah, I loved Harry Potter Lord of the Rings, Narnia. I mean, you name it, it's I thought during the pandemic that I would just read all day every day but it turns out I actually have to do other stuff too.   Michael Hingson  53:59 So I hate it when that happens.   Kelly Brakenhoff  54:02 There is no laundry fairy I hate to be the person to tell you this but there is no laundry fairy,   Michael Hingson  54:07 I haven't found one either. And I get to do the clothes washing at our house which is fine. So for me, I love the brainless activities on Sunday. So there are three tasks that well for that I do on Sundays. It starts with doing the laundry or starting the laundry. Another is we I take the cat box out we use a litter called litter one it's not sand, it's all pine kernels. And you buy them and they come in a disposable box. So we just use in different new box every week. And it's about the same as using regular sand that you buy in the in the store. But at the end of the week, you just throw the whole box out and put a new one up and the cat is very demanding when it comes time to change the box. So that happens on Sunday. I take the trash out on Sunday. And then we have a little If we do get housecleaning help during the week, Karen's in wheelchairs, he has been in a chair her whole life. So it's kind of hard for us to do some of those things. So we do have a housekeeper that comes on Thursdays, in fact, and today's Thursday. So Jeanette is here, but we have a robot vacuum and I do the vacuuming again on Sunday with the robot in our bedroom, because that's also where Alamo my guide dog sleeps. So we get all those. So those are my four tasks on Sunday. And they're they're all pretty brainless in a sense. So I can read while they're going on, which is fun. And Karen is a quilter. So she's usually in sewing. And and she's reading the same thing I read. So it's a question right now, who finishes which JD Robb book first?   Kelly Brakenhoff  55:44 Yeah, that is definitely the the good thing about audiobooks is being able to multitask on some of those things that you don't have to pay so much attention to.   Michael Hingson  55:54 Tell me about your dupe the deaf dog ASL series.   Kelly Brakenhoff  55:58 Well, that is the second series that I started after I finished the mystery novels, I kind of had a moment where I realized that I, you know, I started my own publishing company. And I just had a thought, I mean, it's kind of cliche, it was actually a dream that just came to me of like, what I could do with this publishing company, if I just kind of unleashed it. And so I came up with the idea of, of this orange, English spaniel dog who is deaf and all of the people in his or all of his family can hear. And so it's just about different experiences that he has as the only person in a family of hearing people, and trying to get deaf and hard of hearing children to see themselves and their everyday life experiences on our pages of our books. But I also want kids who can hear to understand what it's like to hear differently. We just finished the third book, and I'm actually actually we just finished the fourth book, the third book just came out. But the fourth book is in production right now. And I had no idea when it started, what it was going to end up being but it's actually turned out to be more successful. And I would say even more fun than my mysteries, the mysteries are kind of like my thing that I enjoy. As far as, like you said, creating the puzzle and, and the challenge of it, but the Duke, the deaf dog ASL series, is kind of what I feel like I'm taking my 30 Whatever years of interpreting and hanging around with really cool Deaf people, and then like sharing that with the world.   Michael Hingson  57:49 So it's not a mystery series.   Kelly Brakenhoff  57:53 No, it is not. They are picture books. So they're only like less than 500 words. And each one is a different situation that do gets into so there's like a different message. And each one more than 90% of children who are born deaf or hard of hearing have parents that can hear I did a lot of research to before I started the books, and there's very few books for young children that have deaf and hard of hearing characters. Once you get into like high school age, or even beyond, there's more books that have deaf and hard of hearing characters. But at the kindergarten, first grade age, there's very few books. And you know, my kids had lots and lots of choices of books to read. So I feel like deaf kids did have lots and lots of choices, books that have characters like them in there. So each book has a different message like the first one was called nevermind. And the message is that everyone deserves to be included in conversations. I mean, how many times do we tell people nevermind when they ask us to repeat ourselves? Or maybe we have, like a older parent or spouse who doesn't hear well, or even like someone who's just a little bit slower to act, or to understand a lot of times we just get impatient and say forget it. I'll explain later. And this book like after I published that first book, I've had so many deaf people come up to me and tell me stories of times when they've been told nevermind. And they thanked me for sharing their stories because they want hearing people to understand how hurtful those words are and what it feels to be left out. So I have a pretty long list of situations I've seen throughout the years that I plan to incorporate into the books and I I'm only stopped by my amount of time and and money to hire illustrators at this point.   Michael Hingson  59:55 Back to mysteries. Of course there's the cat who series Lily and Jackson Brown and also Rita Mae Brown and sneaky pie Brown. But in thinking of the cat who books, why not have a Duke, the Duke, the deaf dog series, solving mysteries, and also deal with all the frustrations that Duke has of trying to get his humans to listen? And how he has to figure things out, not being in a hearing world himself.   Kelly Brakenhoff  1:00:27 Yeah, that's a good thought. I'm actually like I said, I have so many ideas that it's really limited by my time and money, but um, the picture books are more like so Duke's a dog. Right? It's more like he's like a pitbull, like, they stand on their hind legs. And they kind of like even his dad wears like a tie. So they kind of are like human, but they're dogs. But it's a nice way to be able to show diversity and like breeds of dogs and colors of dogs and abilities and body types and stuff without actually having like different children in there. So it's kind of like, like, I don't know, if you remember the Mercer Mayer series, little critter. That's kind of what I thought of, as I   Michael Hingson  1:01:13 was able to read them. Yeah,   Kelly Brakenhoff  1:01:15 that was like my, my model, I guess of who I thought of it's like, so Duke is more just like a character, a fictional character. But I do have a couple of other ideas for series for like middle grade age kids. And those would be mysteries, and those would use some characters. I have a couple of young characters in the Cassandra Sacco series. I did a Halloween short story last year called scavenger hunt. And that two of the main characters in there were 10 year old kids. And so I think I want to do a separate series with them and have those be mysteries because I agree, I think I can incorporate a lot of the things that I know about the Deaf community and Deaf culture and ASL into a mystery, and they get kind of fun that way. And   Michael Hingson  1:02:05 it's great that you're using this opportunity to teach people more about deaf and hard of hearing. And not only as a culture, but as just as much an included an inclusive part of society as everyone else. I am concerned when you're talking about do looking like a character and looking a little bit like people. I just don't want to see a new book coming out about do the deaf dog ASL series goes to Animal Farm just saying. But Duly noted. So So you you did one of your books. As a Kickstarter campaign?   Kelly Brakenhoff  1:02:43 We did. Um, the the most recent one that just published in January, I did my first Kickstarter campaign.   Michael Hingson  1:02:51 Now why did you do that? What brought Kickstarter into it.   Kelly Brakenhoff  1:02:54 I went to this conference last fall in Las Vegas, and I met some authors who publish their books first on Kickstarter, before they release them more widely and other stores. And listening to them made me realize that Kickstarter might be a good way for me to reach new readers. The nice thing about Kickstarter, which I think you said that you've supported a couple of campaigns, honestly, before I had gone to this conference, I did not think starter was something I needed to do, I hadn't really gone on there, I hadn't pledged sponsored anybody else's project. So I just kind of went into it blindly. But I realized that the cool thing about Kickstarter is you get to develop a direct relationship with people who want to buy your product. So in my case, it's a book, but I've gone on there. And since then, I've supported all kinds of different projects. I've done a board game, and a coloring book and a purse. And I mean, there's so many neat, creative ideas that people come up with and put them on Kickstarter, just to see. So then the the customers can come on and pledge money towards that product and say, Yes, I think that's a great idea. The world needs that. And I'm willing to plunk down my money to pre order that thing that you want to make. And so if enough of those people say that they'll pre order the product, then the project is successful, and it funds and then the person who listed the project goes ahead and makes it. So that's been really exciting. But you have this direct relationship where the creator is sending you messages and keeping you updated on the progress like, okay, you know, we're finished in publishing, you know, in the case of publishing, you say, Okay, we finished the illustration and we're waiting for them to be printed and then I actually personally boxed everything up and mailed them to the people with personal note and some extra stickers and everything. So I think I'd really enjoy that contact with people and that communication because it goes both ways, then people can actually respond to me. If I just sell stuff on Amazon or in the local bookstore, I don't really know who buys my, my books. And so the Kickstarter has been a really cool way to just kind of, I guess, learn more about what people want and what people like about them. And it's kind of a neat way to have this direct relationship. It made me I funded my first project successfully, we raised $2,500, which was enough money to buy some hardcover books. In the past, I haven't been able to afford doing those books, as a small publishers. So it's great to be able to order those books and get those into people's hands they came with, they're very well done on nice thick paper with really vivid color illustrations. And then there's photos on each page of different ASL signs. And the photos are really clear. So it was definitely worth I guess, the experience. So I'm actually going to be doing another one in July for the, for the next Duke book. But as a person, like you said, you you have a contract to do your next book. And so you get a lot of times authors will get paid in advance, this is kind of almost the same thing where I'm making this idea. And then I'm, like pre paying some of the costs that it cost to produce the book, like, you know, the illustrating, or the printing, or all the different things that are associated with making the book, it's like a way for me to almost get like an advance except this directly coming from the customers instead of from the publishing company.   Michael Hingso

This is Not a History Lecture
85. Vacation Detitanations for the Ultra Wealthy

This is Not a History Lecture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 127:11


Hey y'all and welcome back to another episode of This is Not a History Lecture. Today, your host Kat tells us the history of Martha's Vineyard, then Kaleigh gives us an overview of one of the wonders of the new world, Machu Picchu.Let's talk!Twitter: @TINAHLpodcastEmail: thisisnotahistorylecture@gmail.comRemember to rate us wherever you can! 

2 Girls 1 Podcast
Sign Language Is Rapidly Evolving in VR [ENCORE]

2 Girls 1 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 54:20


In keeping with our recent coverage of VR communities, we're sharing this encore episode about deaf users of VRchat and the volunteer translators making a big impact in social VR. Enjoy! -- Original Show Notes // February 3, 2020 -- Deaf users of immersive social platforms like VRchat can face a tough time communicating. Unlike other social media, VR spaces rely on verbal and physical communication rather than text. And sign language with current-gen VR controllers is limiting and clunky at best. But groups of volunteer interpreters inside VR worlds are hard at work making sure these spaces are more welcoming and accessible for deaf users. The result is an empowering community of "Helping Hands." This week, Alli and Jen speak with Quentin, a 19-year-old volunteer translator and VR enthusiast, who is bridging the communications gap between deaf and hearing people in VRchat. Quentin (a hearing person) shares how and why he learned American Sign Language, the tech limitations of signing in VR, and how sign language is evolving in VR to accommodate differences between headsets and motion tracking. A transcript of this episode was provided by @Zazzy_chan! You can read it here: http://bit.ly/2UJ1Qcz Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast
She-Hulk S1E4 "Is This Not Real Magic?" Review (A Marvel Comic Universe Podcast) LoS442

Legends of S.H.I.E.L.D.: An Unofficial Marvel Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 61:54


The Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Lauren, Agent Michelle, Agent Chris, and Producer of the show Director SP discuss the 2022 Marvel Studios Disney+ She-Hulk Series fourth episode “Is This Not Real Magic?” The Team debriefs you with a Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. exclusive episode synopsis, a look at the episode's creative team, all about Wongers and Madisynn, that  wedding what Wongers referring to, Morris Walter's shovel, what is the acceptable amount of time before discussing spoilers openly, the 4th Wall Break reviews, the She-Hulk dating scene, the She-Hulk or Jennifer Walters decision, Donny Blaze, agreement under duress, the snowy demon destination, the new Sorcerer Supreme onboarding process, and the amazin 104 year old Hype-Man. The Team also discusses the top Marvel Studios news stories over the past week Chadwick Boseman Wins Posthumous Emmy for ‘What If' Voice-Over Performance, the Avengers Campus' Shang-Chi character actor shares sweet ASL conversation with a fan, a She-Hulk Star Promises Marvel Cameos Nobody Knows About, and the All Elite Wrestling Champion Jade Cargill's She-Hulk cosplay. The team welcome audience feedback and stay tuned after the credits for a few bonus audio scenes.   THIS TIME ON LEGENDS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.:   She-Hulk: Attorney At Law Disney+ Episode 4 “Is This Not Real Magic?” Weekly Marvel News Chadwick Boseman Wins Posthumous Emmy for ‘What If' Voice-Over Performance Avengers Campus' Shang-Chi character actor shares sweet ASL conversation with a fan She-Hulk Star Promises Marvel Cameos Nobody Knows About Audience Feedback Twitter Responses   SHE-HULK: ATTORNEY AT LAW “IS THIS NOT REAL MAGIC?” S1E4 [6:21]   She-Hulk: Attorney At Law episode 4 Premiered on Disney+ - Thursday September 8th, 2022   S1E4 “Is This Not Real Magic?”   Directed By: Kat Coiro https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0192478/?ref_=ttfc_fc_dr1#director 30 Directing Credits starting in 2007 1x Brooklyn Nine-Nine 4xIt's Always Sunny in Philadelphia  1xModern Family 2xDead To Me 2022 Film Marry Me 6 x She-Hulk: Attorney At Law (9 Episode series)   Episode Writer: Melissa Hunter https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0402962/?ref_=ttfc_fc_wr1  13 writing credits starting in 2009 2x Maya & Marty 2x Santa Clarita Diet 2x Home Economics 9x Close Enough 1x She-Hulk   Jessica Gao is the She-Hulk Showrunner https://www.imdb.com/name/nm2005299/?ref_=ttfc_fc_wr1#producer 7 Production Credits Starting In 2017 8 x Take My Wife 10 x Corporate Easter Sunday 9 x She Hulk: Attorney At Law   She-Hulk: Attorney At Law Main Cast Tatiana Maslany as Jennifer Walters / She-Hulk - Lauren Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner / Smart Hulk Chris Ginger Gonzaga as Nikki Ramos Jameela Jamil as Titania - Anthony Josh Segarra as Augustus "Pug" Pugliese Jon Bass as Todd Renée Elise Goldsberry as Mallory Book: - Lauren Tim Roth as Emil Blonsky / Abomination Benedict Wong as Wong Charlie Cox as Matt Murdock / Daredevil Source: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10857160/fullcredits/?ref_=tt_cl_sm             MARVEL STUDIOS WEEKLY NEWS [41:51]   TOP NEWS STORY OF THE WEEK   Chadwick Boseman Wins Posthumous Emmy for ‘What If' Voice-Over Performance https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/tv/tv-news/emmys-chadwick-boseman-posthumous-honor-1235211145/ Chadwick Boseman was honored with a posthumous Emmy win during Saturday's Creative Arts ceremony for his role in Marvel's What If…? series. The late star won the outstanding character voice-over performance category for his role as Star-Lord T'Challa in the “What If… T'Challa Became a Star-Lord?” episode. He was nominated in the category alongside F. Murray Abraham (Moon Knight), Julie Andrews (Bridgerton), Maya Rudolph (Big Mouth), Stanley Tucci (Central Park), Jessica Walter (Archer) and Jeffrey Wright (What If…?). The award marked both Boseman's first win and first Emmy nomination.   MCU – MARVEL STUDIOS    Avengers Campus' Shang-Chi Shares a Sweet ASL Conversation With Fan https://www.cbr.com/shang-chi-avengers-campus-sign-language-conversation-mcu-marvel/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdQMAMC89CY A heartwarming video is going viral after a Disney Parks actor playing Marvel's Shang-Chi had an impromptu conversation with a guest entirely in American Sign Language. The footage, which appears to come from another park guest filming the interaction at the Avengers Campus in Disney California Adventure Park, was posted on YouTube by Good Morning America. It features an actor in character as the lead from the Marvel Cinematic Universe film Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, and begins with a woman telling him in ASL that she likes the rings worn on his arms as part of his costume. The conversation takes place in front of Avengers Campus' Pym Kitchen restaurant.   Top Gun: Maverick Poised to Pass Black Panther at the Box Office https://www.cbr.com/top-gun-maverick-black-panther-box-office/ Paramount Pictures' Top Gun: Maverick is set to surpass the box office of yet another Marvel Studios film. According to Erik Davis, the Tom Cruise-led sequel to the original 1986 Top Gun is currently expected to come out on top of the domestic box office for Labor Day weekend with an additional $7 million. This would push Maverick over $700 million, overtaking earnings for 2018's Black Panther and making it the fifth highest-grossing domestic release of all time. At the moment, the top five domestic releases ever include Black Panther with $700 million, Avatar with $760 million, Spider-Man: No Way Home with $804 million, Avengers: Endgame which pulled in $853 million, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens which sits at the number one spot with $936 million.   DISNEY+   Moon Knight Takes Home An Emmy https://www.cbr.com/moon-knight-book-of-boba-fett-emmys-marvel-star-wars/ Disney+ series Moon Knight just scored at the 74th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards. The shows was recognized at the Creative Arts Emmys ceremony on Sept. 4, 2022, which unlike the Primetime Emmys, focuses primarily on technical achievement. The Creative Arts Emmys also spotlight excellence in genres outside scripted live-action programming, such as animated series, reality TV and documentaries. Moon Knight received its Emmy for Outstanding Sound Editing for a Limited or Anthology Series, Movie or Special.   She-Hulk Producer Reveals How Wong's Surprising Target Reveal Came to Be (Exclusive) https://thedirect.com/article/she-hulk-wong-target-job-exclusive She-Hulk Showrunner Jessica Gaodiscussed Wong's online CV/LinkedIn Profile in an interview with The Direct. "That I actually have to give credit to our graphics team [for]," she said. "And I may be mistaken but probably Olney Atwell is the one that came up with that. I mean our graphics team actually… really paid attention to details and put in a lot of little funny jokes and bits that were really, really wonderful. But, we all just had such a laugh just imagining Wong, first of all, having a LinkedIn profile and having to put a work history. Any work history that ends with 'Sorcerer Supreme' is automatically chef's kiss… I love this era of Wong discovering and exploring American pop culture."   How She-Hulk's Jameela Jamil Convinced Megan Thee Stallion to Guest Star https://www.cbr.com/she-hulk-jameela-jamil-convince-megan-thee-stallion-guest-star-mcu/ https://www.tiktok.com/@hollywoodreporter/video/7138575703074917678 Per The Hollywood Reporter on TikTok, She-Hulk: Attorney at Law star Jameela Jamil confirmed her role in convincing Megan Thee Stallion to join the series for its third episode. "I was the one that made that happen," Jamil noted. "I mean, I know Megan from Legendary and I know how legendary she is, and she's so smart and so funny and just such a star, and I'm such a fan. So I was preparing to come and do this when I was filming Legendary Season 2, and I just asked her, and she turned out to be a huge Marvel fan." https://twitter.com/RUNITUPHOTTIES/status/1566101560022687744   She-Hulk Director Explains the MCU Series' Unconventional Superhero Plot https://www.cbr.com/she-hulk-director-explains-unconventional-plot-mcu/ She-Hulk: Attorney at Law director Kat Coiro recently delved into the show's non-traditional superhero plot during an interview with Total Film, saying, "So much of what I think is fresh about [She-Hulk] is it really is about a woman living a very regular life even though she happens to be imbued with these superpowers and so, while we play into some of the tropes of the genre – like villains! – we have the luxury of a series that doesn't have a ticking plot clock." Coiro concluded by saying She-Hulk's plot is "really about getting to know the characters" and letting viewers see the moments that they never get to explore in plot-driven stories. "So we tease Titania," she continued. "She will come back but she doesn't need to come back immediately, and that way we get to really get to know our characters."   She-Hulk Star Shares Her Wong Thirst Trap Photo https://twitter.com/gingerthejester/status/1565498946981691397 https://www.cbr.com/she-hulk-star-shares-wong-thirst-trap-photo   She-Hulk writer explains Abomination's major personality change https://www.radiotimes.com/tv/sci-fi/she-hulk-abomination-personality-change-exclusive-newsupdate/ Speaking to RadioTimes, She-Hulk: Attorney at Law showrunner Jessica Gao explained how the creative team behind the hit Disney+ series evolved Emil Blonsky/Abomination from a monstrous Super-Soldier to a kind-hearted reformed criminal. The She-Hulk showrunner wanted to see the lighter side of Blonsky after a long absence in the Marvel Cinematic Universe since his first appearance in 2008's The Incredible Hulk.   Rosario Actor Rosario Dawson Talks “Heartbreaking” ‘Clerks III' and Unfinished Business with Marvel https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/movies/movie-features/rosario-dawson-on-clerks-3-hopes-for-marvel-1235213270/?fbclid=IwAR0tT9zpFt6QSLJro8WzvVUeysOfWO9TMZg4EfR3bwhWEG9MruTvcHxNMzU https://www.cbr.com/daredevil-born-again-rosario-dawson-wants-return-mcu/ In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Dawson said that she would be willing to reprise her role as Claire Temple in the upcoming Marvel Cinematic Universe series Daredevil: Born Again. The actor previously portrayed the former night shift nurse in a number of Marvel Television properties such as Daredevil, Luke Cage, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and The Defenders. Dawson feels that Claire has some unfinished business and there is plenty of room for her story to be explored.   Ironheart': Shakira Barrera Joins Marvel Studios' Disney+ Series https://deadline.com/2022/09/ironheart-shakira-barrera-marvel-studios-disney-plus-1235109222/ GLOW star Shakira Barrera has been cast in Marvel Studios' upcoming Ironheart series for Disney+. While the specifics surrounding Barrera's role remain a mystery, it has been reported by Deadline that the actor will appear as a series regular. She will star alongside Dominique Thorne as Riri Williams, as well as Anthony Ramos, Manny Montana, Alden Ehrenreich, Regan Aliyah, Shea Couleé and Zoe Terakes. Barrera starred as Yolanda Rivas in the second season of Netflix's GLOW.   Bob Iger Assesses the Streaming Services: “I Don't Think They'll All Make It” https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/digital/bob-iger-assesses-the-streaming-services-i-dont-think-theyll-all-make-it-1235214146/ Over the last few years, a wide variety of streaming services have been made available to audiences around the world, offering films and television shows from every corner of the industry. According to one former Disney CEO, however, most of these services are destined to fail. Speaking at Vox Media's Code Conference, as reported by The Hollywood Reporter, former Disney CEO Bob Iger discussed services including Netflix, Apple TV+, Prime Video, HBO Max, Discovery+ and Disney+, expressing his believe that only the biggest and most well-resourced services will survive, while the rest will fail.   She-Hulk Star Promises Marvel Cameos Nobody Knows About https://tvline.com/2022/09/08/she-hulk-recap-episode-4-ginger-gonzaga-titania-lawsuit/?fbclid=IwAR3HDESVkv7_O2SpUdoVGuvPl0cSYvB4EgrSbErsaiK2flB8t-4LH3adaqY https://www.cbr.com/she-hulk-secret-marvel-cameos-mcu/ She-Hulk: Attorney at Law star Ginger Gonzaga promised that some unexpected characters from the Marvel comics will appear in the newest Disney+ Marvel Cinematic Universe series. In an interview with TVLine, Gonzaga, who plays Jen Walters' (Tatiana Maslany) best friend Nikki Ramos, was asked whether fans could expect to see some riveting law drama after Titania started legal proceedings against She-Hulk in the show's fourth episode. The actor revealed that the superpowered influencer's lawsuit marks a turning point in the series as it will now focus on superhuman law and the whacky individuals who fall under it. While She-Hulk: Attorney at Law has been no stranger to cameos with MCU alums Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), Emil Blonsky/The Abomination (Tim Roth) and Wong (Benedict Wong) featuring in the first three episodes, Gonzaga shared the show will be host to even more special appearances - possibly of characters who have yet to grace the screen.   OTHER   Regal Owner Cineworld Begins Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Proceedings in U.S. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/business/business-news/cineworld-chapter-11-bankruptcy-filing-regal-1289208/ https://www.cbr.com/cineworld-regal-cinemas-owner-chapter-11-bankruptcy/ Regal Cinemas owner Cineworld Group just kicked off Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings. The London-based British entertainment conglomerate filed for bankruptcy on Sept. 7, 2022 in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, according to The Hollywood Reporter. "As part of the Chapter 11 cases, Cineworld, with the expected support of its secured lenders, will seek to implement a de-leveraging transaction that will significantly reduce the group's debt, strengthen its balance sheet and provide the financial strength and flexibility to accelerate, and capitalize on, Cineworld's strategy in the cinema industry," Cineworld said, in a press release. "The group Chapter 11 companies enter the Chapter 11 cases with commitments for an approximate $1.94 billion debtor-in-possession financing facility from existing lenders, which will help ensure Cineworld's operations continue in the ordinary course while Cineworld implements its reorganization."   FEEDBACK [47:58]   https://twitter.com/LegendsofSHIELD/status/1568274695795134465   https://twitter.com/LegendsofSHIELD/status/1567520562729082882     OUTRO AND BONUS AUDIO [51:59]   We would love to hear back from you! Call the voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871.                    Join Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. next time as the Agents discuss the Disney+ Marvel Studios series Ms. Marvel episode 5. You can usually listen in live when we record Saturday Mornings at 10:00 AM Eastern Time at on YouTube or Twitch. Although the next two episodes will be at different times. Our next episode will be streamed on Thursday September 15th, 2022 at 9 PM ET.  Contact Info: Please see http://www.legendsofshield.com for all of our contact information or call our voicemail line at 1-844-THE-BUS1 or 844-843-2871   Legends Of S.H.I.E.L.D. Is a Proud Member Of The GonnaGeek Network (gonnageek.com).   This podcast was recorded on Saturday September 10th, 2022.   Standby for your S.H.I.E.L.D. debriefing ---   Audio and Video Production by SP Rupert of GonnaGeek.com.

Popcorn and Soda
CODA (2021)

Popcorn and Soda

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 43:57


Does anyone really care if a movie wins an Academy Award for Best Picture anymore? Well, Jason Furie and Adam Roth figured the winner has to be at least a half-decent movie right? With that theory in mind, they check out last year's winner CODA (2021), which stands for Child of Deaf Adults,  about a young woman who is the only hearing person in her family. Simply put...this movie deserves any award that comes its way.Visit Website | Join Newsletter | Support | Facebook | Instagram

KPCW Local News Hour
Local News Hour | September 8, 2022

KPCW Local News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 51:02


Today on the Local News Hour: (5:25) Summit County Council Member Glenn Wright recaps Wednesday's meeting, (20:57) Director of the Ziegfield Theatre production of Wizard of Oz Caleb Parry has backstage highlights from the show, which opens tomorrow at the Egyptian Theatre Friday and will be presented in American Sign Language, and (36:58) Rossi Hill resident Christina Shiebler has details about a survey regarding Deer Valley Resort's base development plans and how residents can participate.

End Seclusion Podcast
"The Five Behavior Roots" Dig down to identify the underlying reason, and respond with compassion

End Seclusion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 77:51


In this presentation, Sandi Lerman will discuss "The Five Behavior Roots" and encourage us to dig down to identify the underlying reason, and then respond with compassion to make things better.Sandi Lerman is the Founder and Program Director of HEART-STRONG International, a global education company that provides training and coaching programs for parents and teachers of children with developmental trauma and professional graduate-level programs for Trauma-Informed Specialists, Certified Parent Coaches, and Certified Educational Trainers.Sandi is an educator with over twenty years of classroom teaching experience in K-12, university, and adult education settings and has been the coordinator for two state-wide parenting and community mental health education programs in Indiana. She is the proud Mama Bear of Hiro, a young adult adopted at age ten who has overcome extreme challenges resulting from complex developmental trauma. Sandi is also a former American Sign Language interpreter, speaks Spanish, and has lived and worked as an educator in both Scotland and Mexico.Support the show

Satisfaction Factor
#49 - The Impact of Diet Culture on Communication & Representation with Lori Civello & Chelsey Cahilly of The Sign Space

Satisfaction Factor

Play Episode Play 45 sec Highlight Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 73:45 Transcription Available


This week we're talking to Lori Civello & Chelsey Cahilly, certified ASL interpreters and co-founders of The Sign Space.Lori Civello (she/her) is a New York City Native and Current Georgia transplant, is a certified language interpreter, Integrated Model of Interpreting practitioner, and college instructor. Lori grew up with Deaf parents and started her interpreting career in high school interpreting community theater shows for the Girl Scouts. Lori has her BA in American Sign Language interpreting & communications. Lori also has a Masters Degree in Higher Education Leadership and is faculty at Fredericks Community College and Georgia State University.Chelsey Cahilly (she/her) is a nationally certified ASL/English interpreter, mentor, college instructor, and practitioner of the Integrated Model of Interpreting (IMI). She began learning ASL from a Deaf friend as a teenager, but has been interpreting professionally for ten years. She is currently working to obtain her master's degree in Communication and Leadership. Chelsey lives in northern NJ with her husband, and three kids who are growing up way too fast.Together, Lori and Chelsey host TheSignSpace.net, an online community where interpreters and students can collaborate and grow through mentoring, workshops, and deliberate practice sessions.If you've been following us on Instagram, you may have seen that Chelsey & Lori have been interpreting the podcast into ASL and posting it, along with their insightful after-cast discussions, on their website! In this episode, we had the opportunity to talk to them directly about their own experiences with diet culture; how experiences with diet culture may differ within Deaf culture; how diet culture & other systems of oppression show up in the ways that we communicate & the ways that we access communication; and how diet culture & other systems of oppression can be obstacles for interpreters in the ways that they can represent & show for their Deaf clients.Here's where you can find The Sign Space:WebsiteInstagramAnd you can get all the information about The Body of Our Work, the workshop that Naomi is co-hosting with Lori & Chelsey about how diet culture impacts the work of ASL interpreters by clicking here!You can stay up to date on all things Satisfaction Factor by following us on IG @satisfactionfactorpod!Here's where to find us:Sadie Simpson: www.sadiesimpson.com or IG @sadiemsimpsonNaomi Katz: www.happyshapes.co or IG @happyshapesnaomiFor this episode's transcript, visit: www.satisfactionfactorpod.comReferenced in this episode:CODA (Children of Deaf Adults, Inc.)Integrated Model of Interpreting by Betty Colonomos"The Power of White Gaze: Erasure of Black Signers" by David Player

Pharmacist's Voice
Back-to-School Series Episode 9, interview with Ashley Walker, PharmD about her online classes:  Speed Signing (American Sign Language) and Preparing for OTC Hearing Aids

Pharmacist's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 74:54


During our conversation, Dr. Ashley Walker talks about her online classes.  One is called Speed Signing.  The other is called Preparing for OTC Hearing Aids.  If you're interested in discovering how learning American Sign Language will benefit your patients with hearing loss, you need to listen to this episode.  We also talk about OTC hearing aids, deaf culture, inclusion, and more.  Ashley is deaf, but she can speak.  You will hear Ashley's voice in this episode.   My Back-to-School Series features interviews with 9 pharmacists who teach online courses. Since it's back-to-school time for my kids, I created a Back-to-School series for my podcast! Check out the series, and get inspired to either learn or create!   Thank you for listening to episode 173 of The Pharmacist's Voice ® Podcast! A link to Ashley's LinkedIn profile, my YouTube channel, and more are in the FULL show notes, which are on https://www.thepharmacistsvoice.com.  Click on the podcast tab, and search for episode 173.

A Way with Words — language, linguistics, and callers from all over

This week on A Way with Words: Language is always evolving, and that's also true for American Sign Language. A century ago, the sign for "telephone" was one fist below your mouth and the other at your ear, as if you're holding an old-fashioned candlestick phone. Now you can sign "phone" with a one-handed gesture. Plus, colorful restaurant slang from the hit TV show "The Bear" inspires a quiz about the language of the kitchen. And looking for a new way to say "It's hot outside"? How about "It's glorgy [GLOR-ghee] out there!" Plus, pothery, laugh to see a pudding crawl, capitalizing the first-person pronoun, silver thaw, the devil's beating his wife, diaeresis, trema, brogans, barge it, Las conejas están pariendo, claggy, janky, mafting, and a brain teaser about restaurant slang. Read full show notes, hear hundreds of free episodes, send your thoughts and questions, and learn more on the A Way with Words website: https://waywordradio.org/contact. Be a part of the show: call 1 (877) 929-9673 toll-free in the United States and Canada; worldwide, call or text/SMS +1 (619) 800-4443. Email words@waywordradio.org. Twitter @wayword. Copyright Wayword, Inc., a 501(c)(3) corporation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

David Boles: Human Meme
Is American Sign Language a Communication Disorder?

David Boles: Human Meme

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 9:57


Is ASL a significant problem of understanding? In this Boles.tv live stream highlight, David Boles wonders if American Sign Language is a Communication Disorder? Does the DSM-5 take precedence over the influence of comity in community? Is a "disorder" considered an inclusive label?

The Next Room with Jane Asher
Jaden Speaks from Heaven with Jessica Marie Tatro

The Next Room with Jane Asher

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 36:47


Jane speaks to Jessica Marie Tatro this week. She is the Founder of Jadens Way and Jadens Way Speaks. She is the mother to three children on earth and a son in heaven. Her son Jaden is number three out of four children. He was born on September 22, 2001, with down-syndrome, autism and numerous medical complexities from birth requiring a permanent tracheotomy and feeding tube , 30 + surgeries and two open heart operations. Jaden was non- verbal all his life and used some very basic American Sign Language along with Picture Exchange Communication in attempt to ask for basic needs. Jaden passed away at 10 years old on January 7th 2012 from medical complications. Since her sons return to Heaven they have been having wonderful conversations together through Jaden's spirit translator Raylene Nuanes and many other gifted mediums. Together they decided to share their conversations and journey with all to help bring to others a understanding of what heaven is like, what life was like for Jaden once he crossed. Jessica's story Jaden Speaks is in "Gathering at the Doorway; An Anthology of Signs, Visits, and Messages from the Afterlife” Find out more about Jane Asher and pick up a copy of her book The Next Room Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Literary Studies
Christopher Krentz, "Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature" (Temple UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:30


Dr. Christopher Krentz is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he has a joint appointment with the departments of English and American Sign Language. He is also the author of Writing Deafness: The Hearing Line in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and editor of A Mighty Change: An Anthology of Deaf American Writing, 1816–1864, as well as numerous articles about disability in literature and culture. He is currently director of the University of Virginia's Disability Studies Initiative and helped found their American Sign Language Program. Characters with disabilities are often overlooked in fiction, but many occupy central places in literature by celebrated authors like Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, J. M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and others. These authors deploy disability to do important cultural work, writes Christopher Krentz in his innovative study, Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature (Temple UP, 2022). Such representations not only relate to the millions of disabled people in the Global South, but also make more vivid such issues as the effects of colonialism, global capitalism, racism and sexism, war, and environmental disaster. Krentz is the first to put the fields of postcolonial studies, studies of human rights and literature, and literary disability in conversation with each other in a book-length study. He enhances our appreciation of key texts of Anglophone postcolonial literature of the Global South, including Things Fall Apart and Midnight's Children. In addition, he uncovers the myriad ways fiction gains energy, vitality, and metaphoric force from characters with extraordinary bodies or minds. Depicting injustices faced by characters with disabilities is vital to raising awareness and achieving human rights. Elusive Kinship nudges us toward a fuller understanding of disability worldwide. Autumn Wilke works in higher education as an ADA coordinator and diversity officer and is also an author and doctoral candidate with research/topics related to disability and higher education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Christopher Krentz, "Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature" (Temple UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 22:30


Dr. Christopher Krentz is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia, where he has a joint appointment with the departments of English and American Sign Language. He is also the author of Writing Deafness: The Hearing Line in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and editor of A Mighty Change: An Anthology of Deaf American Writing, 1816–1864, as well as numerous articles about disability in literature and culture. He is currently director of the University of Virginia's Disability Studies Initiative and helped found their American Sign Language Program. Characters with disabilities are often overlooked in fiction, but many occupy central places in literature by celebrated authors like Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, J. M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Edwidge Danticat, and others. These authors deploy disability to do important cultural work, writes Christopher Krentz in his innovative study, Elusive Kinship: Disability and Human Rights in Postcolonial Literature (Temple UP, 2022). Such representations not only relate to the millions of disabled people in the Global South, but also make more vivid such issues as the effects of colonialism, global capitalism, racism and sexism, war, and environmental disaster. Krentz is the first to put the fields of postcolonial studies, studies of human rights and literature, and literary disability in conversation with each other in a book-length study. He enhances our appreciation of key texts of Anglophone postcolonial literature of the Global South, including Things Fall Apart and Midnight's Children. In addition, he uncovers the myriad ways fiction gains energy, vitality, and metaphoric force from characters with extraordinary bodies or minds. Depicting injustices faced by characters with disabilities is vital to raising awareness and achieving human rights. Elusive Kinship nudges us toward a fuller understanding of disability worldwide. Autumn Wilke works in higher education as an ADA coordinator and diversity officer and is also an author and doctoral candidate with research/topics related to disability and higher education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Pharmacist's Voice
Back-to-School Series Episode 1, the introduction

Pharmacist's Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 8:05


This episode introduces my Back-to-School series, which features interviews with 9 pharmacists who use their voices to teach online courses.  (Since it's back-to-school time, I created a Back-to-School series on my podcast!). Check out the series, and get inspired to either learn or create!   Featured pharmacists and their online courses: Dr. Beju Shah, Pharmacy Informatics Academy  https://pharmacyinformaticsacademy.com  Dr. Blair Thielemier, Pharmapreneur Academy https://pharmapreneuracademy.com  Dr. Jimmy Pruitt, Pharmacy and Acute Care University https://pharmacy-acutecareuniversity.com  Dr. Asha Bohannon, Impact Pharmacist Online Program & PGX Ally Program https://www.paiwellnessgroup.com/impact-program/ https://www.pgxally.com/pharmacists-1 Dr. Adam Martin, Script Your Brand Online Course  https://the-fit-pharmacist.newzenler.com/courses/script-your-brand Dr. Kelley Carlstrom, PharmD, Enjoy Learning Oncology Courses (ELO) (Note:  there are three tiers of this course)  https://www.kelleycpharmd.com  Dr. Stu Beatty, The Pharmacist Provider (New online course coming out around Sept 2022) https://www.thepharmacistprovider.com  Dr. Ashley Walker, Speed Signing with Dr. Ashley R. Walker.  She teaches American Sign Language  https://ashley-walker.mykajabi.com/offers/DRfrX3Ng  Kim Newlove, RPh.  A Behind-the-Scenes Look at The Pharmacist's Voice Podcast https://www.kimnewlove.com  *Course not available until at least 8-31-22.  Check back soon! LinkedIn Profile Beju Shah, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/medicationsafety/  LinkedIn Profile Blair Thielemier, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/btpharmacyconsulting/  LinkedIn Profile Jimmy Pruitt, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimmy-l-pruitt-iii-pharmd-bcps-bcccp-653b7263/  LinkedIn Profile Asha Bohannon, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/drashapaibohannon/  LinkedIn Profile Adam Martin, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/fitpharmfam/  LinkedIn Profile Kelley Carlstrom, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelleydcarlstrom/  LinkedIn Profile Stu Beatty, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/stuart-beatty-ab6a31a5/  LinkedIn Profile Ashley Walker, PharmD https://www.linkedin.com/in/drawalker/  LinkedIn Profile Kim Newlove, RPh https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimnewlove  Thank you for listening to episode 165 of The Pharmacist's Voice ® Podcast! To read the full show notes, visit https://www.thepharmacistsvoice.com.  Click on the podcast tab, and search for episode 165.  

Our Classroom
Episode 30 | Hyphenated w/ Ummi Modeste

Our Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:46


In the third and final part of our poetry series with author Ummi Modeste, she shares and analyzes the poem Hyphenated from her book Because I Knew. This is one of her favorite poems as it speaks to the struggle of tracing her roots. R. Ummi Modeste is a native of Brooklyn, NY where she attended and graduated from the New York City Public School System. She retired from that same school system in 2021, after nearly 30 years of service as a teacher and college and career advisor at City-As-School High School, a unique public school in Manhattan. Ummi holds one bachelor's degree from Ithaca College in Speech, Language and Hearing Services, another from the State University of NY Empire State College in Human Relations; American Sign Language, and a Master's degree in Special Education from Hunter College of the City of New York. Ummi is an active member of the Breadloaf Teacher Network, an international group of teachers who strive to provide innovative and engaging ways for their students to become stronger readers and writers. Every summer, she is one of the facilitators of the Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop (ABL), a two-week professional development workshop held in Andover, MA that focuses on social justice work through literacy. ABL provides professional development for teachers and others who work with youth, as well as workshops for students in cities all over the US. ABL has also held international conferences for teachers and students in Karachi, Pakistan; Nairobi, Kenya and Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. (For more information about ABL, click here). You may connect with Ummi for speaking engagements, poetry readings and to facilitate workshops at: ummi.modeste@gmail.com. or BecauseIKnewBook@gmail.com. To purchase Because I Know, go to the bookstore at thebookpatch.com and search "Because I Knew". The Ant Racist Teacher Video Course is available now and includes a copy of The Anti Racist Teacher: Reading Instruction Workbook (E-book). In this course, you'll find: The Anti Racist Teacher: Reading Instruction E-book 16 lessons w/ tasks for your learning Videos w/ closed caption accessibility Reflection questions to support your teaching Writing prompts to guide your planning Access to a community of learners processing along w/ you Opportunities for live/synchronous sessions w/ Lorena & guest speakers For more education resources subscribe to multiculturalclassroom.com. #poetry #immigration #culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacherssupportteachers #teacherauthor #teachergoals #education #school #educators #teaching #teacher #multiculturalclassroom #ourclassroom #ABAR #socialjusticeeducation

Our Classroom
Episode 29 | Dreaming A Decolonized World w/ Ummi Modeste

Our Classroom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 21:45


Part Two of our poetry series with author Ummi Modeste explores immigration from a number of different angles. In this episode, Ummi reads the poem Dreaming A Decolonized World from her book Because I Knew. This is a passionate conversation that we invite you to join. Click the image above to listen to the episode now! R. Ummi Modeste is a native of Brooklyn, NY where she attended and graduated from the New York City Public School System. She retired from that same school system in 2021, after nearly 30 years of service as a teacher and college and career advisor at City-As-School High School, a unique public school in Manhattan. Ummi holds one bachelor's degree from Ithaca College in Speech, Language and Hearing Services, another from the State University of NY Empire State College in Human Relations; American Sign Language, and a Master's degree in Special Education from Hunter College of the City of New York. Ummi is an active member of the Breadloaf Teacher Network, an international group of teachers who strive to provide innovative and engaging ways for their students to become stronger readers and writers. Every summer, she is one of the facilitators of the Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop (ABL), a two-week professional development workshop held in Andover, MA that focuses on social justice work through literacy. ABL provides professional development for teachers and others who work with youth, as well as workshops for students in cities all over the US. ABL has also held international conferences for teachers and students in Karachi, Pakistan; Nairobi, Kenya and Port-Au-Prince, Haiti. (For more information about ABL, click here). You may connect with Ummi for speaking engagements, poetry readings and to facilitate workshops at: ummi.modeste@gmail.com. or BecauseIKnewBook@gmail.com. To purchase Because I Know, go to the bookstore at thebookpatch.com and search "Because I Knew". The Ant Racist Teacher Video Course is available now and includes a copy of The Anti Racist Teacher: Reading Instruction Workbook (E-book). In this course, you'll find: The Anti Racist Teacher: Reading Instruction E-book 16 lessons w/ tasks for your learning Videos w/ closed caption accessibility Reflection questions to support your teaching Writing prompts to guide your planning Access to a community of learners processing along w/ you Opportunities for live/synchronous sessions w/ Lorena & guest speakers For more education resources subscribe to multiculturalclassroom.com. #poetry #immigration #culturallyresponsiveteaching #teacherssupportteachers #teacherauthor #teachergoals #education #school #educators #teaching #teacher #multiculturalclassroom #ourclassroom #ABAR #socialjusticeeducation

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast
Episode 212: Croakus Pokus

Know Nonsense Trivia Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 115:56


Quizmasters Lee and Marc meet with Ryan Mawson for a trivia quiz with topics including Television, Candy, Geography, Art History, 90's Video Games, Ancient Greece, Famous Racehorses, Disney Songs and more! Round One CANDY - Which brand of candy's name is based on the German word for peppermint? AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE - What two letters in American Sign Language require movement? BREAKING BAD - In the show Breaking Bad, the company Grey Matter was a combination of Walter White and what other name? FAMOUS INVENTIONS - In first-century Greece, Hero of Alexandria invented the first coin-operated vending machine, which would dispense what? GEOGRAPHY - Which sovereign state is the second-smallest in the world (behind Vatican City) and also touts the shortest coastline? ART HISTORY - Author of 1967's Scum Manifesto, which feminist shot and nearly-killed Andy Warhol? Round Two GREEK MYTHOLOGY - Which tragic and complex figure of Greek mythology became the King of Thebes after solving the Sphinx's riddle of "What walks on four legs in the morning, two in the afternoon and three in the evening?" 90'S VIDEO GAMES - In 1992, who became the only Simpsons character other than Bart to have their own video game released for the Nintendo Entertainment System? CHEMISTRY - Haim Wiseman, a Zionist leader and the first president of Israel, developed a bacterial fermentation to develop what chemical which later helped the British make ammunition during World War I, giving them the leg up? HISTORICAL FIGURES - What famous Venetian adventurer and womanizer was, according to his memoirs, imprisoned as a magician, a director of the Paris state lotteries, knighted in the Netherlands, a spy for Louis XV, and a librarian in Bohemia? FAMOUS RACEHORSES - What racehorse won 20 of 21 races in its career, was honored in 1920 alongside Babe Ruth as outstanding athlete of the year by the New York Times and would inspire the name of a heavy metal band in the 1980's (who themselves have broken the Guiness World Record for loudest performance three times)? TV OPENING CREDITS - What aggressive animal is heavily featured in the opening credits of the hit TV show Northern Exposure? Rate My Question TV CHARACTER NAMES - Though spelled differently, what first and last name are shared by a white teenage midwestern stoner from a 1990s FOX sitcom and a brilliant black neurologist on a late 2000s FOX drama? Final Questions FAMOUS ACTORS - Name three actors that connect the TV shows Community and Breaking Bad. DISNEY SONGS - Released in 1992, what was the first Disney song to ever win the Grammy award for "Song of the Year"? OLYMPICS - Cassius Clay, later Muhammad Ali, won the Light Heavyweight Boxing Gold Medal at the Rome olympics in what year? Upcoming LIVE Know Nonsense Trivia Challenges July 27th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 7:30 pm EST June 28th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Trivia Challenge - Ollie's Pub Records and Beer - 7:30 pm EST August 13th, 2022 - Know Nonsense Challenge - Point Ybel Brewing Co. - 6:00 pm EST You can find out more information about that and all of our live events online at KnowNonsenseTrivia.com All of the Know Nonsense events are free to play and you can win prizes after every round. Thank you Thanks to our supporters on Patreon. Thank you, Quizdaddies – Gil, Tim, Tommy, Adam, Brandon, Blake Thank you, Team Captains – Kristin & Fletcher, Aaron, Matthew, David Holbrook, Mo, Lydia, Rick G, Skyler Thank you, Proverbial Lightkeepers – Elyse, Kaitlynn, Frank, Trent, Nina, Justin, Katie, Ryan, Robb, Captain Nick, Grant, Ian, Tim Gomez, Rachael, Moo, Rikki, Nabeel, Jon Lewis, Adam, Lisa, Spencer, Luc, Hank, Justin P., Cooper, Sarah, Karly, Lucas, Mike K., Cole, Adam Thank you, Rumplesnailtskins – Mike J., Mike C., Efren, Steven, Kenya, Dallas, Issa, Paige, Allison, Kevin & Sara, Alex, Loren, MJ, HBomb, Aaron, Laurel, FoxenV, Sarah, Edsicalz, Megan, brandon, Chris, Alec, Sai, Nathan, Tim, Andrea, Ian If you'd like to support the podcast and gain access to bonus content, please visit http://theknowno.com and click "Support." Special Guest: Ryan Mawson.

Stats + Stories
Signing Statistics | Stats + Stories Episode 239

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 27:56


What is a median? How about an interquartile range? Don't even get me started on how to define a p-value. These statistical concepts are hard to grasp for your average statistics student, but imagining how these types of definitions translate into American Sign Language is a whole other ballgame. That is the focus of this episode of Stats+Stories with special guest Dr. Regina Nuzzo. Dr. Regina Nuzzo is a freelance science writer and professor in Washington, DC. After studying engineering as an undergraduate she earned her PhD in Statistics from Stanford University. Currently, she's teaching statistics in American Sign Language at Gallaudet University, the world's only liberal arts college for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Dr. Nuzzo is also a graduate of the Science Communication program at the University of California-Santa Cruz. Her science journalism specialties center around data, probability, statistics, and the research process. Her work has appeared in Nature, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Reader's Digest, New Scientist, and Scientific American, among others.