Podcasts about Michigan Medicine

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  • 61PODCASTS
  • 458EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 15, 2021LATEST
Michigan Medicine

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Best podcasts about Michigan Medicine

Latest podcast episodes about Michigan Medicine

Michigan Surgery Sessions
Michigan Women's Surgical Collaborative | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Surgery Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 16:30


The Michigan Wom​en's Surgical Collaborative (MWSC) has built its mission around highlighting the barriers to achievement for female surgeons and inspiring real change to remove those barriers. On this episode, we talk with two members of the leadership team of the MWSC to understand how the group set the stage for such work, and discuss the work still to be done.Featured speakers include:Dana Telem, M.D., M.P.H.Erin Perrone, M.D.Click here for a transcript for this episode.Michigan Medicine is the academic medical center for the University of Michigan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Quality Month 2021

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 15:28


It's Quality Month, and this year's events will highlight the important work being performed across Michigan Medicine that align with the recently-announced "Build Our BASE" priorities. Check out the latest episode of The Wrap to learn details of some of the projects that are in the spotlight this month and to find out how you can attend any of the exciting Quality Month events! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Pharmacy Technician Training Program

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 15:43


How much do you know about the important work pharmacy technicians do at Michigan Medicine? You can learn all about their job and why the organization is launching a new Pharmacy Tech Training Program in the months ahead. This would be a great episode to share with friends and family who may be interested in a career change! Check it out today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

PRS Global Open Keynotes
“Understanding Craniofacial Growth and Bone Healing” with Nicholas Do MD, Steven Buchman MD, and Christian Vercler MD from University of Michigan's Section of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

PRS Global Open Keynotes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 39:43


In this episode of the PRS Global Open Keynotes Podcast, Nicholas Do MD, Steven R. Buchman MD, and Christian J Vercler MD discuss new advances in craniofacial surgery and the exploration of the functional matrix theory. The PRS Global Open University of Michigan Mini-Series on “Craniofacial Surgery and Bone Healing” contains 3 peer-reviewed articles on the topic and is available to read for free on PRSGlobalOpen.com. Read it here: https://bit.ly/CraniofacialMichigan Dr. Do is a board-certified plastic surgeon, former Craniofacial Fellow at the University of Michigan, and current Assistant Professor at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Buchman is a board-certified plastic surgeon, tenured Professor of Surgery in the Section of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Michigan, Director of the Craniofacial Anomalies Program at the University of Michigan Medical Center, and the Chief of Pediatric Plastic Surgery at the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. Dr. Vercler is a board-certified plastic surgeon is an Associate Professor in the Section of Plastic Surgery in the Department of Surgery at Michigan Medicine. He serves as Co-Chair of the Clinical Ethics Service of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. Your host, Dr. Damian Marucci, is a board-certified plastic surgeon and Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Sydney in Australia. #PRSGlobalOpen #KeynotesPodcast #PlasticSurgery

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Conqu'ring Heroes 31 - Sam Grewe

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 21:28


Brian is in for Jon this week, and he catches up with current U-M medical student Sam Grewe, who won a gold medal in the high jump at the Paralympics Games a few weeks ago. Grewe discusses his decision to amputate his right leg in seventh grade (2:00), the process of transitioning to adaptive sports as a teenager (6:00), his memories from the day he won gold (10:00), and his professional goals in the medical field (15:00). This interview was made possible thanks to our friends at Michigan Medicine and their "Michigan Answers Spotlight" feature on our football radio broadcasts this season. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Axios Today
Pediatricians face a new COVID reality

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 10:54


With COVID-19 cases in children surging across the country, doctors are seeing more kids in their offices and in hospitals. Two pediatricians share what they're seeing and what they want parents to know. Plus, California's recall election and lies about voter fraud. And, what do you want to know about teenage mental health during the pandemic? Guests: Pediatrician Bryan Kornreich, Michigan Medicine's Marisa Louie and Axios' Sara Fischer. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Pilgrim's Odyssey
My Precious, You Are What You Love

The Pilgrim's Odyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 17:08


You are what you love. This is why we can have a culture where people have many things they “love”, but their souls are being destroyed. We can be both “happy” and depressed. Searching for life, but filled with death. I was reminded of this fact reading an article about video game addiction that mentioned a 2016 book by James K. Smith, You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit. It is about shaping a Christian life, and realizing, you are what you love, and often, we might not love what we think. Or I would say, what you desire and falsely love. And even if it is something that would destroy you, this desire shapes our hearts and who we are. In the article I came across by Carmel Richardson for The American Spectator, for many of our young and not so young, it is video games. Especially young boys and men. From the article: “Gaming addictions are real and damaging, even beyond the well-documented: shorter attention spans, academic struggles, and a handful of basement-dwelling Call of Duty players who went off the rails. If those weren't enough, gamers are also highly prone to depression, and increasingly, studies show strong correlations between gaming and suicide rates.” “The demographic most hurt is young men. Statistically, gamers are teen boys, in the phase of life when they seek excitement most and are tempered by maturity least. Video games, which promise endless excitement, can be incredibly addictive to boys of this age. One 2020 poll, done by Michigan Medicine, shows teen boys are far more likely than girls to spend three or more hours gaming in a given day, and boys are twice as susceptible to gaming addictions in general than are girls. To say boys are the only ones to blame would be inaccurate, but certainly the problem affects them more than their female counterparts.” The author's main question, why do we allow video games to proliferate the young so unencumbered? Her implication and my answer, we all have our own “video games” and to limit the youth would mean to shine a light on our own “loves”. When we are blind to what we truly love, we tend to see things the way we want to see them. In a culture where we can get so easily distracted from reality in a search to create our own reality, is it any wonder that we are so divided over data and facts that we cannot agree upon, because we see what we want to see?

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

“The research around psychedelics is just unreal; the potential of these medicines to completely transform the way that we provide mental health care and help people who really need big changes in their life is really exciting.” – Jack Swain  Jack Swain is Head of Clinical Operations at Mindbloom, a mental health and wellbeing company focused on psychedelic therapy. Before joining Mindbloom, Jack Swain was a healthcare consultant at The Chartis Group, where he worked with the Cleveland Clinic and Michigan Medicine. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/jack-swain1-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: Jack's background and intro to Mindbloom How healthcare today is broken, and why Jack is hopeful that it will improve What is psychedelic therapy? Why Mindbloom is focused on treating depression and anxiety Progress in the world of psychedelic medicine Examples of successful treatment with Mindbloom Mindblooms treatment model and clinicians Scaling a telemedicine company The history of psychedelic medicine The importance of journaling in mental health therapy The data and research coming from Mindbloom  Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

Outliers with Daniel Scrivner

“I'm a super optimist. I'm generally pretty buoyant. I see the silver lining in just about everything. Throughout life, as things have come up, I've always viewed it as, how is this a good thing versus how is this a setback?” – Jack Swain  Jack Swain is Head of Clinical Operations at Mindbloom, a mental health and wellbeing company focused on psychedelic therapy. Before joining Mindbloom, Jack Swain was a healthcare consultant at The Chartis Group, where he worked with the Cleveland Clinic and Michigan Medicine. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/jack-swain2-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: Jack's daily habits for mental health OneNote and Getting Things Done Jack's superpowers and struggles Sign up here for Outlier Debrief, our weekly newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Accessibility at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 23:00


This week, The Wrap took a deep dive into equity and inclusivity by discussing the importance of accessibility at Michigan Medicine. Christa Moran of Interpreter Services stopped by to chat about ongoing initiatives and ways that you can help make the organization more open and accessible to those with disabilities and those who do not speak English as their primary language. Of course, there was also the weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inside the Lab
S2Ep1: Personnel Management

Inside the Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 50:12


Pathology administrators are tasked with the recruitment, retention, and management of laboratory staff. But how do you attract personnel for hard-to-fill positions? And how do you help young pathologists and laboratory professionals advance their careers and become the next generation of leaders?  On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Ms. Kelley Suskie, MHSA, FACMPE, Administrator for the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Mr. John Baci, MBA, C-PM, Executive Director of Anatomic Pathology at Boston Children's Hospital, and Mr. Martin Lawlor, Director of Finance and Administration for the Department of Pathology at Michigan Medicine, to discuss personnel management. Our panelists explain what administrators can do to prepare for the retirement cliff facing pathology, challenging laboratory professionals to mentor the next generation of leaders. They explore how personnel management differs in an academic versus clinical setting and offer strategies for networking in the pathology administration community. Listen in as our panelists share their most challenging personnel management experiences and get their advice on confronting bad behavior early on and holding people accountable for their actions as pathology administrators. Topics Covered  ·  Suggestions for recruiting and retaining personnel for hard-to-fill positions· Creating succession plans for the laboratory professionals ·  Preparing for the retirement cliff the pathology field is facing and developing the next generation of leaders· Why it's better to help top performers advance and move on rather than hold them back· How to reconcile making yourself invaluable in the lab with empowering your team· How personnel management differs in an academic vs. clinical setting· Strategies for connecting with others in the community of academic pathology administration· The importance of both internal and external networking in the personnel management space· Challenging personnel management experiences· Developing the courage to confront bad behavior early on and hold people accountable for their actions· Our panelists' advice around mentoring aspiring pathology administrators Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. SuskieMs. Suskie on LinkedInMs. Suskie on Twitter Connect with Mr. Baci Mr. Baci at Boston Children's HospitalMr. Baci on LinkedIn Connect with Mr. Lawlor Mr. Lawlor at Michigan Medicine Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Swails Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP Store 

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Flexible First

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 20:41


Michigan Medicine has adopted the Flexible First Workforce and Workplace initiative as decisions are made regarding faculty and staff returning to the medical campus in the months ahead. Learn more about the initiative and what you can do to prepare for an eventual return to campus on the latest episode of The Wrap. Of course, you'll also find a trivia contest where you can win a great prize! Check it out today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Richard Helppie's Common Bridge
Episode 114- Vaccine and Pandemic as of NOW, with Dr. James Baker

Richard Helppie's Common Bridge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 50:44


A fast- paced discussion of Delta Variant, Breakthrough Infections, Gain-of-Function, Vaccine Success & Side Effects, with Dr. James Baker of Michigan Medicine.Support the show (https://RichardHelppie.com)

Your Brain at Work
De-Escalation: The Most Essential Management Skill of 2021

Your Brain at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 42:43


In Season 3 of Your Brain at Work Live, we debuted with an episode on de-escalation, featuring Joe Smarro of the Emmy-nominated HBO documentary “Ernie and Joe, Crisis Cops.” At this point in Season 5, as the world attempts to reopen and we're constantly bombarded with images and videos of situations that need to be de-escalated -- think about airlines, as one starting place -- we wanted to revisit the topic. This time, we discuss the neuroscience of de-escalation, and day-to-day strategies for bringing down the boil on a situation, with in-house experts Dr. Joy VerPlanck (Senior Insight Strategist, NLI), Dr. David Rock (CEO & Co-Founder, NLI), and Brian Uridge (Deputy Director Division of Public Safety & Security, University of Michigan Medicine).

Michigan Medicine News Break
‘Medicine Is The Ultimate Team Sport' | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 28:08


Today we're sharing a conversation that our Medical School's Director of Admissions Carol Teener had recently with Dr. Deborah Berman. Dr. Berman has taken on an exciting new role at the Medical School, just as the process of selecting our next class of future doctors gets underway.For highlights from their conversation, please visit: https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/med-u/what-does-it-take-to-get-into-michigans-medical-school-just-ask-new-dean See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Inforum's Meet Her Podcast
Season 2, Ep. 11: Rose Glenn, Chief Communications and Marketing Officer, Michigan Medicine

Inforum's Meet Her Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 25:49


Rose Glenn, Chief Communications and Marketing Officer, Michigan Medicine, and a long-time member of Inforum's HealthcareNEXT Industry Group Steering Committee. Support the show (https://inforummichigan.org/about/)

Michigan Medicine News Break
11 Things to Know About Masks Right Now | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 6:10


NOTE: This recording was recorded in May, when the article first published. Check the CDC's website for the most current updates.No matter where you fall on the mask spectrum, here are 11 things to know right now. https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/wellness-prevention/confused-about-latest-mask-rules-read See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Hitinder Gurm & Nancy May ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 8:07


July 28, 2021 ~ The Chief Clinical Officer for Michigan Medicine's Adult Hospitals and the Michigan Medicine Chief Nurse Executive talk to Paul about the new Pavilion and they say the facility is designed for patient and family comfort.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Linda Larin & Tony Denton ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 8:27


July 28, 2021 ~ The Interim Chief Operating Officer for Michigan Medicine's adult hospitals and the Chief Operating Officer of University of Michigan Health talk to Paul about their work at the hospital system.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Marschall Runge & David Miller ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 8:39


July 28, 2021 ~ The CEO of Michigan Medicine and the President of University of Michigan Health talk to Paul about the news that the hospital system has been named the best in Michigan and they also tell Paul about the new facility called the Pavilion.

Michigan Medicine News Break
Data Shows Parents Vaccinated During Pregnancy Help Protect Newborns from COVID | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 3:10


While babies can't receive the COVID vaccine themselves, they may still benefit from vaccine antibodies that pass through the placenta or breastmilk.For the full text of the article, visit: https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/womens-health/covid-19-vaccine-during-pregnancy-protects-newborns See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Marrow Masters
Dr. Sung Choi Shares Her Best Advice Regarding cGVHD as it affects children

Marrow Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 34:04


Dr. Sung Choi is a pediatric bone marrow transplant physician at Michigan Medicine (University of Michigan).Dr. Choi joins us today to discuss the unique challenges for pediatric patients as it relates to GVHD. Passionate and knowledgeable, Dr. Choi will tackle it all, including target organ damage, the cytokine storm, clinical trials and much more. Classic organs affected by acute GVHD include skin, liver and GI tract. Did you know that typically the skin is the most affected in both pediatric and adult patients struggling with GVHD? (Check out our other episode with Dr. Cowen of the NIH in this series for more on all things skin GVHD.)Risk factors (of GVHD) are also discussed--how a mismatch  between the donor and recipient influences the onset of GVHD as well as age, conditioning chemo and much more. High dose steroids are covered and did you know that pediatric patients do not always respond to steroids? Listen in for other options. ResourcesDr. Choi bio: https://www.uofmhealth.org/profile/263/sung-won-choi-mdNational Bone Marrow Transplant Link - (800) LINK-BMT, or (800) 546-5268.nbmtLINK Website: https://www.nbmtlink.org/nbmtLINK Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/nbmtLINKThank you to this season's sponsors:Incyte Corporation: https://www.incyte.com/Kadmon: https://kadmon.com/

Michigan Medicine News Break
The Details and Differences of Pregnancy Specialists | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 10:23


While selecting nursery colors and baby names may be among your first thoughts after discovering you're pregnant, there's another important choice to make. Who do you want on your health care team for this 40-week journey? Three experts explain what you need to know before choosing your prenatal provider.For the full text of the article, visit: https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/womens-health/ob-gyn-family-physician-midwife-doula-which-pregnancy-specialist-right-for-you See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Intern Spotlight

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 22:10


Do you know what it's like to be a summer intern at Michigan Medicine? Find out straight from the source, as three interns join The Wrap employee podcast to share their experiences and reflect on why such opportunities are so important. This week's episode was also hosted by a special guest host -- who happens to be a former intern himself! Check it out today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hearing Matters Podcast
One of the First Deaf Physicians in The United States feat. Dr. Zazove | Michigan Medicine

Hearing Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 24:00


About the Hearing Matters Podcast The Hearing Matters Podcast discusses hearing technology (more commonly known as hearing aids), best practices, and a growing national epidemic - Hearing Loss. The show is hosted by father and son - Blaise Delfino, M.S. - HIS and Dr. Gregory Delfino, CCC-A. Blaise Delfino and Dr. Gregory Delfino treat patients with hearing loss at Audiology Services, located in Bethlehem, Nazareth, and East Stroudsburg, PA.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 07.02.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 59:10


Sunflower peptide as 'template' for potential analgesic Medical University of Vienna (Austria), June 28, 2021 A naturally occurring peptide in sunflower seeds was synthetically optimised and has now been identified as a potential drug for treating abdominal pain or inflammation (in the gastrointestinal tract, abdominal area and/or internal organs). That is the finding of an international study led by Christian Gruber from MedUni Vienna's Institute of Pharmacology (Center for Physiology and Pharmacology), which was conducted jointly with the University of Queensland and Flinders University in Australia and has now been published. The scientific aim of the study is to find analgesics that are only active in the periphery and do not cross the blood-brain barrier, as an alternative to commonly used synthetic opioids. Gruber explains the background: "Morphine was one of the first plant-based medicines and was isolated from the dried latex of poppies more than 200 years ago. It binds to opioid receptors in the brain and is still regarded as the main pillar of pain therapy. However, there is a high risk of opioid addiction, and an overdose - as a result of this strong dependency - inhibits the breathing centre in the brain, which can result in respiratory depression and, in the worst case, in death." For this reason, researchers throughout the world are trying to make analgesics safer and to find active drug molecules that do not have the typical opioid side-effects.  Sunflower extracts were to some extent used in traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. In the current study, the scientists from Austria and Australia, primarily PhD student Edin Muratspahi?, isolated the plant molecule that may be responsible for this effect. Medicinal chemistry methods were then used to optimise the so-called sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), one of the smallest naturally occurring cyclic peptides, by 'grafting' an endogenous opioid peptide into its scaffold.  A total of 19 peptides were chemically synthesized based on the original SFTI-1 blueprint and pharmacologically tested. "One of these variants turned out to be our lead candidate for as potential innovative analgesic molecule, especially for pain in the gastrointestinal tract or in the peripheral organs. This peptide is extremely stable, highly potent and its action is restricted to the body's periphery. Its use is therefore expected to produce fewer of the typical side-effects associated with opioids," point out Gruber and Muratspahi?.  The mode-of-action of the peptide is via the so-called kappa opioid receptor; this cellular protein is a drug target for pain relief, but is often associated with mood disorders and depression. The sunflower peptide does not act in the brain, hence there is much less risk of dependency or addiction. Furthermore, it selectively activates only the molecular signalling pathway that influences pain transmission but does not cause the typical opioid side-effects. The data of the animal model in the current study are very promising: the scientists see great potential for using this peptide in the future to develop a safe medication - which could be administered orally in tablet form - to treat pain in the gastrointestinal tract, and this drug could potentially also be used for related painful conditions, e.g. for inflammatory bowel disease.  Using Nature's blueprint The research of this MedUni Vienna laboratory led by Christian Gruber exploits the concept of using Nature's blueprint to develop optimised drugs. "We are searching through large databases containing genetic information of plants and animals, decoding new types of peptide molecules and studying their structure, with a view to testing them pharmacologically on enzymes or membrane receptors and ultimately utilizing them in the disease model," explains Gruber. Finally, potential drug candidates are chemically synthesised in a slightly modified form based on the natural blueprint, to obtain optimised pharmacological properties.   Study associates organic food intake in childhood with better cognitive development Analysis of multiple prenatal and childhood environmental risk factors suggests that poor nutrition, house crowding and indoor air pollution are associated with poorer cognitive function Barcelona Institute for Global Health (Spain), July 1, 2021 A study analysing the association between a wide variety of prenatal and childhood exposures and neuropsychological development in school-age children has found that organic food intake is associated with better scores on tests of fluid intelligence (ability to solve novel reasoning problems) and working memory (ability of the brain to retain new information while it is needed in the short term). The study, published in Environmental Pollution, was conceived and designed by researchers at the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)--a centre supported by the "la Caixa" Foundation--and the Pere Virgili Health Research Institute (IISPV-CERCA).  The explanation for this association may be that "healthy diets, including organic diets, are richer than fast food diets in nutrients necessary for the brain, such as fatty acids, vitamins and antioxidants, which together may enhance cognitive function in childhood," commented lead author Jordi Júlvez, a researcher at IISPV-CERCA who works closely with ISGlobal.  The study also found that fast food intake, house crowding and environmental tobacco smoke during childhood were associated with lower fluid intelligence scores. In addition, exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) indoors was associated with lower working memory scores.  The study, titled "Early life multiple exposures and child cognitive function: A multi-centric birth cohort study in six European countries", used data on 1,298 children aged 6-11 years from six European country-specific birth cohorts (United Kingdom, France, Spain, Greece, Lithuania and Norway). The researchers looked at 87 environmental factors the children were exposed to in utero (air pollution, traffic, noise, various chemicals and lifestyle factors) and another 122 factors they were exposed to during childhood. A Pioneering Study The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of these exposures on the development and maturation of the human brain, since during childhood the brain is not yet fully developed for efficient defence against environmental chemicals and is particularly sensitive to toxicity, even at low levels that do not necessarily pose a risk to a healthy mature brain.  The originality of the study lies in its use of an exposome approach, i.e. the fact that it takes into account the totality of exposures rather than focusing on a single one. This approach aims to achieve a better understanding of the complexity of multiple environmental exposures and their simultaneous effect on children's neurodevelopment.  Another strength of the study, which analyses cohorts from six European countries, is its diversity, although this factor also poses the additional challenge of cultural differences, which can influence exposure levels and cognitive outcomes. Notable Associations The study found that the main determinants of fluid intelligence and working memory in children are organic diet, fast food diet, crowdedness of the family home, indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke. To date, there has been little research on the relationship between type of diet and cognitive function, but fast food intake has been associated with lower academic development success and some studies have also reported positive associations between organic diets and executive function scores. "In our study," explained Júlvez, "we found better scores in fluid intelligence and working memory with higher organic food intake and lower fast food intake."  In contrast, exposure to tobacco smoke and indoor PM2.5 during childhood may negatively affect cognitive function by enhancing pro-inflammatory reactions in the brain. Still, according to Júlvez, it is worth bearing in mind that "the number of people living together in a home is often an indicator of the family's economic status, and that contexts of poverty favour less healthy lifestyles, which in turn may affect children's cognitive test scores".  Some Surprising Findings  The study also found some unexpected associations, which could be explained by confounding and reverse causality. For example, a positive association was found between childhood exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and cognitive function, even though PFOS is considered an endocrine disruptor that may alter thyroid function and negatively influence cognitive development.  The study forms part of the large European project Human Early-Life Exposome (HELIX), as does another recent paper that used the same exposome and the same participants but looked at symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and childhood behavioural problems. "We observed that several prenatal environmental pollutants (indoor air pollution and tobacco smoke) and lifestyle habits during childhood (diet, sleep and family social capital) were associated with behavioural problems in children," explained Martine Vrijheid, last author of the study and head of ISGlobal's Childhood and Environment programme. "One of the strengths of this study on cognition and the earlier study on behavioural problems is that we systematically analysed a much wider range of exposure biomarkers in blood and urine to determine the internal levels in the model and that we analysed both prenatal and childhood exposure variables," concluded Vrijheid.     Extract of mulberry leaves partially restores the composition of intestinal microbiota and strengthens liver glycogen fragility in diabetic rats Macau University of Science and Technology (China), June 28, 2021 According to news reporting out of Macau, People's Republic of China, research stated, “Mulberry leaf as a traditional Chinese medicine is able to treat obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. It is well known that diabetes leads to intestinal microbiota dysbiosis.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the Macau University of Science and Technology, “It is also recently discovered that liver glycogen structure is impaired in diabetic animals. Since mulberry leaves are able to improve the diabetic conditions through reducing blood glucose level, it would be interesting to investigate whether they have any positive effects on intestinal microbiota and liver glycogen structure. In this study, we first determined the bioactive components of ethanol extract of mulberry leaves via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Murine animal models were divided into three groups, normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, high-fat diet (HFD) and streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 2 diabetic rats, and HFD/STZ-induced rats administered with ethanol extract of mulberry leaves (200 mg/kg/day). Composition of intestinal microbiota was analyzed via metagenomics by sequencing the V3-V4 region of 16S rDNAs. Liver glycogen structure was characterized through size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Both Student's t-test and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis. A group of type 2 diabetic rat models were successfully established. Intestinal microbiota analysis showed that ethanol extract of mulberry leaves could partially change intestinal microbiota back to normal conditions. In addition, liver glycogen was restored from fragile state to stable state through administration of ethanol extract of mulberry leaves. This study confirms that the ethanol extract of mulberry leaves (MLE) ameliorates intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and strengthens liver glycogen fragility in diabetic rats.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “These finding can be helpful in discovering the novel therapeutic targets with the help of further investigations.”     Supplemental antioxidants may reduce exacerbations in cystic fibrosis     University of Colorado, July 2, 2021 An antioxidant-enriched vitamin may decrease respiratory exacerbations in people with cystic fibrosis(CF), according to new research published online iin the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. In "Effects of an Antioxidant-Enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial," Scott D. Sagel, MD, PhD, a professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital Colorado and director of the University of Colorado Cystic Fibrosis Center, and coauthors report a 50 percent reduced risk of time to the first exacerbation requiring antibiotics in those receiving the supplemental antioxidants. During the 16-week study of 73 patients (36 received supplemental antioxidants), 53 percent of the antioxidant-treated group experienced 28 exacerbations, compared to 68 percent of the control group who experienced 39 exacerbations. The researchers also found that supplemental antioxidants increased circulating antioxidant concentrations of beta-carotene, coenzyme Q10, gamma-tocopherol (a form of vitamin E) and lutein and transiently decreased inflammation (at 4 weeks, but not 16 weeks) as measured by two blood-based biomarkers of inflammation, calprotectin and myeloperoxidase (MPO). People with CF typically experience chronic bacterial infections, which lead to inflammation and the release of "vast amounts of reactive oxygen species in the airways," the authors wrote. Normally, they added, the body would marshal an antioxidant defense to neutralize this oxidant stress, but CF is characterized by dietary antioxidant deficiencies. This contributes to an oxidant-antioxidant imbalance and more inflammation, which leads to lung damage and a progressive loss of lung function. "Improving antioxidant status in CF is an important clinical goal and may have a positive effect on health," Dr. Sagel said. "Oral antioxidant formulations had been tested in CF with mixed results. However, there had not been a well-designed randomized controlled trial of an antioxidant 'cocktail' that included multiple antioxidants in a single formulation." This phase 2 trial, conducted at 15 CF centers affiliated with the CF Foundation Therapeutics Development Network, enrolled patients who were 10 years and older (average age 22 years), with pancreatic insufficiency, which causes malabsorption of antioxidants. Participants had an FEV1, the measure of how much air can be forcefully exhaled in one second, between 40 and 100 percent of what would be predicted, based on age, gender, height and a range of other characteristics. Patients in the control group received a multivitamin without antioxidant enrichment. The two groups tolerated their vitamins equally well, and there were no differences in adverse events between the two groups. The study did not meet its primary endpoint: change in sputum MPO concentration over 16 weeks. The authors chose sputum MPO "rather than another marker of airway inflammation such as neutrophil elastase because MPO generates reactive oxidant species as part of its function in innate host defense mechanisms, and is considered by many a marker of oxidative stress." "While the antioxidant supplement did not appear to exert sustained anti-inflammatory effects, we believe its effect on time to first pulmonary exacerbation was significant and clinically meaningful," Dr. Sagel said, adding that the improvement in antioxidant status alone may justify its use. "Developing safe and effective anti-inflammatory treatments remains a key priority of the CF community."   Maternal diets rich in Omega-3 fatty acids may protect offspring from breast cancer Marshall University School of Medicine, June 28, 2021 According to researchers at Marshall University, a maternal diet rich in Omega-3 fatty acids protects from breast cancer development in offspring. In a new studyrecently published by Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, researchers noted a significant difference in mice from mothers that were fed a diet rich in canola oil, compared with mothers fed a diet rich in corn oil. A maternal Omega 3-rich diet affected genome-wide epigenetic landscape changes in offspring and potentially modulated gene expression patterns. Dr. Ata Abbas, a former postdoctoral research fellow in Marshall's Department of Biological Sciences, headed a research team under the leadership of Dr. Philippe Georgel in the College of Science. Research was done in the Cell Differentiation and Development Center at Marshall as part of a collaborative effort with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, under the leadership of Dr. W. Elaine Hardman. Researchers noticed a three-week delay in mortality in mice whose mothers were fed canola oil versus corn oil. The early delay in mortality was significantly different, but the ultimate overall survival rate was not. Eventually, all the mice developed tumors, but the ones fed canola oil had tumors that were slower-growing and smaller than the mice fed corn oil. Translated to human time scale, the duration of the protective effect linked to the maternal diet would be equivalent to several months (Sengupta et al., 2016). This study is among a body of work done by Marshall University scientists and others looking at the link between Omega-3 fatty acids and reduced incidence of various types of cancer including, but not restricted to, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma. "The issue of parental diet and inter-generational transmission has become an important field of research; however, the mode of action often remains partially elusive," said Georgel, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Marshall. "The MU research group focused on 'epigenetic' aspects of trans-generational transmission to explain the reported role of Omega-3 fatty acids. Epigenetics involves changes in gene expression which are not linked to changes in genetic sequences. These results have the potential to promote the design of simple changes in diet which would allow for reduced onset of various types of cancer, not only for the individuals using that diet but also for their offspring."     Compounds found in green tea and wine may block formation of toxic metabolites Tel Aviv University (Israel), July 2, 2021 A new Tel Aviv University study suggests there is hope of treating certain inborn congenital metabolic diseases -- a hope found in green tea and in red wine. Most people with inherited metabolic disorders are born with a defective gene that results in a critical enzyme deficiency. In the absence of a cure, many patients with inborn congenital metabolic disorders must adhere to a strict and demanding diet their entire lives. This new research finds that certain compounds found naturally in green tea and red wine may block the formation of toxic metabolites. The research was led by Prof. Ehud Gazit of TAU's Faculty of Life Sciences and his doctoral student Shira Shaham-Niv. It was published in the Nature group journal Communications Chemistry. The researchers considered two compounds: (1) epigallocatechin gallate, known as EGCG, found naturally in green tea, which has attracted attention within the medical community for its potential health benefits; and (2) tannic acid, found in red wine, which is known to prevent the formation of toxic amyloid structures that cause neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. "In the case of inborn congenital metabolic diseases, the body does not produce a vital metabolic enzyme," Shaham-Niv said. "As a result, metabolites -- substances that are, among other things, the building blocks of DNA and proteins -- accumulate in the body. Such uncontrolled accumulation is toxic and can cause severe developmental and mental disorders. "Our new study demonstrates once again the ability of nature to produce the best candidate of drugs to treat some of the worst human maladies." Collectively, this group of disorders constitutes a significant portion of pediatric genetic diseases. The disease phenylketonuria (PKU), which produces the aggregation of the metabolite phenylalanine, is one common inborn metabolic disease. Infants with PKU must adhere to a strict diet free of phenylalanine for the rest of their lives. If they don't, they may face severe debilitating developmental problems. "But this is an incredibly difficult task, since phenylalanine is found in most of the food products that we consume," Shaham-Niv said. "The avoidance of certain substances is the only way to prevent the debilitating long-term effects of inborn congenital metabolic disorders. We hope that our new approach will facilitate the development of new drugs to treat these disorders." The new research is based on two previous studies conducted at Prof. Gazit's TAU laboratory. In the first study, phenylalanine was shown to be capable of self-assembly and of forming amyloid structures like those seen in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. In the second study, by Shaham-Niv, other metabolites that accumulate in other inborn congenital metabolic diseases were also shown to undergo self-assembly processes and form toxic amyloid aggregates. "Both studies led to an overhaul in the research community's understanding of metabolic diseases," Shaham-Niv said. "In our new study, we examined whether the molecules identified in past studies on Alzheimer's disease and other amyloid diseases, which are known to inhibit the formation of amyloid aggregates, could also help counteract the amyloid formation process of metabolites in metabolic diseases." The new research focused on EGCG and tannic acid using test tubes and culture cell systems. The two substances were tested on three metabolites related to three innate metabolic diseases: adenine, cumulative tyrosine and phenylalanine. The results were promising. Both tannic acid and EGCG were effective in blocking the formation of toxic amyloid structures. The researchers also used computer simulations to verify the mechanism driving the compounds. "We are entering a new era of understanding the role and the importance of metabolites in various diseases, including metabolic diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and even cancer," Shaham-Niv concluded. "The tools we have developed are ground-breaking and have tremendous potential to help a wide range of patients in the future."       People with fibromyalgia are substituting CBD for opioids to manage pain University of Michigan, June 24, 2021 Fibromyalgia is one of many chronic pain conditions that remains stubbornly difficult to treat.  As the ravages of the opioid epidemic lead many to avoid these powerful painkillers, a significant number of people with fibromyalgia are finding an effective replacement in CBD-containing products, finds a new Michigan Medicine study.  CBD, short for cannabidiol, is the second most common cannabinoid in the cannabis plant, and has been marketed for everything from mood stabilization to pain relief, without the intoxicating effects produced by the most common cannabinoid, THC. THC, which stands for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, is the ingredient in marijuana that causes people to feel high. The cannabis industry has exploded, aided by the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana in states around the United States and the removal of hemp-derived CBD from Schedule 1 status--reserved for drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse--at the federal level.  Previous research shows that some people substitute medical cannabis (often with high concentrations of THC) for opioids and other pain medications, reporting that cannabis provides better pain relief and fewer side effects. However, there is far less data on CBD use. "CBD is less harmful than THC, as it is non-intoxicating and has less potential for abuse," said Kevin Boehnke, Ph.D., a research investigator in the Department of Anesthesiology and the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. "If people can find the same relief without THC's side effects, CBD may represent a useful as a harm reduction strategy." Boehnke and his team surveyed people with fibromyalgia about their use of CBD for treatment of chronic pain.  "Fibromyalgia is not easy to treat, often involving several medications with significant side effects and modest benefits," Boehnke explained. "Further, many alternative therapies, like acupuncture and massage, are not covered by insurance." For this study, the team focused on 878 people with fibromyalgia who said they used CBD to get more insight into how they used CBD products.  The U-M team found that more than 70% of people with fibromyalgia who used CBD substituted CBD for opioids or other pain medications. Of these participants, many reported that they either decreased use or stopped taking opioids and other pain medications as a result.  "I was not expecting that level of substitution," said Boehnke, noting that the rate is quite similar to the substitution rate reported in the medical cannabis literature. People who said they used CBD products that also contained THC had higher odds of substitution and reported greater symptom relief. Yet the finding that products containing only CBD also provided pain relief and were substituted for pain medications is promising and merits future study, noted Boehnke.  The team noted that much of the widespread use of CBD is occurring without physician guidance and in the absence of relevant clinical trials. "Even with that lack of evidence, people are using CBD, substituting it for medication and doing so saying it's less harmful and more effective," he said.  Boehnke stressed the need for more controlled research into how CBD may provide these benefits, as well as whether these benefits may be due to the placebo effect.  Clinically, opening up lines of discussion around CBD use for chronic pain is imperative, said Boehnke, for medication safety reasons as well as for "enhancing the therapeutic alliance and improving patient care."

Michigan Medicine News Break
More People Are Turning to CBD to Manage Fibromyalgia Pain | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 3:53


The cannabis-derived substance provides fewer side effects, with less potential for abuse.For the full blog post text, visit: https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/body-work/people-fibromyalgia-substituting-cbd-for-opioids-to-manage-pain See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Michigan Medicine News Break
Is the Idea of a Maskless World Giving You Anxiety? | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Medicine News Break

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 5:43


Experts weigh in on how best to adapt to new mask-related policies.For the full blog post text, visit: https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/wellness-prevention/coping-anxiety-as-mask-mandates-lift See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ASRMtoday Podcast
ASRM Today: LGBTQ+ Issues in Reproductive Medicine

ASRMtoday Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 21:16


It's Pride Month and today we are discussing LGBTQ+ issues in reproductive medicine. Joining us today is Dr. Mark Leondires, who is Medical Director and Founder RMA of Connecticut, and Founder of Gay Parents To Be, and Dr. Molly Moravek an assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, and the Department of Urology at Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan. More info at www.asrm.org Gay Parents To Be website www.gayparentstobe.com Endocrine Society on Transgender Health  http://transcare.ucsf.edu/guidelines UCSF Guidelines http://transcare.ucsf.edu/guidelines Tell us your thoughts on the show by emailing asrm@asrm.org ASRM Today Series Podcasts are supported in part by the ASRM Corporate Member Council.  

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap – Celebrating quality and continuous improvement at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 13:29


Has your team completed quality or continuous improvement work over the past year? If so, Michigan Medicine wants to celebrate you! Find out how as two members of the Quality Month planning committee joined The Wrap employee podcast to discuss this year's celebration and tell listeners how they can take part. Of course, there was everyone's favorite new segment, the Lightning Round, along with the weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Michigan Medicine's partnerships and affiliations

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 15:41


How much do you know about the organization's partnerships with Trinity Health? Learn more about them -- and why they're so important -- with Rafina Khateeb, M.D., who stopped by The Wrap to give insight into the working relationships Michigan Medicine experts have at St. Joseph Mercy Chelsea and Ann Arbor. On top of that, you'll have a chance to win a prize through the weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Michigan Minds
Firearm Injury Prevention Series: Preventing Youth Suicide 

Michigan Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 16:00


This episode of Michigan Minds is part of a special series from University of Michigan Public Engagement & Impact in collaboration with the Office of the Vice President for Research on firearm injury prevention. Cindy Ewell Foster, PhD, clinical child psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Michigan Medicine and Rackham Graduate School, has been working in the field of suicide prevention for nearly 20 years with research focused on comprehensive public health approaches to youth suicide prevention. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 13:18


Clinical trials are the most important tool that can be used to identify just how successful a new vaccine or treatment option will be. On the latest episode of The Wrap employee podcast, learn all about COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials at Michigan Medicine, how they were carried out and why the team behind them took a drastic step to ensure participants could keep themselves safe. On top of that, listeners will get to know Dr. Daniel Kaul a bit better and you can take part in the weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

This Week in Health IT
Next in Health IT with Andrew Rosenberg, M.D.

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 50:08


May 19, 2021: In healthcare, a significant portion of the workforce have to be on site. How do leaders of today support and manage flexible, hybrid and remote work? Our guest today is  Andrew Rosenberg, CIO at Michigan Medicine who shares his insights on virtual care, 21st Century Cures, innovation, information blocking, telehealth and the cloud. How do we take the lessons of virtual care and continue to really shift the paradigm, not just with care at home, but how do we improve capacity in our tertiary hospitals and improve patient engagement in clinics? Are we at a point now where technology is driving the business strategy? Or are we still at a point where technology serves the business strategy and therefore the business strategy dictates the technology? What about application modernization and how it relates to cybersecurity and business continuity? Have we entered a new era in our cyber journey? And do you build your own technology products or buy them from vendors? There's a reason for both.Key Points:As a moderator it's essentially impossible via Zoom or Teams to spark a fun and educational debate versus doing it in person [00:04:20]Ambulatory care always had a relatively low volume of virtual visits. The peak in 2020 was 70-80% being virtual but it’s gone back down to 20%. [00:29:03]Patients love telehealth. They don't have to drive and wait around to be literally seen for two minutes. [00:35:05]It's not about information blocking. It’s about interoperability and availability. [00:37:25]The typical person does not understand the depth of their medical data. They seek a trusted professional to help them. [00:38:45]The pursuit of healthcare is constantly trying to shift from things that we deem as inefficient to more patient centric, more humane and less expensive [00:25:20]Michigan Medicine

Michigan Insider
011 - Sam with Rewind at Michigan Medicine 051221

Michigan Insider

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 25:37


Sam with Rewind at Michigan Medicine See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Axios Today
Kids and COVID in Michigan

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 10:54


This week, new COVID cases in the state of Michigan dropped almost 25%. Still, on Wednesday, 4,880 new cases were reported. The state is now also starting to see a decline in hospitalizations after record rates of cases among young adults and children. Plus, what’s behind the push for paid podcasts. And, European soccer teams’ fight against racism. Guests: Dr. Marisa Louie, the medical director of Children's Emergency Services at Michigan Medicine, and Axios' Sara Fischer and Kendall Baker. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Justin Kaufmann, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, Amy Pedulla, Naomi Shavin, Alex Sugiura and Michael Hanf. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. Go deeper: Coronavirus cases are finally falling The podcast paywall wars have arrived Books become free speech battleground Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Thank Blue gratitude campaign

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2021 10:57


This week's show was filled with gratitude, as The Wrap welcomed in two U-M undergraduates who discussed their class project — a campaign to collect 1,000 thank you notes directed at Michigan Medicine faculty and staff. There was also the weekly trivia contest and the celebration of week full of sports! Check it out today. And if you want to participate in the Thank Blue campaign, visit the following link: https://thank-blue.web.app/#thank-you See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Plenary Session
3.60 Drugs for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Dr. Bernard Marini

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021 82:15


Today we bring back popular guest Dr. Bernie Marini, a Clinical Pharmacist Specialist in Hematology at University of Michigan Medicine, to discuss treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession Check out our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew

All Home Care Matters
An Interview with Oasis Everywhere - Senior Virtual Learning

All Home Care Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 29:04


In this episode and interview we explore what Oasis Everywhere is and how it is helping seniors engage in life-long learning and staying active. Even during the pandemic, you'll hear how two of our guests were able to socialize and create a lasting friendship. We enjoyed our time with Oasis Everywhere and with Paul Weiss the President of Oasis Everywhere, along with Barbra and Carole who met each other while taking classes at Oasis Everywhere. If you are interested in learning more we have included some information and history of Oasis Everywhere to share with you. The Oasis Institute, a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to enriching the lives of adults ages 50+, Announced the launch of Oasis Everywhere, a virtual lifelong learning platform with an expansive menu of online classes aimed to provide seniors with social connections and enrichment. Oasis Everywhere offers live online courses led by top instructors from across the country Utilizing a simple online platform and Zoom video conferencing,  Anyone can easily explore their interests regardless of geographic location, mobility, or travel constraints. Affordably-priced classes are easily searchable and open for registration through the Oasis Everywhere website, www.oasiseverywhere.org. Available courses cover a variety of topics ranging from art and history to science, religion, cooking, technology, current events, health, and more. The need for online classes increased exponentially in 2020 due to the isolation experienced by so many seniors during the COVID-19 pandemic. The National Poll on Healthy Aging conducted by AARP and Michigan Medicine in June 2020 reported 56 percent of respondents over the age of 50 sometimes or often felt isolated, more than double the number in the same study from 2018. The Oasis Institute launched Oasis Everywhere to address that need. Participants on the platform have reported that their learning experiences are valuable, varied and offer high-quality intellectual stimulation amongst the uncertainty. Participants have something to look forward to as they see old friends and make new ones through the interactive video sessions. Founded in St. Louis, Missouri, for nearly 40 years, Oasis Centers and partners throughout the country have served adults ages 50 and over as a “home away from home” with robust educational offerings that include arts and humanities, science and technology, health education and exercise programs, as well as purposeful volunteer opportunities. Due to the pandemic, for the first time in the organization’s history, that all came to a screeching halt. The timing could not have been better to expedite the launch of a project five-years in the making…Oasis Everywhere. Oasis Everywhere is open for individual enrollment and offers group enrollment for senior centers and care facilities that want to provide additional enrichment to their residents. The classes offer a turnkey solution and enrollment group discounts for facilities that want to expand the variety of opportunities for learning and social activities that they offer. Senior living communities who register residents receive a 15% discount.  To sign up for classes, visit www.oasiseverywhere.org  and view the growing list of courses to choose from.    About Oasis: The Oasis Institute is a national nonprofit organization in St. Louis, Missouri, founded in 1982, centered on a mission to serve adults ages 50 and over, during a time when many programs for older adults were oriented around childish games and passive activities. Today, almost 40 years later, The Oasis Network includes the Oasis headquarters in St. Louis, a national network of nine educational centers, spanning the country coast to coast, and program partners in nearly 250 communities across the country. Oasis’ tutoring program serves older adults interested in teaching or mentoring through partnerships in education and school districts as well as a new direct-to-consumer virtual tutoring model that brings Oasis tutors straight to your child at home or wherever they may be learning. Our volunteer programs help older adults fulfill the satisfaction of joy that comes with giving back to their communities. Find more information about the Oasis Institute on Facebook at @OasisInstitute, on Twitter at @OasisInstitute, on LinkedIn at The Oasis Institute, or via their website www.oasisnet.org. We want to thank you for joining us here at All Home Care Matters, All Home Care Matters is here for you and to help families as they navigate long-term care issues. Please visit us at allhomecarematters.com there is a private secure fillable form there where you can give us feedback, show ideas, or if you have questions. Every form is read and responded to. If you know someone is who could benefit from this episode, please share it with them. Remember, you can listen to the show on any of your favorite podcast streaming platforms and watch the show on our YouTube channel and make sure to hit that subscribe button, so you'll never miss an episode. On our next episode we will be discussing healthy nutritional tips for seniors.    

The Peter Attia Drive
#155 - Chris Sonnenday, M.D.: The history, challenges, and gift of organ transplantation

The Peter Attia Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 134:33


Chris Sonnenday is the Transplant Center Director for Michigan Medicine. As Peter’s senior resident while at Johns Hopkins, Chris made a lasting impression on him with his remarkable leadership and ability to maintain his humanity through the stressors of that challenging environment. In this episode, Chris tells the incredible backstory of the history of transplant medicine, focusing on the kidney and the liver. He discusses the surgical and immunologic developments that launched the field forward, but also lays out the challenges ahead for the field, such as the rising prevalence of chronic kidney and liver failure. Chris also tells many stories of tragedy and triumph that comes with working in organ transplantation, but ultimately explains the rewarding nature of being a witness to the gift of organ donation.   We discuss: What attracted Chris to medicine, and his leadership in residency (3:30); How Chris maintained his empathy and humanity through the stresses of med school and residency (8:30); Why Chris chose a complicated field like transplant medicine (23:15); Explaining kidney transplantation to showcase the challenge of organ transplantation surgery (28:00); Overcoming the immune-based challenges of transplant surgery (37:00); How the discovery of cyclosporine transformed the field of organ transplantation (49:00); Rising chronic kidney failure due to the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome (53:45); Why living kidney donations are superior, and the possibility of a market for kidney donation (59:30); Designing a fair system of organ distribution (1:17:30); The debate on what constitutes “death” when deciding when to take organs from a registered organ donor (1:21:45); Reflections on the gift of organ donation (1:33:15); The history of liver transplantation and why it’s so complex (1:39:15); Addressing acute liver failure and the amazing baboon experiment (1:46:15); The potential for the rising prevalence of NAFLD and NASH to overwhelm the liver transplant infrastructure in the US (1:54:45); The importance of teamwork in successful organ transplantations, and the most tragic event Chris has ever witnessed (2:05:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/ Show notes page for this episode: http://peterattiamd.com/ChrisSonnenday Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/ Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/ Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

This Week in Health IT
Newsday - Nerds Talk Technology Impact from Healthcare News Headlines

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 52:35


March 22, 2021: Why is healthcare still about a decade behind? How can we start taking advantage of the cloud to get more flexibility and agility? How can we create faster, better and stronger consumer first workflows? Vik Nagjee, Director of Healthcare & Life Sciences for Sirius joins Bill for the news. Grand Rounds and Doctor on Demand have merged. Banner Health posted a 19% drop in net income last year. Michigan Medicine is moving forward with a billion dollar hospital. Amazon Care launched in 50 States for their employees. Plus the amazing platform Health Share, the impact of IRIS, robotic process automation pilots and the challenges of 5G.Key Points:The veto culture in healthcare is very challenging [00:06:53] What is the impact of IRIS to a health system? [00:10:25] Banner has an amazing M and A strategy. They’re super fast. They're super precise. Clinical precision. Surgical precision. [00:24:55] Amazon Care is essentially a concierge level service for employees for an employer program. [00:26:40] Silicon Valley still barely understand healthcare [00:29:55] Coopertition with big tech is what is going to win [00:31:05] Transcarent are applying the Livongo playbook to the employer-sponsored healthcare system [00:31:35] There’s a whole new art and science around the patient room of the future [00:37:35] Stories:Grand Rounds and Dr on Demand have merged to address uncoordinated care - Healthcare InnovationBanner Health posted a 19% drop in net income in 2020, and announced they are moving forward with a 200M+ construction project - Fierce HeatlhcareMichigan Medicine is moving forward with 1B hospital - Healthcare Finance NewsAmazon is expanding Amazon Care telehealth service nationally for its employees and other companies - CNBC‘Concierge Medicine On Steroids’ Startup Raised $40 Million To Disrupt Employer-Sponsored Care - ForbesWalmart to launch digital records for COVID-19 vaccine recipients - Beckers

Michigan Surgery Sessions
Mentoring Across Differences | Michigan Medicine

Michigan Surgery Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 31:27


Mentor-mentee relationships can often form around similarities in interests and backgrounds. Some of the richest relationships, though, develop across differences. How can mentors and mentees work effectively together when they come from different background and have different experiences, and how can those differences be leveraged to benefit everyone?On this episode, we talk about that dynamic, and strategies for finding mentors and mentees who will bring those valuable differences to the table. Featured speakers:Moderator: Michelle Moniz, M.D.Guest Speaker: Andrew Ibrahim, M.D.Click here for a transcript for this episode.Michigan Medicine is the academic medical center for the University of Michigan. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Urology COViD
Focal Therapy for Prostate Cancer

Urology COViD

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2021 62:15


Hello and Welcome to the Urology COViD Lecture Series Podcast! Brought to you by the UCSF Department of Urology. In today's episode, we have Dr. Arvin George from Michigan Medicine talking about Focal Therapy for Prostate Cancer. Learn more by visiting our website! urologycovid.ucsf.edu.

Urology COViD
Urinary Fistula

Urology COViD

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 59:39


Hello and Welcome to the Urology COViD Lecture Series Podcast! Brought to you by the UCSF Department of Urology. In today's episode, we have Dr. Paholo Romo from Michigan Medicine talking about Urinary Fistula. Learn more by visiting our website! urologycovid.ucsf.edu.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Get to know Paul Sturgis, MSHROD, SPHR

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2021 12:52


This week's episode of The Wrap shines the light on one of Michigan Medicine's newest leaders: senior director of Human Resources Strategy and Organizational Effectiveness Paul Sturgis. Paul discusses his various roles, the importance of diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, and his movie obsession. He also participates in the brand-new Lightning Round segment. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Anti-racism efforts at Michigan Medicine

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2021 22:31


The Wrap kicked off Black History Month with an inside look at anti-racism efforts at Michigan Medicine, with the help of two members of the Anti-Racism Oversight Committee. Find out what sort of work is already underway, and what is to come in the months and years ahead, from Phyllis Blackman and Steve Vinson. There's also the brand-new Lightning Round and weekly trivia contest. Check it out today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines
The Wrap - Mid-year reviews

The Wrap by Michigan Medicine Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2021 12:56


A new and improved version of The Wrap employee podcast is back! With new co-host Hunter Mitchell, The Wrap will still bring you all the news you need to know at Michigan Medicine, but in a more informal, conversational and fun way. Check out the first episode of the new format, featuring Brian Cole of Organizational Learning, who stopped by to discuss the importance of mid-year reviews. On top of that, there was an exciting new feature, the Lightning Round, and the weekly trivia contest. Take a listen today! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

TheSugarScience Podcast- curating the scientific conversation in type 1 diabetes
Episode 52: Scott Soleimanpour, MD, Associate Professor, Director of the Michigan Medicine Diabetes Transition Program, University of Michigan

TheSugarScience Podcast- curating the scientific conversation in type 1 diabetes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 42:47


In this episode, Scott Soleimanpour joins us to discuss his fascinating research taking place at the University of Michigan. Dr. Soleimanpour provides details about a recent publication, Mitophagy protects β cells from inflammatory damage in diabetes. Dr. Soleimanpour's lab focuses on the molecular and genetic regulation of the mitochondrial life cycle, with a focus on mitophagy, a pathway to dispose of unhealthy or damaged mitochondria. Our studies also concentrate on novel genetic targets affecting the mitophagy pathway, which are also associated with diabetes in humans, through studies in cellular and mouse genetic model systems, as well as isolated human islets. To learn more about Soleimanpour's lab follow the link below:Soleimanpour Lab

3Ps of Cancer
The Changing of Cancer Care Delivery

3Ps of Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 21:11


The Rogel Cancer Center's Associate Chief Clinical Officer of Cancer Services, David Smith, M.D., shares how clinical care delivery for cancer patients at Michigan Medicine had to pivot during the COVID-19 pandemic. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Plenary Session
3.27 All Recent Acute Myeloid Leukemia Drugs with Dr. Bernard Marini

Plenary Session

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2020 56:58


On today's episode we discuss all the new drugs for acute myeloid leukemia with Dr. Bernie Marini, a Clinical Pharmacist Specialist in Hematology at University of Michigan Medicine. Back us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/plenarysession Check out our YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCUibd0E2kdF9N9e-EmIbUew