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Best podcasts about film news

Latest podcast episodes about film news

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Ann Hui had been working on a documentary for a Hong Kong network when she interviewed a number of ‘boat people,' people fleeing Vietnam from the rule of China. This piqued her curiosity in the subject and defined her next two films, The Story of Woo Viet and Boat People. This ‘Vietnam Trilogy' of hers, and particularly the last film, gave Ann Hui a boost in her career as it took off around the world, marking her as one of the Hong Kong New Wave directors. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we close out our series on Hui as well as kick off a series on journalists with her 1982 film Boat People. Boat People gives us the blank slate reporter we've been looking for. There are many comments and reviews about this film that dislike the portrayal of the journalist as being too naïve. For us, it feels like a character choice and works well to set up the film as a journey for this photographer – our audience surrogate – as the layers are slowly peeled back to reveal what sort of atrocities are really going on in China-ruled Vietnam after the US left. Add to that exceptional child actor performances as the kids that connect with our photographer, not to mention the visceral violence that shakes us up, and it's easy to see why this film affects us. The cinematography, the music, the locations, the performances, the direction – everything works well to deliver a powerful film that depicts a unique conflict in this part of the world we learned little about in our history books. We have differing opinions on how well the film stuck with us, but no matter how you slice it, it was a film that affected us and worked well. We have a great conversation about it so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Find places to view this at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2022-01-08 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 69:03


Mandy Kaplan, Steve Sarmento, and Tommy Metz take over the Saturday Matinée this week. What's on deck? Tommy loves Search Party and Yellow Jackets. So there. Is The Matrix Resurrections laughably bad or some sort of genius? Some people clearly think the former. As for us...? Don't Look Up. Hrm... Uh... Yeah... Betty Davis? Peter Bogdanovich? And the news broke after we recorded, but Sidney Poitier too? What an awful start to 2022. Trailers Steve's Trailer: Memoria Mandy's Trailer: Cyrano Tommy's Trailer: The Woman In The House Across the Street From The Girl in the Window THE LIST! We're talking career-renewing performances! Steve's List Tom Hanks in Philadelphia Liam Neeson in Taken Burt Reynolds in Striptease and Boogie Nights Mandy's List Debbie Reynolds in Mother Leslie Nielsen in Airplane! Betty White in The Proposal Tommy's List Matthew McConaughey in Dallas Buyers Club & Killer Joe Michael Keaton in Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) Robert Downey, Jr. in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

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As a filmmaker in Hong Kong, there's an inevitable balancing act they need to do with their stories and how they depict China. This story portrays an interesting element of World War II that wasn't often taught in Western history classes – the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong. Having it told from the Hong Kong perspective is also unique to us. That being said, the film was made to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to the fold of China. Does that affect the tone of the story? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on Hong Kong New Wave director Ann Hui with her 2017 film Our Time Will Come. The time has come to discuss Our Time Will Come. It's hard to not start our conversation with celebration of the fantastic delight we get from Eddie Peng as the revolutionary Blackie Lau. Every time he's on screen, it lights up. How does everyone else do? Honestly, lots of performances to celebrate, and when we're not celebrating Eddie Peng, it's Deannie Ip, Xun Zhou, Wallace Huo, or many of the other performers in the film. But does the story work? It works differently for each of us, and we debate why. Is it because our unfortunate lack of knowledge in the history in this part of the world during WWII? Or whether there should be a romance? Or if the story delivers enough tension in the action scenes and sequences? Or maybe the story never quite delivers? And why does the CG in the film look less than top notch? Regardless, it's an interesting film with characters we generally like that shows how simple school teachers and mothers can end up becoming spies. We have a great time in our conversation with the film. It's worth checking out, so do so then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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The How to Split a Toaster Divorce Hollywood Holiday Special • CROSSOVER!

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Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 35:57


Happy New Year! Each year on the podcast How to Split a Toaster: A Divorce Podcast about Saving Your Relationships, we take a break and talk about how movies deal with divorce and the law. This year, in our season break, we brought the team together to talk about divorce in the movies. From hyper-stylized to hyper-real, how well do filmmakers capture divorce? Andy and Pete join host and attorney Seth Nelson as we build our divorce movie watchlist! Seth It's Complicated (steal) The First Wives Club Something's Gotta Give Under the Tuscan Sun Pete War of the Roses (steal) Crazy, Stupid, Love. Her Marriage Story Gloria Bell Andy The Squid and the Whale Blue Valentine A Separation Waiting to Exhale (steal) Life of the Party

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2022-01-01 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 80:23


Ring in the New Year with Kyle Olson and Rob Kubasko!

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There are a lot of elements from Ann Hui's own life in her film Song of the Exile. It's not a biographical film, though. Knowing that, what are we meant to take away from it? Is it an exploration of Hui's own life? A chance for her to exorcise some demons from her youth? Or did she simply use those elements as a way to frame this story about a daughter slowly growing to know her own mother? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Ann Hui series with her 1990 film Song of the Exile. We didn't find as much to connect within Song of the Exile. This was a frustrating film experience for us. There were interesting story elements throughout the film, but they never congealed to make a complete film for us. It's the story of a self-centered daughter who has to learn that her mother isn't just someone to hate but who is a person with their own life journey and baggage. It's the story of a mother who has to reconnect with her own past to find reconciliation and acknowledge that the life she's living now is actually pretty good. But could it be more clear? We think so. There are also elements of the East/West mentality throughout the film, though never completely clear with their intent. Is that simply because it was a Hong Kong film made at a time when China was getting close to taking over control of what was at the time a British colony? Or was there more here? That speaks to some of our overall difficulties with the film – we don't have a good understanding of the conflicts between China, Japan, and Manchuria, where some of this film takes place. Would more knowledge of that history have helped us? And would all of this work better for an audience from Hong Kong and the area? Despite all of that, Maggie Cheung and Lu Hsiao-fen work well as daughter and mother. But this feels like a film that gets lost in its telling. Is this the mother's story? The daughter's? All in all, there are a lot of interesting elements and it certainly is a film worth looking at. We just found it disappointing in the end, but plenty of people seem to love this film, so perhaps it's for you. So check out the movie then tune in to the episode! There is a lot to talk about in the film. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on YouTube Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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The original idea for Arthur Christmas, at the time called Operation Rudolph, had a much darker thread in it involving reindeer burgers. Luckily, the story evolved and turned into a wild story about a hereditary line of Santas running things with a million elves helping out (really doing all the work). The story is one of commerce and efficiency, but also about the meaning of Christmas and believing. Sarah Smith had experience with complex stories, so this film's clever script fits right in with her live action work she'd done before with Armando Iannucci. Directing her first animated film, with help from Barry Cook, she crafted a holiday classic. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we wrap up our 10 Year Anniversary series with Smith's 2011 film Arthur Christmas. Arthur Christmas makes us happy. This is an easy film to love. Wonderful characters, fun character design from the minds of the Aardman team, and a heartwarming story about Santa's youngest son, Arthur, who works in the mail department. He may be a bit clumsy, but he has the true spirit of the holiday. James McAvoy brings him to life in a performance full of goofy charm. He's helped by Jim Broadbent, Hugh Laurie, and Bill Nighy as they set out to deliver a present that got missed. The story is touching, and it's smarter than a lot of animated films. Small jokes, big jokes, Aardman jokes – everything's in there. And we laugh a lot throughout this one. But there's also a thread of commerce and big business taking over operations of this sort of place, brought to live in Hugh Laurie's character Steve, who has transformed delivery with the sleigh into the highest of high tech jobs, with the actual sleigh replaced by what looks like the Starship Enterprise painted red. It's a genius idea, and it speaks to the idea of commerce vs. the true meaning of Christmas. It's hard to go wrong with Arthur Christmas. We have such a great time with this one. It's an annual viewing at Andy's house and will be for years to come. If you haven't seen it yet, check it out then tune in. And let us know what you think! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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Spider Man: No Way Home

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 84:26


They stuffed a lot of movie into two and a half hours with Spider-Man: No Way Home. Villans and Spiders-Men from multiple movies across the franchise hit the screen and while most of the rumors predicted such, there's little room to deny that what the team pulled off here is truly epic. So, it's the movie we got. But is it the movie we wanted? Is it the story we needed? To hash it all out this week, Ocean Murff is joined by Marvel Movie Minute hosts of present and past: Matthew Fox, Kyle Olson, and Rob Kubasko. All, unabashed comic book fans, pull apart the action, the logic, and even the ethics of this web-slinging wonder. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: JustWatch • Apple TV • Amazon Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-12-18 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 82:19


Pete Wright, Ocean Murff, and Tommy Metz head up the Saturday Matinée for our penultimate episode of 2021. What's on deck? Ocean and Tommy make an able plea that we all watch Succession and now's just the right time during a season break. Along the way, we talk about the latest Vulture piece suggesting that HBOMax won the year with their day-date Warner Bros strategy, directors be damned. The latest Potterverse entry trailer — Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledorehas dropped fresh with recasting and a distinctly Azkaban feel. Will it live up to the original series third ep? Pete's mad about retreads. Do we really need to know how you met your father? We try to talk about Mike Flanagan, because Tom loves him. But it's a pretty anemic effort. We get there… eventually. Here's Keanu Reaves and Carrie-Anne Moss talking about making The Matrix Awakens feature for Epic Games, and crapping on NFTs. Trailers Pete's Trailer: Everything, Everywhere All At Once Tommy's Trailer: The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent Ocean's Trailer: The Lost City THE LIST! It turns out, most Christmas movies are happy. This is our discovery upon inheriting the list topic The Saddest Christmas from last week's hosts. Pete's List Jack Frost Fatman Last Christmas Tommy's List Edward Scissorhands The Ice Storm Jacob's Ladder Ocean's List Rocky IV • Rocky IV: Rocky vs. Drago: The Ultimate Director's Cut Batman Returns Trading Places

NSRT - Nerd Science Recorded On Tape
UPDATE #65: Cowboy Bebop ist tot + Guy Ritchies neue Agenten + Sonic 2 und der Fortsetzungsfluch

NSRT - Nerd Science Recorded On Tape

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 53:30


Überraschung geglückt, oder? Nachdem wir euch letzte Woche mit einem Cliffhanger dastehen lassen haben, melden wir uns heute in aller Frische zurück. Wie gewohnt geht es heute um aktuelle Releases, unsere ganz persönlichen Highlights sowie jede Menge News und Trailer. Unter anderem erhält die The Last of Us Serie Zuwachs in Form eines grummeligen Beamten, Guy Ritchie kehrt wieder zum Agenten-Genre zurück und Segas Sonic darf erneut die Welt vor Jim Carrey retten. Wie immer gilt: Bleibt dran, nicht verpassen! Und damit herzlich Willkommen zu UPDATE #65 von NSRT – Nerd Science Recorded on Tape. Der Filmpodcast, den wirklich jeder braucht. Link zur Folge: https://nsrtpodcast.podigee.io/141-update65

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Ann Hui has had a long career and was close to retiring in 2011 when she made A Simple Life. Luckily, she enjoyed making that film so much and enjoyed its success that she decided to keep directing. The film is a quiet one about a maid who has served the same family for over 60 years, now looking after Roger, the son who has become a film producer. After a stroke, however, she decides to retire. And Roger has to now figure out how to take care of her. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversary series with a crossover episode that is also the first entry in our Ann Hui series with her 2011 film A Simple Life. A Simple Life is a simple film, but emotionally rich. With Andy Lau as Roger and his real-life godmother Deannie Ip playing Ah Tao, his family's maid for generations, there is a built-in connection between these two actors. They feel real and feel like family. That being said, Lau does a great job at the start playing the workaholic who hardly even acknowledges her presence, except when he wants to request particular meals. He never has had to think of her as anything but the person who gets everything done for him. So when Ah Tao has a stroke and decides to retire to a nursing home, the story provides a strong opportunity for Roger to figure out how to fit caring for her into his own life. Lau plays it incredibly well, but part of the reason it works so well is because he's playing opposite Ip who shines in her role. It's a quiet film though. There isn't a lot of time for large, gregarious scenes. These two never make the film maudlin. It always feels even keel, even when we're left to wonder if we're supposed to be seeing the nursing home as an antagonistic force in her life. It never quite plays the way we think it would and that provides a bit of confusion for us, but largely it's fine. We have a great time with this film. It's touching in its quiet methodologies and carried by incredible performances. It's great to see it still works so well 10 years later, and it's a great film to kick off our Ann Hui series with. Check this film out then tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-12-11 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 62:34


Is there a problem with ABC's efforts to amp the nostalgia in “Live In Front of a Studio Audience”? You take the good, you take the bad, am I right? Trailers this week surprise us all as Mandy gets her pick in first with Spidey, Kyle brings a trailer only our Brit friends will be able to watch, and Rob brings Ritchie and a prayer. Mandy's Trailer: SPIDER-MAN: Into the Spider Verse 2 Kyle's Trailer: Last Train to Christmas Rob's Trailer: Operation Fortune: Ruse De Guerre THE LIST! Action in the Snow! What does that mean, you ask? Great question! Might be funny. Might be horrific. Might be … you know … an acorn. Also, there is some strange Christmas Story antagonism in this segment. You have been warned. Mandy's List Ice Age A Christmas Story Dumb and Dumber Kyle's List Die Hard 2: Die Harder Cliffhanger The Long Kiss Goodnight Rob's List Spies Like Us Stripes Planes, Trains and Automobiles

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Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 76:01


Bollywood has overtaken Hollywood as the largest center for film production in the world, but we have yet to talk about a Bollywood film on this podcast. Well, we're changing things with today's episode. Zoya Akhtar, co-writer and director of this film, is from a prominent film production family. This was her second film and it became an immediate success, following three friends as they take a periodic adventure vacation merged with a bachelor party for one of them who is recently engaged. The film becomes a story of personal journeys for each of them, though, and that's a formula that often works very well for us. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we hit the road with Akhtar to celebrate the 10 Year Anniversary of her 2011 film Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara. Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara is a delight of a film. There's not as much music as we thought there would be in Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara, but there is music, there is dancing, and there's a lot of fantastic character development in this film. Plus, everyone in this film is downright beautiful. If you're thirsty, you're bound to find someone to enjoy. The three leads playing the friends on their road trip – Hrithik Roshan, Frahan Akhtar, and Abhay Deol – are great characters and we always buy them as friends. To that end, they each have their own journeys to take as they enjoy this road trip. Are the female characters in this film given as much development as the men? Or are they just there to help their development? Honestly, they're so much fun that it's okay that they may be a bit trope-y. Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara is a fun film that hits all the spots for us. We have a great time talking about it and it's certainly an easy film to recommend. Check it out and definitely enjoy the soundtrack. It's a blast! Then tune in to the podcast and enjoy! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-12-04 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 75:01


Rob and Pete review the week with news, some confusing trailer selections, a not-so-mysterious game of Step-Up, and picks the celebrate over-indulgent performances in film. In the News The Expanse is coming back for season six on December 10 and, in what can only be called a true Belter Holiday Miracle, the ninth book was just released too! Tatum is back with Soderbergh and we have some ideas for titles. Red Notice is the most watched thing on the ‘Flix. Reviews of West Side Story are starting to come in and it turns out things are looking pretty darned good. Cara Delevingne is moving into the Building for Season 2. And, Rob delivers a special message to Kyle about Tom Holland. Let's Do Trailers Rob's Trailer: And Just Like That… Pete's Trailer: Reacher THE LIST! Over-the-Top Performances — bonus if it's a western Rob's List Waterworld Speed Super Mario Brothers Pete's List Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans Django Unchained The Hateful Eight

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Nadine Labaki started as an actress but starting in 2007 with Caramel, she started working as a writer/director. Her films look at life in Lebanon but through unique prisms that aren't confined by the grim realities. In her 2011 film Where Do We Go Now?, Labaki uses a magical realist tone with musical elements to craft a story about the women in an isolated village working together to stop the men – divided by Christian and Muslim faiths – from constantly fighting. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversary series with Labaki's Where Do We Go Now?. We clearly enjoy Where Do We Go Now? and have a lot to say about Labaki's film. This is a film that may work for some people and not others, but it worked for us. The story shines with magical realism, creating this isolated town where the news is sparse, allowing for the women to craft their own narrative essentially. That allows for a unique story, one that surprises as much as it delights. The women of the town, led by Labaki playing Amal, keep trying ploy after ploy to stop the men, divided by religion, from fighting. Not all their plans work, but they're always thinking and ready to try new things, even if that means hiring Ukranian exotic dancers for a week. That's an area we struggled with a bit, but it still generally works. And with Labaki at the helm, this unique story feels cohesive. The cinematography and music come together wonderfully in the musical elements. Could it have used more songs? Maybe. But we like it as-is and think it would have to be double its length to really include more songs. It works the way it is with just the few musical moments. They're enough to remind us of the magic of this world It's a fun movie about a serious subject and allows for a unique vision of this community without saying that Labaki's solved religious conflicts the world over by allowing women to be the ones driving the decisions. It's a beautiful story of community and one that really surprised us with its warmth. Check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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We Need to Talk About Kevin

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Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 66:50


Tackling a film that looks at a school shooting is a challenging prospect, but writer/director Lynne Ramsay and her co-writer Rory Stewart Kinnear decided to accept the challenge when they signed on to adapt Lionel Shriver's book “We Need to Talk About Kevin.” The film is a tough film to watch, but the focus on the mother dealing with what her son has done allows us to explore thoughts about the role of a parent in this sort of situation, nature versus nurture, community reactions, and more. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversaries series with Ramsay's 2011 film We Need to Talk About Kevin. There's a lot to talk about in We Need to Talk About Kevin. Tilda Swinton. Ezra Miller. John C. Reilly. Three incredible performances at the heart of this movie in a film full of great performances, but it's Swinton who carries the film as we follow her on her journey to deal with what her son's done. She's a powerhouse in this film and takes us on quite a trip. The way Ramsay puts the film together is a key part of that too, though, because she's dancing all through her life from the time she met her husband through to now, and we see those bits pop up like memories flitting through her mind as she debates with herself if she's at fault. And that's really the crux of the film. Is she at fault? She's certainly taken the blame upon herself as we've seen over the course of the film that she's never gotten along with her son. But is she right? Was he intrinsically evil already? And does that matter to her or will she always carry all these emotions and walls? It's a strong film and one we love, despite being a very dark and challenging story. We have a great conversation about it so check it out and tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Original Material Flickchart Letterboxd

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JJ and Steve wrap up this season of Trailer Rewind with a powerful film. This is one of the few films that JJ doesn't want to spoil. He and Steve both agree that you should avoid this trailer until after you have watched the film. Antebellum takes its time to tell its story, but JJ and Steve agree that the payoff is worth the wait. Why all the secrecy about a film that doesn't have great reviews on Letterboxd or IMdB? Did Antebellum suffer from not having a theatrical release? How do you categorize and recommend a film that you can't say much about for fear of spoiling it? These are the questions they hope to answer on this season finale episode. Is this film for you? Within the first 15 minutes of this episode you will know whether you will push play, or keep scrolling. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon • Hulu • YouTube Script Transcript Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-11-20 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 117:21


It's a big week. Yes, we're watching some stuff. The Harder They Fall is on the watchlist, along with Ghostbusters: Afterlife, Carnage, and Shang-Chi. Even Red Notice gets a shout-out. But it's really all about the Disney+ Marvel slate Kyle does an able job of leading Ocean and Pete through the massive announcements from Marvel on their small-screen slate coming in 2022 and 2023. Moon Night. Zombies. Echo. Ironheart. Secret Invasion. Hawkeye. Agatha. She-Hulk. More, and more, and more. Let's Do Trailers Kyle's Trailer: Spider-Man: No Way Home Ocean's Trailer: Try Harder Pete's Trailer: Pam & Tommy THE LIST! Movies with games that have complicated rules? Plenty of ways to approach this one, and it's fair to say we have a bit of everything on the list. Kyle's List War Games Die Hard With A Vengeance Labyrinth Ocean's List The Game Ender's Game Escape Room Pete's List Cube Circle California Split

Cinema Strikes Back
#168: 5 Filme, bei denen wir uns NICHT einig sind! | Podcast

Cinema Strikes Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 100:54


Das ist unser letzter Podcast - zumindest für dieses Jahr! Alper, Jonas und Marius reden über fünf Filme, bei denen sie sich überhaupt nicht einig sind, berichten von den besten Filmen vom Fantasy Filmfest und den teuersten Netflixfilm aller Zeiten: Red Notice! Außerdem hat sich Alper das Spin-Off von Army of the dead angeschaut, Matthias Schweighöfers neuestes Werk Army of Thieves. Das und mehr in dieser Ausgabe von Cinema Talks Back! Podcast zum Anhören: Spotify: https://go.funk.net/csb_spotify iTunes: https://go.funk.net/csb_itunes RSS-Feed: https://go.funk.net/csb_rss Podcast Timestamps: 00:00:00 - Für Podcast-Profis 00:09:26 - Fantasy Filmfest 2021 Highlights 00:42:45 - Army Of Thieves & Red Notice 01:06:00 - 5 Filme, bei denen wir uns NICHT einig sind #Podcast #CinemaStrikesBack Moderation: Alper Turfan, Marius Stolz, Jonas Ressel Kamera & Ton: Jonas Ressel Redaktion: Jonas Ressel, Alper Turfan, Marius Stolz Schnitt: Patrik Hochnadel Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cinemastrikesback/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/csb_de Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/CSB_DE/ Cinema Strikes Back gehört zu #funk. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/funkofficial Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/funk TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@funk Website: https://go.funk.net https://go.funk.net/impressum

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Céline Sciamma had already proven herself a strong writer/director of complicated love stories involving people figuring out their own sexuality when she wrote and directed Tomboy. The film tells a story of a 10-year-old girl – our titular tomboy – who tells all the kids she's a boy when she moves to a new neighborhood. It's a small decision but an important one as this young kid works to figure out who she is. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversaries series with Sciamma's 2011 film Tomboy. Tomboy worked exceptionally well for both of us. This story is touching and powerfully performed by the young actors in the film, notably Zoé Héran in the title role of Laure who starts going by Mickäel. The quiet intensity in this child's performance is stunning and has to be weighted as she's carrying Tomboy on her shoulders. On top of that, she has to play as a boy, meaning taking her shirt off when her team goes skins for the football match. It's incredible. Sciamma gets amazing performances from the adults as well, and does a great job of not writing Laure's parents as antagonists. Their reaction to her decision makes perfect sense as a parent and come across as loving people trying to figure all of this out themselves. And Sciamma delivers a simple but beautiful film to look at. Many shots, notably of Laure as Mickäel, feel like still portraits and capture her struggle and strength. It's these moments where Héran's quiet performance really shines through. Tomboy is a strong film about identity that feels as relevant today – if not moreso – than it did in 2011 when it was first released. The fact that Sciamma continues releasing potent, powerful, and important films dealing with this subject says a lot about her staying power as a filmmaker. We have a great time talking about this film. Check it out then tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Find where you can watch this at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-11-13 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 89:38


Happy Birthday! Ok, not your birthday, unless your birthday is on November 11, and you just hit 10 years old. Cause WE did, just the other day! And now we're going to wax a bit poetic about a history of talking about movies together. A Sampling of the Original Crew Pete Wright, Andy Nelson, Steve Sarmento, and Tommy Metz III join the crew this week to share a peek into the wayback machine. We talk about those first rocky Movies We Like episodes, the first Film Boards, and the community that has come up around this show. But don't worry, it's not all about the good ol' days. Steve brings news of this weekend's launch of the IMAX aspect ration on select Marvel movies on Disney+. Twenty-six percent more pixels! We lost Dean Stockwell so we take a podcast knee in his memory. And the first Rust lawsuits are filed, shedding a little more light on the conditions that led to the shooting death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. Four trailers this week run the table from horror to comedy to cowboys, and also the one Steve brought. Steve's Trailer: *C'mon C'mon Tommy's Trailer: The Power of the Dog Pete's Trailer: Silent Night Andy's Trailer: 8-Bit Christmas THE LIST! It's the list pick that couldn't be stopped! Questionable accents has been picked twice before but never delivered… well, not until now. The twist: hosts had to demonstrate their picks in the appropriate accents. Steve's List snatch. The Highlander The Dark Knight Rises Tommy's List Django Unchained Thirteen Days Rounders Pete's List Blood Diamond Varsity Blues Captain Corelli's Mandolin Andy's List The Dark Knight X-Men The Beguiled

Dancing Is Forbidden
Aqua Teen Hunger Force Panel Recap | Aqua Donk Side Pieces + ATHF 2022 Film News

Dancing Is Forbidden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 14:26


This weekend was the Adult Swim Festival, so I felt like it was worth it to dedicate an entire episode covering the Aqua Teen Hunger Force panel. While only 35 minutes in length, we were given a crazy amount of information pertaining to the upcoming shorts and film! In this episode, I go over all the interesting bits and share my excitement for the year to come! References: • Aqua Donk Side Pieces Trailer: https://twitter.com/adultswim/status/1459694797942398978 Contacts:  Support the Show: patreon.com/dancingisforbidden Leave a voice message: speakpipe.com/dancingisforbidden Discord: https://discord.gg/NpjSXPECw6 Instagram: @AquaTeenPod Twitter: @AquaTeenPod Email: DancingIsForbiddenPod@gmail.com YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe5gFb5eAYH3nyF3DZ5jwhQ Website: dancingisforbidden.com Twitch: twitch.tv/ronnieneeley

Cinema Strikes Back
#167: Wir nerden richtig ab – mit Yves von MOVIEPILOT! | Podcast

Cinema Strikes Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 106:28


Yves Arievich von Moviepilot ist heute bei CINEMA STRIKES BACK zu Gast! Gemeinsam mit Marius und Alper spricht er über Themen aus der Welt der Filme und Serien, die ihn interessieren. Die drei nerden zuerst lange über die ROCKY- und CREED-Reihe ab, sprechen dann über das Fantasy Filmfest und die besten Filme, die sie in den letzten Wochen gesehen haben, bevor sie darüber quatschen, was sie in aktuellen Filmen nervt. Damit ein herzliches Willkommen zu einer weiteren Folge von Cinema Talks Back, dem Podcast von CINEMA STRIKES BACK! Podcast zum Anhören: Spotify: https://go.funk.net/csb_spotify iTunes: https://go.funk.net/csb_itunes RSS-Feed: https://go.funk.net/csb_rss Podcast Timestamps: 00:00:00 - Für Podcast-Profis 00:03:37 - Rocky 00:59:51 - Cinema Flashback 01:18:19 - Kleinigkeiten, die uns an Filmen nerven #film #podcast Moderation: Marius Stolz, Yves Arievich, Alper Turfan Redaktion: Alper Turfan Kamera & Ton: Jonas Ressel Schnitt: Patrik Hochnadel Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cinemastrikesback/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/csb_de Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/CSB_DE/ Cinema Strikes Back gehört zu #funk. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/funkofficial Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/funk TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@funk Website: https://go.funk.net https://go.funk.net/impressum

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
Raiders of the Lost Ark Revisited

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 74:20


It's fun revisiting Spielberg's 1981 classic Raiders of the Lost Ark, the film that we used as our launching point for this podcast. In honor of our ten year anniversary, we thought it would be fun to return to where it all began and have another conversation about Raiders as well as what we've been doing over the last ten years. So join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we dig back into the archives with Indiana Jones to celebrate our anniversary. It's not just Raiders of the Lost Ark we discuss. Sure, we talk about Spielberg's 1981 masterpiece, but we also talk about how we came to the decision to start a podcast. Why did it take Andy so long to jump on the podcasting bandwagon all those years ago? And why did it take him so long to get a better audio system? We also talk about the origins as Movies We Like and our early, looser format. With time, everything's evolved and (hopefully) improved. And other than our summer hiatuses, which we started a few years ago, we've been keeping consistent on the podcast with a new episode every week, not counting member bonus episodes and more. But we do dig into Raiders of the Lost Ark a bit, and we also talk about our reactions to what we thought in that first episode. We look at what Spielberg, Harrison Ford, Karen Allen, and more have been up to since we last discussed them. We talk about the ten consistent team members who worked on all four films. And we look at awards and the numbers for the movie. It's a delightful conversation and a great way to return to where it all began. If you haven't seen Raiders of the Lost Ark, by all means stop reading and go watch it immediately, but if you have, tune in and enjoy this retrospective episode! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Tune in to that First Episode Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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While in film school at NYU, Dee Rees directed a short film called Pariah that was essentially the first act of a feature script she was developing. Spike Lee, her professor and mentor, helped her get the feature version financed and in 2011, she released it to much acclaim. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversary series with Rees' feature version of her short film Pariah. There's a lot to discuss about Pariah, from the performances to the filmmaking style. We love all of the performances in this film, but Adepero Oduye as Alike, our protagonist, is the heart of this film. Her journey of coming out as a lesbian is a powerful one, and we're right along the ride with her from the start of the film. But all the performances in Pariah are great. Pernell Walker as Alike's best friend Laura. Aasha Davis as her first love Bina. Charles Parnell and Kim Wayans as her parents. Everyone gets story time and they sell this journey. Pariah is a strong story because Rees doesn't make the parents typical antagonists who aren't happy with her as a lesbian. We get a sense of their world and can understand their perspective, even if we don't agree with them. We also get a strong sense of the family world and connections to church, not to mention Dad's affair. All of this helps us feel like we understand the family dynamics. Rees and her cinematographer Bradford Young crafted a personal, intimate film. The film is beautiful to look at with many gorgeous closeups. It also has raw energy in the scenes that require it. All told, it's clear right out of the gate that Rees is a filmmaker pushing honesty and truth with her first film in a visually exciting way. Pariah is a powerful film that delivers and rightfully holds up as one of the great LGBTQ films. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd Pariah NYU Short • 2007 Pariah on Criterion

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If Beale Street Could Talk

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:58


It would be a disservice to the film to just say that JJ and Steve are just checking a box with “If Beale Street Could Talk”. While both of them had it on their list of films to see in 2018 neither of them ever got around to seeing it until now. They can now check that box, but both of them agree that its a film not to be missed. This is a gorgeous film to look at. Its beauty combined with a simple and straightforward story makes this a deceptive film. Its relevant and topical without being confrontational. It's a film you will want to watch with a friend because you may have a strong desire to talk about it. It's a film that should be seen by more people. Is this film for you? Within the first 15 minutes of this episode you will know whether you will push play, or keep scrolling. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon • Hulu • YouTube Script Transcript Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork James Baldwin: Later Novels Flickchart Letterboxd

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Eternals introduces us to a whole new era in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. New heroes, new villains, new locations and technologies. It's hard to say the company faces any true risks anymore given their Celestial girth in the entertainment space, but this is a big movie with a lot of moving parts helmed by a director demonstrably adept at intimacy. How well does Chloé Zhao translate her brand of storytelling to the big budget, big hero screen? Ocean Murff is joined by Pete Wright and Justin Jaeger to take a closer look at the film. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership. Visit TruStory FM to learn more. Watch this film: JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Original Material Flickchart Letterboxd

Film Kids Giant Squids
33: The Single Hole of a Wack-a-Mole

Film Kids Giant Squids

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 77:37


A special (belated) episode, meaning November is is still spooky month  - which is Brooke's true nightmare. 127 Hours with a Film Kid: Brooke gives a quick IATSE update, followed by Netflix's employee walkout, and Ruby Rose's allegations against CW/WBTV. Us: A surprise pairing caused directly by Lindsey, we manage to discuss the reasons we don't want kids (mainly their ability to see shadow people), a new conspiracy Lindsey has concocted around the restaurant industry, and when is the time for men to stop being allowed to make decisions. Replicas:  In a movie where there are literally no consequences despite setting up all of the immediate consequences, we discuss how a man ineptly tries to get away with murdering his entire family, despite not murdering his entire family. We also discover that while Lindsey may have a face-blindness for actors, it certainly is not height-blindness. Film Kids Giant Squids is produced and hosted by Lindsey Buttel and Brooke Hoppe. Intro music is by the band Poly Action.  Transition music is The Leviathan Part III by Mad Scientist Mike All licensed under CC BY 3.0 Find Us Onlinehttps://filmkidsgiantsquids.comhttps://twitter.com/FilmSquidsPodhttps://www.instagram.com/filmsquidspod/https://www.facebook.com/filmsquidspod

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
2021-11-06 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 72:41


We know, this is the show you've all been waiting for. The Unicorn episode that lights up the night sky as Ocean Murff and Mandy Kaplan once again share a podcast stage to discover if there is, indeed, anything on which they agree. Friends, this is that episodes. What starts as a romp down Succession Lane, and Foundation Court takes us into a whole neighborhood of our trio's love of reality television. Steve's Trailer: The Beach Mandy's Trailer: The Unforgivable Ocean's Trailer: House of Gucci THE LIST! This week the crew was tasked with coming up with a list of films featuring angelic visitations. No, that's not ghosts. Steve's List Wings of Desire The Adjustment Bureau A Life Less Ordinary Mandy's List Two of a Kind Michael Grease Ocean's List Dogma Fallen Heaven Can Wait

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The Story Well NaNoWriMo Special: “Word By Word And Bird By Bird” / “The Squeeze”

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 75:02


Welcome to the Story Well, a way station for storytellers of all stripes to pull up a seat alongside their compatriots and listen to them talk of art and craft. The topic of the day is NaNoWriMo, the writing endurance test where writers are tasked with writing a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. All three of us competed in this Mount Everest of writing challenges with varying levels of success. But what does success even mean in this case? We'll talk ideas, strategies and then take some time to create a story from scratch.

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Brazil's economy has certainly had its share of ups and downs over the decades. The struggle to create a capitalist economy hasn't been easy, and allowed for rich fodder for the filmmaking duo of Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra to write and direct a story about a middle class family struggling in the labor market. This film, Trabalhar Cansa or Hard Work in English, came out 10 years ago now. Does it resonate today? Does it resonate for people outside of Brazil (or Brasil, as Brasileros would write)? And do the filmmakers try to do too much – or too little – in their film? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10 Year Anniversary series with Rojas' and Dutra's 2011 film Hard Labor. Hard Labor deals with a lot more than the labor market. Like we ran into a number of times in our Horror Debuts series, Rojas' and Dutra's film is laden with metaphors and allegories. There are vicious barking dogs outside of Helena's new store that threaten her when she's trying to leave. There's black seepage oozing from between the tiles in the back of the store. And let's not forget the werewolf-esque body parts that Helena pulls from out of behind her wall. These elements give the film a definite horror vibe, but is that enough if the film doesn't stick with the horror? To that end, would it have been better if it stuck with the straight drama of our characters Helena, Otávio, and Paula and their struggles with employement instead of including these metaphors? By including them, does the film get muddled and become less clear on its messaging? We go back and forth on these points because Pete didn't like them at all and Andy liked them, though still felt they were a bit confusing. But what about the dramatic story in Hard Labor? This is where we feel the film excels. Watching the three main characters struggle with their jobs is the heart of this movie, particularly when Rojas and Dutra end the film on such a punch-in-the-gut moment. They each show an interesting transition over the course of the film. What did we think about them? How well do we care for them? And do we find any particularly interesting or less intriguing? It's an interesting film that never quite works as well as it should but still clearly shows a proclivity for a type of storytelling that it sounds like Rojas and Dutra have continued, both solo and together. It's an interesting film to discuss even if watching it won't be for everyone. Check it out and tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Watch this on Apple or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

Movies in the Buff
The Storyboard - 502

Movies in the Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 38:56


Welcome to the Storyboard where the guys give you some industry news, let you in on what they're watching or looking forward to and give you a preview of this month's movies, Inside Man and Michael Clayton!Take it to the baby town... If you like what you hear, please rate, review and subscribe!!You can find us on Facebook and Instagram at Movies in the Buff and Twitter @BuffMovies, or email us at watchingmoviesinthebuff@gmail.com.moviesinthebuff.buzzsprout.comHosted by John Dreher and Brett Bolton; Cover Art by Melanie BrownA High Tops Media Podcast You can follow for more content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @hightopsmedia Check out more podcasts on our website https://www.hightops.media/

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2021-10-30 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 67:29


Tommy Metz is back in the big chair this week with Rob Kubasko and Kyle Olson. Kicking off our weekend festivities, Rob leads a rousing celebration of the new DJI Ronin 4D. Seriously, it's an amazing camera in if you're at all excited about gear, this thing is bonkers. Arcade 1up has a new cabinet that GenX gamers will likely appreciate: the T2: Judgment Day machine. Yes, it's a classic arcade cabinet. But think about it this way. If you own it, NO QUARTERS. Got $400+ to burn? Check out the Ghostbusters HasLab Plasma Series Spengler's Proton Pack. Or, at least go look at it and realize that your family would have issues with you spending the money but leave the tab open in your browser, longingly checking it every few days, wondering what it would be like to call yourself a collector, changing your identity accordingly, and still coming to the same, sad, conclusion: $400 is crazy to pay for a proton pack that doesn't actually include the Ghostbusters Plasma Series Spengler's Neutrona Wand in the box. Oh, and surprising everyone, Tom saw Dune… and liked it. The team brings trailers that are, now surprising no one, on brand. Rob's Trailer: Lightyear Kyle's Trailer: Cowboy Bebop Tommy's Trailer: The Card Counter THE LIST! The list this week comes courtesy of last week's hosts, a celebration of movies including actors who are too old to be sincerely playing high school students. Rob's List Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Sense and Sensability Yentl Kyle's List Like Crazy & Breathe In Mean Girls Behind the Candelabra Rob's List Carrie & Grease Catch Me If You Can Grease (again, but with Stockard Channing)

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Miranda July spends more time as a performance artist than as a filmmaker, so it makes sense that her second film, The Future, feels a bit like a performance piece. That also likely speaks to why its quirky charm works for some but for others, they feel it represents the worst side of independent film. But that's what art is, right? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our 10th Anniversary celebration series with July's 2011 film The Future. Miranda July and Hamish Linklater are a perfect couple in The Future. Linklater's recently appeared on Mike Flanagan's Midnight Mass on Netflix and was amazing in that role, so it's great to jump back 10 years to see him in this film. He and July, playing his girlfriend, are the perfect 30-something couple, happy with their existence but unsure how to move things forward. That's when the cat Paw-Paw enters their lives, and suddenly, they feel like their lives are coming to an end. From there, it's a bit of an existential journey with each character – Linklater as Jason and July as Sophie – working through their own interpretation of the future and their position in life. But where do we land on the film as a whole versus the various parts? There's also Paw-Paw the cat and the Moon as well. The first half focuses on their relationship. The second half focuses on them struggling with where they think their lives might lead. But there's also Paw-Paw the cat, talking to us in metaphors about life and the death. At the same time, we also have the Moon, talking to Jason while he's frozen time and is struggling about whether to unfreeze it or not. The Future is a unique film that works for us, but likely won't work for everyone. July gives us a lot to discuss with this quirky, unique film. Not everyone will like it – we even are a bit split on it – but it's clearly a film from a unique voice and certainly worth watching and revisiting. Check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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JJ and Steve launch into the final trio of films for this season with 2018's Skin. This is a tough film to recommend because it's not entertainment, and it doesn't feel right to call this story enjoyable. However, both JJ and Steve agree that there is something to be learned from stories like this. It is a film that is likely to start great conversations with friends. What draws young, lost boys to organizations like the Vinlanders Social Club? How can a sense of belonging to a family lead people to hateful acts of violence? Is it possible for people to ever leave their past behind them? While wrestling with reasons to recommend Skin JJ and Steve coin a new phrase to describe films like it. In retrospect it's a category that fits many films they have discussed. Is this film for you? Within the first 15 minutes of this episode you will know whether you will push play, or keep scrolling. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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We're off-world this week as we head into Denis Villeneuve's Dune with Ocean Murff, Matthew Fox, Steve Sarmento, and Pete Wright. This is a property with some baggage and we come carrying a lot of it. Loved the book? Loved the Lynch film? Loved the SyFy remake? We're a mixed back on the show this week and one of us hasn't seen a single dune-y thing until this very film. This, of course, gives us the opportunity to talk about how well the movie sets up the universe of Dune without the knowledge of the story and where our hero ultimately goes in the sequel. How well does the political intrigue land? Where is Zendaya in this thing? Why is there a guy named Duncan Idaho in the year 10000? It's a complicated story and we set out to explore how well this version communicates its themes in our search for Chani and the worm riders. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: JustWatch Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Dune by Frank Herbert Flickchart Letterboxd

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
2021-10-23 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 82:13


Steve Sarmento is in the big chair this week with Mandy Kaplan and Pete Wright. It's Dune weekend, so of course we're talking about theaters, box office, and shooting big. There's a Breakfast Club reboot brewing… just kidding, there isn't, but we talk about it anyway. The streamers are trying to make us feel guilty about churning and returning but it turns out we're doing it anyway. The bigger news this week is over at Netflix as the company deals with a walkout and controversy relating for its handling around the Dave Chapelle special. Steve and Mandy Freaky Friday'd this week when it comes to trailers. No idea how it happened, but Mandy picked Cena. Mandy's Trailer: Peacemaker Steve's Trailer: The Lost Daughter Pete's Trailer: Being the Ricardos THE LIST! This week's list is all about movies in other movies. Whether we see a movie in production or characters watching a movie in the movie, it's up for grabs this week. Mandy's List The Last Exorcism Singin' in the Rain For Your Consideration Steve's List Hail, Caesar! State and Main The Last Shot Pete's List Hooper Scott Pilgrim vs. The World Last Action Hero

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In 2008, 18 students at Gloucester High School in Gloucester, MA, all got pregnant. At the time, the principal said that there had been a pact between a number of the girls to all get pregnant together. The mayor later came out to say that there wasn't a pact, and later some of the girls said there was a pact but it had been made after the pregnancies and more about helping each other raise their babies together. The initial story about the pregnancy pact had gotten out into the world, however, and created quite a fervor because the concept of so many young teens making a life-altering decision like this in such an off-the-cuff way is so frightening. Some people wrote books, others made Lifetime movies. French writer/director sisters Delphine and Muriel Coulin adapted the concept into their feature film debut 17 Filles, or 17 Girls in English. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we kick off our Tenth Anniversary series, celebrating films celebrating their 10th anniversaries as we celebrate our own – with Coulins' 17 Filles, or 17 Girls. It's a challenging film for each of us for different reasons, which makes for a lot to talk about with 17 Girls. Pete didn't like this movie. He didn't like the characters. He found the story fairly boring. Andy liked the movie, but**—Hold on there! This is currently only available for members. It'll be available to everyone else soon, but why not become a member so you can listen to it now?** We'd love it if you became a member to support our show, but you'd love it because of everything you get. We have monthly member bonus episodes that only members can access. You also get monthly Flickchart re-ranking episodes, access to members-only Discord channels, and early releases for every episode. We have a special episode we release at the end of each series called Retake during which we break down our overall thoughts of the entire season. Plus, you get to vote on the movies we discuss in our members only episodes as well as the movie lists we discuss on the Saturday Matinée podcast! What can we say? It pays to be a member. Learn more about supporting The Next Reel film podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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James Bond is a brand. That's Ocean's opening salvo in this week's discussion on the twenty-fifth Bond outing. And with brand status comes responsibility. How has Daniel Craig's outing as Bond changed the franchise, and has it changed forever? This is an emotional movie for our hosts but not the emotion that you might expect. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting Trailer Rewind and TruStory FM's family of film podcasts through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this film: JustWatch Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Original Material Flickchart Letterboxd

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed
2021-10-16 • Saturday Matinée

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 75:52


Well what do you know? Kyle leads Rob and Pete through a discussion of Bones and Cougar Town, which leads to a big show for Rob. A big show. We chat through a tease of Bond, a little Fandome, some Ted Lasso and Murder… there's a lot up front before we get to trailers that break us, each in their own very special way. Rob's Trailer: The Tender Bar Steve's Trailer: Hawkeye Pete's Trailer: Scream 5 THE LIST! Movies about people employed as dancers? What could possibly go wrong! Rob's List Step Up Step Up 2: The Streets Step Up 3D Kyle's List Breakin' Two: Electric Boogaloo Hairspray Strictly Ballroom Pete's List Shall We Dance Hustlers Honey

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Retake: Horror Debuts

The Next Reel Film Podcast Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 56:17


We're done talking about the movies. Now let's talk about the series. We have come to the end of our Horror Debuts series, exploring six films and one extra as our September 2021 Member Bonus Episode. All told, we looked at Messiah of Evil, Goodnight Mommy, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, The Babadook, The Lure, Saint Maud, and Relic. Each director (or pair of directors as the case may be) brings a unique vision to their story, and perhaps the fact that they chose the horror genre as the place to start their feature film career is telling as it allows for a lot of play. So what did we – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – think about not just the films but the series as a whole? How do these films stand up to other horror films of the past and of this last decade? Why these shifts in the types of horror films getting made? We dig in to horror films in general and these films specifically in our Horror Debuts Retake. Here's a hint at what we talk about. How accurate were our original star ratings from when we had our initial conversations as compared to now? Pete found that Goodnight Mommy hasn't held up over time and demoted it whereas Andy largely still connects with The Babadook the least. Relic tops both of our lists though. Horror films have evolved over the years and decades. It's great seeing so many strong female voices rising in the ranks as directors over the last few decades. We would've liked to have had more woman-directed horror debuts on this list but found few before the turn of the century. Messiah of Evil is a fun one to include, but even that was co-directed (and still had Gloria Katz uncredited for her role in directing, likely because of DGA policies). But is there anything to the fact that these films have horror elements but aren't straight-up horror films? Or that they're incorporating metaphorical elements much more strongly than we've seen recently? Horror films have shifted each decade, so this tone definitely seems to fit the overall vibe of horror in the 2010s, but is any of that coming from the larger group of female directors? We finally rank all of the films on Flickchart. It's becoming more and more clear to us that our middle block is throwing too many films we really like into the bottom half. Regardless, it's an interesting order that mostly reflects our positions on the films, even if not 100% accurate. All in all, it was a thrilling series and a great addition to our 11th season. Next up – as a way to celebrate our tenth anniversary coming up on November 11th, we're looking at 10 films that are also celebrating their Tenth Anniversaries! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Original poster artwork Rank the Movies on Flickchart: Messiah of Evil Goodnight Mommy A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night The Babadook The Lure Saint Maud Relic The Series on Letterboxd Listen to Each of the Episodes: Messiah of Evil Goodnight Mommy A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night The Babadook The Lure Saint Maud Relic This is a member bonus episode. We'd love it if you became a member to support our show, but you'd love it because of everything you get. We have monthly member bonus episodes that only members can access. You also get monthly Flickchart re-ranking episodes, access to members-only Discord channels, and early releases for every episode. We have a special episode we release at the end of each series called Retake during which we break down our overall thoughts of the entire season. Plus, you get to vote on the movies we discuss in our members only episodes as well as the movie lists we discuss on the Saturday Matinée podcast! What can we say? It pays to be a member. Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM.

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Flickchart Re-Ranking • October 2021

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:29


Who rules the roost in this month's Flickchart Re-Ranking? Pete or Andy? Pete and Andy are back for yet another cockfight, this time for our October Flickchart Re-Ranking for our wonderful members. Also, Andy challenges Pete to remember which series each movie was featured. Here's a breakdown of the battles. Based on this list, what would you pick to win? And which one will win as we duke it out? Here's the list of our rankings in this month's Flickchart Re-Ranking episode. Inception vs. The Fly Snatch. vs. Moon City Zero (Zerograd) vs. The Illusionist (2006) Sophie's Choice vs. TimeCrimes Dr. Strangelove vs. Miller's Crossing The Book of Eli vs. The Emigrants Il Postino (The Postman) vs. Force Majeure Compulsion vs. Network Star Trek V: The Final Frontier vs. The Town Defending Your Life vs. Rabid Fast Times at Ridgemont High vs. Day of the Locust Cloverfield vs. The Philadelphia Story Duck, You Sucker vs. Intacto Born on the Fourth of July vs. 2001: A Space Odyssey Lady Vengeance vs. Underworld: Evolution Interstellar vs. The Man With Two Brains Roma vs. Son of the Bride National Lampoon's Vacation vs. Detour Dead Ringers vs. The Lonely Guy The Illusionist (2006) vs. Letters From Iwo Jima Silver Streak vs. Sophie's Choice The Hurt Locker vs. Pennies From Heaven Drive vs. Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore We also look at our top 5 and bottom 5. Should we feel guilty about any of these or are we okay with where they are? What do you think? So much blood in our re-rankings this month. Wanna look at our entire chart? Just click here to visit our Flickchart page!

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The release of Rose Glass's 2019 film Saint Maud was cut short due to the pandemic, but the film still garnered enough attention from festival play and the awards circuit to become a talking point in movie circles as the newest horror film worth seeing. Glass received a lot of the praise as a new director who clearly has a sense of vision and story with this, her debut feature. And the performances of both Morfydd Clark and Jennifer Ehle were discussed as true highlights. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we wrap up our Horror Debuts series with Glass's 2019 film Saint Maud. We are a bit split on Saint Maud. Despite the fact that the trailer for this was selected for a Saturday Matinée episode in December 2019, Pete didn't remember watching it so had no idea what to expect when he started this movie. When the story shifted at its midway point, that disappointed him because he was so engaged with what had been set up in that first half and he was never able to really connect with the film after that point. Andy, on the other hand, remembered the trailer and while he didn't feel the trailer changed his opinion of the film, he was able to move along with the shift in the story. So does that matter? Or does it end up becoming a point in the story where you just have to go along with the shift? Some people seem to be able to go along with that better than others but there certainly is a contingent of people online who seemed to connect more to the first half of the story. Outside of that, though, it's clear that Glass has a sense of story. We both firmly connected with Maud's journey, particularly as it relates to her time with Amanda. Both Clark and Ehle are perfect in their parts and the exploration of obsession, possession, and mental breakdowns are handled well. Glass crafted a difficult but affecting journey with Maud. We discuss the way she works through Maud's descent into madness and religious fervor. There's also some talk about her self harm. Maud also uses sex as a tool when she is trying to get out of her personal nadir before reconnecting with God. Then there's the conversation with Joy. If Joy had agreed to hang out, would all of this have gone away? Or would it have gotten there eventually? It's hard to say but interesting to think about. It's a powerful film that didn't affect us equally but is still a strong one worth looking at. So check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Film Sundries Find out where you can watch this at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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To close out the series of war films, Tommy joins JJ and Steve to discuss The Kill Team. Will this finally be a war film that is about war? The Kill Team is written and directed by Dan Krauss, who also directed the 2013 documentary The Kill Team, which is the basis for the 2019 film. JJ and Steve watched the documentary and bring their insights to the discussion. Both films tackle dark and disturbing subject matter and the gray ethical area that these films confront demand debate and discussion. While they won't land on answers as to what is right, just, or good, JJ, Steve, and Tommy do have an engaging discussion. Is this film for you? Within the first 15 minutes of this episode you will know whether you will push play, or keep scrolling. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork The Kill Team Original Documentary Flickchart Letterboxd

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There is clearly a coming of age story in Agnieszka Smoczynksa's 2015 film The Lure, which is also a horror and a musical. And it's likely that genre mashup that made it difficult for people to connect to the movie and why it did poorly at the box office. Smoczynska created a strong vision for her first film, though, and because of that, the film's cult following is already growing not to mention people taking it seriously because of its placement in Criterion's lineup of releases. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – for the fifth film in our Horror Debuts series as we join the dance party in Smoczynska's 2015 film The Lure. The Lure is pretty bonkers, but at a level that works well for both of us. While the genre mashup may be difficult for some people to click with, it worked for us. Well, to that end, Andy feels more comfortable calling it a dark fairytale musical rather than a horror film. No matter how you slice it, though, it's a fascinating film that metaphorically explores female coming-of-age and sexuality through a fairytale lens. There is a strong current of Hans Christian Anderson's “The Little Mermaid” running through this film and the filmmakers have also imbued the mermaids with the darker elements from Homer's “The Odyssey.” Using horror films like The Lure to explore metaphorical issues We've talked about horror as metaphor in both The Babadook and Relic. Horror has often been a way for storytellers to deal with issues in metaphorical ways but there's something strong in this recent run of films we've discussed that seems to make the metaphors very visual. It's a wonderful genre to explore ideas like these and we love how recent filmmakers are pushing their stories forward so deliberately. Plus, they all have strong visual design and story structure that makes these films stand out. The Lure does have its share of story issues, particularly as it builds toward the climax in the third act, but the world is so unique and engaging that it's easy to give it more of a pass. But why does this need to be in the 80s? Is it just because that's when the director, writer, and musicians upon which the story is very loosely based spent their childhood? Do the metaphors work when trying to explore what they're saying about Communist Poland in the 80s? On top of that, we also have a metaphor for immigrants moving to foreign lands to make better lives for themselves only to get trapped in the sex industry. So when is it too much? Regardless, we still really enjoy this film. The performances are great, particularly from the three actresses playing the two mermaids and their mother figure in the band. We have a lot to talk about with this one so check the film out and tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this on Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Transcript Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-10-02 • Saturday Matinée

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 86:48


Rob Kubasko leads our entry into our third century with Mandy Fabian and the apparently-satisfying Kyle Olson. Mandy's crushing on The Other Two, which is eerily similar-not-similar to Kyle's current fascination, Y: the Last Man. Rob is here to represent a walk through the CBS crime shows of the CBS television network. Of the more serious news, ScarJo got paid. The Disney-Scarlett Johansson settlement should quiet the media battle as the two sides come to terms on compensation for Black Widow at its streaming/theatrical release earnings. The BBC is preparing for what they're calling an "explosive" 20th Anniversary of Doctor Who in 2023: Russell T Davies — the producer at the wheel from 2005-2009 — will be coming back for the celebration episode and beyond. And, near the end of the show, Kyle drops a gem in the form of a podcast: Batman: The Audio Adventures. It's an HBOMax thing, and they team there seems to think you can only get it if you're a subscriber. But then why did they release it as a podcast? We'll never know. But seriously, this cast is a who's who of comedy aces and Jeffry Wright under the cowl? Can't lose. Let's Do Trailers Rob's the only one who knows anything about Kurt Warner. Mandy's trailer proves that doesn't matter a bit because even if we don't love sports, we loves us some sports movies. Rob offers snark by way of Hollywood tropes and handsome Rob Lowe. And Kyle brings a trailer that he's actually picked before, but before you turn off the show, don't worry because they've changed it up enough that it appears the filmmakers were preparing for this week and tried to make it a new movie altogether. Mandy's Trailer: American Underdog Rob's Trailer: Attack of the Hollywood Clichés Kyle's Trailer: The Harder They Fall Games! Rob's Ultimate Movie Monster Show-Down Bracket "Well, you make a compelling argument." Rob brings an epic tour of movie monster history in a bracket that ends with a shocking Final Four Match-up between Draculas, Mummies, Frankensteins, and Werewolves. THE LIST: Annoying Children No, it's not a great week for the kids. It turns out our trio has strong feelings about the worst children in movies... even if those children weren't out to be the worst. Sometimes, they just can't help it. Mandy's List Weird Science Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory The Toy Kyle's List Jerry Maguire Jurassic World ⭐ Superman Returns Rob's List Clifford The Lost World The Mummy Returns

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Relic • Member Bonus

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 54:14


Relic delivers on the haunted house tropes. There's a tone and mood that often permeates horror films that give you a constant sense of dread and terror. Sometimes, it's broken up with laughs or jump scares, but that's clearly not what director/co-writer Natalie Erika James is looking for. Her debut film Relic generates this sense of dread and terror but maintains it throughout in a quiet way that for some keeps them on the edges of their seats but for others leaves them feeling bored. Which are we? Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we add to our Horror Debuts series this member bonus episode, James' 2020 film Relic. Relic is a quiet but moody metaphorical horror film. There are shadowy spirits lurking in the corners of Edna's house, but are they really there? The way James constructs the film creates wonderful tension as we just catch glimpses of something in the shadows. It's really a blink-and-you-miss-it type of treat because they're not highlighted by musical stings that hit you over the head. We love the way she builds tension through these techniques, and how she uses her location to great effect. The cast is wonderful as well. Emily Mortimer, Robyn Nevin and Bella Heathcote play the three generations of this family and as the story progresses, we are right there with mother and daughter as they try to sort out what's wrong with Gram. Their performances become more affecting as the story reveals itself to be about the family struggle with Alzheimer's. It's a powerful metaphor handled well and works because of the power in the three lead performances. Relic is a quiet horror film but one that works exceptionally well for us. It's likely not for everyone, particularly people who are looking for those jump scares in their horror, but we had a great time watching it and talking about it. Check it out then tune in! The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Theatrical trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd Get your Relic T-Shirt!

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What is it about Jennifer Kent's film The Babadook that draws so many people in? Before writer/director Jennifer Kent made her debut feature film The Babadook, she made a short film called Monster which bears a lot of similarities with her feature. What it doesn't have is the metaphorical element that the feature carries, but it's got a mom, her son, and a monster living in the closet. In some ways, the streamlined short story works better because it's just a straightforward story. The feature film is hard to separate from its existence as a metaphor as grief. Still, countless people have found a connection with it. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Horror Debuts series with Kent's first film, 2014's The Babadook. Here's a hint at what we talk about in our conversation about The Babadook. Does the fact that the Babadook is so obviously a metaphor for the mother character's grief after losing her husband in a car wreck make the film less interesting? Or perhaps that's its strength and why so many people connect with it. Either way, the film seems to have garnered many fans who love it and just as many who find it too obvious as to what Kent is saying. (Oddly, when Andy first saw the film, he completely ignored any readings of the film and watched it only for what it was, and seeing it that way didn't work that well for him.) What it does do, however, is allow for interesting conversations about grief after watching it, so perhaps it's a win no matter how you see it. But assuming you get past the grief metaphor, what about the way the mother and child are written? It's a difficult duo to connect with because we're asked to join Amelia seven years after she's lost her husband and she's a mess. She also isn't a great parent – Samuel, who's about to turn seven – is aggressive, violent, and uncontrollable. He often seems like he's more in charge than she is. But is that a bad thing if they're written this way and we can't connect? Or does it force us to find a way to sympathize with them? (No matter how you slice it, though, six-year-old Noah Wiseman delivers as strong a child performance in a horror film as Danny Pintauro did in Cujo.) These two elements seem to largely be the things that keep audiences from really connecting with The Babadook. If you can get into the metaphor and if you can connect with the characters, you'll likely love this ride. If you can't truck with one or both of these, however, you may struggle a bit more with the film. And that's where we sit. That's not to say we didn't like The Babadook. Kent clearly has a handle on her directing style. The Babadook looks great. She uses creative transitions. We feel completely in this world and it works well. The character design of Mister Babadook, done with practical effects and patterned in part after Lon Chaney in London After Midnight, is terrifying. And honestly, there may be elements that we each struggle with but we still find it an effective ride. So to that end, should we count this as a win? We think so. It's a strong first film and clearly shows her vision as a storyteller. Plus, it allows for an exciting conversation. We have a great time digging into this one, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. Watch this on Apple or Amazon, or find other places at JustWatch Script Draft 6.3 by Jennifer Kent Trailer Poster artwork Flickchart Letterboxd Jennifer Kent's short film Monster

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During their seasons on Trailer Rewind JJ and Steve have seen a lot. But will it prepare them for The Yellow Birds? Have years of viewing violence numbed them to the atrocities and dehumanizing experience of war? Will they be the same when they come back from watching The Yellow Birds? Is the talented cast of Alden Ehrenreich, Tye Sheridan, Toni Collette, Jennifer Aniston, Jason Patric and Jack Huston able to hold this film together? Is this film for you? Within the first 15 minutes of this episode you will know whether you will push play, or keep scrolling. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel's Discord channel! Film Sundries Thank you for supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast on Patreon! Watch this film: iTunes • Amazon Script Transcript Original theatrical trailer Original poster artwork [Original Material][original] Flickchart Letterboxd

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2021-09-25 • Saturday Matinée EPISODE 200!

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 63:25


It's episode 200 of the Saturday Matinée! A fine how-do-you-do to that. Thanks to everyone who has made our weekend romp so much fun these past four years! We start with Mandy mad at Steve about Martin. Steve attempt to retaliate by defending his position on 'Below Decks' to a woman who counts among her many interests, 'The Housewives'. It goes about as well as you can imagine. Trailers this week run the gamut: Our A24 entry puts Denzel in the middle of The Scottish Play adapted and directed by mono-Coen. Pete brings a nightmare circus staring the subject of his very one-sided friendship, Bradly Cooper. And did you forget Spielberg is don't that one Sondheim thing? He is. But you'd be forgiven if you did. Steve's Trailer: The Tragedy of Macbeth Pete's Trailer: Nightmare Alley Mandy's Trailer: West Side Story Game! Name That Crew! In keeping with our big 200th show, we're digging through the history of other shows that crossed that 200-episode boundary. Pete starts a bidding war cataloging how many principle characters Mandy and Steve can remember from past US prime time hits. THE LIST: Save the Cat! Blake Snyder was a screenwriter who wrote Stop or My Mom will Shoot and Blank Check in the 90s. He also wrote the book Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need in which he coined the phrase that describes the decisive moment the protagonist demonstrates that they are worth rooting for, the moment in which they save the proverbial cat. It's a controversial concept that has grown in popularity to the point that the Save the Cat 15 beat structure has shaped many Hollywood blockbusters of an age. And, since we have a perfect Save the Cat moment in Ana Lily Amirpour's 2014 film, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, members voted that we talk all about the same moments in other films. But we're cheeky, so this list is largely full of saving actual cats, not metaphorical cats, and also we pet a dog. Steve's List Casablanca Bright Alien Pete's List Thor Keanu Superman Mandy's List Oliver! Pretty Woman Sixteen Candles