Podcasts about Michigan Medicine

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  • 94PODCASTS
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 5, 2022LATEST
Michigan Medicine

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Best podcasts about Michigan Medicine

Latest podcast episodes about Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - 2022 School Supply Drive

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 15:35


On Monday, Aug. 8, the organization will kick off a school supply drive to help children in the community. This week, Alfreda Rooks, director of Community Health Services, joined The Wrap to discuss the drive and a number of other initiatives that are sure to help improve health in the community surrounding Michigan Medicine. Check out this wide-ranging discussion today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Notable Speeches
Dr. Kristen Collier of the University of Michigan Medical School

Notable Speeches

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 18:58


This episode features an address by Dr. Kristen Collier, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and director of the school's Program on Health, Spirituality & Religion. She spoke on July 24, 2022, at Michigan Medicine's annual White Coat Ceremony welcoming new med students Dr. Collier's address generated controversy, not because of her remarks but because of her views on abortion. She is pro-life. Some students walked out rather than listen to her remarks. This podcast presents her speech in full. She spoke about the need for physicians to focus on patients as human beings, not simply as "cases." If you have a comment or question about the Notable Speeches podcast, email feedback@notablespeeches.com.

The Public Health Millennial Career Stories Podcast
113: Public Health Journey of Detours and Closed Roads with Jasmin Barber, MPH

The Public Health Millennial Career Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 72:35


In this week's episode, Jasmin Barber, MPH is a Pediatric Orthopedic Clinical Assistant at Michigan Medicine. She has experience and a passion for service, leadership, and a commitment to engaging, investing, and contributing to the pursuits to lessen barriers in public health. She got her Bachelor of Arts in biology with a concentration in health careers at Spring Arbor University. She then got her Master of Public Health at Grand Canyon University. She currently works as a Pediatric Orthopedic Clinical Assistant at Michigan Medicine.Shownotes: thePHmillennial.com/episode113Jasmine Barber, MPH on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jasmin-barber-mph-b42j09l07Omari on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/omari-richins-mph/Omari on IG: https://www.instagram.com/thephmillennial/Public Health Hired (Sponsor): https://www.publichealthhired.com/Support the show

Living African
014: A Different Perspective of Healing from Fibroids - With Mane Ndoping

Living African

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 64:57


The topic of fibroids is one thing that we will never stop talking about to raise awareness about the disease in our community. As time goes by, I have gotten to know more women who have struggled with fibroids and I have come to the realization that it is far more common than being spoken about.  Data from Michigan Medicine shows that “Nearly a quarter of Black women between 18 and 30 have fibroids compared to about 6% of white women, according to some national estimates. By age 35, that number increases to 60%. Black women are also two to three times more likely to have recurring fibroids or suffer from complications.” There is definitely a dire need for more education and discussion on this topic to help raise awareness and sensitize our community. So, today, our guest will give us a different perspective on her personal experience with fibroids. Be inspired!   Meet Our Guest : Our guest for Episode 14 aka “A Different Perspective of Healing from Fibroids” is Mane Ndoping. Mane was Born and raised in Cameroon and came to the US when she was 18. Studied psychology in undergrad 2012. Obtained MSc in Occupational Therapy 2015. She is a health and wellness enthusiast focusing on mental wellness and functional nutrition. She started a journey of self-healing in 2009, which has morphed through the years leading to the birth of NannezFruitDlight in 2019; a venture that she's passionate about through which she shares her personal journey of healing as well as information for other health challenges from other health and wellness professionals. Contact Our Guest: Email: mnaboutme@gmail.com Instagram: NannezFruitDlight and or Mz_Nanne   Things You Will Learn in This Episode:  [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction Introducing our guest - Mane Ndoping [03:00 – 30:00] Mane's Entrepreneurship Journey  Getting to know Mane Ndoping Coming to America Health complications after diagnosis Continious check ups & diagnosis [30:00 – 1:00:00] Further Diagnosis & Treatment Change of diets  Healing from Fibroids Recommendations on how to heal from Fibroids Words of encouragement to the African community How to get in touch with Mane [1:00:00 – 1:13:55] Final Words Mane's final words Anyoh's final words Tweetable Quotes: “Some foods that we eat overwork the liver and make it hard for it to eliminate toxins, so it just stays in the body. One thing I learned about fibroids is that people who have fibroids, in most cases, have high estrogen. And the liver helps to excrete the excess. But then if we feed our liver with less optimal food, it's not able to excrete it so it stays in the body, and then it causes [complications].” - Mane Ndoping    LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!   Connect with Living African Podcast: You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com.   Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com for more resources and to learn more. Connect with host, Anyoh: You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad).

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 06.30.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 61:43 Very Popular


Videos: 1. Artificial Intelligence: The Coming Storm | Michael Harrison | TEDxBlinnCollege (8:00)*Michael holds a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in theoretical physics minor in quantum chromodynamics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He earned distinction in his master's program in aerospace systems architecture at the University of Southern California. 2 .  Vitamin Authentication. Electronic pill that stays in your body & will become a 18bit Battery operated chip (1:00) 3. Pfizer CEO ‘Almost Certain' Americans Will Have To Take New COVID Vaccines ‘Every Year' 4.  There was an unexpected 40% increase in ‘all cause deaths' in 2021 5. Hear ex-CIA director's prediction about who will win in Ukraine 6. Jonathan Haidt The Coddling of the American Mind Anticoagulant activities of curcumin and its derivative Kyungpook National University (South Korea) Curcumin, a polyphenol responsible for the yellow color of the curry spice turmeric, possesses antiinflammatory, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities. However, anticoagulant activities of curcumin have not been studied.  The anticoagulant properties of curcumin and its derivative (bisdemethoxycurcumin, BDMC) were determined by monitoring activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT) as well as cell-based thrombin and activated factor X (FXa) generation activities.  Data showed that curcumin and BDMC prolonged aPTT and PT significantly and inhibited thrombin and FXa activities. They inhibited the generation of thrombin or FXa. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, curcumin and BDMC showed anticoagulant effect in vivo.  Surprisingly, these anticoagulant effects of curcumin were better than those of BDMC indicating that methoxy group in curcumin positively regulated anticoagulant function of curcumin. Therefore, these results suggest that curcumin and BDMC possess antithrombotic activities and daily consumption of the curry spice turmeric might help maintain anticoagulant status.   Probiotics may prevent breast cancer: Study Western University (Ontario), June 27, 2022   A new study has found probiotics may prove to be a critical factor in preventing breast cancer.   Dr Gregor Reid, the professor of microbiology, immunology and surgery at the Western University in Ontario, Canada, said the bacteria having the potential to abet breast cancer are present in the breasts of cancer patients, while beneficial bacteria are more abundant in healthy breasts.   In the study, Reid's PhD student Camilla Urbaniak obtained breast tissues from 58 women, who were undergoing lumpectomies or mastectomies for either benign (13 women) or cancerous (45 women) tumors as well as from 23 healthy women, who had undergone breast reductions or enhancements. Researchers found that women with breast cancer had elevated levels of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis, two bacteria known to induce double-stranded breaks in DNA in HeLa cells, which are cultured human cells. They say the breaks are prone to errors, which can cause cancer to develop.   Health-promoting bacteria Lactobacillus and Streptococcus (lactic acid bacteria) were more abundant in women with healthy breasts, both are anti-carcinogenic.     'Mystical' psychedelic compound found in normal brains University of Michigan, June 27, 2022 In the past few years, thrill-seekers from Hollywood, Silicon Valley and beyond have been travelling to South America to take part in so-called Ayahuasca retreats. Their goal: to partake in a brewed concoction made from a vine plant Banisteriopsis caapi, traditionally used by indigenous people for sacred religious ceremonies. Drinkers of Ayahuasca experience short-term hallucinogenic episodes many describe as life-changing. The active ingredient responsible for these psychedelic visions is a molecule called dimethyltryptamine (DMT). For the first time, a team led by Michigan Medicine has discovered the widespread presence of naturally-occurring DMT in the mammalian brain. The finding is the first step toward studying DMT-- and figuring out its role -- within the brains of humans. "DMT is not just in plants, but also can be detected in mammals," says Jimo Borjigin, Ph.D., of the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology. Her interest in DMT came about accidentally. Before studying the psychedelic, her research focused on melatonin production in the pineal gland. In the seventeenth century, the philosopher Rene Descartes claimed that the pineal gland, a small pinecone-shaped organ located deep in the center of the brain, was the seat of the soul. Since its discovery, the pineal gland, known by some as the third eye, has been shrouded in mystery. Scientists now know it controls the production of melatonin, playing an important role in modulating circadian rhythms, or the body's internal clock.  The core idea seems to come from a documentary featuring the work of researcher Rick Strassman, Ph.D. with the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. In the mid-1990s, he conducted an experiment in which human subjects were given DMT by IV injection and interviewed after its effects wore off. In a documentary about the experiment, Strassman claims that he believed the pineal gland makes and secretes DMT. Borjigin sought to discover how and where DMT was synthesized.  They found DMT in other parts of the brain, including the neocortex and hippocampus that are important for higher-order brain functions including learning and memory." A paper published in 2018 by researchers in the U.K. purported that DMT simulates the near death experience, wherein people report the sensation of transcending their bodies and entering another realm.    Puffing curcumin may blast Alzheimer's Vanderbilt University, Jun 22, 2022   The new delivery method may be more effective than others in getting the compound past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain, where it can fight the plaque that leads to Alzheimer's.   Deep breaths of curcumin may be key to fighting Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from Vanderbilt University. Curcumin, a compound in the spice turmeric, has a demonstrated ability to smash the plaques in the brain that lead to the neuron loss that causes Alzheimer's, according to the study's senior author,Wellington Pham, Ph.D The challenge, however, has been getting the curcumin into the brain. Pham and colleagues at Shiga University of Medical Science in Otsu, Japan, developed a new delivery strategy. They created a curcumin moleculte that could be tracked with an MRI, to be administered as an aerosol through a nebulizer. This method delivers the dose more directly to the brain than taking the compound orally and digesting it. After tests in mice, the team found that “delivery to the cortex and hippocampal areas is more efficient using aerosolized curcumin than intervenous injection in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease,” said Pham.   Anti-anxiety medication limits empathetic behavior in rats University of Chicago, June 27, 2022   Rats given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free trapped companions because the drug lessened their empathy, according to a new study by University of Chicago neuroscientists.   The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, validates studies that show rats are emotionally motivated to help other rats in distress. In the latest study, rats treated with midazolam did not open the door to a restrainer device containing a trapped rat, although control rats routinely freed their trapped companions. Midazolam did not interfere with the rats' physical ability to open the restrainer door, however. In fact, when the restrainer device contained chocolate instead of a trapped rat, the test rats routinely opened the door. The findings show that the act of helping others depends on emotional reactions, which are dampened by the anti-anxiety medication.   "The rats help each other because they care," said Peggy Mason, PhD, professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago. "They need to share the affect of the trapped rat in order to help, and that's a fundamental finding that tells us something about how we operate, because we're mammals like rats too."       7 Simple Ways to Unclog Your Arteries Naturally GreenMedInfo, June 23, 2022   Statistically, atherosclerosis (the progressive clogging of the arteries) is the #1 killer on the planet.  A complex process, involving autoimmunity, infection, dietary incompatibilities, and many known and unknown factors, it is – despite conventional medical opinion – entirely preventable, and in some cases reversible.   Here is the peer-reviewed, published research proving the fact: B Vitamins – yes, something as simple as adding a source of B-complex to your regimen can prevent the juggernaut of heart disease from taking your life prematurely. A doubled-blind, randomized study, published in 2005, in the journal Atherosclerosis found that a simple intervention using 2.5 mg folic acid, 25 mg Vitamin B6, and 0.5mg Vitamin B12 for 1 year, resulted in significant reductions in arterial thickness (as measured by intima media thickeness).[1] Even niacin ]or folic acid  alone has been show to have this effect in patients. [Note: Always opt for natural sources of the B-group vitamins, including probiotic supplementation (which produce the entire complement for you), or a whole food extract, versus synthetic or semi-synthetic vitamins which, sadly, predominate on the market today]. Garlic – as we have documented extensively previously, garlic can save your life. It has been found to regress plaque buildup in the arteries, among many other potentially life-saving health benefits.  Pomegranate – this super healing fruit has been found to regress plaque buildup in the arteries, as well as being demonstrated to provide dozens of validated health benefits, including replacing the function of the mammalian ovary! Fermented Cabbage – Kimchi, a Korean recipe, which includes fermented cabbage, hot pepper, and various other ingredients, including fermented fish, appears to stall the atherosclerotic process in the animal model.  Additionally, strains of good bacteria in kimchi have been found capable of degrading toxic chemicals that can additional bodily harm. L-Arginine: This amino acid is capable of preventing arterial thickening – up to 24% reduction! -- in the animal model. We have done an extensive literature review on arginine supplementation and have found that in over 30 studies demonstrating this fact addition to 150 known health benefits, it is capable of addressing the underlying dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease: endothelial dysfunction, with no less than 20 studies proving this fact. Curcumin: the primary polyphenol in the Indian spice turmeric known as curcumin has been found to be an excellent cardioprotective, with over 30 studies demonstrating this fact. One study found that curcumin prevented damage to the arteries associated with blockage (neointima formation).  Sesame Seed: probably one of the most underappreciated super foods on the planet, sesame seed, which we have shown is as effective as Tylenol for arthritic pain, may be an excellent cardioprotective substance, ideally suited for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. One animal study found it was capable of preventing atherosclerosis lesion formation. 

Pediatric Meltdown
A Child Psychiatrist's Perspective for PCP's: Leave the "Fix It" Mindset at the Exam Door

Pediatric Meltdown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 54:05


Welcome to Pediatric Meltdown, the podcast for busy pediatricians who want to better understand children's emotional health and behaviors and gain the skills and knowledge to help them thrive. I am your host, Lia Gaggino, Today we are joined by Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin. Dr.  Mohiuddin is the Director of the Multidisciplinary Autism Program at the University of Michigan. She also is the fellowship training director of the Child Psychiatry Fellowship Program at Michigan Medicine and co-director of behavioral science sequence at the University of Michigan Medical School.  She is passionate about educating medical students, residents, fellows and other physicians about childhood mental health and care of individuals with ASD and developmental disabilities across the lifespan. In a surprising, at least to me, conversation, child psychiatrist Dr. Mohiuddin shares a new mental healthcare perspective for PCP's - abandon the "fix it" mindset and instead consider a chronic illness model that focuses on partnership with the patient and family to identify their most important concerns. Her insights suggest that using our longitudinal relationship with families, we can make enormous impact. For those of us who are overwhelmed by the notion of mental health care is primary care, Dr. Mohiuddin suggests reframing our negative self-talk and setting positive intentions for the day - "You've Got This!" comes to mind for me. Deep breath, you know more than you think you do!            Key Highlights:   [00:30 - 09:04] Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin on How to Address Overwhelming Mental Health Needs in Pediatric Patients Welcoming back,  Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin is a child psychiatrist and director of the multidisciplinary autism program at the University of Michigan. She also is the fellowship training director of the child psychiatry fellowship program at Michigan Medicine and co-director of behavioral science sequence at the University of Michigan Medical School. She is passionate about educating medical students, residents, fellows, and other physicians about childhood mental health and care of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities across the lifespan. During the course of becoming a physician, she believes that breaking down patients and building them up is important, but can lose pieces   [09:05 - 25:56] How to Address the System of What's Going On at School, but Not Everything Has to Be Achieved in a Visit Pediatric clinicians need to reframe their job as a partnership with patients and families, rather than “Fixing” things Mental health is similar to medical issues in that there are acute exacerbations and chronic stressors that cannot always be fixed It is important for pediatric clinicians to listen to patients and understand their values in order to help them make change Mental Health Conditions: It's Not Just About Fixing Them   [25:57 - 34:24] How to Collaborate with a Pediatrician to Improve Patient Care When meeting with patients, it is important to be clear about expectations and to level them for the patient. It is also important to be patient with patients and not expect them to fix everything right away. Patients can learn a lot from their physician colleagues, especially when it comes to general intervention strategies.   [34:25 - 42:58] Primary Care Physicians Struggle To Find Meaning In Their Work Taking advantage of Primary Care.  focusing on positive self-talk rather than the negative. CBT for physicians Acknowledging the our work is hard. Closing segment Final Words All of us who care for children are overwhelmed by their emotional distress. Let the patient and family lead. Let them identify Partner with the family to seek change over time and help create a working game plan using your expertise Pediatricians have the advantage of longitudinal relationships with families and kids...

Michigan Medicine News Break
Re-release: Data supports what surgeons performing gender-affirming mastectomies see in clinic

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 3:38


Surgeons who perform gender-affirming mastectomies know that they help patients. A 2021 study by Michigan Medicine researchers provides data to show exactly how. This episode originally aired in November 2021.The transcript for this episode can be found here.For the full article text, please visit: "Gender-affirming mastectomies improve mental health, sexual functioning and more."Don't forget to subscribe to the Michigan Medicine News Break on Apple, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts, and check out all of the shows on the Michigan Medicine Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Newborn Screening SPOTlight Podcast
Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

Newborn Screening SPOTlight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 41:33


Listen as Dr. Megan Pesch shares her journey to becoming a parent advocate and a researcher in Cytomegalovirus (also called CMV). Dr. Pesch is an Assistant Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Michigan where she is the Director of the Congenital CMV Developmental Follow-up Clinic. Dr. Pesch completed her medical school training, residency, and fellowship at the University of Michigan. She is board certified in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and serves as the President-elect of the National CMV Foundation. Dr. Pesch's youngest daughter has a profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss from congenital CMV and this led to her involvement in national advocacy efforts to ensure that all newborns receive CMV screening.  Dr. Pesch's clinical interests include the early diagnosis and treatment of congenital CMV using a multidisciplinary approach with a focus on family care and support, while her research focuses on healthcare provider practices around congenital CMV diagnosis and management and understanding the relationship between autism and CMV.   The month of June is CMV awareness month. Please visit the National CMV foundation to learn more about advocacy efforts in CMV in your area and how you can support NBS for CMV.   Learn more about Dr. Megan Pesch and her advocacy effort on newborn screening for CMV: https://ihpi.umich.edu/our-experts/pesch https://www.nationalcmv.org   Podcast Interview Question with Dr. Megan Pesch. You are currently an Assistant Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the Director of the Congenital CMV Developmental Follow-up Clinic at the University of Michigan. Can you tell our listeners more about CMV and how it impacts mothers, their babies and families? (perhaps, talk about the differences between prenatal CMV and neonatal congenital CMV)? You are a clinician and a researcher, and lead efforts in the Pesch Lab at Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan! One of your projects brings together a multidisciplinary group of health care providers to refer infants who fail their newborn hearing screen for congenital cytomegalovirus testing. Tell us more about this important project and explain how you got involved in newborn screening research? Currently, there is no standard of care or routine screening for newborns for congenital cytomegalovirus at birth. What can parents do if they suspect their baby has CMV? (perhaps discuss the Alethia CMV Assay Test System) What is hearing targeted early cytomegalovirus (HT-CMV) screening? One of your current studies seeks to understand the possible connection between exposure to CMV during pregnancy and the later risk of autism. Can you tell us more about this effort? What are you hoping to learn? What is the biological pathway? You are also the President-elect of the National CMV Foundation. What are some of the current activities or programs that people can get involved in your advocacy efforts? What are the recent advocacy efforts to support newborn screening for CMV? Is it currently being reviewed to be added to the RUSP? Are you involved in training the next generation of pediatricians, and what do you tell them about newborn screening research? You are busy as a clinician, researcher, advocate, and parent. Do you have any stories of inspiration that keep you going? What does NBS research mean to you? To learn how NBSTRN can help your research in newborn screening, visit www.nbstrn.org  

Crain's Conversations
The Build Up with Albert Berriz

Crain's Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 23:44


What we talked about: 2:00 - The state of McKinley and how the business has changed over 30 years3:05 -Why they are staying in the workforce housing market4:40 - Why they won't be expanding to regions outside of Ann Arbor and Orlando12:40 - How they handle rising rents14:00 - How to improve affordable housing16:50 - How they retain staffers18:10 - What they are doing for a succession plan18:55 - What it was like coming to the U.S as a refugee19:55 - His management style and how he uses social media22:15 - His biggest mistake in business and how he overcame it

Marrow Masters
Dr. Sean Smith on Improving and Maintaining Mobility with Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease

Marrow Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 21:51


Dr. Sean Smith is the director of the cancer rehabilitation program at Michigan Medicine, in Ann Arbor, as well as an associate professor at the University of Michigan. He's dedicated to helping patients improve function as it relates to a variety of musculoskeletal, neurological and cognitive deficits related to cancer and its treatment.Dr. Smith says every patient is different, and they may try many treatments at once to find the best fit for each individual situation.  The sooner he and his team can intervene, often the better the results.Skin and muscle tightening can sometimes occur with chronic GVHD.  One of the first treatment methods is stretching - whether that's giving a patient stretching exercises to do or employing the help of a physical or occupational therapist.   There are also other methods to break up scar tissue.  Other tactics may include cortisone injections, paraffin baths, and oral or topical steroids.  Dr. Smith explains how these tools are used. Fatigue is a very common issue relating to chronic Graft vs. Host Disease.  This can be due to anemia, drug side effects, poor sleep, and other factors. Our guest walks through treatment of each of these individual symptoms.Exercise, mindfulness, and even meditation are key tools in Dr. Smith's toolbox.  Your definition of exercise may be different than before transplant, but spending the time doing what you can is so important.  He shares some sobering numbers about how quickly muscles can deteriorate after transplant if not used.   Dr. Smith also talks about "pre-habilitation" - the exercise you can do before transplant.Resources:Dr. Sean Smith Bio: https://medicine.umich.edu/dept/pmr/sean-r-smith-mdNational Bone Marrow Transplant Link - (800) LINK-BMT, or (800) 546-5268.nbmtLINK Website: https://www.nbmtlink.org/nbmtLINK Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/nbmtLINKnbmtLINK YouTube Page can be found by clicking here.Thank you to this season's sponsors:Pharmacyclics: https://www.pharmacyclics.com/Janssen: https://www.janssen.com/Kadmon: https://kadmon.com/Sanofi: https://www.sanofi.com/

The Paul W. Smith Show
The Paul W. Smith Show ~ John Osterholzer

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 8:24


June 16, 2022 ~ In this edition of "Michigan Answers" Paul talks to the Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division at Michigan Medicine about military burn pits and how they can affect veterans.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Keeping you safe at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 12:40


Michigan Medicine Security – along with the U-M Division of Public Safety and Security (DPSS) – is committed to keeping you, your colleagues, learners patients and visitors safe. They do so through a commitment to trust, training and technology. Recently, Brian Uridge, director of Michigan Medicine Security, joined The Wrap to discuss his team's strategy and why each element is so important in the wake of recent tragedies around the country. Check out this important conversation today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Gun Reform Still Stalled in Michigan

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 25:27


Guns are now the leading cause of death for American children, but Michigan laws won't budge. Today, we talk with the Michigan State Senator whose district includes Oxford Township, where the mass shooting at Oxford High earlier this school year remains a fresh wound. And we hear from a researcher who narrows in on gun deaths -- and ways to possibly mitigate them -- among Michigan children. GUESTS: Rosemary Bayer, state senator representing Oxford Township and co-chair of the Michigan Firearm Safety and Violence Prevention Caucus (D-12) Patrick Carter, co-director of the Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention and associate professor of emergency medicine at Michigan Medicine  ---- Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Stateside's theme music is by 14KT. Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Michigan Minds
Connecting Michigan Clinicians with Pediatric and Perinatal Mental Health Resources

Michigan Minds

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 18:30


The Michigan Child Collaborative Care Program, or MC3, is a statewide program connecting primary care providers with psychiatrists and behavioral specialists for consultations and training to support their ability to provide mental health care in their clinics. Sheila Marcus, MD, heads the pediatric component of MC3 and is a professor of psychiatry at Michigan Medicine. Marcus joined Michigan Minds to talk about the importance of providing pediatric and perinatal mental health support across the state of Michigan and explain how MC3 is working to do just that. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Michigan Medicine News Break
COVID Recovery and Lung Health

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 34:04


We have expanded the Michigan Medicine News Break to include Twitter Space conversations with Michigan Medicine experts. Today's episode is a conversation about COVID and overall lung health shared by three experts from the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. COVID-19 has affected all of us in some way, and unfortunately doesn't seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. Dr. MeiLan Han, Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at University of Michigan Health, Dr. Hallie Prescott and Dr. Thomas Valley, also of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, dive into what the pandemic has taught us about lung health in general, lung health implications of long COVID and how we can apply lessons learned to better support overall lung health in the future.You can find Michigan Medicine on Twitter @umichmedicine.The transcript for this episode can be found here.The Michigan Medicine News Break is a part of the Michigan Medicine Podcast Network. You can subscribe to the Michigan Medicine News Break podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you listen to podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ethics and Culture Cast
Episode 69: Dr. Kristin Collier

Ethics and Culture Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 34:45


Dr. Collier is a graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School and she completed her internal medicine residency and chief medical resident year at the University of Michigan Health System. She is the director of Michigan Medicine's program on Health, Spirituality & Religion. Her special clinical interests include preventative medicine, primary care, depression and heart disease. Special Guest: Kristin Collier, MD.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap – AHI Teen Advisory Council

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 21:55


The Adolescent Champion Teen Advisory Council (TAC TAC) is a diverse group of youth ages 15-22 in the Washtenaw County area who serve as an advisory council to Michigan Medicine's Adolescent Health Initiative. Recently, several members of the council sat down with The Wrap to discuss their important work and how it feels to make an impact on the care provided at Michigan Medicine and beyond. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Nancy May ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 8:47


May 11, 2022 ~ The Chief Nurse Executive at Michigan Medicine talks to Paul about "Nurse's Week" and says she's honored to be working with the absolute best and most caring people in the business.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Celebrating 10 years of the patient portal

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 16:39


The Michigan Medicine patient portal recently celebrated its 10th anniversary! This week's episode of The Wrap employee podcast gives listeners an inside look at the team behind the portal and the features and tools it provides to faculty, staff and patients. Of course, there's also the trivia contest where you can win a prize! Check it out today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Living African
03: My Battle With 100 Fibroids - With Hilda Ngelo

Living African

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 69:04


The topic of fibroids will be one thing that we will never stop talking about because raising awareness is very necessary. This time around, we will dive deep into a personal experience of one of our sisters on her quest to get rid of 100 fibroids.   By age 50, nearly two-thirds of women experience uterine fibroids, which are noncancerous tumors that grow in the uterus and range from pea to football-sized and even larger. Data from Michigan Medicine shows that “Nearly a quarter of Black women between 18 and 30 have fibroids compared to about 6% of white women, according to some national estimates. By age 35, that number increases to 60%. Black women are also two to three times more likely to have recurring fibroids or suffer from complications.”   This data shows that women in our communities are disproportionately affected by fibroids and for that reason, there is a dire need for more education and discussion on this topic to help raise awareness and sensitize our community. Be inspired!   Meet Our Guest Our guest for this episode is Hilda Ngelo. Hilda was born in Cameroon and is an IT Change Partner, Creative Director of Ndià  Mangye, and Editor-in-Chief at Mammypi  FashionTV.    Hilda shares with us her journey with fibroids, which has been such a difficult one to say the least, but she came out stronger than ever and survived a surgery, which took out 100 fibroids from her body. Hilda's story doesn't only depict the strength of a woman, but her ability to bear it all and never lose hope!    Be inspired by Hilda's story just as we are!   Contact Hilda: Facebook: Hilda Ngelo and/or Mammy Pi Instagram: @mammypi   Watch Hilda's Story on BBC: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00151j8   Things You Will Learn in This Episode:  [00:01 – 03:00] Introduction Introducing our guest - Hilda Ngelo [03:00 – 25:00] Hilda Narrates Her Experience With Fibroids Early signs of fibroid First diagnosis and surgery Health complications after surgery A shocking second diagnosis More fibroids found in a 3D scan [25:00 – 50:00] Second Surgery & Recovery More health complications and difficulties The risks of surgery The series of events that led to the surgery Having faith and staying cheerful through it all Hilda's recovery so far [50:00 – 01:05:00] Addressing Important Issues The need for more education and sensitization Our women need to be courageous and ask a lot of questions We need to stop dismissing the concerns of others [01:30:00 – 01:09:03] Final Advice Hilda's advice to women Hilda's final words Anyoh's final words Quotes “I think clinicians should be able to listen to patients and provide accurate information to them. And if the patient doesn't understand, get somebody that can understand that information and break it down to the patient in a language that they better understand.” — Hilda Ngelo   “Please speak up, speak to somebody you trust. Find somebody in your circle that you trust. And if there's nobody, please do reach out because I'm here to listen, I'm here to help, and advise you.” — Hilda Ngelo  “In a different world like in the western world as a whole, A lot of black or African women go through so much but they are so afraid to ask the right questions because they think the doctor or health professional won't give them a chance to ask those [questions] or meet them with aggression as they have experienced back home [in Africa].” — Anyoh Fombad     LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue putting out the best content just for you!   Connect with Living African Podcast You can connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, or Twitter, or send us an email at hello@livingafricanpodcast.com. Check out our website www.livingafricanpodcast.com  for more resources and to learn more. You can connect with Anyoh on Facebook (@anyohf), Instagram (@anyohfombad), and Twitter (@anyohfombad).

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Advancing health for the LGBTQ+ community

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 17:07


Last week, Michigan Medicine was recognized for being a “Leader in LGBTQ+ Healthcare Equality” by the Human Rights Campaign. Learn more about this honor — and the steps Michigan Medicine has been taking to improve care for this community — on the latest episode of The Wrap podcast. Listeners will also find tips to enhance their interactions working with LGBTQ+ patients and get a preview of Patient Experience Week. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Frankel Innovation Initiative

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 19:13


Let's get innovative! Do you have an idea for a clinical project that could directly impact patient care? If so, you may qualify for funding from the Frankel Innovation Initiative, a $20 million fund supporting the research and development of life-saving therapies and innovative new technologies at Michigan Medicine. Learn more about this important program and hear about some of the research that has benefited from it on the latest episode of The Wrap employee podcast! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Clinical research coordinators are advancing health at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 17:55


Clinical research coordinators (CRCs) are a critical underpinning to conducting high-quality clinical research, and their work contributes to the research stature of Michigan Medicine and advancing patient care. Learn more about these vital team members -- and a new career ladder that will help them lay down roots in Ann Arbor -- on the latest episode of the employee podcast! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - How Community Health Services teamed up to serve families in need

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 33:26


Through work with local community partner agencies, Program for Multicultural Health (PMCH) staff members found that the COVID-19 pandemic devastated local families and increased impact of social determinants of health. In an effort to support families' increased needs, PMCH — which is part of Michigan Medicine's Community Health Services (CHS) — partnered with SOS Community Services in Ypsilanti to launch a Baby Supply Drive. On the latest episode of the employee podcast, a PMCH team member, along with a staff member from SOS in Ypsilanti and an SOS program participant discussed the importance of the campaign and how it will impact community members moving forward. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show Notes - 03.30.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 53:56


Global diets are harming human and planetary health   University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) and Harvard School of Public Health, March 29, 2022   A global diet that increasingly includes ultra-processed foods is having a negative impact on the diversity of plant species available for human consumption while also damaging human and planetary health, according to a commentary published in the journal BMJ Global Health. Ultra-processed foods such as sweetened or salty snacks, soft drinks, instant noodles, reconstituted meat products, pre-prepared pizza and pasta dishes, biscuits and confectionery, are made by assembling food substances, mostly commodity ingredients, and 'cosmetic' additives (notably flavors, colors and emulsifiers) through a series of industrial processes. These products are the basis of a 'globalized diet' and are becoming dominant in the global food supply, with sales and consumption growing in all regions and almost all countries. Currently, their consumption is growing fastest in upper-middle-income and lower-middle income countries.   (NEXT)   People with fibromyalgia are substituting CBD for opioids to manage pain   The cannabis-derived substance provides fewer side effects, with less potential for abuse University of Michigan, March 24, 2022   As the ravages of the opioid epidemic lead many to avoid these powerful painkillers, a significant number of people with fibromyalgia are finding an effective replacement in CBD-containing products, finds a new Michigan Medicine study. Previous research shows that some people substitute medical cannabis (often with high concentrations of THC) for opioids and other pain medications, reporting that cannabis provides better pain relief and fewer side effects. Kevin Boehnke, Ph.D., a research investigator in the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center surveyed people with fibromyalgia about their use of CBD for treatment of chronic pain. The U-M team found that more than 70% of people with fibromyalgia who used CBD substituted CBD for opioids or other pain medications. Of these participants, many reported that they either decreased use or stopped taking opioids and other pain medications as a result.   (NEXT)   Sleep Increases Chromosome Dynamics that Clear Out DNA Damage Accumulated During Waking Hours   Bar-Ilan University (Israel), 03-28-22   In a new study, published in the journal Nature Communications, researchers at Bar-Ilan University in Israelbreveal a novel and unexpected function of sleep that they believe could explain how sleep and sleep disturbances affect brain performance, aging, and various brain disorders. Using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques in live zebrafish, the researchers were able to define sleep in a single chromosome resolution and show that single neurons require sleep to perform nuclear maintenance. DNA damage can be caused by many processes including radiation, oxidative stress, and even neuronal activity. DNA repair systems within each cell correct this damage. The current work shows that during wakefulness, when chromosome dynamics are low, DNA damage consistently accumulates and can reach unsafe levels. The role of sleep is to increase chromosome dynamics, and normalize the levels of DNA damage in each single neuron. Apparently, this DNA maintenance process is not efficient enough during the online wakefulness period and requires an offline sleep period with reduced input to the brain in order to occur. Their discovery was achieved thanks to the characteristics of the zebrafish model. With their absolute transparency, and a brain very similar to humans, zebrafish are a perfect organism in which to study single cell within a live animal under physiological conditions. Using a high resolution microscope, the movement of DNA and nuclear proteins within the cell—inside the fish—can be observed while the fish are awake and asleep. The researchers were particularly surprised to find that chromosomes are more active at night, when the body rests, but this increased activity enables the efficiency of the repair to DNA damage.   (NEXT)   Tai chi can mirror healthy benefits of conventional exercise   University of Hong Kong and University of California at Los Angeles, March 21, 2022   A new study shows that tai chi mirrors the beneficial effects of conventional exercise by reducing waist circumference in middle-aged and older adults with central obesity. Central obesity is a major manifestation of metabolic syndrome, broadly defined as a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, including central obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level, and high blood pressure, that all increase risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. 543 participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to a control group with no exercise intervention (n= 181), conventional exercise consisting of aerobic exercise and strength training (EX group) (n= 181), and a tai chi group (TC group) (n= 181). Interventions lasted 12 weeks.   (NEXT)   Improvement of vitamin D levels linked to longer life   Second Medical Centre & National Clinical Research Centre (China), March 28 2022.   The investigation included 1,362 participants aged 60 to 113 who had their serum vitamin D levels measured in 2012 and 2014. Mortality data was collected in 2018. Deficient vitamin D levels of less than 20 ng/mL were detected among 67.5% of the participants in 2012 and 68.4% in 2014. During follow-up, 420 deaths occurred. Men and women who were deficient in vitamin D in 2012 and 2014 had a 2.33 times greater risk of mortality than those who maintained nondeficient levels. Among participants who maintained sufficient vitamin D or were deficient in 2012 and not deficient in 2014, the risk of dying was 30% and 53% lower than participants who were deficient at both time points. Women and participants who among the oldest old at 80 years of age or older experienced the greatest benefit.

The Race to Value Podcast
The Enablement of Localized Solutions to Improve Care Outcomes, with Dr. Tim Peterson and Kendall Cislo

The Race to Value Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 65:00


The Physician Organization of Michigan Accountable Care Organization (P.O.M. ACO) is a statewide ACO in the Medicare Shared Savings Program that has saved the Medicare Trust Fund more than $199 Million to-date. It is a physician-led partnership in operation since 2013 that supports more than 5,000 providers serving approximately 60,000 Medicare beneficiaries.  P.O.M. ACO aligned with the University of Michigan Health System, whose Faculty Group Practice participated in a Medicare demonstration project that paved the way for ACOs under federal health care reform years ago.  This is an outstanding Accountable Care Organization led by Dr. Tim Peterson and Kendall Cislo who are featured in this week's episode of the Race to Value. In this interview, you will learn how P.O.M. ACO has been successful by enabling localized solutions, in partnership with their provider network and beneficiary population, to improve care outcomes.  We discuss how the ACO engages their beneficiaries through committee and Board participation, how primary care providers and specialists work together to build “localized” population health programs, and how care management interventions can provide meaningful outcomes in both rural and urban settings.  This is an important interview for ACO leaders to listen to who are looking to establish improved relationships with both providers and patients to drive more effective care management interventions in caring for seniors and underserved populations. Episode Bookmarks:  02:00 Physician Organization of Michigan Accountable Care Organization (P.O.M. ACO) --  a statewide ACO that has saved more than $199 Million 02:40 Introduction to Dr. Tim Peterson (Population Health Executive for Michigan Medicine and ACO Executive and Chairman for P.O.M. ACO) and Kendall Cislo (Chief Operating Officer at P.O.M. ACO) 05:30 How ACO success has been determined by collaboration between a faculty academic practice and groups of independent physicians 10:00 Dr. Peterson discusses some of the unique public health and chronic disease challenges facing urban and rural Michiganders and how medical management programs of P.O.M. ACO meets patient needs 12:00 “Part of our ACO success has been the enablement of local solutions to address local problems.” 12:45 Recent study on patient perceptions of ACOs: Only 7 percent of 55- to 64-year-olds and 4 percent of those over 65 reported ever hearing about value-based care! 13:40 How beneficiary engagement and “the voice of the beneficiary” impact quality improvement and the Triple Aim 15:30 Why the economics of value-based payment shouldn't matter to patients (focus on quality care and out-of-pocket burden most important) 17:30 Utilizing a beneficiary engagement advisory committee as a key strategy for performance success 21:40 “The goal of our ACO is not to build a centralized infrastructure – it is instead to build localized solutions with our network of providers.” 24:30 Engaging patients to raise awareness of high cost (low value) specialists in the area 25:40 Partnering with dialysis centers to more effectively engage patients with kidney disease 28:30 “The key message to remember in healthcare is that we do everything for the patient.  What would you do for a patient if it was your Mom.” 31:20 Engaging physicians to more effectively collaborate with them in population health and quality improvement strategies 34:30 Collaborative conversations to improve risk adjustment coding documentation to more adequately reflect burden of illness in the patient population 38:00 Building local market capabilities for pharmacy integration in rural primary care practices 40:30 Annual Wellness Visits as opportunities to address what is most important in a patient's life and how that has transformed the ACO 44:30 The importance of clinical integration in improving care coordination and why specialist participation in an ACO is a performance adva...

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - A journey through mental illness

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 43:40


This week, there's a bonus podcast of The Wrap! Recently, we talked to Kelly Milimore Patrick, a registered nurse within the Department of Psychiatry at Michigan Medicine. Through a family diagnosis, Patrick realized that her path as a nurse was leading to psychiatry. She talks about that diagnosis, how it inspired her to change directions and why she wants to give back to others going through similar circumstances. Check out this important conversation today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Today in Health IT
Interview In Action – HIMSS 2022 Featuring Andrew Rosenberg with Michigan Medicine

Today in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 10:08


Andrew Rosenberg with Michigan Medicine and I dive deep on topics pertaining to communication and a foundation for innovation at HIMSS 2022. I hope you enjoy.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Celebrating Nutrition Month and the role of RDNs at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 25:18


Earlier this week you heard from registered dietitian nutritionists in Headlines, who explained what they love about their jobs at Michigan Medicine. But that story isn't the only way to learn about the valuable role of RDNs when it comes to clinical care. Two members of the Nutrition Services team joined The Wrap employee podcast recently to describe their work and provide further insight in celebration of Nutrition Month. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Becker’s Healthcare Digital Health + Health IT
Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine

Becker’s Healthcare Digital Health + Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 22:13


This episode features Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine. Here, he discusses his focus on improving remote communication and automation in order to work more efficiently during and after the pandemic, implementing more comprehensive cloud-based services, and more.

Michigan Medicine News Break
Doctor revives fellow hockey player | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 7:11


It was a normal day for Jeff Zampi, M.D., who had spent most of it performing procedures to treat babies, children, adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease. And after wrapping up work at University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, the pediatric cardiologist laced up his skates to hit the ice for a hockey game nearby in Ann Arbor: his Mott team was facing the Ice Cats. But by the third period of the match, Zampi found himself switching back to doctor mode.For more information about this story visit https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/heart-health/doctor-revives-fellow-hockey-player-after-cardiac-arrest-during-game.The transcript for this episode can be found here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

BackTable Urology
Ep. 32 Tips and Tricks for Telehealth with Dr. Chad Ellimoottil

BackTable Urology

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 52:23


In this episode of BackTable Urology, Dr. Aditya Bagrodia and Dr. Chad Ellimoottil, a Michigan Medicine urologist and Director of the U-M Telehealth Research Incubator, discuss advice and future projections for telehealth. --- EARN CME Reflect on how this Podcast applies to your day-to-day and earn AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs: https://earnc.me/rNETfY --- SHOW NOTES In this episode of BackTable Urology, Dr. Aditya Bagrodia and Dr. Chad Ellimoottil, a University of Michigan urologist and the Director of U-M Telehealth Research Incubator, discuss his advice and future projections for telehealth. Across all specialties, 15-20% of monthly medical visits are currently being conducted via telehealth. When deciding whether a consultation is appropriate for a virtual platform, Dr. Ellimoottill recommends assessing a patient's unique situation instead of relying on their diagnosis. He emphasizes the importance of in-person visits if AUA guidelines require the physician to perform a physical exam. Next, Dr. Ellimoottil shares his tips for having a successful telehealth appointment. First, he notes that punctuality is even more important over a virtual platform, as many patients may assume they are using the virtual platform incorrectly if they do not see a provider at the scheduled time. Additionally, he encourages physicians to keep their eyes focused on the camera and dress as professionally as possible, whether it be through wearing a white coat or displaying their certifications in the background. Finally, he places great importance on asking the patient directly about their telehealth experience for suggestions on improving it. He notes that this action can greatly reduce the number of dissatisfied patients who do not show up to their scheduled visits. Furthermore, the doctors discuss the future direction of telehealth. Although he notes that interstate consultations were beneficial at the start of the pandemic, Dr. Ellimoottil acknowledges that these consultations have become very complex because of recent regulatory changes. He also commends the availability of virtual interpreters in telehealth consultations, but addresses the inaccessibility of setting up a telehealth appointment to non-English speaking patients, which has contributed to healthcare inequity during the pandemic. Both doctors agree that there remains much research and many initiatives to be carried out in order to make telehealth a possibility for indigent and elderly populations as well. Finally, the doctors discuss the impact of telehealth on physicians. Dr. Ellimoottil believes that physician satisfaction with telehealth is directly associated with their personal mindset about telehealth. Thus, telehealth may cause burnout for one provider but enhance the quality of life for another. Nevertheless, he believes that telehealth will benefit both patients and providers if it is proposed as an option to both parties.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1898: Securing the Mobile Workforce

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 29:43


Denis O'Shea joins me on Tech Talks Daily in a discussion about securing remote workers using their personal devices. We also talk about balancing security with employee experience, and he shares a few tips around running a paper-less, server-less, password-less business. Finally, I learn more about the story behind Mobile Mentor. Denis O'Shea founded Mobile Mentor in New Zealand in 2004. Since then, the company has helped millions of people unlock the full potential of their technology. In 2017, O'Shea moved to Nashville, Tennessee to launch the company's US business, with a focus on securing the mobile workforce in industries such as healthcare, education, finance, and government services.  Mobile Mentor is a global leader in the endpoint ecosystem, helping clients navigate the right balance between security and employee experience. The company was named Microsoft's 2021 Global Partner of the year for Modern Endpoint Management primarily for their work helping Alive Hospice safely treat patients during COVID 19.  In addition to being a top Microsoft partner, they are also certified by Apple and Google. In addition, mobile Mentor has recently worked with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Michigan Medicine, Mayo Clinic, and the US Coast Guard.

APTA Vestibular SIG Podcast: Supported by the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy
Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction Clinical Practice Guideline Update: A Discussion with the Authors

APTA Vestibular SIG Podcast: Supported by the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 29:18


Host Diron Cassidy, PT, GCS is joined by Courtney Hall PT, PhD and Wendy Carender, PT, NCS to discuss the recently published update of the clinical practice guideline for vestibular rehabilitation for peripheral vestibular hypofunction. Dr. Hall is a Research Health Scientist at the Mountain Home Hearing and Balance Research Program at the James Quillen VA Medical Center and Professor in the Physical Therapy Program at East Tennessee State University. Ms. Carender is a physical therapist in the Department of Otolaryngology, Michigan Medicine, in the University of Michigan Health System. Both are co-authors of the updated clinical practice guideline, which is published online and will be in the April issue of the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy. For more resources for the updated clinical practice guideline visit neuropt.org.​

ANPT Vestibular Special Interest Group
Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction Clinical Practice Guideline Update: A Discussion with the Authors – Episode 62

ANPT Vestibular Special Interest Group

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 29:18


Host Diron Cassidy, PT, GCS is joined by Courtney Hall PT, PhD and Wendy Carender, PT, NCS to discuss the recently published update of the clinical practice guideline for vestibular rehabilitation for peripheral vestibular hypofunction. Dr. Hall is a Research Health Scientist at the Mountain Home Hearing and Balance Research Program at the James Quillen VA Medical Center and Professor in the Physical Therapy Program at East Tennessee State University. Ms. Carender is a physical therapist in the Department of Otolaryngology, Michigan Medicine, in the University of Michigan Health System. Both are co-authors of the updated clinical practice guideline, which is published online and will be in the April issue of the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy. For more resources for the updated clinical practice guideline visit neuropt.org.​

Becker’s Healthcare Digital Health + Health IT
Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine

Becker’s Healthcare Digital Health + Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2022 22:13


This episode features Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine. Here, he discusses his focus on improving remote communication and automation in order to work more efficiently during and after the pandemic, implementing more comprehensive cloud-based services, and more.

Out of the Gray (Gy) - Standard Imaging
Equity, Diversity and Inclusivity with Kelly C Paradis PhD, Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Equity and Wellness, Department of Radiation Oncology Michigan Medicine and Elizabeth Covington PhD, Associate Professor and Director of Quality and S

Out of the Gray (Gy) - Standard Imaging

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 52:41


Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Pérez: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/41104077-invisible-womenSome publications from our interview study:https://aapm.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acm2.13554https://www.advancesradonc.org/article/S2452-1094(21)00082-8/fulltext EthicsPoint - American Association of Physicists in Medicine

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 21:40


This episode features Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, Chief Information Officer at Michigan Medicine. Here, he discusses his focus on improving remote communication and automation in order to work more efficiently during and after the pandemic, implementing more comprehensive cloud-based services, and more.

WJR Michigan Answers
WJR Michigan Answers ~ Dr. Kevin Ward

WJR Michigan Answers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2022 8:18


January 27, 2022 ~ Critical care medicine, sometimes called intensive care medicine, has existed for less than 40 years. Emergency Medicine and Biomedical Engineering Professor at Michigan Medicine and executive director of the Max Harry Weil Institute for Critical Care Research and Innovation Dr. Kevin Ward talks about how the ICU has progressed, and how it will change in the coming decades.

A Health Podyssey
Katye Spector-Bagdady on Racial Diversity and Inclusion in Precision Medicine and Big Data

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 24:55


Precision medicine is built on a platform of big data, or large data bases that permit analysis of correlations among environmental and personal factors, treatments, and health outcomes.Data bases that once included only paper records now include tissue samples, air and water samples, and more. There's vast potential for significant advances in health care from precision medicine.But existing large data bases tend to be drawn almost entirely from European and Asian populations, limiting the reach of the benefits of precision medicine. Since big data analytics are often hidden from the patient (and sometimes even the clinician), non-representative data also contributes to mistrust in a health care system that has a long history of excluding certain people.Kayte Spector-Bagdady from the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine from the University of Michigan Medical School joins Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil on A Health Podyssey to discuss the representativeness of data banks and what to do about it.Spector-Bagdady and coauthors published a paper in the December 2021 issue of Health Affairs examining the lack of racial and ethnic diversity in data bank recruitment and enrollment at Michigan Medicine, a major academic medical center.They found failures of representation were in part due to recruitment practices and in part due to the disproportionate rate at which black, Asian, and Hispanic patients declined enrollment when offered, relative to non-Hispanic white patients.If you enjoy this interview, order the December 2021 Health Affairs issue.Pre-order the February 2022 Racism and Health issue.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - CVC Innovation Challenge

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 17:54


The Frankel Cardiovascular Center is once again hosting its Innovation Challenge, a Shark Tank-style event designed to help fund creative projects that will enhance cardiovascular care both at Michigan Medicine and beyond. Learn more about the challenge and its affiliated programs on the latest episode of The Wrap employee podcast! Of course, you can also win a prize as part of the weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Living With Cystic Fibrosis
Brett Bowman and Mom Kim talk transplant, blindness and Legacy.

Living With Cystic Fibrosis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:42


Kim Bowman, and her husband Brian are two of the strongest people I know.  Kim and I have been friends for a long time.  We both had two children with cystic fibrosis…she had two boys, (Blake and Brett) and I have Molly and Emily.Blake only made it to his 14th birthday.  He died from cystic fibrosis in January of 2015.  It's every parent's nightmare, (whether or not  your child has cystic fibrosis)…that your child should precede you in death.  I don't know how Kim got out of bed after Blake died, but she did.Not too long after, 4 years later, Brett needed a double lung transplant. How terrified Kim and Brian must have been.  They now have to deal with the possibility their only living son could now die from a transplant.  Fortunately, he didn't, but it wasn't' smooth sailing.  Brett came out of the transplant with beautiful new lungs, but lost his eyesight due to bacteria in the lungsThere was no time for Kim and Brian to rest emotional. Today Brett is rising up from the cruelty of this disease.  He just got his leader dog…and so his new chapter begins.For more information on The Bonnell Foundation find us at https://thebonnellfoundation.org/Vertex Pharma - the science of possibility.  https://www.vrtx.comSponsored by  https://www.fordfund.org/globalcaringmonth  The original music in this podcast is performed by Kevin Allan, who happens to have Cystic Fibrosis.  You can find him on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/KevinAllanMusicThis podcast was produced by JAG in Detroit Podcasts. https://jagindetroit.com/

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - A conversation with U-M Health President David Miller, M.D., M.P.H.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 19:52


This week on The Wrap, U-M Health President David Miller, M.D., M.P.H., shared important words of gratitude and hope as Michigan Medicine manages yet another surge of COVID-19. He specifically recognizes all of the faculty and staff who have helped the organization find success over the past two difficult and challenging years -- in patient care, education and research. As the employee podcast kicks off another year, check out what he had to say! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New England Journal of Medicine Interviews
NEJM Interview: Dr. Debra Weinstein on the pandemic's effects on graduate medical education and what we can learn from them.

New England Journal of Medicine Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 12:35


Dr. Debra Weinstein is executive vice dean for academic affairs at the University of Michigan Medical School, chief academic officer for Michigan Medicine, and a member of the Journal's Perspective Advisory Board. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal. D.F. Weinstein. Reengineering GME in a Pandemic — Looking Back, and Forward. N Engl J Med 2022;386:97-100.

Gut Feelings: With Dr. D and GI Jo: A Rome Foundation/DrossmanCare Podcast Series
IBS Management and the Mega Trends that will Improve Management

Gut Feelings: With Dr. D and GI Jo: A Rome Foundation/DrossmanCare Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 28:25


In this episode, Dr Drossman and Johannah Ruddy welcome guest William Chey, MD from Michigan Medicine. Dr. Chey talks about the exciting aspects of managing IBS and other DGBI with the emerging data around the benefits of diet therapy, behavioral health therapies and digital medicine to improve access to care.

PRS Global Open Keynotes
“Understanding Craniofacial Growth and Bone Healing” with Nicholas Do MD, Steven Buchman MD, and Christian Vercler MD from University of Michigan's Section of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

PRS Global Open Keynotes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:44


In this episode of the PRS Global Open Keynotes Podcast, Nicholas Do MD, Steven R. Buchman MD, and Christian J. Vercler MD discuss new advances in craniofacial surgery and the exploration of the functional matrix theory. The PRS Global Open University of Michigan Mini-Series on “Craniofacial Surgery and Bone Healing” contains 3 peer-reviewed articles on the topic and is available to read for free on PRSGlobalOpen.com. Read it here:  https://bit.ly/CraniofacialMichigan Dr. Do is a board-certified plastic surgeon, former Craniofacial Fellow at the University of Michigan, and current Assistant Professor at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Buchman is a board-certified plastic surgeon, tenured Professor of Surgery in the Section of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Michigan, Director of the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at the University of Michigan Medical Center, and the Chief of Pediatric Plastic Surgery at the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. Dr. Vercler is a board-certified plastic surgeon is an Associate Professor in the Section of Plastic Surgery in the Department of Surgery at Michigan Medicine. He serves as Co-Chair of the Clinical Ethics Service of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. Your host, Dr. Damian Marucci, is a board-certified plastic surgeon and Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Sydney in Australia. #PRSGlobalOpen #KeynotesPodcast #PlasticSurgery

Health Professional Radio - Podcast 454422

While the numbers are constantly rising, more than 1 in 10 Americans – or more than 34 million people – live with diabetes already today. For many of them, nerve damage caused by diabetes – a condition called diabetic neuropathy – is a common complication that can cause painful shooting and stabbing sensations along with burning, tingling and numbness that affect the lower extremities. To understand more about the challenges patients face due to this condition, a new national survey reveals its findings on what it truly means to live with diabetic nerve pain. Here to discuss neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy – or diabetic nerve pain – and the survey findings is Dr. Rodica Pop-Busui, MD, PhD, Professor of Internal Medicine, Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes and Vice Chair Clinical Research, Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and Lindsay Colbert, Executive Director of the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. Rodica Pop-Busui, MD, PhD, is the Larry D. Soderquist Professor of Diabetes, a prominent diabetologist at Michigan Medicine and a recognized leader in the field of diabetes and diabetes complications. She is the Vice Chair for Clinical Research in the Department of Internal Medicine and the Associate Director of Clinical Research, Mentoring and Development of the Elizabeth Weiser Caswell Diabetes Institute at the University of Michigan. Her research interests involve chronic complications of diabetes, particularly diabetic peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, as well as diabetic foot complications, diabetic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease, and the design and conduct of traditional and pragmatic clinical trials for patients with diabetes. Dr. Pop-Busui has published more than 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters, and received awards from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the University of Michigan. She has chaired the most recent American Diabetes Association Position Statement on Diabetic Neuropathy, and has served as Chair of the American Diabetes Association Scientific Research Review Clinical and Chair of the ADA Diabetes & Cardiovascular Disease Interest Group. She is also one of the principal investigators in the recently established NIDDK Diabetes Foot Consortium. She has led neuropathy studies in several of the most important national and international diabetes clinical trials to date including: the NHLBI-funded Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial, the NIDDK funded Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Diabetes 2 (BARI- 2D) and Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications. In addition, she designed and leads several investigator-initiated studies funded by NIDDK and Pharma to unveil disease modifying agents for diabetic neuropathy and other diabetes complications. Lindsay Colbert, MA, is Executive Director of the Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy (FPN), a public charity organization based outside of Chicago, Illinois, that is dedicated to improving the lives of patients living with peripheral neuropathy. In her tenure with the organization, Colbert has lead FPN to increase awareness of peripheral neuropathy, prioritize research and funding in the field, and provide educational programs to patients throughout the world who are desperate for answers and hope. Colbert holds a Master of Arts degree in International Development and French from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining FPN in 2017, Colbert developed her marketing, fundraising and nonprofit management skills for over a decade at two Chicago-based institutions, namely Rotary International and Northwestern University. She resides in a Chicago suburb with her husband and two daughters. In her free time, Colbert enjoys traveling, cycling, gardening, and playing with her children.

Pediatric Meltdown
Disruptive Behaviors: Insights and Strategies from a Child Psychiatrist

Pediatric Meltdown

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 58:22


Children that exhibit aggressive and disruptive behaviors can be hard to manage and treat especially if the root causes are not clearly understood. Paresh Patel, M.D., PhD, joins us in this episode to talk about exploring what may be behind difficult behaviors and offers management and treatment strategies. Dr. Patel emphasized that behaviors are often symptoms of deeper problems. Pediatric clinicians can begin to peel back the layers, and with the support of mental health professionals, find strategies that address what is really going on with kids. He also believes that medication should only be administered with the intent to stop the medication. Take a listen to his thoughts about the role of psychotropic medications and aggressive and disruptive behaviors and when we can lean on our colleagues in psychiatry. Although the first stop for many parents whose kids are struggling with difficult behaviors is the pediatric office, it is really about a team approach that includes our friends in psychiatry and mental health. Tune in for a thoughtful discussion about aggression and disruptive behaviors in kids with Dr. Patel! [00:01 - 07:23] Opening Segment Let's welcome, Paresh Patel, M.D., PhD His path to child psychiatry  [07:24 - 21:57] Disruptive Behaviors  What Paresh learned under the MC3 Program Medication is only a smart part of treatment  Handling children with disruptive behaviors  Paresh shares his experience  Behaviors are symptoms Non-verbal vs. verbal communication Some key insights from Paresh  [21:58 - 36:13] Free Will Among Children  Paresh's message for parents on how to be “super parents” He talks about the notion of free will among children Here's a true story from Paresh you should not miss  [36:14 - 51:29] Longitudinal Relationships and Trust Building relationships and trust among pediatricians When to resort to antipsychotic medication for children  We break down the different therapies available to children [51:30 - 58:21] Closing Segment Paresh's message for his resident self Finals takeaways Children do well if they can Behavior is a symptom  Turning parents into “super parents” No bad kid or bad parent Start medication to stop medication  Involve the therapist in the therapy  Jump with both feet and pay attention Tweetable Quotes: “The behavior is just a symptom of a deeper problem, and a deeper problem can be along the child continuum.” - Paresh Patel, M.D., PhD “Start medication with the intention to stop it.” - Paresh Patel, M.D., PhD Resources Mentioned: https://mc3.depressioncenter.org/ (Michigan Child Collaborative Care Program) Pediatric Meltdown previous episode: https://apple.co/3mJRlld (Autism Spectrum Disorders in Primary Care: Recognizing Early Signs and Initiating Treatment‬) Book: https://amzn.to/3teO4wJ (The Explosive Child) Email pdpatel@med.umich.edu to connect with Paresh and check out http://med.umich.edu/ (Michigan Medicine) to learn more about his work.  If you'd like to connect with me, you can find me at https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-lia-gaggino-80322a31/ (LinkedIn), https://www.facebook.com/DrLiaGaggino/ (Facebook), and https://twitter.com/gagginol?lang=en (Twitter) or email me at gagginol@yahoo.com. To learn more about me visit https://www.medicalbhs.com/ (https://www.medicalbhs.com/) LOVE WHAT YOU HEARD? Leave us a 5-star review so we can continue to provide you with great content. Share this episode and help people know more about children's health and well-being.

Pediatric Meltdown
Autism Spectrum Disorders in Primary Care: Recognizing Early Signs and Initiating Treatment

Pediatric Meltdown

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 66:15


We have a special episode for today because of two important guests. Dr. Sheila Marcus is the Section Chief of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry of Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan while Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin is the Director of the University's Multidisciplinary Autism Program. They join us to discuss autism spectrum disorders and how we can detect them in as early as 4-12 months. We will learn that the symptoms of these disorders are often subtle and that early detection is critical Let's listen to Dr. Marcus and Dr. Mohiuddin to learn more about autism spectrum disorders. [00:01 - 02:51] Opening Segment Welcoming today's guests, Dr. Sheila Marcus and Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin,  We introduce our topic for this episode [02:52 - 13:24] Observe the Baby Dr. Marcus tells us what to look out for in a 4- to 12-month old baby A baby should learn how to love the parents by this time  Listen to Dr. Mohiuddin's advice for pediatricians Encourage the patient's parents to come back Use appropriate language that only subtly expresses your concern  Observe the baby with the parent without your presence [13:25 - 23:31] Consider Virtual Evaluations They talk about the pros and cons of virtual evaluations  Hear the parents' voice, see the baby The importance of early interventions for babies exhibiting signs of autism Dr. Marcus explains [23:32 - 34:02] Explain the Spectrum  They explain why autism disorders are located in a spectrum Not a matter of “you have it” or “you don't have it” Dr. Marcus talks about the common tests to detect autism spectrum disorders early What are the usual treatments for autism spectrum disorders?  [34:03 - 47:43] Don't Always Fill in the Gaps  Adults can let the conversation with a kid remain uncomfortable Dr. Mohiuddin explains  Why should adults “not fill in all the gaps?” We talk about how kids with autism build social relationships  Dr. Mohiuddin reminder on giving medications  [47:44 - 57:53] Think About the Kid's Future We share some useful resources to educate you more about autism Links below The challenging part of transitioning to adolescence and adulthood They talk about the importance of thinking about the kid's future Independent living skills, work, and preferences, among others [57:54 - 01:06:15] Closing Segment Parting words from Dr. Marcus and Dr. Mohiuddin  Final Takeaways Always listen to parent concerns and take them seriously Early identification and evaluation make all the difference Delivering the diagnosis can be hard and painful for patients  Early symptoms are sometimes too subtle  Applied Behavior Analysis and Early Start Denver Model Older language with strong language skills can be missed easily  Don't always fill in the gaps Think early about the kid's trajectory in the future  Medications should only be considered in extreme cases As adults, kids may do well regardless of their skills  Tweetable Quotes: “...if a parent who's an astute observer and somebody whose opinions you've always trusted sensed [the possibility of autism], number one, believe them.” - Dr. Sheila Marcus  “In doing an evaluation of an older kid who has not had a diagnosis of autism yet but there has been suspicion, part of the trick of doing the evaluation is...you as an adult have to not fill in all the gaps.” - Dr. Sarah Mohiuddin  Resources Mentioned: https://mc3.depressioncenter.org/ (Michigan Child Collaborative Care Program) https://bit.ly/35eUuCh (Autism: AAP guidance includes updates, searchable topics, executive summary) https://bit.ly/3rXUss3 (What are the Early Signs of Autism?) https://bit.ly/2XhYUng (Autism Spectrum Disorders) https://bit.ly/3hOewIK (Applied Behavior Analysis) Netflix Show: https://bit.ly/3rW9P4d (Love on the Spectrum) Email smmarcus@med.umich.edu to connect with Dr. Marcus and...

RAISE Podcast
41: Megan Doud, University of Michigan

RAISE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 57:39


About MeganMegan Doud serves as the Assistant Vice President for Strategic Resource Development in the Office of University Development at the University of Michigan. In this role, she is responsible for strategic planning and resource management, finance and administration, talent management, leading the development of new digital fundraising strategies, and overseeing annual giving and pipeline programs including student philanthropy.Since beginning her tenure at Michigan nearly 12 years ago as an Assistant Director of Annual Giving, Megan has helped to build and develop programs in Annual Giving, Leadership Annual Giving, Student Philanthropy, and Digital Fundraising for both the university and Michigan Medicine. Last year, U-M had more than 116,000 annual donors who collectively contributed more than $66 million.Prior to joining the University of Michigan, Megan worked on the Annual Giving team at Northwestern University and served as the Director of Development for Peninsula Players Theatre in Fish Creek, Wisconsin.Megan holds a bachelor's degree in economics from Northwestern University and an MBA from the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.