Podcast appearances and mentions of George Bernard Shaw

Irish playwright, critic and polemicist, influential in Western theatre

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Latest podcast episodes about George Bernard Shaw

Soul Synergy Experience Podcast
Ep 21 - On Rejection and Discovering The Source Of Love with Lu Camy

Soul Synergy Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 21:01


In this episode, hypnotist and soul guide Lu Camy reflects on how feeling rejected can manifest as the result of the accumulation of old wounds, limiting beliefs, and suppressed emotions in the body. In this episode, Lu dives into universal spiritual wisdom and therapeutic approaches to transform rejection into a growth experience.TopicsThe ego identification with the bodyFinding the real source of loveBecoming less vulnerable to illusion and stronger in truth Seeing ourselves without old "measurements" and becoming willing to see others without "old measurements." Quote"The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor: he took my measure anew every time he saw me, while all the rest went on with their old measurements and expected them to fit me." - George Bernard Shaw.The most important relationship is the one we have with the sacred within More info:Awaken Now Book Clubwww.lucamy.com/bookclubwww.lucamy.comInstagram @lu.camy @soulsynergyexperience

Team Performance - Winning Ways for Uncertain Times
The Problem with Communication...

Team Performance - Winning Ways for Uncertain Times

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 35:40


George Bernard Shaw said, “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place. Join Christian Napier and Spencer Horn and they discuss what they have learned to help solve one of the biggest problems every organization and relationship face…communication!

Extreme Health Radio
Dr. Ed Park – Can Telomere Activation Allow Us To Live To 200 Years Old & What Are The Implications?

Extreme Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 116:08


Today we spoke with Dr. Ed Park author of the book Telomere Timebombs (I highly recommend it!) and he's also the man behind the product TA-65 which we talked about along with his other product Recharge, which we are going to start taking soon. We'll report back to you as to our experience with it. We were turned on to Dr. Park from a listener and when I began to research the work that he's doing, I was highly impressed and immediately became excited to introduce him to all of you. Some interesting things to consider about living a very long life span... Are humans able to live until we're 200, 400 or more years old? Imaging living in a healthy, vibrant, strong and youthful body all the way until we're that age? Would you want to do it? [spp-tweet "You don't stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing. George Bernard Shaw"] It means you'd out live multiple generations of family below you. It's a concept that's inconceivable and maybe that's part of the problem. Because we're so programmed for early death maybe it actually imbues itself deep into the very fibers and strands of our DNA? Maybe this energetic blockage of how long we can live actually affects sub atomic particles which actually cause our telomeres to get snipped off from our DNA because telomerase isn't abundant enough. Maybe I don't know what I'm talking about but it's just a theory. Would you want to live that long? Today we had Dr. Ed Park join us in the studio to talk about telomere activation, anti aging (some people prefer to call it pro youthing) and life extension using a super concentrated ancient Chinese herb called astragalus. Dr. Park was gracious enough to make the drive and come into our studio. After the show was over we talked extensively about what it would mean to live for hundreds of years. Would there be over population? Would there be issues with people running out of money? Would there be a drain on natural resources? These are all topics we discussed at the end of the show. We hope you enjoyed our interview with Dr. Ed Park as much as we did and if you did would you consider clicking "like" and "share" on this page to let your friends and family know about the work he is doing? Kate and I would greatly appreciate that! :) Sponsors For This Episode: Carnivora Superfoods - Target & enhance your immune system with Carnivora supplements to prevent disease and feel amazing. Kate and I highly recommend checking them out! BioAge Superfoods - Kate and I have been taking BioAge superfoods now for quite some time and we don't want to be without it. Their spirulina is incredible. Pick some up today. You'll be glad you did. Show Notes For This Episode: Click here to download the show notes for THIS EPISODE. Commercials During This Episode: Commercial #1 - BioAge Superfoods Commercial #2 - Carnivora Immune System Support Commercial #3 - Qigong Moving Meditation Commercial #4 - Vitamix Blender Commercial #5 - Omron Nebulizer Find Extreme Health Radio On: [include file=showpage-itunes-soundcloud-stitcher.html] Please Subscribe: Subscribe To Our Radio Show For Updates! Other Shows: [include file=show-links.html] Listen to other shows with this guest. Show Date: Wednesday 9/10/2014 Show Guest: Dr. Ed Park Guest Info: Dr. Ed Park, MD, MPH, is a telomere and telomerase expert and founder of Recharge Biomedical. He graduated with honors from Harvard University with BA (Bachelor of Arts) in Biological Anthropology in 1989. Dr. Park received MD (Doctor of Medicine) from Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and MPH (Master of Public Health) from Columbia University, School of Public Health, in 1993. He completed internship and residency at Beth Israel Hospital, a teaching hospital of the Harvard Medical School in 1997. Show Topic: D Ed Park, telomere, anti aging, pro youthing,

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago hollywood disney master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north fame record island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone matrix vietnam ocean tribute southern california catholic mothers beatles cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz wizard elvis rock and roll finland xmen bay area pakistan volunteers parks villains snacks garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern americana invention woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad pink floyd elvis presley belgians newsweek republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland miles davis peace corps rock and roll hall of fame spence lovin family tree triumphs carousel mixcloud buchanan charlie chaplin tilt san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt starship national endowment janis joplin ayn rand headquarters schmitt chaplin hippies monkees slick steely dan bakersfield triad concierto old west garfunkel rock music elektra rca runnin sketches buddy holly greenwich village milne white rabbit phil spector village voice get together zappa haskell byrds ravel spoonful jerry garcia levis heartbeats doris day stranger in a strange land jefferson airplane fillmore brian jones steve ditko george bernard shaw glen campbell bolero david crosby my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum harry nilsson superior court methuselah jacques brel sgt pepper judy collins heinlein ed sullivan show dryden tom wolfe buffalo springfield bessie smith weavers rca records great society objectivism robert heinlein altamont jefferson starship ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records san franciscan grace slick ditko carter family bluesman john sebastian family dog colonel tom parker tennessee georgia abbie hoffman mercury records bill thompson town criers roger mcguinn balin jorma charles lloyd fillmore east rickenbacker smothers brothers tommy oliver merry pranksters van dyke parks mystic arts gary davis hot tuna one flew over the cuckoo john wyndham monterey pop festival milt jackson jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon we built this city mothers of invention dave van ronk cass elliot echoplex monterey jazz festival yippies fillmore west mickey thomas ian buchanan slicks moby grape roy buchanan jimmy brown wellingtons jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin kantner casady all worlds surrealistic pillow blues project jack casady fred neil bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence billy roberts john hammond jr jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
美文阅读 More to Read
美文阅读 | 百万富翁的悲哀 Sorrows of the Millionare (萧伯纳)

美文阅读 More to Read

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 28:25


Daily Quote What can shorten time? Activities. What can lengthen time uneasily to endure? Comfort. (Johan Wolfgang von Goethe) Poem of the Day 饮酒·结庐在人境 陶渊明 Beauty of Words Sorrows of the Millionaire by George Bernard Shaw

At the Flicks
214: Summer Special

At the Flicks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 97:35


Welcome to our Summer special. We know what you are thinking dear listener, At The Flicks, late again. You might be right, or we might be early for Summer 2023, you decide, we couldn't possibly comment. Don't go looking at the films under review to work out if they are released 2022 or 2023. It's not that type of review show. This is a classic movie review show. To be honest, we haven't been that impressed with many of the movies released recently, so we set a challenge for the review team. Pick a highly acclaimed movie you have never seen, then we would all review it. The selection process made for some very interesting choices. Now, we aren't going to tell you who picked what film, you will have to listen to the show to find that out, however we will tell you what films were selected, and they are as follows: The Cabinet Of Dr Caligari. The classic silent German film from when way back in 1921, when even our Graham was young. This film has received much renewed attention as a talking point in the Nicholas Cage feature The Unbearable Weight Of Massive Talent. Check this out to find out if the review team rate it as highly as Nicholas Cage. Sunset Boulevard (1950). Billy Wilder's acidic take on Hollywood turned out to be a marmite film for the review team. Listen in to find out who liked it and who didn't. Inherit The Wind (1960). Spencer Tracy and Frederic March star in this court room drama based on the 1925 Scopes Monkey Trail. The one that some in the team had not heard of but all of enjoyed. Also prompted a fascinating discussion about the relevance of the movie in today's society. My Fair Lady (1964). Pardon me. What, the Oscar winning British musical based on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw? Is this a mistake? Not at all, although everyone thought the person who selected this had picked it for mischievous reasons, which I guess is a good clue as to who selected it. Vertigo (1958). The classic Hitchcock thriller and Sight & Sound's selection for the greatest film of all time. Do the review team agree with Sight & Sound – check out our discussion. Five great films for which we give our views. Let us know what you think, if the show is a success, we will pick another five classics in the near future (or will that be the near past?). Oh, one final comment, if you listen closely, you will find out how reviewer Darren got his name. A great story. Until the next time, see you At The Flicks.

Arts & Ideas
George Bernard Shaw

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 51:26


Disillusionment with war and how you sue for peace are at the heart of Shaw's drama Arms and the Man, being staged in Richmond this autumn. Whilst in Bath a touring production of Mrs Warren's Profession stars Caroline Quentin and her daughter Rose Quentin as the former prostitute and her disapproving daughter. Anne McElvoy is joined by director Paul Miller, Professor Sos Eltis who has edited Shaw's work and theatre critic and writer Mark Lawson to look at Shaw's ability to construct arguments on stage and the resonances of his plays now. Arms and the Man runs at the Orange Tree Theatre in London directed by Paul Miller from 19 November 2022 – 14 January 2023 Mrs Warren's Profession directed by Anthony Banks runs at the Bath Theatre Royal from 9th - 19th November starring Caroline Quentin and her daughter Rose Quentin as Mrs Warren and her daughter Vivie. It then tours to the Richmond Theatre from 22nd November to 26th November 2022 and goes on to visit theatres including the Chichester Festival Theatre, the Hall for Cornwall, the Yvonne Arnaud in Guilford. My Fair Lady - a production from the Lincoln Centre directed by Bartlett Sher - is at the Cardiff Millennium Centre from November 8th to 26th and it then tours to Edinburgh, Southampton, Sunderland, Bristol, Birmingham and Manchester. Producer: Ruth Watts You can find other Free Thinking conversations about drama past and present including discussions about Moliere, Ibsen, the playwright Rona Munro, John McGrath's Scottish drama, in a collection called Prose, Poetry and Drama https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p047v6vh

Breaking Walls
BW - EP133—006: Thanksgiving With I Love A Mystery—Tony Randall's Early Career

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 47:09


Tony Randall was born Aryeh Leonard Rosenberg on February 16th, 1920 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He attended Northwestern University for a year before going to New York City to study under Sanford Meisner and choreographer Martha Graham. Randall worked as an announcer at WTAG in Worcester, Massachusetts. As Anthony Randall, he starred with Jane Cowl in George Bernard Shaw's Candida and with Ethel Barrymore in Emlyn Williams's The Corn Is Green. After serving with the U.S. Army Signal Corps in World War II, he came back to New York City. In 1946, Randall was cast in Katharine Cornell's revival of The Barretts of Wimpole Street. The following year in Antony and Cleopatra and in 1949 he appeared in Caesar and Cleopatra. Simultaneously, Randall found work in radio. Randall was twenty-nine and in New York when I Love a Mystery was revived. He originally auditioned for the part of Doc, but Carlton Morse felt he was better suited for Reggie York. As much as Randall loved I Love A Mystery, he wasn't a huge fan of many of the soap operas he appeared on.

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time
+1: Day-Tight Compartments (#1326)

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 5:00


The Place to Live to Dominate the Day   In our last +1, Dale Carnegie joined us to complement some Brian Cain wisdom about the importance of focusing on THIS moment (RIGHT NOW!) to crowd out any potential stress about the past or the future that might be eliciting some feelings of depression or anxiety.   As you may recall, and, don't worry! I promise that I will continue to unapologetically repeat all the important themes we discuss to make sure we're practicing one of the key tenets of Learning 101 known as “spaced repetition” …     Here's how Cainer put it: “Remember, depression is obsession with the past, anxiety is obsession about the future, and optimal performance is obsession about the present.”   And…   Here's how Carnegie put it: “George Bernard Shaw was right. He summed it all up when he said: ‘The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not.' So don't bother to think about it! Spit on your hands and get busy. Your blood will start circulating; your mind will start ticking—and pretty soon this whole positive upsurge of life in your body will drive worry from your mind. Get busy. Keep busy. It's the cheapest kind of medicine there is on this earth—and one of the best.”   Now…   I ended that +1 with one of my go-to lines, encouraging you to consider putting this wisdom into practice “All day, every day. Especially… TODAY!”   Which makes me think of ANOTHER Big Idea from Carnegie's How to Stop Worrying and Start Living.    He tells: “So let's be content to live the only time we can possibly live: from now until bedtime. ‘Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, from now until nightfall,' wrote Robert Louis Stevenson. ‘Anyone can do his work, however hard, for one day. Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till the sun goes down. And this is all that life really means.'"   And…   Carnegie encourages us to consider living in what he calls “Day-tight compartments.”    He tells us: “Shut the iron doors on the past and the future. Live in Day-tight compartments.”    Then…   He tells us to ask ourselves THESE questions:   “Do I tend to put off living in the present in order to worry about the future, or to yearn for some ‘magical rose garden over the horizon'? Do I sometimes embitter the present by regretting things that happened in the past—that are over and done with? Do I get up in the morning determined to ‘Seize the day'—to get the utmost out of these twenty-four hours? Can I get more out of life by ‘living in day-tight compartments'? When shall I start to do this? Next week? ... Tomorrow? ... Today?”   Those are some GREAT questions.   And…   Reflecting on those is the focus of Today's +1.   Let's spend a moment doing so now…   “Do you tend to put off living in the present in order to worry about the future, or to yearn for some ‘magical rose garden over the horizon'? Do you sometimes embitter the present by regretting things that happened in the past—that are over and done with? Do you get up in the morning determined to ‘Seize the day'—to get the utmost out of these twenty-four hours? Can you get more out of life by ‘living in day-tight compartments'? When shall you start to do this? Next week? ... Tomorrow? ... Today?”   Your answers?   btw…   Hint: The answer to #5 is…   You should start to do this… TODAY!     Yep. Today's the day to move from Theory to Practice to Mastery, Hero.   But only always.   Day 1. All in.    Here's to living in day-tight compartments.   LET'S GO!

Faith Community Bible Church
Listen More. Speak Less

Faith Community Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 39:18


INTRO Good morning church family. As Jason said, my name is JP Denham and I normally have the joy of serving back there on the drums. Thank you to the elder team for their prayers and support. It is quite different back there where I can hide under a pair of big headphones. But I'm really thankful to serve in this way this morning and I'll be our guide as we continue through the book of James. OVERVIEW of the book of James As we get started, I'd like to begin by zooming out for a few minutes and taking a broad look at where we are in this book and where we have ventured thus far. This book, perhaps more than any other book in the New Testament, resembles the book of Proverbs. In some ways it is the NT counterpart to Proverbs, in that it seems to hop from one topic to another to some degree without always a direct connection or flow of thought. The book of James was written to Christian Jews that had been scattered abroad and the book addresses many issues that were of particular importance to them, and now also to us. It was written very much like the wisdom literature of the OT and covers many different topics including things like patience in trials, wisdom, faith, discussion of the rich & poor, obedience to God, and as we'll cover today, guidance on how we think, speak, and act. And so as we proceed in James, we'll also spend a significant portion today in the book of Proverbs, which will provide a deeper clarity of what the Lord has to say to us through James. Furthermore, James references Jesus' sermon on the mount many times. And in this way, much of what is written here should be read through the lens of Jesus' great sermon. As you may recall, Jesus touched on many different aspects of the life of a Christian, ultimately providing us guidance in the process of sanctification, becoming more and more like Him. RECAP Sanctification, this process of being shaped into HIS image, can be uncomfortable as we have been learning through this series. It has been described even as “surgery” for our hearts. The Lord continues to lovingly reshape our hearts and minds to make us more like Himself. Let's briefly review the last couple weeks. Two weeks ago Jason spoke about theological “slow motion”, seeing in slow motion how sin can manifest in us over time. Recall that this process of sin involves several steps: 1. Invitation - we are invited to question God's claims and promises to us 2. Deception - this is the “hook”. Satan does not fish with bare hooks, but disguises them in things that look appealing 3. Incubation - this is where sin grows in our minds. The seed of deception can having growing power in our minds as it lingers 4. Conception - This is where lies that have been incubating give birth to sin And last week in James 1:17-18 we learned that “Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above”. Let's be reminded and not deceived - God is good ALWAYS. There is no variation or shadow due to change. And thus, all His gifts to us are GOOD, but they are only reflections of the giver. Likewise, trials direct our eyes BACK to the source of all good- the Lord! Lets remember the instructions we received earlier: James 1:2 ~ Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds. AND James 1:12 ~ Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life, which God has promised to those who love him. Ultimately, these passages are given to us as proof of His goodness, and as God's loving instructions and guidance in becoming more like His Son Jesus. This process of sanctification is a call to TRUE freedom. PRAY Now we come to this next section of James, we're going to be focusing on verses 19 and 20. As we begin, let's go to the Lord in prayer. Father, thank you for this time we have together this morning to worship you and to read and understand the words that you have given us in James. As we move forward in these passages, I ask that you provide us with a clear understanding of this section. Please speak through me this morning and help me to glorify You. For anyone here today that does not yet know You, I ask that You would reveal Yourself to them through these words You've given us. And for those here that know You as their Lord and Savior, would you please continue to refine us, shaping our character to be more and more like Jesus, for your purposes and your glory. In Jesus' name, Amen OVERVIEW of James 1:19-20 Let's read verses 19 and 20 together this morning. They should be up on the screen. "Know this, my beloved brothers: let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger; for the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God." This verse gives us some instructions, but even more than that, we're receiving a warning against several dangers here. Why quick to listen? Why slow to speak and slow to anger? What is at stake here? And what or who are we to be quickly listening to, and likewise to whom are we to be slow to speak? At first glance, it may seem to us that this references our relationships with other people, and that is true, but not the whole picture. There is more to this than simply improving our communication with other people. This is also, and even more importantly, about humility and our submission to God. These verses ultimately instruct our posture before God and others. As we look at this section today, we're going to examine how these instructions direct us both in our relationships with other people, and also with God. BREAKDOWN of JAMES 1:19-20 GET THIS Let's break this passage down and examine it in its parts. James begins by calling the readers to “understand this”, that is GET THIS! He's emphasizing what is to come by saying to everyone “pay close attention to this next part!”. And he draws them by his greeting. “My beloved brothers” - this is a reference to dearly loved, fellow brothers & sisters adopted in this family of God. James begins by warmly asking his readers to pay close attention to what is to come. This is James, the brother of Jesus, who came to believe in Jesus only AFTER His resurrection, now a pillar in the early church, calling us to pay close attention to what comes next. QUICK TO LISTEN James says “let every person be quick to hear”. Other translations say “quick to listen”. What does it mean to hear or listen? At face value it may seem clear, but under the surface this is more than just talking about the speed of sound, or even our willingness to literally HEAR. The Greek word used in this case is the word akouō (ah-KOO-oh). This word means to hear, to comprehend, to understand, and to OBEY. So with whom are we to be quick to listen, understand, or obey? Interpersonally, we must LISTEN to others in order to understand. An Irish playwright, George Bernard Shaw, once said, “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place”. How often do we determine to REALLY listen to others? Proverbs 19:20 Listen to advice and accept instruction, that you may gain wisdom in the future. Proverbs 12:15 The way of a fool is right in his own eyes, but a wise man listens to advice. We are clearly being led to both invite wise instruction into our lives, and also to really listen and understand. But there is more here. This instruction to be quick to listen emphasizes the need for submission to the Lord. We are not just told HEAR Him, but to obey. To illustrate this idea, think about a parent and child. When we tell our children to listen, what we are really telling them is we are instructing them to obey. We're not simply instructing them to HEAR what we're saying, but to then follow through in obedience. Take a look at the following video which helps to illustrate this idea. My 3 year old must argue and debate everything! This cute kid did not want to listen. The Bible says a great deal about LISTENING to God's voice, but listening isn't just HEARING, it is obeying. To hear is to obey. In a few verses ahead in verse 22, James explains: “But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves”. And, even more importantly, Jesus instructs us several times on the importance of not just hearing but DOING. Luke 8:21 - 'But he answered them, “My mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it.” ‘ He's making it clear that those who He recognizes as His family are those who are submitted to God's Lordship. And in Luke 11:28 '(Jesus) said, “Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and keep it!” ' We are promised a BLESSING here, that when we hear and obey, we will receive His blessing. What blessing are we talking about? In Luke 6 Jesus describes this blessing. Luke 6:47-48 'Everyone who comes to me and hears my words and does them, I will show you what he is like: he is like a man building a house, who dug deep and laid the foundation on the rock. And when a flood arose, the stream broke against that house and could not shake it, because it had been well built. ' Jesus makes it clear that this blessing that comes from listening and doing is that of having a firm foundation, in Him, that cannot be shaken. So we can see that hearing and doing/obeying are two sides of the same coin. It is made clear in scripture that to hear and obey are really one and the same in God's mind. SLOW TO SPEAK This passage says “be slow to speak”. What does it mean to be slow to speak? Simply put, if you're talking you aren't listening. It's about a balance. Which practice tips the scale, is it speaking or is listening? How many in this room have ever been in a conversation during which you know the other person isn't really listening to you? Rather than a back and forth exchange of ideas, you can SEE the wheels turning behind the eyes or body language of the other, showing you that what's really happening is that the person is formulating THEIR next idea. The other is waiting for JUST a long enough pause to get started again. In a conversation like this, if you were to ask the other person to summarize what was said, often they'd be unable to do so. Think of the path of communication like a pipeline. Whatever is flowing through that pipe can only go in one direction at a time. The direction of the flow ideas may switch back and forth, but cannot go both directions simultaneously. This is a picture of what we see in these instructions. Let's again look at what some of the wisdom literature of the OT has to say about this: Ecclesiastes 5:2 ' Be not rash with your mouth, nor let your heart be hasty to utter a word before God, for God is in heaven and you are on earth. Therefore let your words be few. ' The greater emphasis of being slow to speak is really about having reverence before our God and King. Can we picture standing before a king? Not only would you wait to be spoken to, but your words would be few and carefully measured. These instructions continue in warning us to avoid sin in this: Proverbs 10:19 ' When words are many, transgression is not lacking, but whoever restrains his lips is prudent. ' Proverbs 13:3 ' Whoever guards his mouth preserves his life; he who opens wide his lips comes to ruin. ' We must put a gate on our speech in the timing, thought, and volume of speech. We should not only be slow to speak, but we should be careful to avoid wordiness, and we should not allow any speech that is uttered carelessly to escape our lips. SLOW TO ANGER Moving along in the verse, James instructs “Let every person be slow to anger; for the anger of man does not produce the righteousness of God”. It is important to note here that not all anger is sinful. Paul wrote of this in Ephesians 4:26 “Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger”. So there is a clear distinction. There IS such a thing as “righteous anger”. But in contrast, the anger that is being referred to here is unrighteous anger. Righteous anger is anger over things that oppose God, like evil, idolatry, and sin. It is to be GRIEVED by these things. But in contrast, unrighteous anger is typically rooted in feeling an attack on our own pride. Let's remember once again that this letter has been primarily written to the Jewish Christians of that time. A lack of self-controlled disposition in the form of “religious zeal” was unfortunately a trait of some of these Christians, who carried this tradition perhaps from the zeal of the religious elite, the pharisees. This is what we call misplaced zeal. What is zeal? Zeal is a great energy or enthusiasm for things. And religious zeal, a passion and enthusiasm for God, is wonderful. But I believe what James is getting at here is a wrath of anger that is thinly cloaked as religious zeal. This type of anger gets disguised, and does not glorify God or produce righteousness. Instead, in its worst forms it can manifest in things like persecution, hypocrisy, and violence. James gives us warnings here that echo the primary focus of Jesus' teaching in the sermon on the mount when Jesus referred to sins of the heart and mind. I want us to remain here in this section together for a few minutes. Think to yourself, what is this anger we're referring to? Anger is an emotion, yes. Just like things like happiness, sadness, anxiety, it is something we can experience. But it is more than that. Unchecked, anger becomes a FRAMEWORK from which we are led further into sin. It is that “hook” that we learned about - an enticing lure into a mindset which only leads to brokenness, pain, or destruction. We see a great example of this in Genesis when Cain becomes angry with his brother Abel, and with God. Both brothers offer sacrifices. Abel's offering to the Lord was accepted but Cain's was not. And what happened? Let's read in Genesis 4: 'In the course of time Cain brought to the Lord an offering of the fruit of the ground, and Abel also brought of the firstborn of his flock and of their fat portions. And the Lord had regard for Abel and his offering, but for Cain and his offering he had no regard. So Cain was very angry, and his face fell. The Lord said to Cain, “Why are you angry, and why has your face fallen? If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is contrary to you, but you must rule over it.” ' Genesis 4:3-7 Sin crouches at the door. Like a lion in the grass, and you don't even see it, but its desire is to CONSUME you. JC RYLE was an Anglican Bishop in England, and prolific writer in the 1800's. He wrote - “Of all the feelings that man's heart experiences, there is none perhaps which so soon runs into sin as the feeling of anger. There is none which once excited seems less under control. There is none which leads on to so much evil. The length to which ill-temper, irritability, and passion, will carry even godly men, all must know. We may rest assured that there is no human feeling which needs so much cautious guarding as this. A sinless wrath is a very rare thing. The wrath of man is seldom for the glory of God.” Proverbs 14:29 says “Whoever is slow to anger has great understanding, but he who has a hasty temper exalts folly”. Later in chapter 16 we're told that control of our anger actually demonstrates great strength. Proverbs 16:32 “Whoever is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city.” How often have you seen anger used as a form of control? And yet we're being told here instead, that control of our anger is true strength. When we are quick to anger we are engaging in an act of worship. Yet it is not God we're worshiping, but the idols of comfort, riches, power, control, selfish desires, etc. Church, this is a universal problem. I stand here as a person who struggles with this, and I know you do too. How often have we justified various forms of anger? It was justified because it was true. But was it spoken in love? You see, anger begets more anger. But in Proverbs 15:1 -- “A soft word turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.” If this stings a bit, you're not alone. In Galatians 5 we see anger listed among many other sins including things you might imagine as “much worse”, such as idolatry, sorcery, or sexual immorality. This is an example of what it means to walk in the flesh. But instead, as the passage goes on to say, those who belong to Christ have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. And we instead would walk in the Spirit, experiencing the fruit of the spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. APPLICATION Church, we are called to be quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to anger. What are we talking about here? This is about allowing the Holy Spirit to replace OUR perspective with His. Our thoughts for HIS thoughts. Our understanding for HIS. So I want to pose a question to us today. What is the framework from which we think or think, speak, and act? In what do we trust? Is the framework simply our own thoughts? When we are quick to listen, slow to speak, and slow to anger, we are submitting ourselves to the thoughts of God and adopting a POSTURE of humility before Him. Proverbs 3:5-7 ' Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths. ELIJAH I want to begin to wrap up by summarizing part of the story of Elijah found in the book of 1 Kings in the OT. Elijah was a prophet who had boldly confronted the worship of idols in Israel, all sanctioned by the poor leadership of King Ahab and his sinister wife Jezebel. In 1 Kings 18: 21 “Elijah came near to all the people and said ‘how long will you go limping between two different opinions? If the Lord is God, follow Him; but if Baal, then follow him'. What proceeds is this ultimate fire sacrifice showdown, which is a great example of faith to us. Elijah proposes that both he and the prophets each set up a sacrifice to their respective god, and pray for an answer by fire. In short, the prophets of Baal hear no answer. And yet after dousing his own sacrifice with tons of water, the LORD answers Elijah and consumes the entire thing, even consuming all the rocks and water, the altar, and everything. These prophets of Baal are executed for their treachery, and Elijah goes up on the mountain to pray and ask the Lord to end the drought and famine, according to His promise. Elijah went up to the top of Mount Carmel to pray. And scripture tells us he bowed his head down and put his face between his knees. And he told his servant to look toward the sea. So he went up and looked, but said there was nothing. At that point, Elijah could have panicked, he could have doubted God, or could have been angry. But he waited. In his posture, he LISTENED. He sent the servant back seven times to look again, until the rain did in fact come. Elijah didn't trust in his own senses in that moment, but submitted to God's promise - even over the interpretation of the physical reality. This is about us taking ALL of our own thoughts, perspectives, desires, and the very fabric of our beings, our identities, and submitting them to the Lord, so that HE can reshape us in HIS image, sanctifying us, according to His love and His purposes. QUESTION & CLOSING As we close this morning, I want to pose the question to us all: have we instead been slow to listen, quick to speak, and quick to anger? Have you seen the destructive force of anger in your own speech, or have you been pierced by it? What do we do with our anger? Do we turn it on our families or friends? Do we turn it towards our enemies? Do we turn it towards ourselves in sin and shame? Do we turn it on God? We must remember that the Lord Jesus is our example in this kind of humility1 s our high example, demonstrating what this looks like through his life, ministry, persecution, crucifixion, death, burial, and resurrection. Submission of our listening/obedience, speech, and disposition to the Lord is what our God uses to bring us into an ever more complete reliance on Him. CLOSING PRAYER Lord, thank you for Your word and your wisdom. God, we ask that you would guide us and humble us, showing us how to be quick to listen and obey You, and teaching us to control our speech and our anger. And where we have used anger to wound, or we have been wounded, I pray that You would lead us to repentance, and bring restoration and healing. Help us to not walk in the flesh by our own power, but instead to walk in the Spirit. We thank you for your love and kindness, and we worship You. In Jesus' name, Amen.

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time
+1: The Secret to Being Miserable (#1325)

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 3:45


And Its Antidote (Found in Spit!)   In our last +1, we spent a little more time with Brian Cain and his wisdom on the fact that “depression is obsession with the past, anxiety is obsession about the future, and optimal performance is obsession about the present.”    All of which begged the question: What are YOU obsessed about these days?    And…   All of that led to my admonition to activate our Soul Force by getting our Energy to Heroic levels and Focusing it on What's Important NOW all day every day.    Today I want to revisit the topic and bring another peak performance guru to the party to share HIS wisdom on the subject.   We'll go old school and invite Dale Carnegie to join us.   As you almost certainly know, Carnegie wrote one of the all-time best-selling personal development books How to Win Friends and Influence People. He wrote that book in 1936. It's sold over 30 million copies. (Check out the Notes for more.)   What you may not know is that he wrote another great book called How to Stop Worrying and Start Living. That book was written in 1948. 6 million copies of that book have been sold as well. (Check out the Notes for more.)   In How to Stop Worrying and Start Living, Carnegie echoes Cainer's wisdom about focusing on the PRESENT to deal with any potential depression and anxiety.   He tells us: “George Bernard Shaw was right. He summed it all up when he said: ‘The secret of being miserable is to have the leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not.' So don't bother to think about it! Spit on your hands and get busy. Your blood will start circulating; your mind will start ticking—and pretty soon this whole positive upsurge of life in your body will drive worry from your mind. Get busy. Keep busy. It's the cheapest kind of medicine there is on this earth—and one of the best.”   There ya go.   Feeling stressed?   Perfect.   That's part of a good, noble life.    The moment you quit thinking you should be exonerated from the pain of uncertainty and the pain of hard work will be one of the most powerful, antifragile confidence-building moments of your life!   Now…   Spit on your hands and get busy doing your best at whatever is in front of you.   RIGHT. NOW.   Gremlins come back to the party a minute or three later?   Perfect.    Repeat.   Get back to work.   Focusing your Energy on What's Important Now.   Not once in a while and not only when you feel like it.   All day, every day.   Especially when?   TODAY.

Woman's Hour
Beth Mead, Female doctors and the menopause, Donna Patterson, Policing, Shonda Rhimes & Betsy Beers, Caroline and Rose Quentin

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 56:46


Beth Mead was Player of the Tournament at the Euro's earlier this year, and runner-up in the Ballon d'Or which decides the best player in the world. Beth plays for Arsenal in the Women's Super League, and has a new book out called Lioness: My Journey To Glory. After Donna Patterson's maternity leave, her employer Morrison's gave her a full-time role, despite her only working part time. She represented herself in a tribunal and she won a £60k pay-out for maternity discrimination. Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers are the producing partners behind some of the biggest American TV dramas of modern times – Grey's Anatomy, Scandal, How to Get Away with Murder, and Bridgerton. A report by the Police watchdog, His Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary - into eight forces in England and Wales, has warned that hundreds of police officers have been cleared to serve when they should have failed vetting procedures. Sir Peter Fahy, the Chief Constable of Greater Manchester Police from 2008 to 2015 gave his reaction. One in five female doctors say they have considered early retirement due to menopause symptoms. A new report warns that without better support there could be ‘an exodus' of female doctors from the NHS. Dame Jane Dacre, President of the Medical Protection Society, and Dr Nadira Awal, a GP who specialises in women's health discuss. Mother and daughter acting duo, Caroline and Rose Quentin are appearing in a new touring production of the George Bernard Shaw play, Mrs Warren's Profession. They discuss their relationship and their first experience of working together. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Dianne McGregor

Woman's Hour
Dame Sharon White - Chair of John Lewis, Beth Mead, Caroline and Rose Quentin

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 56:36


Dame Sharon White is the first ever female chair of John Lewis Partnership and was recently named the UK's most influential black person in the 2023 Powerlist. She became the chair of the John Lewis Partnership in January 2020 just as the Covid pandemic hit and is responsible for turning around the fortunes of John Lewis and Waitrose in what is widely seen as the most challenging time in the company's history. She joins Emma. The accolades just keep coming for Beth Mead, she won the Golden Boot - meaning she scored the most goals - and Player of the Tournament at the Euro's earlier this year, and last month she was runner-up in the Ballon d'Or which decides the best player in the world. Beth, who plays for Arsenal in the Women's Super League, has a new book out called Lioness: My Journey To Glory and joins Emma in the studio. Men Behaving Badly star Caroline Quentin is joined by her daughter Rose for a new touring production of the George Bernard Shaw play, Mrs Warren's Profession. They play Mrs Warren and her daughter Vivie, who suffers a crisis of conscience when she discovers that her comfortable life has been funded by her mother's work in the sex industry. Caroline and Rose join Emma to discuss their relationship and their first experience of working together.

The Big Talk with Tricia Brouk
What Makes a Great Eulogy

The Big Talk with Tricia Brouk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 18:43


What Makes a Great Eulogy: Giving a Eulogy That Truly Celebrates the Person You're Honoring In today's podcast, I read again from Lend Me Your Ears: Great Speeches in History by William Sapphire. And this is a very unique episode because the speeches I'm sharing are actually three eulogies.   While it may seem strange that I'm reading eulogies, the reality is that it's incredibly important if you ever have to give a eulogy that you have inspiration. Because when you think about what it means to stand up and honor someone who has passed, you want to do everything possible to get that moment right.   Also, when you are a speaker and thought leader, you are always acting as an influential voice, and making an impact with the words you share.   In this episode, we'll explore: George Bernard Shaw's salute to his friend Albert Einstein The words India's Prime Minister Nehru shared about Gandhi The eulogy I gave at my father's funeral What to do when or if you are called to speak about a loved one's life What makes a great eulogy More from Tricia  Consistently Share Your Big Idea with Secrets of The Big Talk Explore my content and follow me on YouTube Follow me on Instagram  Connect with me on Facebook  Connect with me on LinkedIn  Visit my website at TriciaBrouk.com   

Euripides, Eumenides
Comstockery

Euripides, Eumenides

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 64:07


Host Aaron Odom (@TridentTheatre) and Seattle Improviser and Actor Dan Posluns discuss censorship of two plays written by George Bernard Shaw, all stemming from the political efforts of Anthony Comstock, one of America's most prevalent enemies of vice.

The Assistant Principal Podcast
Five for Friday 17-21

The Assistant Principal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 14:32


 2022-10-21_68_Five for Friday Final Audio Hello colleagues and welcome to the Assistant Principal Podcast I'm your host, Frederick Busky. The goal of this podcast is to improve life and leadership for assistant principals. Today's episode of five for Friday recaps the strategic leadership emails for the week of October seventeenth through twenty first. With a caveat. Although we did indeed publish these emails this week, they are actually repeats from our list of greatest hits. This week as well as next week, I am in Kenya and so we just thought that this would be a fun way to kind of cover our bases, but also still continue to provide you some value while I'm away playing and learning and being in schools in Kenya. So I hope you enjoy this recap. The topic of Monday's message was leadership, isolation, and I hope you're subscribing to the daily list because one of my all time favorite photographs was included as part of this daily email and it is a black and white photo of somebody standing in a puddle with a box over their head. When I first saw this photo, it just made me think of the isolation and the loneliness that can come with leadership. I didn't really go into anything in the email that talked about how to break that, break that isolation down, but I just asked readers to come sit with that and think about their own feelings. Think about how you can take care of yourself. And break down some of that isolation. You see things and you say why, but I dream things that never were, and I say why not? That quotes from George Bernard Shaw in 1949 and the topic of Tuesday's email is vision. I thought this was a nice juxtaposition from Monday's email of a leader with a box over their head. I have to admit that I have a love hate relationship with vision. I used to believe very strongly and passionately that it was a leader's job to provide vision. And then I had a leader that came into my organization and completely trashed it. In my mind he trashed it and he had his own vision. And despite there being lots of people that had invested many years in the organization, he came in from the outside and just imposed his vision over everything. And that constituted a lot of destruction of programs and really damaging people. So I've become. Kind of very skeptical about the idea that leaders come in and impose a vision from outside. I think what we need to be focusing more on is the development of shared vision. And when we talk about visionary leadership, I think what we really should be talking about is the expectation that leaders can come in and create space for people to talk about their own dreams and goals and aspirations, and that leaders can facilitate a group of people sharing that and finding the commonality and developing a vision that is common to the participants. The people within the organization and that then the leader can really give voice to that and help keep people focused on that vision. Speaking of vision, Wednesday's email was about the difference between Mission, vision and goals, and I told the story of a trip that Pam and I took in the summer of 20. 21 So Pam is my wife, the other doctor Buskey. And in the summer of 2021 we jumped in an SUV and drove across country visiting all kinds of parks and things. And so I used that trip to talk about the mission, which the mission was to reconnect with family and friends and to have memorable experiences in nature. That's what we were going out to do. Vision is about the outcome resulting from enacting or fulfilling your mission. So our goal was to reconnect with family that were, excuse me, our mission was to reconnect with family and have memorable experiences. The vision was that we would drive home renewed in multiple ways, with a new set of memories and a great appreciation for our country, its people, and its beauty. Now, goals are the achievements that will help you fulfill your mission. So for our trip, some of our goals were backpack in the Badlands Backpacking Glacier Park, visit my friend Nat and Klamath Falls, spend time with my mom in San Francisco, and visit other family on the way home. Now, as it turned out, we did not meet all those goals. Yet we still achieved the mission and we still fulfilled our vision. So remember, the goals were places we would visit and things we would do. The mission was to reconnect with family and have memorable experiences, and the vision was that those experiences would leave us renewed and connected when we got home. So how could we achieve the mission and the vision if we didn't achieve the goals? Well, what happened was the summer of 2021 there was a massive heat wave across the northwest. And so some of the things that we wanted to do we just, we got cooked out of and so we had to change our plans. So we wound up not backpacking in the Badlands and we didn't backpack in Glacier Park. But that's OK, because one of the things that we sometimes do is we get so focused on goals that we forget why we have the goals, right? The goals are just kind of measurement steps on the way to achieving the mission and the vision. And there are a lot of times when the goals stop making sense for whatever reason. So when you're thinking about your organization and the mission and the vision and goals, yes, you want to attend to the goals, but don't get too focused on the goals. Always check and make sure that you're actually making progress on the mission. Because that's the most important thing. The title of Thursday's email was are you a force multiplier? And this email was inspired by something my good friend and colleague Doctor Robert Maddox sent me about the human touch and the human touch as being a force multiplier. The idea here is that connecting with people builds community, and that community creates strength, resilience and hope. So I offered three things that people could do. Each one of those would take less than three minutes and challenged readers to execute on one of these things to create connectivity and build community and thereby be a force multiplier because leaders are force multipliers. So the first thing was to me, call or email someone that you worked with this week and express gratitude. The second thing was to get together with another leader and identify a strategic behavior that you can implement next week. For example, engaging in five minute coaching and commit to being each other's accountability partners in executing that strategy. And the third one was a little bit selfish. I encouraged people to email me with an example of how something this week helped you to help someone else or a topic that you'd like me to write about in the future. And I do hope, if you are on the email list and you got this email on thursday, I hope you acted. I hope you took that opportunity to be intentional and to do something to reach out and create connectivity and build community with someone, whether that's me or somebody else. And if you're not on the email list and you're hearing this now on a Friday afternoon or maybe a Saturday. I encourage you to challenge yourself me call or email someone you worked with this week and just express gratitude. Work with another leader and think about a strategy that you could use next week to build community, build connection with people, and then hold each other accountable for doing it or. When you're done with this podcast, go ahead and email me and tell me something about this past week that you did to help someone else or send me a topic that you'd like me to write about. And finally, on Friday, we revisited the idea of m - V divided by E motivation equals value divided by effort. There was a graphic included in that you could print out and put up by your computer or on a wall somewhere. I just think M - V divided by E is so powerful. I won't elaborate on it hugely, but the idea is that increased value, decreased effort leads to increased motivation. And if we want people to be more motivated, what we can do is either increase value, decrease effort, or do both of those things. And I think where the power lies in this is that it gets us out of the judgment game. If we're trying to lead something or do something and people aren't following, people aren't doing what we want them to do. It's not about them being lazy or unmotivated or resistant. It's simply a mathematical formula. If people aren't doing what we want them to do, it's because that the given value or what they perceive as a value is not worth the perceived effort. And so we need to stop judging and start moving into problem solving mode and figure out how do we increase value? How do we decrease effort? So that's the week. I can't tell you that there's a single big takeaway. I think it's just really about being intentional and being mindful, checking in with yourself. Checking on that isolation, but then also checking in on other people and working to build community and connect to think about as a leader. How you're bringing people together and helping them articulate a vision and how you're expressing a shared vision and then got not getting too hung up on the goals. Yeah, their guideposts, but sometimes we need to go around them or go off in a different direction, direction. What's really important is the mission. Ok, this wraps up this week's five for Friday rendition of the Assistant Principal podcast. If you enjoyed today's show, please subscribe and rate this podcast. Rating the podcast really does help other people find it. I'm always trying to improve this show, so if you have feedback for me, please email at frederick buskey dot com. Or if you want to share something else, one of those stories about how you helped someone this past week or direction that you'd like me to write about that would be great. If you'd like to find out more about what I'm doing to support assistant principals, you can head over to my website at frederickhusky.com backslash the assistant. Principal i'm frederick busky. I hope you'll join me next time for the Assistant Principal podcast cheers. 

MusicLessons4Keyboard
Casio SA-76 Spooky Music in C Major

MusicLessons4Keyboard

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 1:06


Be inspired by great music composed by Lerner and Loewe this Halloween. Sheet music for this song is available at musicnotes.com. My Fair Lady is a musical based on George Bernard Shaw's 1913 play Pygmalion, with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. Note to music students: explore every avenue to master songs and stay motivated to learn new ones. Granted, it's the image, not this music that's spooky. Although, in some troubled relationships it may apply. Stay positive and keep practicing! Halloween's origins can be traced back to the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain, which was held on November 1 in contemporary calendars. It was believed that on that day, the souls of the dead returned to their homes, so people dressed in costumes and lit bonfires to ward off spirits.

Backstage Babble
Tovah Feldshuh

Backstage Babble

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 32:08


Today, I am so excited to announce my interview with  four-time Tony winner Tovah Feldshuh, who is currently starring opposite Lea Michele as Rosie Brice in Funny Girl on Broadway. Tune in to hear some of the stories of her legendary career, including what her research process was like for her current role, the classic sitcom that she turned down, the time she was compared to Elizabeth Taylor, why Lea Michele is perfect for “the most extraordinary female role in musical theater history,” the advice she got from Sam Levene, the irony of Rodgers & Hart, the great actress who officiated her wedding, the song that Comden and Green wrote for her, the George Bernard Shaw play she'd like to star in, and what the process was like of penning her successful memoir Lilyville. Plus, she shares her Tallulah Bankhead impression! You won't want to miss this fascinating and fun conversation with one of Broadway's brightest lights.

NonsenseAtWork
#275: It's Time To Become a Skeptic Again

NonsenseAtWork

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 1:00


Way back in 1933 George Bernard Shaw said that "If all the economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a conclusion." But apparently he was not the first person to use that expression. At least, according to people who research these types of quotes. The funny thing is that these people don't seem able to agree on who said what when. Another funny thing is that by the time I graduated as an economist, I was convinced that George Bernard Shaw had not used the word conclusion, but the word agreement. ("If all the economists were laid end to end, they would not reach agreement.") I had been exposed to conclusions aplenty. But agreements? Few. Which is why I find myself in an economy that is in a mild recession as it continues to grow. (Maybe you don't agree, because you've reached a different conclusion.)

Premiere the Play
And Then Galatea Laughed: A Very Modern Romance by Scott Carter Cooper

Premiere the Play

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 92:56


George Bernard Shaw is struggling to produce his new play, Pygmalion. With only one day before the first performance, Mrs. Patrick Campbell has just returned from an unannounced three-day holiday and Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree is struggling with the production. Meet the Artists: https://deanproductionstheatre.com/galatea-episode/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dptc/support

The insecurity project
Episode 257. Dreamers, lost testosterone and an echo chamber

The insecurity project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 32:22


This episode goes out to all the dreamers who are living in the tension of knowing what they truly desire, but not yet seeing the fulfilment of these dreams in their life. I know that feeling well. I often experience the suffering that comes from this kind of separation myself and have compiled a bunch of wisdom from the greats who've gone before us to help manage the disappointment of unrealised goals without this disappointment settling in your bones Wisdom from the likes of:Mark Manson, Jim Carey, Bill Bryson, Peter Drucker, Jesus and George Bernard Shaw. This episode also address how to know if your ambitions are delusional and the physical anguish experienced at finals time if your beloved footy team loses.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Mary Fisher - Whispers Of AIDS - One Of The Top 100 Speeches Of The 20th Century!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 34:48


I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us. I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast. Last episode we concluded our series on George Bernard Shaw, a man who believed art should be didactic. This week we explore another artist, Mary Fisher, who also has something important to say. Fisher advocates through her sculptures, quilts and textiles, but also through her speeches. She has authored six books, received honorary doctorates and has traveled around the world as a Special Representative of the United Nations. Fisher first emerged into the American national spotlight on August 19 in 1992 when she ascended to the podium in Houston, TX at the 1992 Republican National Convention. She spoke for ten minutes in the middle of the day long before the famous keynote politicians of the evening. She was not is a politician. She stood before the crowd of partisan delegates as the daughter of a wealthy and powerful fundraiser. She was an adviser to former president Ford, but that was not why she was there. She was there to announce that she, like Rock Hudson, Magic Johnson and Freddie Mercury and thousands of others was HIV positive. Her speech, “A Whisper of AIDS”, rocked not just the stunned onlookers from within the hall, but also the millions who watched the broadcast on TV. It has been ranked by Oxford Press as one of the 100 Best American Speeches of the 20th Century. Today we will read her remarkable speech, discuss the rhetorical situation in which is was delivered, and the impact Fisher has made on this important global issue. If you've listened to our discussions of other non-fiction pieces, you may have heard us reference Aristotle, the father of rhetoric in the West. He has informed speakers and writers for thousands of years, literally. According to Aristotle, all speakers must do three essential things do to be effective. First, we must establish our credibility. When anyone gets up to speak whether you realize it or not, you're going to ask yourself why should I believe what you have to say? Secondly, we must open the hearts of our listeners. They must not just hear words but be moved to act. Thirdly, we must create a line of reasoning that makes sense. Our reasons must connect with each other and add up to a conclusion that compels us to move forward in the direction provided by the speaker. These three elements constitute what many call the rhetorical triangle. It's easy to understand what to, much harder to pull it off. The Ancient Greeks called it ethos, pathos, logos, and the greatest practioners in the world have moved the human race, to do great things as well as to commit great atrocities just through words. Today, especially as we look at this extremely impactful speech, we need to discuss another ancient rhetorical concept. The term is “Kairos” or time. The Greeks used it not to mean the clock as in chronology but to mean timeliness, the timing of the speech - the concept of timeliness of something. Of course, we understand this all the time, how many times have you heard someone say, “I don't know if this is the right time to tell you…and then they drop a bombshell”. We intuitively know that sometimes the timing of something makes or breaks the argument. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

CISO Tradecraft
#96 - The 9 Cs of Cyber

CISO Tradecraft

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:33


Ahoy! and welcome to another episode of CISO Tradecraft -- the podcast that provides you with the information, knowledge, and wisdom to be a more effective cyber security leader.  My name is G. Mark Hardy, and today we're going to -- talk like a pirate.  ARRR As always, please follow us on LinkedIn, and make sure you subscribe so you can always get the latest updates. On today's episode we are going to talk about the 9 Cs of Cyber Security.  Note these are not the 9 Seas that you might find today, the 19th of September, which happens to be the 20th annual International Talk like a Pirate Day.  They are the nine words that begin with the letter C (but not the letter ARRR): Controls, Compliance, Continuity, Coverage, Complexity, Competency, Communication, Convenience, Consistency. Please note that this talk is inspired by an article by Mark Wojtasiak from Vectra, but we have modified the content to be more aligned with our thoughts at CISO Tradecraft. Now before we go into the 9 Cs, it's important to understand that the 9 Cs represent three equal groups of three.  Be sure to look at the show notes which will link to our CISO Tradecraft website that shows a 9-box picture which should make this easier to understand.  But if you're listening, imagine a three-by-three grid where each row corresponds to a different stakeholder.  Each stakeholder is going to be concerned with different things, and by identifying three important priorities for each, we have our grid.  Make sense?  Okay, let's dig in. The first row in our grid is the focus of Executive Leaders. First, this group of executives such as the CEO, CIO, and CISO ensure that the IT controls and objectives are working as desired.  Next, these executives want attestations and audits to ensure that compliance is being achieved and the organization is not just paying lip service to those requirements.  Thirdly, they also want business continuity.  IT systems must be constantly available despite attacks from ransomware, hardware failures, and power outages. The second row in our grid is the focus of Software Development shops. This group consists of Architects, Developers, Engineers, and Administrators.  First, they need to ensure they understand the Coverage of their IT systems in asset inventories -- can we account for all hardware and software.  Next, developers should be concerned with how Complexity in their environment can reduce security, as these tend to work at cross-purposes.  Lastly, developers care about Competency of their teams to build software correctly; that competency is a key predictor of the end quality of what is ultimately produced. The third and final row in our grid is the focus of Security Operations Centers. This group consists of Incident Handlers and Responders, Threat Intelligence Teams, and Business Information System Officers commonly known as BISOs.  They need to provide clear communication that informs others what they need to do, they need processes and tools that enable convenience so as to reduce friction.  Finally, they need to be consistent.  No one wants a fire department that only shows up 25% of the time. So now that we have a high-level overview of the 9 C's let's start going into detail on each one of them.  We'll start with the focus of executive leaders.  Again, that is controls, compliance, and continuity. Controls- According to James Hall's book on Accounting Information Systems[i], General Computer Controls are "specific activities performed by persons or systems designed to ensure that business objectives are met." Three common control frameworks that we see inside of organizations today are COBIT, COSO, and ITIL. COBIT®, which stands for The Control Objectives for Information Technology was built by the IT Governance Institute and the Information Systems Audit and Controls Organization, better known as ISACA®.  COBIT® is primarily focused on IT compliance, audit issues, and IT service, which should not be a surprise given its roots from ISACA® which is an Audit and Controls organization.  Overall, COBIT® 2019, the latest version, is based on the following six principles[ii] (note that the prior version, COBIT® 5[iii], had five): Provide stakeholder value Holistic approach Dynamic governance system Governance distinct from management Tailored to enterprise needs End-to-end governance system COSO  stands for The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.  Their latest version is the 2017 Enterprise Risk Management - Integrated Framework, which is designed to address "enterprise risk management and the need for organizations to improve their approach to managing risk to meet the demands of an evolving business environment.[iv]"  COSO states that internal controls are a PROCESS, effected by leadership, to provide reasonable assurance with respect to effectiveness, reliability, and compliance[v].  The framework consists of five interrelated principles[vi]: Governance and culture Strategy and objective-setting Performance Review and revision, and Information, communication, and reporting To support these principles, COSO defines internal controls as consisting of five interrelated components: Control environments, Risk Assessments, Control Activities, Information and Communication, and Monitoring Activities. The third framework is ITIL®, which stands for Information Technology Infrastructure Library. First published in 1989 (the latest update is 2019/2020), ITIL® is managed and maintained by AXELOS, a joint venture between the Government of the United Kingdom and PeopleCert, which acquired AXELOS in 2021. According to their website[vii], "ITIL 4 is an adaptable framework for managing services within the digital era.  Through our best practice modules, ITIL 4 helps to optimize digital technologies to co-create value with consumers, drive business strategy, and embrace digital transformation." (Talk about buzzword compliance).  ITIL® 4 focuses on process and service management through service strategy, service design, service transition, service operation, and continual service improvement.  What is interesting is that there is no third-party assessment of ITIL® compliance in an organization, only individual certification. At the end of the day an organization needs to pick one of these popular control frameworks and show controls are being followed.  This isn't just a best practice; it's also required by Sarbanes Oxley.  SOX has two sections that require control attestations that impact cyber.  Section 302 requires corporate management, executives, and financial officers to perform quarterly assessments which: Evaluate the effectiveness of disclosure controls, Evaluate changes in internal controls over financial reporting, Disclose all known control deficiencies and weaknesses, and Disclose acts of fraud. Since financial services run on IT applications, cybersecurity is generally in scope for showing weaknesses and deficiencies.  SOX Section 404 requires an annual assessment by both management and independent auditors.  This requires organizations to: Evaluate design and operating effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting, Disclose all known controls and significant deficiencies, and disclose acts of fraud. Once we understand the requirements for controls, we need to be Compliant. Compliance is the second C we are discussing today.  Remember the CFO and CEO need to produce annual and quarterly reports to regulators such as the SEC.  So, if you as a CISO can help them obtain a clean bill of health or fix previous audit findings, you help the business. A useful tool to consult in terms of compliance is a concept from the Institute of Internal Auditors known as the three lines model or three lines of defense[viii].  This model has as a foundation six principles: Governance Governing body roles Management and first- and second-line roles Third line roles Third line independence, and Creating and protecting value The first line of defense is the business and process owners who maintain internal controls.  You can think of a software developer who should write secure software because there is an IT Control that says so.  That developer is expected to run application security scans and vulnerability scans to find bugs in their code.  They are also expected to fix these issues before releasing to production.  The second line of defense are elements of an organization that focus on risk management and compliance.  Your cyber team is a perfect example of this.  If the developer doesn't fix the application vulnerabilities before sending code to production, then the company is at risk.  Cyber teams generally track and report vulnerability findings to the business units to ensure better compliance with IT controls. Finally, the third line of defense is internal audit.  Internal audit might assess an IT control on secure software development and say we have an issue.  The developers push out bad code with vulnerabilities.  Cyber tells the developers to fix, yet we are observing trends that the total vulnerabilities are only increasing.  This systemic risk is problematic, and we recommend management comply with the IT controls by making immediate fixes to this risky situation. Now, other than the observation that the ultimate line of defense (internal auditors) is defined by the Institute of Internal Auditors (no conflict of interest there), note that internal auditors can report directly to the board.  Developers and CISOs typically cannot.  One of the most powerful weapons in an auditor's toolbox is the "finding."  The U.S. Code defines what represents a finding[ix] in the context of federal awards, to include: Significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in internal control and significant instances of abuse Material noncompliance with the provisions of Federal statutes or regulations Known questioned costs, specifically identified by the auditor, greater than $25,000 for a type of compliance requirement Internal auditors have both a mandate from and access to the board to ensure that the organization meets compliance requirements.  So, if you've been unsuccessful in getting funding for what you consider a critical security asset, maybe, just maybe, you casually point that out to the auditors so that it ends up in a finding.  After all, findings get funded.  Don't get caught, though, or you'll have some explaining to do to your boss who previously turned you down. Management cares a lot about Continuity. Remember, if the business is down, then it's not making money, and it's probably losing money by the hour.  If the business isn't making money, then they can't pay for the cyber department.  So, among your goals as a cyber executive is to ensure the continuity of revenue-generation services.  To start, you must identify what those activities are and find ways to protect the services by reducing the likelihood of vulnerabilities found in those systems.  You also need to ensure regular backup activities are occurring, disaster recovery exercises are performed, Business Continuity Plans are tested, and tabletops are executed.  Each of these activities has the potential to identify gaps which cause harm to the continuity that executives care about. How do you identify revenue-generating elements of the business?  Ask.  But do your homework first.  If you're a publicly traded company, the annual report will often break out lines of business showing profit and loss for each.  Even if it's losing money today, it still may be vital to the organization.  Think, ahem, about your department -- you're probably not making a profit for the company in the security suite, but your services are definitely important.  Look at the IT systems that support each line of business and assess their criticality to the success of that business component.  In today's digitized workplace, the answer will almost always be "yes," but since you don't have unlimited resources, you need to rack and stack what has to be protected first.  A Business Impact Analysis, or BIA, involves meeting with key executives throughout the organization, assessing the importance and value of IT-supported business processes, ranking them in the order in which they need to be assured, and then acting on that knowledge.  [I thought we had done an episode on BIA, but I checked back and couldn't find one.  So, expect to learn more about that in a future episode.] Backups and disaster recovery exercises are a must in today's world of ransomware and surprise risks, but make sure that you're not just hand-waving and assuming that what you think is working really is working.  Do what I call "core sampling" -- get with your team and dig way down until you reach some individual file from a particular date or can observe all logs collected for some arbitrary 5-minute period.  It's not that that information is critical in and of itself, but your team's ability to get to that information quickly and accurately should increase your confidence that they could do the same thing when a true outage occurs. Lastly, tabletop exercises are a great way to ensure that your team (as well as others from around the organization, up to and including senior leadership) know what to do when certain circumstances occur.  The advantage of tabletops is that they don't require much time and effort from the participants to go through emergency response procedures.  The disadvantage of tabletops is that you risk groupthink when everyone thinks someone else took care of that "assumed" item.  Companies have been caught flat-footed when the emergency diesel generator doesn't kick in because no one in the tabletop tests ever thought to check it for fuel, and the tank was empty.  Things change, and there's nothing like a full-scale test where people have to physically go to or do the things they would in a true emergency.  That's a reason why kids in school don't discuss what to do in a fire drill, they actually do what needs to be done -- get out of the building.  Be careful here you don't have a paper tiger for a continuity plan -- it's too late when things start to come apart to realize you hadn't truly done your homework. Those are the three Cs for executives -- controls, compliance, and continuity.  Now let's move on to developers. If you remember, the three Cs for developers are coverage, complexity, and competency. Developers need to care about Coverage. When we talk about coverage, we want to ensure that we know everything that is in our environment.  That includes having a complete and up-to-date asset inventory, knowing our processes are free from security oversight, as well as ensuring that our security controls are deployed across all of our potential attack surfaces.  "We've got your covered" is usually considered reassuring -- it's a statement that someone has thought of what needs to be protected. Specifically, our technical team members are the only ones who can generally tell if the IT asset inventory is correct.  They are the ones who run the tools, update the agents (assuming we're not agentless), and push the reporting.  If the scanning tools we use are missing hardware or software, then those gaps represent potential landing zones for enemy forces.  The Center for Internet Security's Critical Controls start with these two imperatives.  Essentially, if you don't know what you have, how can you secure it? Knowing our processes is key.  For developers today, it's much more likely that they're using a DevOps continuous integration / continuous delivery, or CI/CD process, rather than the classic waterfall methodology.  Agile is often an important part of what we do, and that continuous feedback loop between developer and customer helps to ensure that we cover requirements correctly (while being careful to avoid scope creep.)  Throughout our development cycle, there are numerous places where security belongs -- the art we call DevSecOps.  By putting all of our security processes into version control -- essentially automating the work and moving away from paper-based processes, we create a toolchain that automates our security functionality from pre-commit to commit to acceptance to production to operations.  Doing this right ensures that security in our development environment is covered. Beyond just the development pipeline, we need to cover our production environment.  Now that we've identified all hardware and software and secured our development pipeline, we need to ensure that our security tools are deployed effectively throughout the enterprise to provide protective coverage.  We may know how many servers we have, but if we don't scan continuously to ensure that the defenses are running and up to date, we are effectively outsourcing that work to bad actors, who fundamentally charge higher billing rates than developers when they take down critical systems via ransomware. In his book Data and Goliath, Bruce Schnier wrote, "Complexity is the worst enemy of security, and our systems are getting more complex all the time.[x]" Complexity is inversely correlated to security. If there are two hundred settings that you need to configure properly to make containers secure, that's a big deal.  It becomes a bigger deal when the team only understands how to apply 150 of those settings.  Essentially, your company is left with fifty opportunities for misconfiguration to be abused by bad actors.  Therefore, when possible, focus your understanding on how to minimize complexity.  For example, instead of running your own containers on premises with Kubernetes, try using Amazon Elastic Container Services.  There's a significant amount of configuration complexity decrease.  In addition, using cloud-based services give us a lot of capabilities -- elastic scaling, load balancers, multiple regions and availability zones, and even resistance to DDoS attacks.  That's a lot of overhead to ensure in a high-availability application running on servers in your data center.  Consider using AWS lambda where all of that is already handled as a service for our company.  Remember that complexity makes security more difficult and generally increases the costs of maintenance.  So only increase complexity when the business benefit exceeds the costs. From a business connectivity perspective, consider the complexity of relationships.  Many years ago, data centers were self-contained with 3270 green screens (or punched card readers if you go back far enough) as input and fan-fold line printer generated paper as output.  Essentially, the only connection that mattered was reliable electrical power. Today, we have to be aware of what's going on in our industry, our customers, our suppliers, consumers, service providers, and if we have them, joint ventures or partners.[xi]  This complex web of competing demands stretches our existing strategies, and sometimes rends holes in our coverage.  I would add to that awareness, complexity in our workforce.  How did COVID-19 affect your coverage of endpoints, for example?  Most work-from-home arrangements lost the benefit of the protection of the enterprise security bubble, with firewalls, scanners, and closely-manage endpoints.  Just issuing a VPN credential to a developer working from home doesn't do much when junior sits down at mom's computer to play some online game and downloads who-knows-what.  Consider standardizing your endpoints for manageability -- remove the complexity.  When I was in the Navy, we had exactly two endpoint configurations from which to choose, even though the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet, or NMCI, was the largest intranet in the world at the time.  Although frustrating when you have to explain to the admiral why his staff can't get fancier computers, the offsetting benefit is that when an emergency patch has to get pushed, you know it's going to "take" everywhere. Number six is Competency -- another crucial skill for developers. If your organization doesn't have competent developers, then more vulnerabilities are going to emerge.  So how do most other industries show competencies?  They use a licensure and certification process.  For example, teenagers in the United States must obtain a driver's license before they are legally approved to drive on their own.  Nearly all of us have been through the process -- get a manual when you get a learner's permit, go to a driving school to learn the basics, practice with your terrified parents, and after you reach the minimum age, try not to terrify the DMV employee in the passenger seat.  In the UK, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency recommends a minimum of 47 hours of lessons before taking the driving test, which still has only a 52% pass rate on the first attempt[xii]. Now ask yourself, is developing and deploying apps riskier than driving a car?  If so, consider creating a Developer Driver's License exam that identifies when developers are competent before your company gives them the SSH keys to your servers.  Before your new developer sits for the exam you also need to provide the training that identifies the Rules of the Road.  For example, ask: When a new application is purchased, what processes should be followed? When are third party vendor assessments needed?  How does one document applications into asset inventory systems and Configuration Management Databases? If you can build the Driver's Education Training equivalent for developer and measure competency via an exam, you can reduce the risk that comes from bad development and create a sense of accomplishment among your team. So, to summarize so far, for executives we have controls, compliance, and continuity, and for developers we have coverage, complexity, and competency.  It's now time to move to the last three for our security operations center:  clarity, context, and community. The seventh C is Communication. Let's learn from a couple quotes on effective communication. Peter Drucker said, “The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn't said.”  When you share an idea do you look at the person you are informing to see if they understand the idea?  What body language are you seeing?  Are they bored and not facing you, are they engaged and leaning in and paying close attention, or are they closed off with arms crossed?  We've probably all heard the term "active listening."  If you want to ensure the other party understands what you're saying (or if you're trying to show them you understand what they are saying), ask the listener to repeat back in their own words what the speaker has just said.  You'd be amazed how few people are needed to play the game of "telegraph" and distort a message to the point it is no longer recognizable. George Bernard Shaw said, “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”  When you present a technical topic on a new risk to executives, ask questions to ensure they understand what you just shared.  If you don't do so, how do you know when you might be overwhelming them with information that goes right over their heads.  There's always the danger that someone will not want to look stupid and will just nod along like a bobblehead pretending to understand something about which they have absolutely no clue.  Richard Feynman had said, "If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself."  Well, let me offer G Mark's corollary to that quote:  "If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you can't explain it to your board."  And sometimes the big boss.  And sometimes your manager.  And sometimes your co-worker.  Ask for feedback; make sure the message is understood. Earl Wilson said, “Science may never come up with a better office communication system than the coffee break.”  When you want to launch a really important initiative that needs group buy-in, did you first have one-on-ones to solicit feedback?  Did you have an ear at the water cooler to understand when people say yes but really mean no?  Do you know how to connect with people so you can ask for a favor when you really don't have the resources necessary to make something happen?  Unless you are in the military, you can't issue lawful orders to your subordinates and demand that they carry them out.  You have to structure your communication in such a way that expectations are made clear, but also have to allow for some push-back, depending on the maturity of the relationship you've developed with your team.  [War story:  Just this past week, Apple upgraded to iOS 16.  We use iPhones exclusively as corporate-issued handsets, so I sent a single sentence message to my senior IT team member:  "Please prepare and send an email to all who have an iPhone with steps on how to update the OS soonest.  Thank you."  To me, that seemed like clear communication.  The next day I get a response, "People are slowly updating to 16.0 on their own and as the phone prompts them."  After a second request where I point out "slowly" has not been our strategy for responding to exploitable security vulnerabilities, I get a long explanation of how Apple upgrades work, how he's never been questioned in his long career -- essentially the person spent five times as much time explaining why he will NOT do the task rather than just doing it.  And today 80% of the devices are still not updated.  At times like this I'm reminded of Strother Martin in Cool Hand Luke:  "What we have here is failure to communicate."  So, my lesson for everyone is even though you think your communications are crystal clear, they may not be perceived as such.] Our last quote is from Walt Disney who said, “Of all our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language.”  If you believe that pictures are more effective than words, think about how you can create the best pictures in your emails and slide decks to communicate effectively.  I remember a British officer who had visited the Pentagon years ago who commented, "PowerPoint is the language of the US military."  I think he's right, at least in that context.  Ask yourself, are pictures part of your language? Convenience is our eighth C that we are going to talk about. How do we make something convenient?  We do it by automating the routine and removing the time wasters.  In terms of a SOC, we see technology in this space emerging with the use of Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response, or SOAR technologies.  Convenience can come in a lot of ways.  Have we created helpful playbooks that identify a process to follow?  If so, we can save time during a crisis when we don't have a minute to spare.  Have we created simple processes that work via forms versus emails?  It's a lot easier to track how many forms have been submitted and filter on field data versus aggregating unstructured emails.  One thing you might consider as a way to improve convenience are Chatbots.  What if someone could ask a Chatbot a Frequently Asked Question and get a quick, automated, and accurate response?  That convenience helps people, and it saves the SOC time.  If you go that route, as new questions get asked, do you have a way to rank them by frequency and add them as new logic to the chatbot?  If you do, your chatbot gets more useful and provides even greater convenience to the workforce.  How great would it be to hear your colleagues saying it was so convenient to report an incident and see that it was handled in such a timely manner.  Find ways to build that experience and you will become the partner the business wants. Last, but not least, is the 9th C of Consistency. Want to know how to create an audit finding?  Try not being consistent.  Auditors hate that and love to point out inconsistencies in systems.  I'm sure there are auditors right now listening to this podcast smiling with joy saying, "yup, that's me."  Want to know how to pass every audit standard?  Try passing the CARE Standard for cyber security.  CARE is a Gartner acronym that means Consistent, Adequate, Reasonable and Effective.  Auditors look at the Consistency of controls by performing tests to determine if the control is working the same way over time across the organization.  Auditors also look for Adequacy to determine if you have satisfactory controls in line with business needs.  Auditors ensure that your practices are Reasonable by identifying if there exist appropriate, fair, and moderate controls.  Finally, auditors look at Effectiveness to ensure the controls are producing the desired or intended outcomes.  So, in a nutshell, show Auditors that you CARE about cyber security. Okay, let's review.  Our nine Cs are for executives, developers, and SOC teams.  Executives should master controls, compliance, and continuity; developers should master coverage, complexity, and competency; and SOC teams should focus on clarity, communications, and consistency.  If you paid careful attention, I think you would find lessons for security leaders in all nine boxes across the model.  Essentially, don't conclude because boxes four through nine are not for executives that you don't need to master them -- all of this is important to being successful in your security leadership career. Well thanks again for listening to the CISO Tradecraft podcast as we discussed the 9 C's.  And for International Talk Like a Pirate Day, I do have a rrr-request:  if you like our show, please take a few seconds to rate us five stars on your favorite podcast provider.  Another CISO pointed out to me this past week that we came up first on Spotify when searching for C-I-S-O, and that's because those rankings are crowd-sourced.  It's a great way to say thank you for the time and effort we put into our show, and I thank you in advance.  This is your host G. Marrrrk Hardy, and please remember to stay safe out there as you continually practice your CISO Trrrradecraft. References https://www.vectra.ai/blogpost/the-9-cs-of-cybersecurity-value https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_technology_controls https://www.isaca.org/resources/cobit https://www.apexgloballearning.com/cobit-vs-itil-governance-framework-company-choose-infographic/ https://www.slideshare.net/alfid/it-control-objectives-framework-a-relationship-between-coso-cobit-and-itil https://internalaudit.olemiss.edu/the-three-lines-of-defense/ https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/15-quotes-effective-communication-jim-dent-lssbb-dtm/ https://www.gartner.com/en/articles/4-metrics-that-prove-your-cybersecurity-program-works?utm_medium=socialandutm_source=facebookandutm_campaign=SM_GB_YOY_GTR_SOC_SF1_SM-SWGandutm_content=andsf249612431=1andfbclid=IwAR1dnx-9BqaO8ahzs1HHcO2KAVWzYmY6FH-PmNoh1P4r0689unQuJ4CeQNk   [i] Hall, James A. (1996).  Accounting Information Systems.  Cengage Learning, 754 [ii] https://www.isaca.org/resources/news-and-trends/industry-news/2020/cobit-2019-and-cobit-5-comparison [iii] https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/cobit [iv] https://www.coso.org/SitePages/Enterprise-Risk-Management-Integrating-with-Strategy-and-Performance-2017.aspx [v] https://www.marquette.edu/riskunit/internalaudit/coso_model.shtml [vi] https://www.coso.org/Shared%20Documents/2017-COSO-ERM-Integrating-with-Strategy-and-Performance-Executive-Summary.pdf [vii] https://www.axelos.com/certifications/itil-service-management/what-is-itil [viii] https://www.theiia.org/globalassets/site/about-us/advocacy/three-lines-model-updated.pdf [ix] https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/2/200.516 [x] https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/7441842-complexity-is-the-worst-enemy-of-security-and-our-systems [xi] https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/issues/reinventing-the-future/take-on-tomorrow/simplifying-cybersecurity.html [xii] https://www.moneyshake.com/shaking-news/car-how-tos/how-to-pass-your-uk-driving-test

I Love This, You Should Too
175 My Fair Lady (1964)

I Love This, You Should Too

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 78:02


Our feature this week is the Audrey Hepburn & Rex Harrison classic musical My Fair Lady. We talk dubbing controversies, feminism, Henry Higgins being a dick, employment opportunities, ambiguous endings, new wave music videos, bigfoot, Spooktember, and more! #FlowerShopForEliza We don't actually talk about bigfoot, but I don't think anyone reads these. Corrections: Audrey Hepburn did do another musical Indy loved: Funny Face!   My Fair Lady is a 1964 American musical drama film adapted from the 1956 Lerner and Loewe stage musical based on George Bernard Shaw's 1913 stage play Pygmalion. With a screenplay by Alan Jay Lerner and directed by George Cukor, the film depicts a poor Cockney flower-seller named Eliza Doolittle who overhears an arrogant phonetics professor, Henry Higgins, as he casually wagers that he could teach her to speak "proper" English, thereby making her presentable in the high society of Edwardian London. The film stars Audrey Hepburn as Eliza Doolittle and Rex Harrison as Henry Higgins, with Stanley Holloway, Gladys Cooper and Wilfrid Hyde-White in supporting roles. A critical and commercial success, it became the second highest-grossing film of 1964 and won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor, and Best Director.[4] In 1998, the American Film Institute named it the 91st greatest American film of all time. In 2006 it was ranked eighth in the AFI's Greatest Movie Musicals list. My Fair Lady Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJBM6qs22sE&ab_channel=ParamountMovies   Rex Harrison Wins Best Actor: 1965 Oscars: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aL5W0dxoQY&ab_channel=Oscars

How To Love Lit Podcast
George Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion - Episode 3 - The Ending - It's A Breakup Not A Wedding!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 38:05


Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us. And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This episode we are wrapping up our three-part series on George Bernard Shaw otherwise known as GBS and his phenomenally successful play, Pygmalion. In week 1, we introduced Shaw, some of his political ideologies, the Greek myth Pygmalion from where Shaw took his inspiration, as well as ACT 1. Last week, we discussed Acts 2 and 3. We talked about Rosenthal's revolutionary psychological discovery named the Pygmalion Effect. We spoke to the symbolism of language, of clothes, of the gramophone, and mirrors. We highlighted the parallels between Alfred Doolittle and Professor Higgins. We allowed Shaw to preach at us as he humorously characterized the “undeserving poor”, and “middle class morality”, all Shavian terms, and finally we got to Eliza, the flower girl transformed into a duchess crashing through that point of no return otherwise known as the climax. She fools all of good society into thinking she's genteel getting away with declaring that it was “not bloody likely” she'd be walking home but would be taking a taxi. And of course, all of this is very didactic, a word he uses to mean moralizing, but it's also very very funny. We smile when Alfred Doolittle justifies begging for money to buy liquor by claiming that it couldn't possibly ruin him. It would all be gone by the end of the weekend. He further claims (and of course this is Shaw's voice moral judgement toward us theater attenders) that anyone would be as immoral as he, if we were also the undeserving poor. He's simply too poor to afford morals; morals are luxuries of the middle class. Shaw's wit is on full display when he's sermonizing which brings us to the final two acts of the play. Of course, they sermonize the most, but also are arguably the most entertaining for the same reason. We referenced the end of the play and that Shaw would never have endorsed the thematic license My Fair Lady took with the ending, but today we will make Shaw's case for him as to why. For a good long time, I was with the rest of the world and was highly irritated at Shaw's anti-climatic ending. Having said that, after reading his sequel, hearing his commentary, and understanding better Shaw's purposes for having it end the way it does, I now completely agree with Shaw, there is no other way to end the play but for Higgins and Eliza to part ways. Well, there went that, I hope it's okay we're going spoil the ending at this point. Well, let me put it this way, if you've watched My Fair Lady, or Pygmalion, you may think that Shaw think that Shaw spoiled his own ending because there is not a happily ever after ending to this romantic comedy. People feel deceived when they get to the end because romantic comedies are not supposed to end in angst but especially one with the word romance in the title. We haven't brough it out yet, but there is a subtitle to this play, and many have claimed Shaw has misled us with what he's attempting to do in the play through the subtitle. The full title of the play is Pygmalion, a Romance in Five Acts. He labels it a romantic comedy, and most people reading that reasonably assume certain characteristics that are usual to comedies, at least classically modeled ones. For one, there should be a wedding at the end, and secondly, the lead man should end up with the lead woman, a love story gone right. Everyone knows, comedies end in marriage; tragedies end in death. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

This Poor Pastor's Podcast
Episode 107 - A Failure of Communication - Part 1

This Poor Pastor's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 30:10


George Bernard Shaw said (maybe) "The biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has actually taken place." Ouch! Often we blame the listener for our communication problems, but it is just as often the speaker. How can we do a better job at avoiding communication failure? Well, in this episode I will give you three things that will help immediately. Seriously, they will make you more effective today! Try it! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thispoorpastor/support

Arts & Ideas
Immortality

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 44:54


Karel Čapek's 1922 play The Makropulos Affair about a famous singer who has lived for over 300 years was adapted into an opera by the composer Leoš Janáček and premiered in 1926. George Bernard Shaw's play Back to Methuselah, which premiered in 1922, also looks at human destiny and ideas about long life. As Welsh National Opera's new touring production of The Makropulos Affair opens in Cardiff, Matthew Sweet and guests New Generation Thinker Sarah Dillon, classicist Charlotte Higgins and philosopher Rebecca Roache explore the quest for endless youth in literature, film and myth and discussions of the idea by philosophers including Bernard Williams. The Makropulos Affair opens at the Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff on Friday 16th September for three performances and then goes on tour to Llandudno, Plymouth, Birmingham, Southampton and Oxford. Professor Sarah Dillon is working on a student guide How to Study the Contemporary and researching a literary history of AI. Her books include Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning and she is on the editorial boards of C21: Journal of Twenty-First Century Writing and Fantastika. Charlotte Higgins' books include Greek Myths: A New Retelling and Red Thread: On Mazes and Labrynths Producer: Torquil MacLeod The Free Thinking programme website has a playlist called Free Thinking the Future which includes discussions about AI, robots and an interview with Ray Kurzweil https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03zwn4d

London Walks
Today (September 17) in London History – St Paul’s Covent Garden & Pygmalion

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 18:47


Life Talk with Craig Lounsbrough
Being a Lamp That's Lit - Part Two

Life Talk with Craig Lounsbrough

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 22:57


Being a Lamp That's Lit So let's begin at the beginning and ask the first question that needs to be asked . . . are you a lamp that's lit?  Matthew chapter 5 talks about being a light, but we might want to first ask the fundamental question, am I a lamp that's lit in the first place? How many of us are lit and ablaze?  We're all lamps . . .  every one of us.  But how many of us are lit and burning and casting light, because it's one thing to be a lamp, and it's quite another thing to be lit.  If you walk through life being a lamp that's not lit, you will live a diminished life and you will add to the diminishment of those around you.  And that is tragic. The Irish play-write, George Bernard Shaw was interviewed by a reporter who asked him, “Mr. Shaw, if you could live your life over and be anybody you've known, any person from history, who would you be?”  Listen carefully to what he said.  George Bernard Shaw said this.  He replied, “I would choose to be the man George Bernard Shaw could have been, but never was.”  Will that be your commentary on your life?  When the end comes and the years are dwindling, will you say, I would choose to be the man I could have been, but never was? George Bernard Shaw was a lamp that, by his own admission, was never lit. “Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.”  You . . . all of you . . .  all of us are lamps.  And the question that I have for you is “are you lit?   Additional Resources Discover an array of additional resources on our website at www.craiglpc.com.  Find all of Craig's thoughtful, timely, and inspirational books at Amazon. com, Barnes and Noble, or wherever books are sold.  Also, take a moment to explore Craig's Public Speaking Resources for information regarding the resources available to your business, ministry, or organization.

Savvy Radio Show
#703 12 Power Principles for Success -Bob Proctor-

Savvy Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 32:25


1. Risk must be taken 2. Suffering 3. Only a person who risks is free 4. Risk is not gambling 5. Core beliefs 6.Tit for tat 7. Big trees grow from small seeds 8. Failing will never make you a failure unless you quit 9.  Success is not reaching the goal. Success is moving toward goal 10. Rainy day. 11. Inner slavery 12. Great resistance 13. Take real risks 14. Higher respect 15. At this point 16. George Bernard Shaw 17.  Earl Nightingale 18. Visualize 19. More important than IQ 20. Helen Keller Do you have any ideas/questions? Share some feedback go to www.savvypodcast.com

How To Love Lit Podcast
George Bernard Shaw - Pygmalion - Episode 2 - The Pygmalion Effect And The Many Effects Of Pygmalion!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 38:17


Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Classic Audiobook Collection
The Perfect Wagnerite by George Bernard Shaw ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 329:45


The Perfect Wagnerite by George Bernard Shaw audiobook. The Perfect Wagnerite: A Commentary on the Niblung's Ring (originally published London, 1898) is a philosophical commentary on Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, by the Irish writer George Bernard Shaw. Shaw offered it to those enthusiastic admirers of Wagner who "were unable to follow his ideas, and do not in the least understand the dilemma of Wotan." He interprets the Ring in Marxian terms as an allegory of the collapse of capitalism from its internal contradictions. Musicologically, his interpretation is noteworthy for its perception of the change in aesthetic direction beginning with the final scene of Siegfried, in which he claimed that the cycle turns from Musikdrama back towards opera.

Life Talk with Craig Lounsbrough
Being a Lamp That's Lit - Part One

Life Talk with Craig Lounsbrough

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 16:53


Being a Lamp That's Lit So let's begin at the beginning and ask the first question that needs to be asked . . . are you a lamp that's lit?  Matthew chapter 5 talks about being a light, but we might want to first ask the fundamental question, am I a lamp that's lit in the first place? How many of us are lit and ablaze?  We're all lamps . . .  every one of us.  But how many of us are lit and burning and casting light, because it's one thing to be a lamp, and it's quite another thing to be lit.  If you walk through life being a lamp that's not lit, you will live a diminished life and you will add to the diminishment of those around you.  And that is tragic. The Irish play-write, George Bernard Shaw was interviewed by a reporter who asked him, “Mr. Shaw, if you could live your life over and be anybody you've known, any person from history, who would you be?”  Listen carefully to what he said.  George Bernard Shaw said this.  He replied, “I would choose to be the man George Bernard Shaw could have been, but never was.”  Will that be your commentary on your life?  When the end comes and the years are dwindling, will you say, I would choose to be the man I could have been, but never was? George Bernard Shaw was a lamp that, by his own admission, was never lit. “Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl.”  You . . . all of you . . .  all of us are lamps.  And the question that I have for you is “are you lit?   Additional Resources Discover an array of additional resources on our website at www.craiglpc.com.  Find all of Craig's thoughtful, timely, and inspirational books at Amazon. com, Barnes and Noble, or wherever books are sold.  Also, take a moment to explore Craig's Public Speaking Resources for information regarding the resources available to your business, ministry, or organization.

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas
George Bernard Shaw shares some DAILY FIRE

Daily Fire with John Lee Dumas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 1:17


Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time. ~George Bernard Shaw Check out John Lee Dumas' award winning Podcast Entrepreneurs on Fire on your favorite podcast directory. For world class free courses and resources to help you on your Entrepreneurial journey visit EOFire.com

The History of Literature
439 Poets' Guide to Economics (with John Ramsden)

The History of Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 47:19


Sure, we know poets are experts in subjects like love, death, nightingales, and moonlight. But what about money? Isn't that a little...beneath them? (Or at least out of their area of expertise?) In this episode, Jacke talks to author John Ramsden (The Poets' Guide to Economics) about the contributions made by eleven poets to the field of economics. What did men like Defoe, Swift, Shelley, Coleridge, Sir Walter Scott, de Quincey, Ruskin, William Morris, George Bernard Shaw, Hilaire, Belloc, and Ezra Pound get right? Where did they go wrong? Additional listening suggestions: 165 Ezra Pound Jonathan Swift 82 Robinson Crusoe Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Touche Podcast
Maaike Cafmeyer

Touche Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 107:38


Actrice Maaike Cafmeyer 'goa sjette gevn' als de West-Vlaamse politieagente 'Chantal' op één. Acteren is het liefste wat ze doet, al heeft het proces-De Pauw haar ook de keerzijde laten zien. De inzichten van de Ierse toneelauteur George Bernard Shaw én de cocon van haar gezin hielden haar recht. Maar hoe moet het verder? Heeft ze er ooit aan gedacht te stoppen? Wat helpt haar relativeren en hoe gaat ze de tweede helft van haar eeuw tegemoet?

Dice Funk - D&D Comedy
Dice Funk S9: Part 25 - Dio, Friend of the Oceans

Dice Funk - D&D Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 76:35


“What is life but a series of inspired follies? The difficulty is to find them to do. Never lose a chance: it doesn't come every day.” - George Bernard Shaw, Pygmalion   STARRING - Austin Yorski: @austinyorski Sophie: @Sophie_frm_Mars   SUPPORT LINKS - Patreon.com/austinyorski Patreon.com/SophieFromMars YouTube.com/SophieFromMars   ART, AUDIO, & MUSIC - "Bonfire" by Rachel Hillman: RachelHillmanMusic.com "Corona Radiata" by Nine Inch Nails, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license "Discipline" by Nine Inch Nails, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license Thumbnail Art: @snowwraithian   DISCORD - https://discord.gg/YMU3qUH