Podcasts about Wage

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Reimbursement paid by an employer to an employee

  • 1,687PODCASTS
  • 2,523EPISODES
  • 32mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jul 2, 2022LATEST
Wage

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Best podcasts about Wage

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Latest podcast episodes about Wage

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | More Sharks, Less Lifeguards @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 32:48


OC First MonkeyPox / Sharks population way uplifeguard shortage // Min wage goes up / Professional cornhole Pickleball v Paddle tennis // CA new laws in effect / Pink Dot / buying underage beer // Tim's monkeypox / mean Joe green commercial for Coke

StudioOne™ Safety and Risk Management Network
Ep. 217 Understanding the Impact of Dual Wage and Total Temporary Disability

StudioOne™ Safety and Risk Management Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 5:53


Rancho Mesa's Alyssa Burley and Vice President of the Construction Group, Sam Clayton discuss the recently approved dual wage threshold increase in California for mechanical, electrical and plumbing (or MEP) contractors. Show Notes: Subscribe to Rancho Mesa's Newsletter. Request a Key Performance Indicator Director/Host: Alyssa Burley Guest: Sam Clayton Producer/Editor: Lauren Stumpf Music: "Home" by JHS Pedals, “News Room News” by Spence © Copyright 2022. Rancho Mesa Insurance Services, Inc. All rights reserved.

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham
The Eskom wage negotiation: The right to strike in a time of crisis

Afternoon Drive with John Maytham

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:30


Guest: Puke Maserumule is a Labour Law Specialist at Maserumule Attorneys, and he joins John to discuss the wage dispute and the right to strike in a time of crisis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Episode 94: The boomer fantasy of wage spirals, the failed states of America and good news about Queensland coal

"The Week on Wednesday" with Van Badham & Ben Davison

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 76:39


Van Badham and Ben Davison emerge from their COVID isolation to breakdown the real story behind the wages debate in Australia. The reality doesn't match the ideological chest beating from the business lobby who were quick to claim a Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) mandate for a wages cap (their isn't one) to stop a "wages spiral" and that Sally McManus, leader of Australian Unions, had called the RBA governor a "boomer". (She didn't).   Van and Ben look at the ways collective bargaining is failing, how it can/could work to lift wages, some innovations like the TWU/Uber agreement and why more and more workers are banding together to take action across whole sectors (like the teacher unions in New South Wales).  Across the board union members are earning more, so join your union at australianunions.org.au/wow Of course Liberal Leader Peter Dutton was quick to jump on the "wage spiral" rhetoric along with his anti-teacher culture war so Van and Ben look at why Liberal's in Australia might be using American style tactics. This episode takes an extended look into the US Supreme Court, the fundamentalists that Trump appointed to the court, the activism they are now displaying in overturning Roe V Wade, removing gun control laws, imposing religion in schools and directing federal funds to religious organisations. With the January 6 Commission hearings in full swing Van gives a clear eyed analysis of Trump, and his enablers, lack of commitment to democracy, dedication to culture wars and power at all costs approach. The good news is that Queensland is imposing a form of progressive taxation on coal companies! And as always we acknowledge the Cadre and Extend the Reach supporters who make it possible for us to reach even more people at www.buymeacoffee.com/weekonwednesday

First Take SA
Eskom's unions dispute wage agreement with Eskom

First Take SA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 8:02


The National Union of Mineworkers, Num, and the National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa, Numsa say there is no wage agreement with Eskom. Yesterday Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan announced the power utility had reached a wage agreement with striking workers. The two unions say this is false. For more on this, Elvis Presslin spoke to Livhuwani Mammburu, the National spokesperson of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) and Eskom spokesperson, Sikonathi Mantshantsha...

Paradigm132
Wage inflation

Paradigm132

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 9:32


On todays episode I speak about wage inflation and how some silicone valley companies are looking to combat the issue --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rashad-horne/support

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance
Acquire Podcast Ep12: How Earnin uses organic community building to grow earned wage access

Tearsheet Podcast: The Business of Finance

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 28:52


On today's episode I've got the pleasure of speaking to a company I've been fangirling over for quite a while (who even fangirls over a company in the financial space? but it's true). When I first heard of Earnin, a simple Google search led me to their many Facebook groups featuring a huge community of everyday people sharing their financial struggles and supporting one another in ways big and small –- despite being total strangers on the internet. I invited Brittanie Williams, Earnin's CMO, to talk to us about building a strong and truly community-based brand, building with customers for customers, and flipping the script on what we think when we talk about the millions of people who live paycheck to paycheck.

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 4155: TERRORISTS WAGE JIHAD ON PRIDE MONTH!

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 50:35


Terrorists targeted celebrations of Pride Month -threatening participants in Turkey and Ramallah until they cancelled them, and perpetrating a mass shooting in Norway! Why? You might ask. Well, the history goes back to Muhammad and his recommended punishment for homosexual activity. Chanting “Allahu Akbar” and showing frightening videos, they intimidated students at Istanbul University into cancelling their LGBT+ picnic. In Ramallah, the son of aprominent preacher from the terror group Hamas, posted a video on social media warning people arriving at a concert hall, that the star singer-songwriter about to perform is banned because he's gay. In Oslo, Norway, just hours before the Pride Parade wasabout to begin, Zaniar Matapour, a 42-year-old Iranian refugee, who'd come to Norway at age 12, began a shooting rampage. He targeted three gay sites, notably the London Pub. He shouted “Allahu Akbar” as he started shooting and left a trail of 2 dead and over 21 injured. Matapour is a fascinating guy. You will hear his life story, which includes mental illness, and many run ins with the law, for which he was hardly punished. Most interesting, are his connections to terrorists and ISIS. Not unlike many other lone wolves, Matapour had been on Norway's counterterrorism radar until they let them fall through the cracks. Now the authorities are investigating to see what they missed, trying to determine whether this was: a terror attack, a hate crime, a result of his mental illness, or all of the above. Indeed, having much similarity to Omar Mateen's attack on the Pulse Nightclub, it may havebeen a copycat crime!

The Truth on Trump
Dems Wage Insurrection Against Supreme Court

The Truth on Trump

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 5:49


Insights Into Tomorrow
Insights Into Tomorrow: Episode 17 "Woman's Rights are Human Rights"

Insights Into Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 69:00


There has been a disturbing trend in recent years in the United States.  An assault has been waged on basic human rights.  Victims of this assault have been chosen by the color of their skin and their gender All are victims that have been targeted for generations and have fought for their equal, human rights.In this episode of Insights Into Tomorrow we're going to take a deeper look at the assault on women's rights. We'll take a look at this history of women's rights through the years, we'll examine the current state of women's rights, we'll explore the threats against those rights. Before we leave we'll take a special look at the current issue of abortion and the impending supreme court decision that threatens to overturn Roe v. Wade Support the show

Marketplace Morning Report
The Supreme Court’s ruling puts pressure on companies to act

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 7:11


Many U.S. companies are keeping quiet about the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, but some have spoken up. We take stock of some of the mounting financial obstacles that await people trying to access abortion services. Wage gains for some workers could stop as a result of the Fed’s ongoing battle against inflation.

Marketplace All-in-One
The Supreme Court’s ruling puts pressure on companies to act

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 7:11


Many U.S. companies are keeping quiet about the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, but some have spoken up. We take stock of some of the mounting financial obstacles that await people trying to access abortion services. Wage gains for some workers could stop as a result of the Fed’s ongoing battle against inflation.

People Profits & Purpose Podcast with Nick Psaila
Ep 73: Overcome Min. Wage Increases by Doing THIS - Coaching Conversations

People Profits & Purpose Podcast with Nick Psaila

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 26:28


EPISODE IN BRIEF In today's episode of Coaching Conversations, Nick and Chris discuss recent news on the minimum wage increase and sort through strategies to combat the wage rise. You may have navigated the past two years very well, but for those with staff doing low to medium skill level activities, it's news that brings yet another obstacle. So, if you're a business owner and feeling a little unsettled by the government's decision, this one's for you. The nitty-gritty of the minimum wage increase is coming up in this new episode of Coaching Conversations….  Time Code/Show Notes 0.26  Intro: Business coach experts Nick and Chris shed some light on the way forward and share some strategies to soften the blow. 02.20  Covid has devastated small businesses so it's hard to reconcile this new increase with the pain of the past few years. But like GST, you must learn to accept it. 4.00  Change your mindset. What if you think of it as helping your employees realise this small reward. Think of it as alleviating some of the financial stress so they may be free to focus on the job – and less on an inadequate wage.     6.35  It is what it is. Accept it. Then think about how you will tackle it. How do you become more client-centric – how do you add value…  how do you INCREASE your fees to combat the wage rise.           8.40 How can you become more valuable to your customers. 10.43  Nick encourages you to look at the increase over a year.          Look at how you can manage that figure and split it up over that time and how you may make it back. 14.10  Observe the facts. Get out a calculator and figure out how much it will cost per employee. Don't let stress snowball. Reverse engineer it over the cost of a 12 months… 15.25  Work on a deal. How can you create a win-win and base the increase on performance. Ask ‘are you really happy with a 5 percent increase…. What can you do to increase your value to me so I can look at a further incentivisation…' Change the entitlement into an incentive. Or create a ‘Bonus' structure. 18.00  Make it a performance-driven KPI and give them more. You can flip the mindset on it's head. 22.10  Beware the employee who takes the hand out and does nothing to earn it. Do you really want those who do not add value to their talent and skills... 23.50 Nick talks about how you can pay your employees to work smarter not harder. How do you push them to earn bonuses not hand-outs… 25.25  Reach out to ask@upcoach.com.au if you have any questions and change your mind-set under the guidance of an extraordinary business coach.                                           EPISODE SUMMARY        It's all in the re-think. The way you manipulate your mindset to change entitlement into an incentive. Have awareness – have acceptance. Ask yourself… how can you increase more value on the front end - from the people who are buying products from you… Calculate the percentage increase over a year – then multiply that by the amount of product you need to sell. And do a deal with your employee around their performance. Incentivize an increase instead of it being a seen as a handout…

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener
NUMSA speaks out on current wage dispute protests at Eskom's power stations.

The Midday Report with Mandy Wiener

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 11:35


Phakamile Hlubi, Numsa spokesperson  Sikhonathi Mantshantsha - Eskom spokesperson  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kan English
News Flash June 23, 2022

Kan English

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:40


Wage negotiations intensify as nation-wide teachers' strike continues for second day, Foreign Minister Lapid to Turkey for talks on fighting Iranian terror, Prime Minister Bennett considering taking a break from politics See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Islam
Public servants unhappy with wage increase offer

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 3:41


Public servants unhappy with wage increase offer by Radio Islam

Montrose Fresh
MCSD board approves new wage settlement, staff to receive hefty compensation package

Montrose Fresh

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 5:29


The MCSD board unanimously approved a wage settlement between the district and the Uncompahgre Valley Education Association during a school board meeting last week. Support the show: https://www.montrosepress.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio
Boston Women's Workforce Awards Companies Closing Gender, Racial Wage Gaps

WBZ NewsRadio 1030 - News Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 0:38


CEO Podcast | BNR
Niels Wage (Perpetual Next): ‘We kijken continu naar hoe we afval beter kunnen inzetten met zo'n hoog mogelijke impact.'

CEO Podcast | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 20:52


Waar gaat de Nederlandse producent van hernieuwbare grondstoffen Perpetual Next zijn grondstoffen vandaan halen nu de vraag ernaar steeds groter wordt? In ‘De Top van Nederland', een uitgebreid gesprek met Niels Wage, topman van Perpetual Next.  Abonneer je op de podcast Ga naar ‘De Top van Nederland' en abonneer je op de podcast, ook te beluisteren via Apple Podcast en Spotify.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Zakendoen | BNR
Niels Wage (Perpetual Next) over biologische koolstof

Zakendoen | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 104:47


Perpetual Next, Nederlandse producent van biologische koolstof, heeft een investering opgehaald van 420 miljoen euro. Maar is dat wel genoeg om alle groeiplannen van het bedrijf mee te bekostigen? Topman Niels Wage is te gast in BNR Zakendoen. Edin Mujagic Elke dag, even over twaalf, bespreekt presentator Thomas van Zijl met een econoom de belangrijkste macro-economische ontwikkelingen. Vandaag te gast: Edin Mujagic van OHV Vermogensbeheer. Economenpanel De Amerikaanse Federal Reserve heeft de grootste rentestap in 30 jaar gedaan. En: De drie grootste banken van Nederland hebben de Tweede Kamer een plan aangeboden om de woningmarkt te renoveren. Dat en meer bespreken we in het economenpanel met: - Steven Brakman, Hoogleraar internationale economie aan de Rijksuniversiteit Groningen - Bert Colijn, Senior econoom bij ING Luister | Economenpanel Inzicht Het kabinet wil dat er toezicht komt op algoritmes. En dat toezicht moet komen van de Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens. Daar wordt vanaf volgend jaar één miljoen euro voor uitgetrokken, en dat bedrag loopt vanaf 2026 op tot 3,6 miljoen euro. Maar een grote groep experts ziet hier geen heil in. Bij ons te gast is Lokke Moerel, hoogleraar Technologie en Recht aan de Universiteit Tilburg, advocaat bij techkantoor Morrison & Foerster en lid van de Cyber Security Raad. Zakenpartner Ze studeerde Nederlandse Taal en Cultuur aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam en begon haar carrière in de literaire uitgeverswereld. Na enkele omzwervingen, richtte ze een platform met erotische (luister)verhalen op. Door haar pitch in het tv-programma Dragons Den haalde ze ook nog eens Shawn Harris binnen. De zakenpartner deze week is Eva de Visser, oprichter van Rouze. Contact & Abonneren BNR Zakendoen zendt elke werkdag live uit van 12:00 tot 14:30 uur. Je kunt de redactie bereiken via e-mail en Twitter. Abonneren op de podcast van BNR Zakendoen kan via bnr.nl/zakendoen, of via Apple Podcast en Spotify. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Unions say Gov's offer of wage increases fall short of inflation

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 9:03


Kevin Callinan, President of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions, discusses the divide between unions and Government on public sector pay talks.

KVMR News
The Morning Update - Prevailing Wage

KVMR News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 7:00


RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
PM dubs electricity market failure an "incredible embarrassment"

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 14:11


Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, says the suspension of the National Electricity Market is a direct result of the Coalition Government's policy deadlocks and failure to invest in the grid. He says lessons will be learned from the energy crisis and policy adjustments made where necessary.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Business decries wage rise, as ACTU welcomes decision

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 12:32


The head of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry Andrew McKellar, says businesses will have to pay an extra $7.9 billion to cover the costs of the decision to lift the minimum wage. ACTU Secretary Sally McManus, says it's just an extra dollar an hour for some of the lowest paid workers, who carried Australia through the pandemic.

Australia Wide
Walgett parents demand more school options with ongoing concerns over trouble-plagued local community college

Australia Wide

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 30:00


Drive With Tom Elliott
Small Business Australia responds to latest wage increases

Drive With Tom Elliott

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 6:54


There are calls for Australia's politicians to "get their snouts out of the trough" and offer "consistent leadership" on business, with fears the latest wage increase could end many small businesses. Bill Lang is Executive Director of Small Business Australia and told Tom Elliott it would have a massive impact. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

4BC Drive with Mark Braybrook
Industry warns of impact to small business amid wage rise

4BC Drive with Mark Braybrook

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 5:34


The Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland says they were shocked by the rise to the minimum wage. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The West Live Podcast
Ka-CHING! What does wage rise mean for you?

The West Live Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 6:10


We know cost of living pressures are hitting Australians hard. Anger about It helped Anthony Albanese topple Scott Morrison in the election. Well after he got the top job. Australia's new PM went to the fair work commission and asked them to increase the minimum wage for workers.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mornings with Neil Mitchell
The latest on wage rises in Australia (and Neil Mitchell's reaction)

Mornings with Neil Mitchell

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:39


9 News political reporter Jonathan Kearsley shared the latest details with 3AW on Wednesday, confirming the changes will impact almost three million Australians. Neil Mitchell also shared his surprise at the size of the increase. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Stick Together
Wages v Profits

Stick Together

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022


Wage suppression has been going on for 40 years. The issue of wages and standard of living has reached a critical point as workers demand that profits are being gained at the expense of a fair deal.

PCTY Talks
#PCTYSHRM22: Wage and Hour Pitfalls

PCTY Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 6:40


Brenda Kasper can help us all understand a little more about navigating potential wage and hour pitfalls while managing a remote, hybrid, or on-site workforce. Brenda S. Kasper is a founding member of Kasper & Frank LLP, a law firm representing California and multi-state employers for all of their human resources and employment law needs.  She regularly advises employers of all sizes on wage and hour compliance, leaves of absence, disability accommodation, reductions in force, terminations and discipline management, employment contracts, personnel policies, and hiring issues.  She also provides management and human resources training.  Brenda is a former HR director so her legal advice is practical, creative and tailored to each client's needs.  She was the 2015 San Diego SHRM Board President, is an instructor for the HR Certification program at the University of California San Diego Extension and holds her SHRM-SCP and SPHR-California certifications. Mentioned in the episode: SHRM Session: Managing Employees in the Virtual/Hybrid and In-Person Worlds: Avoiding Wage and Hour Pitfalls In-Person Wednesday 06/15/2022 08:45 AM - 09:45 AM

Business News Leaders
Unions and Sibanye-Stillwater agree on a 3-year wage deal.

Business News Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 15:49


Sibanye-Stillwater is set to restart operations at its gold mines in Gauteng and Free State after signing a three-year wage deal with unions. The move puts an end to a three-month strike where employees forfeited more than R1.2 billion in wages. Business Day TV discussed the deal in greater detail with Sibanye-Stillwater's Executive Vice President of Investor Relations and Corporate Affairs and the National Union of Mineworkers' National Spokesperson, Livhuwani Mammburu.

The Property Planner, Buyer and Professor
#157: Market Update May 22 - RBA increases the cash rate but it's no reason to panic! What is the wage price spiral, why Australians are ahead on their loan repayments, the current state of the economy, unemployment, rentals, consumer sentiment and m

The Property Planner, Buyer and Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 47:08


Got a question for the trio? - https://zfrmz.com/uLtjhyBskV96PY6eJfaIhttps://propertyplanning.com.au/propertyplannerbuyerprofessor/In this week's episode Dave, Cate and Pete take you through:Market update1. Cash rate rises by 50 basis points, but the sky's not falling inThe RBA raises the cash rate by 50 basis points to 0.85%, with an expectation that rates will increase by the same amount next month as well. However, this is no reason to panic. The cash rate was at 1.50% pre-covid, so there is still some room to move and the reality is that the cash rate was never meant to be as low as 0.10%. This was an extraordinary measure put in place to tackle the challenges that global pandemic brought.2. The wage price spiralThe trio discuss the possibility of a wage price spiral caused by high inflation. If wages increase in line with inflation (5-6%), it embeds inflation further and that's when the probability of job losses is increased, which is a worse outcome than slightly lower wage growth. This is an increased risk if minimum wages are increased, as employment awards and enterprise agreements are raised by the same percentage, effecting a vast amount of wage growth.3. The current state of the economyWhilst many home owners may not like the prospect of increasing interest rates, however the economy is a strong position, which is why the cash rate has been increased. As stated by the RBA, the Australian economy is resilient, growing by 0.8 per cent in the March quarter and 3.3 per cent over the year. Australians are well ahead on their mortgage repayments, with a median of 21 months of repayments in savings, even with a 2% rise in mortgage rates, this would only reduce to 19 months. There is an upswing in business investment underway and a large pipeline of construction work to be completed. The terms of trade are at record highs, the lowest unemployment rate in almost 50 years and jab vacancies at high levels.4. The latest home value index resultsThe trio discuss the index results for May, which show Sydney and Melbourne on the decline, while Canberra went slightly backwards but a negligible amount. Astoundingly, Adelaide is still going strong with 1.8% increase over May. The market is well and truly slowing down for the other capitals and regions alike. As they say, all good things must come to an end, as we enter a period of 6 to 18 months of excellent buying opportunity.5. Rentals and vacanciesRental markets continue to remain tight, with each capital city under 2% for vacancy rates. Those are expected to get tighter with the flow of new migrants to Australia. Builders will not be able to pick up the slack and increase supply to meet the demand, with fixed priced contracts in precarious positions as a few major builders go under. Now that prices are flattening, yields are growing even faster, with Melbourne now leading the charge for units, adding on 10% in the last year for asking prices.6. Listing numbers on the declineTotal listings are down for every capital city and in a change of gear, old listings (listings on the market for longer than 180 days) are increasing. This means that the up-take of the less desirable stock has slowed down for much of the nation, only in Brisbane are buyers still snatching up whatever they can. The upshot is that buyers are taking their time, FOMO has lessened and there is not as much pressure from other competing buyers.7. Consumer sentiment continues to diveThe house price expectations index, which typically lags behind market movements, is catching up with the market and starting to reduce. The time to buy a dwelling index, which peaked in November 2020, is now the lowest it's been since the GFC.8. What do lending indicators tell us about the property marketIn April, the amount of finance fell by 6.4%, coming off a big high. The hardest hit were owner occupiers, which fell 7.3% from the previous month with investors showing more resilience with a drop of 4.8%. This move is largely correlated with property values, which have also seen a decline.Visit the show notes - https://propertyplanning.com.au/market-update-may-22-rba-increases-the-cash-rate-but-its-no-reason-to-panic-what-is-the-wage-price-spiral-why-australians-are-well-ahead-of-their-mortgage-repayments-the/

Episode 91: A decade of economic damage, minister making their mark, NSW workers face down wage cuts and good news about sea grass

"The Week on Wednesday" with Van Badham & Ben Davison

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 68:43


Van Badham and Ben Davison look at what's happening in our economy as the Reserve Bank raises rates, inflation spikes and wages continue to go backwards in real terms. Van and Ben get underneath the headline figures to look at what's really driving inflation, who's profiting and why wage increases are exactly what we need to get the economy humming.  You can get your wages moving by joining your union at australianunions.org.au/wow They also examine how the Liberal/National policies of the last decade put more workers on minimum rates, forced more people into their own "business" (with no employees and revenues of less than an average wage) and what the "Uberfication" of growing sectors means for job security and wages. It has only been a little over two weeks and already Albo and his ministers are making their mark on everything from foreign relations to the minimum wage, from arts policy to the NDIS.  Van and Ben look at some of the highlights, including the departure of the CEO of the NDIA and the Charities Commissioner, along with some of the policy statements from the ministers. In NSW the Perrottet government is trying to divide workers through a series of industrial bully boy tactics, selective bribes and divisive language.  But as today's public sector walk off shows, the workers of NSW remain united whether they are in teaching, higher education, health, nursing, transport, railways or a paramedic.  Check out psa.as.au for details of the latest actions. And there is good news about the worlds largest plant, right here in Australia! Plus we give shout outs to our Cadre and Extend the Reach supporters who have grown the audience of The Week on Wednesday to nearly 50,000 a month, you can check out the supporter page at www.buymeacoffee.com/weekonwednesday  

Medieval Death Trip
MDT Ep. 91: Concerning Wage Warfare after the Plague

Medieval Death Trip

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 40:39


This episode, we follow up on a question from Ep. 90 about why the wandering worker Thomas Fuller might have fallen in with a criminal shepherd by looking at a pair of vagrancy and labor laws from the economically disrupted decades following the Black Death: the Statute of Laborers of 1351 and the Commons' Petition against Vagrants of 1376. We also learn a bit about late medieval prisons. Today's Texts: Henderson, Ernest F., editor and translator. Select Historical Documents of the Middle Ages. George Bell and Sons, 1892, pp. 165-168. Google Books. "Commons' Petition Against Vagrants" of 1376," reprinted in R.B. Dobson, The Peasants' Revolt of 1381. MacMillan, 1970, pp. 72-74. Google Books. References: Clark, Elaine. "Institutional and Legal Responses to Begging in Medieval England." Social Science History, vol. 26, no. 3, Fall 2002, pp. 447-473. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40267786. Geltner, Guy. "Medieval Prisons: Between Myth and Reality, Hell and Purgatory." History Compass, vol. 4, 2006, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1111/j.1478-0542.2006.00319.x. Available at guygeltner.net.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Angus Taylor: Wage increases should be on the back of productivity

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 14:46


The RBA shocked many economists by raising interest rates by 50 basis points to 0.85%. While the government is blaming its predecessors for the budgetary problems its inherited, the opposition is calling on them to contain their spending.

The Investor Lab
Is Now a Good Time to Buy an Investment Property?

The Investor Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 51:22


Is there such a thing as the ‘right time' to buy an investment property?  Should you worry about rising interest rates? Can you still afford to buy property at this stage? Is there a solution to Australia's housing crisis? Today, we're going alfresco and talking about whether it's a good time to invest in property, how interest rates and inflation are affecting the property market, the status of property supply in Australia, and more! If you love this episode, let us know by emailing us at til@dashdot.com.au, and don't forget to subscribe, rate, and share this podcast!  See you on the inside!  In this episode, we cover: Why people overthink the ‘right time' to buy property [02:39] How interest rates and inflation work [06:34] Institutional investors entering the residential property market en masse [09:28] The alarmist view of interest rates [13:07] Wage growth vs interest rates [17:03] What the government should do to fix Australia's housing problem [21:11] How the housing affordability crisis is affecting the population [24:33] Is it possible to get cash flow positive property? [28:25] Why those who bought more than a year ago are riding the interest rate rise [35:16] Should you lock in your interest rates? [38:27]  Reducing your Loan-to-Value Ratio [41:40] Understanding the risks of investing [47:26]   Connect With Us: See our other Podcasts: https://theinvestorlab.com.au/ Watch on Youtube (https://www.youtube.com/c/TheInvestorLab)  Listen on Spotify (https://spoti.fi/3Np19x8)  The Dashdot Website (https://www.dashdot.com.au/) Limitless: The Renegade's Guide to Building Wealth Through Property - Goose McGrath (https://www.renegadespropertybook.com) Ready to work with us directly? (https://dashdot.com.au/discovery) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Financial Survival Network
Who Knows What Evil Lurks in the Heart of the Economy? Jim Welsh Does! #5523

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 22:36


Summary: Markets have been extremely volatile, and pressing questions about the future of the economy linger. Will inflation and negative GDP print decline? Furthermore, how will these factors affect you and your investments? Jim Welsh appears on this episode of FSN to inform us about what to expect in consideration of the role that the Fed will play over the next couple of months. We're seeing increases in gas and oil, wage growth that does not mirror the progression of inflation, and depletion of supplies in the energy sector. Listen in for more insight on the mayhem of the markets, and scenarios for the foreseeable future. Highlights: -Jim was expecting a 10-15% pullback going into this year, accounting for trends in the S&P -We've had the pullback from the highs, but the S&P needs to punch about 4200 to open the door for higher prices -The Fed is at an interesting juncture that will play a role over the next few months -Interest rate increases have adversely affected the economy, housing, etc. -Consumers still have over $2 trillion worth of savings, but the bottom 20% of wage earners spend 70-75% of their disposable income -The squeeze is already intense, and this is going to continue -Wage growth (about 5-6%) is not parallel with inflation -The Fed is trying to prevent the markets from getting ahead of them, which contributes to their decision making -The increase in gas and oil in May will contribute a lot to inflation -As they raise rates more, the economy will show signs of slowing in the next few months -The Fed has started to shrink its balance sheet, which has not been paid attention to closely
-Jim thinks we may be on the cusp of a 15-20 year bear market; a lot of issues that have been building up with the US economy will most likely come to a head -Is inflation down-ticking enough to give people on the Federal Reserve confidence that inflation is going to trend downwards? -Gold needs to hold recent lows to make another run above 1900s -When volatility increases, the relation between sectors moves upwards towards 1 -We need to see a break in oil, and subsequently, in gasoline prices -We should be focusing on the price of natural gas rather than oil -We're depleting supplies that, in the past, would have gone to other domestic needs -There is a floor underneath Natgas prices Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Macro Tides

Calvary Chapel Greenville
The Diviner's Wage

Calvary Chapel Greenville

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 54:00


Speaker: Pastor Greg Hill Scripture: Numbers 22: 1-35 Date: Sunday, June 5, 2022

Thoughts on the Market
Special Encore: Mid-Year Economic Outlook - Slowing or Stopping?

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 10:29


Original Release on May 17th, 2022: As we forecast the remainder of an already uncertain 2022, new questions have emerged around economic data, inflation and the potential for a recession. Chief Cross Asset Strategist Andrew Sheets and Chief Global Economist Seth Carpenter discuss.----- Transcript -----Andrew Sheets: Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets. Morgan Stanley's Chief Cross-Asset Strategist. Seth Carpenter: And I'm Seth Carpenter, Morgan Stanley's Chief Global Economist. Andrew Sheets: And today on the podcast, we'll be talking about our outlook for strategy and markets and the challenges they may face over the coming months. It's Tuesday, May 17th, at 4 p.m. in London. Seth Carpenter: And it's 11 a.m. in New York. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the global Morgan Stanley Economic and Strategy Team have just completed our mid-year outlook process. And, you know, this is a big collaborative effort where the economists think about what the global economy will look like over the next 12 months, and the strategists think about what that could mean for markets. So as we talk about that outlook, I think the economy is the right place to start. As you're looking across the global economy and thinking about the insights from across your team, how do you think the global economy will look over the next 12 months and how is that going to be different from what we've been seeing? Seth Carpenter: So I will say, Andrew, that we titled our piece, the economics piece, slowing or stopping with a question mark, because I think there is a great deal of uncertainty out there about where the economy is going to go over the next six months, over the next 12 months. So what are we looking at as a baseline? Sharp deceleration, but no recession. And I say that with a little bit of trepidation because we also try to put out alternative scenarios, the way things could be better, the way things could be worse. And I have to say, from where I'm sitting right now, I see more ways for the global economy to be worse than the global economy to be better than our baseline scenario. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, I want to dig into that a little bit more because we're seeing, you know, more and more people in the market talk about the risk of a slowdown and talk about the risk of a recession. And yet, you know, it's also hard to ignore the fact that a lot of the economic data looks very good. You know, we have one of the lowest unemployment rates that we've seen in the U.S. in some time. Wage growth is high, spending activity all looks quite high and robust. So, what would drive growth to slow enough where people could really start to think that a recession is getting more likely?Seth Carpenter: So here's how I think about it. We've been coming into this year with a fair amount of momentum, but not a perfectly pristine outlook on the economy. If you take the United States, Q1, GDP was actually negative quarter on quarter. Now, there are a lot of special exceptions there, inventories were a big drag, net exports were a big drag. Underlying domestic spending in the U.S. held up reasonably solidly. But the fact that we had a big drag in the U.S. from net exports tells you a little bit about what's going on around the rest of the world. If you think about what's going on in Europe, we feel that the economy in the eurozone is actually quite precarious. The Russian invasion of Ukraine presents a clear and critical risk to the European economy. I mean, already we've seen a huge jump in energy prices, we've seen a huge jump in food prices and all of that has got to weigh on consumer spending, especially for consumers at the bottom end of the income distribution. And what we see in China is these wave after wave of COVID against the policy of COVID zero means that we're going to have both a hit to demand from China and some disruption to supply. Now, for the moment, we think the disruption to supply is smaller than the hit to demand because there is this closed loop approach to manufacturing. But nevertheless, that shock to China is going to hurt the global economy. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the other major economic question that's out there is inflation, and you know where it's headed and what's driving it. So I was hoping you could talk a little bit about what our forecasts for inflation look like going forward. Seth Carpenter: Our view right now is that inflation is peaking or will be peaking soon. I say that again with a fair amount of caution because that's been our view for quite some time, and then we get these additional surprises. It's clear that in many, many economies, a huge amount of the inflation that we are seeing is coming from energy and from food. Now energy prices and food prices are not likely to fall noticeably any time soon. But after prices peak, if they go sideways from there, the inflationary impulse ends up starting to fade away and so we think that's important. We also think, the COVID zero policy in China notwithstanding, that there will be some grudging easing of supply chain frictions globally, and that's going to help bring down goods inflation as well over time. So we think inflation is high, we think inflation will stay high, but we think that it's roughly peaked and over the balance of this year and into next year it should be coming down.Andrew Sheets: As you think about central bank policy going forward, what do you think it will look like and do you think it can get back to, quote, normal? Seth Carpenter: I will say, when it comes to monetary policy, that's a question we want to ask globally. Right now, central banks globally are generically either tight or tightening policy. What do I mean by that? Well, we had a lot of EM central banks in Latin America and Eastern Europe that had already started to hike policy a lot last year, got to restrictive territory. And for those central banks, we actually see them starting to ease policy perhaps sometimes next year. For the rest of EM Asia, they're on the steady grind higher because even though inflation had started out being lower in the rest of EM Asia than in the developed market world, we are starting to see those inflationary pressures now and they're starting to normalize policy. And then we get to the developed market economies. There's hiking going on, there's tightening of policy led by the Fed who's out front. What does that mean about getting back to an economy like we had before COVID? One of the charts that we put in the Outlook document has the path for the level of GDP globally. And you can clearly see the huge drop off in the COVID recession, the rapid rebound that got us most of the way, but not all the way back to where we were before COVID hit. And then the question is, how does that growth look as we get past the worst of the COVID cycle? Six months ago, when we did the same exercise, we thought growth would be able to be strong enough that we would get our way back to that pre-COVID trend. But now, because supply has clearly been constrained because of commodity prices, because of labor market frictions, monetary policy is trying to slow aggregate demand down to align itself with this restricted supply. And so what that means is, in our forecast at least, we just never get back to that pre-COVID trend line. Seth Carpenter: All right, Andrew, but I've got a question to throw back at you. So the interplay between economics and markets is really uncertain right now. Where do you think we could be wrong? Could it be that the 3%, ten-year rate that we forecast is too low, is too high? Where do you think the risks are to our asset price forecasts? Andrew Sheets: Yeah, let me try to answer your question directly and talk about the interest rate outlook, because we are counting on interest rates consolidating in the U.S. around current levels. And our thinking is partly based on that economic outlook. You know, I think where we could be wrong is there's a lot of uncertainty around, you know, what level of interest rate will slow the economy enough to balance demand and supply, as you just mentioned. And I think a path where U.S. interest rates for, say, ten year treasuries are 4% rather than 3% like they are today, I think that's an environment where actually the economy is a little bit stronger than we expect and the consumer is less impacted by that higher rate. And it's going to take a higher rate for people to keep more money in savings rather than spending it in the economy and potentially driving that inflation. So I think the path to higher rates and in our view does flow through a more resilient consumer. And those higher rates could mean the economy holds up for longer but markets still struggle somewhat, because those higher discount rates that you can get from safe government bonds mean people will expect, mean people will expect a higher interest rate on a lot of other asset classes. In short, we think the risk reward here for bonds is more balanced. But I think the yield move so far this year has been surprising, it's been historically extreme, and we have to watch out for scenarios where it continues. Seth Carpenter: Okay. That's super helpful. But another channel of transmission of monetary policy comes through exchange rates. So the Fed has clearly been hiking, they've already done 75 basis points, they've lined themselves up to do 50 basis points at at least the next two meetings. Whereas the ECB hasn't even finished their QE program, they haven't started to raise interest rates yet. The Bank of Japan, for example, still at a really accommodative level, and we've seen both of those currencies against the dollar move pretty dramatically. Are we in one of those normal cycles where the dollar starts to rally as the Fed begins to hike, but eventually peaks and starts to come off? Or could we be seeing a broader divergence here? Andrew Sheets: Yeah. So I think this is to your point about a really interesting interplay between markets and Federal Reserve policy, because what the Fed is trying to do is it's trying to slow demand to bring it back in line with what the supply of things in the economy can provide at at current prices rather than it at higher prices, which would mean more inflation. And there's certainly an important interest rate part to that slowing of demand story. There's a stock market part of the story where if somebody's stock portfolio is lower, maybe they're, again, a little bit less inclined to spend money and that could slow the economy. But the currency is also a really important element of it, because that's another way that financial markets can feed back into the real economy and slow growth. And if you know you're an American company that is an exporter and the dollar is stronger, you likely face tougher competition against overseas sellers. And that acts as another headwind to the economy. So we think the dollar strengthens a little bit, you know, over the next month or two, but ultimately does weaken as the market starts to think enough is priced into the Fed. We're not going to get more Federal Reserve interest rates than are already implied by the market, and that helps tamp down some of the dollar strength that we've been seeing. Andrew Sheets: And Seth thanks for taking the time to talk. Seth Carpenter: Andrew, it's been great talking to you. Andrew Sheets: And thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share the podcast with a friend or colleague today.

Labor Relations Information System
First Thursday, June 2022

Labor Relations Information System

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 51:10


This month's cases: Porta-Potty Retaliation, City of Shelton, 2022 WL 1442880 (CT.Dept.Lab. 2022). [Download the decision.] What Happens When The Employer Fails To Respond To A Grievance? Sun Coast PBA v. City of St. Petersburg, 2022 WL 1521990 (Fla. PERC Gen. Coun. 2022). No Weingarten Representation When Employer Assures Employee Discipline Not Possible, Canovas v. Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners, 2022 WL 1265867 (Fla. PERC 2022). Arrest Does Not Necessarily Trigger Weingarten Rights, State of New Jersey, 2022 WL 810182 (N.J. PERC ULP Director 2022). Sergeant Demoted For Intimate Relationship With Officer, Wolfe v. City of Town and Country,... The post First Thursday, June 2022 appeared first on Labor Relations Information System.

Coastal Community Church Audio
Act Your Wage | #BLESSED

Coastal Community Church Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 44:03


Proverbs 13:7 One person pretends to be rich, yet has nothing; Proverbs 22:7 Just as the rich rule the poor, so the borrower is servant to the lender. Servant: ebed; a SLAVE, in BONDAGE 3 Biblical Values to Act Your Wage 1. Embrace the value of SELF-CONTROL. Proverbs 25:28 A person without self-control is like a city with broken-down walls. Learn to say NO for a little while in order to say YES later in life. Live like NO ONE else so that one day you can truly live like NO ONE else. 2. Embrace the value of SACRIFICE. Hebrews 12:2 We do this by keeping our eyes on Jesus, the champion who initiates and perfects our faith. Because of the joy awaiting him, he endured the cross, We give up something we LOVE for something we love EVEN MORE. 3. Embrace the value of PLANNING. Luke 14:28 Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Won't you first sit down and estimate the cost to see if you have enough money to complete it? Before you PAY for it, PRAY for it! Proverbs 21:5 Good planning and hard work lead to prosperity, but hasty shortcuts lead to poverty. Action Items: Save $1000 for emergencies Do the debt SNOWBALL Proverbs 6:5 Free yourself, like a gazelle from the hand of the hunter, like a bird from the snare of the fowler. Thank you for joining us online this weekend for the latest in our series #BLESSED --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coastalchurch/message

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin
Be Disciplined and Grow your Network

THINK Business with Jon Dwoskin

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 20:17


Jon talks with Ben Prawdzik, CEO/Co-Founder of Wage.com, an infrastructure software solution that lets people seamlessly and securely share their payroll data with third parties without clunky login flows or document uploads. Ben graduated from Yale with a BS in physics before spending several years in technology investing at Bain Capital. Ben then went to Stanford to pursue an MBA while simultaneously incubating the idea for Wage, which he came up with while working on a financial software deal at Bain. Connect with Jon Dwoskin: Twitter: @jdwoskin Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jonathan.dwoskin Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thejondwoskinexperience/ Website: https://jondwoskin.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jondwoskin/ Email: jon@jondwoskin.com Get Jon's Book: The Think Big Movement: Grow your business big. Very Big!   Connect with Ben Prawdzik: Website: wage.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/wage_inc LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/wagehq

The Daily Break
Gas vs Wage, Virus vs Cancer, Mom vs Bear

The Daily Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 6:41


Andrew Tallman with today's latest trending headlines from Newsweek.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)
TWiET 494: Dig The Gig - Ransomware gang threatens Costa Rica government, Kubernetes API servers exposed to public internet, managing income volatility with Gig Wage

This Week in Enterprise Tech (Video HD)

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 79:10


Ransomware gang threatens to overthrow Costa Rica government Majority of Kubernetes API Servers Exposed to the Public Internet Your iPhone Is Vulnerable to a Malware Attack Even When It's Off Hacker Finds Way to Unlock Tesla Models, Start Cars Training to beat a bad cybersecurity culture Ben Verde-Chapman, Chief Growth Officer of GigWage talks about the financial needs of the gig worker and reducing the impact of income volatility. Hosts: Louis Maresca, Brian Chee, and Curt Franklin Guest: Ben Verde-Chapman Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-enterprise-tech. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: linode.com/twiet Compiler - TWIET plextrac.com/twit

Thoughts on the Market
Mid-Year Economic Outlook: Slowing or Stopping?

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 10:22


As we forecast the remainder of an already uncertain 2022, new questions have emerged around economic data, inflation and the potential for a recession. Chief Cross Asset Strategist Andrew Sheets and Chief Global Economist Seth Carpenter discuss.-----Transcript-----Andrew Sheets: Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets. Morgan Stanley's Chief Cross-Asset Strategist. Seth Carpenter: And I'm Seth Carpenter, Morgan Stanley's Chief Global Economist. Andrew Sheets: And today on the podcast, we'll be talking about our outlook for strategy and markets and the challenges they may face over the coming months. It's Tuesday, May 17th, at 4 p.m. in London. Seth Carpenter: And it's 11 a.m. in New York. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the global Morgan Stanley Economic and Strategy Team have just completed our mid-year outlook process. And, you know, this is a big collaborative effort where the economists think about what the global economy will look like over the next 12 months, and the strategists think about what that could mean for markets. So as we talk about that outlook, I think the economy is the right place to start. As you're looking across the global economy and thinking about the insights from across your team, how do you think the global economy will look over the next 12 months and how is that going to be different from what we've been seeing? Seth Carpenter: So I will say, Andrew, that we titled our piece, the economics piece, slowing or stopping with a question mark, because I think there is a great deal of uncertainty out there about where the economy is going to go over the next six months, over the next 12 months. So what are we looking at as a baseline? Sharp deceleration, but no recession. And I say that with a little bit of trepidation because we also try to put out alternative scenarios, the way things could be better, the way things could be worse. And I have to say, from where I'm sitting right now, I see more ways for the global economy to be worse than the global economy to be better than our baseline scenario. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, I want to dig into that a little bit more because we're seeing, you know, more and more people in the market talk about the risk of a slowdown and talk about the risk of a recession. And yet, you know, it's also hard to ignore the fact that a lot of the economic data looks very good. You know, we have one of the lowest unemployment rates that we've seen in the U.S. in some time. Wage growth is high, spending activity all looks quite high and robust. So, what would drive growth to slow enough where people could really start to think that a recession is getting more likely?Seth Carpenter: So here's how I think about it. We've been coming into this year with a fair amount of momentum, but not a perfectly pristine outlook on the economy. If you take the United States, Q1, GDP was actually negative quarter on quarter. Now, there are a lot of special exceptions there, inventories were a big drag, net exports were a big drag. Underlying domestic spending in the U.S. held up reasonably solidly. But the fact that we had a big drag in the U.S. from net exports tells you a little bit about what's going on around the rest of the world. If you think about what's going on in Europe, we feel that the economy in the eurozone is actually quite precarious. The Russian invasion of Ukraine presents a clear and critical risk to the European economy. I mean, already we've seen a huge jump in energy prices, we've seen a huge jump in food prices and all of that has got to weigh on consumer spending, especially for consumers at the bottom end of the income distribution. And what we see in China is these wave after wave of COVID against the policy of COVID zero means that we're going to have both a hit to demand from China and some disruption to supply. Now, for the moment, we think the disruption to supply is smaller than the hit to demand because there is this closed loop approach to manufacturing. But nevertheless, that shock to China is going to hurt the global economy. Andrew Sheets: So Seth, the other major economic question that's out there is inflation, and you know where it's headed and what's driving it. So I was hoping you could talk a little bit about what our forecasts for inflation look like going forward. Seth Carpenter: Our view right now is that inflation is peaking or will be peaking soon. I say that again with a fair amount of caution because that's been our view for quite some time, and then we get these additional surprises. It's clear that in many, many economies, a huge amount of the inflation that we are seeing is coming from energy and from food. Now energy prices and food prices are not likely to fall noticeably any time soon. But after prices peak, if they go sideways from there, the inflationary impulse ends up starting to fade away and so we think that's important. We also think, the COVID zero policy in China notwithstanding, that there will be some grudging easing of supply chain frictions globally, and that's going to help bring down goods inflation as well over time. So we think inflation is high, we think inflation will stay high, but we think that it's roughly peaked and over the balance of this year and into next year it should be coming down.Andrew Sheets: As you think about central bank policy going forward, what do you think it will look like and do you think it can get back to, quote, normal? Seth Carpenter: I will say, when it comes to monetary policy, that's a question we want to ask globally. Right now, central banks globally are generically either tight or tightening policy. What do I mean by that? Well, we had a lot of EM central banks in Latin America and Eastern Europe that had already started to hike policy a lot last year, got to restrictive territory. And for those central banks, we actually see them starting to ease policy perhaps sometimes next year. For the rest of EM Asia, they're on the steady grind higher because even though inflation had started out being lower in the rest of EM Asia than in the developed market world, we are starting to see those inflationary pressures now and they're starting to normalize policy. And then we get to the developed market economies. There's hiking going on, there's tightening of policy led by the Fed who's out front. What does that mean about getting back to an economy like we had before COVID? One of the charts that we put in the Outlook document has the path for the level of GDP globally. And you can clearly see the huge drop off in the COVID recession, the rapid rebound that got us most of the way, but not all the way back to where we were before COVID hit. And then the question is, how does that growth look as we get past the worst of the COVID cycle? Six months ago, when we did the same exercise, we thought growth would be able to be strong enough that we would get our way back to that pre-COVID trend. But now, because supply has clearly been constrained because of commodity prices, because of labor market frictions, monetary policy is trying to slow aggregate demand down to align itself with this restricted supply. And so what that means is, in our forecast at least, we just never get back to that pre-COVID trend line. Seth Carpenter: All right, Andrew, but I've got a question to throw back at you. So the interplay between economics and markets is really uncertain right now. Where do you think we could be wrong? Could it be that the 3%, ten-year rate that we forecast is too low, is too high? Where do you think the risks are to our asset price forecasts? Andrew Sheets: Yeah, let me try to answer your question directly and talk about the interest rate outlook, because we are counting on interest rates consolidating in the U.S. around current levels. And our thinking is partly based on that economic outlook. You know, I think where we could be wrong is there's a lot of uncertainty around, you know, what level of interest rate will slow the economy enough to balance demand and supply, as you just mentioned. And I think a path where U.S. interest rates for, say, ten year treasuries are 4% rather than 3% like they are today, I think that's an environment where actually the economy is a little bit stronger than we expect and the consumer is less impacted by that higher rate. And it's going to take a higher rate for people to keep more money in savings rather than spending it in the economy and potentially driving that inflation. So I think the path to higher rates and in our view does flow through a more resilient consumer. And those higher rates could mean the economy holds up for longer but markets still struggle somewhat, because those higher discount rates that you can get from safe government bonds mean people will expect, mean people will expect a higher interest rate on a lot of other asset classes. In short, we think the risk reward here for bonds is more balanced. But I think the yield move so far this year has been surprising, it's been historically extreme, and we have to watch out for scenarios where it continues. Seth Carpenter: Okay. That's super helpful. But another channel of transmission of monetary policy comes through exchange rates. So the Fed has clearly been hiking, they've already done 75 basis points, they've lined themselves up to do 50 basis points at at least the next two meetings. Whereas the ECB hasn't even finished their QE program, they haven't started to raise interest rates yet. The Bank of Japan, for example, still at a really accommodative level, and we've seen both of those currencies against the dollar move pretty dramatically. Are we in one of those normal cycles where the dollar starts to rally as the Fed begins to hike, but eventually peaks and starts to come off? Or could we be seeing a broader divergence here? Andrew Sheets: Yeah. So I think this is to your point about a really interesting interplay between markets and Federal Reserve policy, because what the Fed is trying to do is it's trying to slow demand to bring it back in line with what the supply of things in the economy can provide at at current prices rather than it at higher prices, which would mean more inflation. And there's certainly an important interest rate part to that slowing of demand story. There's a stock market part of the story where if somebody's stock portfolio is lower, maybe they're, again, a little bit less inclined to spend money and that could slow the economy. But the currency is also a really important element of it, because that's another way that financial markets can feed back into the real economy and slow growth. And if you know you're an American company that is an exporter and the dollar is stronger, you likely face tougher competition against overseas sellers. And that acts as another headwind to the economy. So we think the dollar strengthens a little bit, you know, over the next month or two, but ultimately does weaken as the market starts to think enough is priced into the Fed. We're not going to get more Federal Reserve interest rates than are already implied by the market, and that helps tamp down some of the dollar strength that we've been seeing. Andrew Sheets: And Seth thanks for taking the time to talk. Seth Carpenter: Andrew, it's been great talking to you. Andrew Sheets: And thanks for listening. If you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts and share the podcast with a friend or colleague today.

Arete Coach: The Art & Science of Executive Coaching
Arete Coach Podcast 1074 Severin Sorensen "Navigating Labor Scarcity and Wage Inflation"

Arete Coach: The Art & Science of Executive Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 33:28


This is episode 1074 of the Arete Coach Podcast with host Severin Sorensen, and wherein we revisit 'The Great Resignation" thread and explore navigating labor scarcity and wage inflation. There are two times as many open positions as there identified unemployed workers to fill the positions. A scarcity of labor is impacting wages, worker sentiment, and compensation. In this episode we explore 10 pockets to find more talent today; and 9 ways to pay your employees higher wages from your internal company resources. We discuss incentives, compensation, gainsharing, and qualities of great places to work. This is the second episode on the Great Resignation, and those desiring more information are encouraged to listen to episode 1050 of the Arete Coach Podcast with host Severin Sorensen, and we explore 'The Great Resignation or The Turning Away From, and Turning To… Trend" was released on 11/29/21. The Arete Coach Podcast seeks to explore the art and science of executive coaching. You can find out more about this podcast at aretecoach.io. This episode was produced on May 15, 2022. Copyright © 2022 by Arete Coach™ LLC. All rights reserved.

Rebel Entrepreneur with Alan Donegan
When Do You Pay Yourself A Wage? With Mike Jones

Rebel Entrepreneur with Alan Donegan

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 51:29


The transition from employee to entrepreneur can be a tough one. Certain fundamentals change completely, such as getting a wage every month or two weeks. When you are first starting this can be tough to get your head around! When do I pay myself? What will my salary be? How do I get money out of my business? Join Mike Jones as he asks Alan all about the transition from wages to entrepreneur.

The Daily Zeitgeist
Dems Vibez R Off, Vampire Tips For Celebs 05.03.22

The Daily Zeitgeist

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 68:06


In episode 1239, Jack and Miles are joined by podcasters and hosts of What Could Go Right? Zachary Karabell and Emma Varvaloucas to discuss... Democrats Find Themselves Faced With A Strange Conundrum for MidTerms / 2024: The Vibes Are All F---ed Up, Since we stan vampire culture… and more! Democrats Find Themselves Faced With A Strange Conundrum for MidTerms / 2024: The Vibes Are All F---ed Up Since we stan vampire culture… The Progress Network: @progressntwrk LISTEN: Umi Says by Soul Supreme See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.