Podcast appearances and mentions of Miles Davis

American jazz musician

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Latest podcast episodes about Miles Davis

The Chase Thomas Podcast
Giannis Dominating With Bucks Again, Durant's Future With Nets, & Louisville Might Be Historically Bad With The Washington Post's Michael Lee & Stats By Will

The Chase Thomas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 107:04


Chase Thomas is the Sports Renaissance Man, Atlanta Sports Guy & VFL. On today's program, Chase is joined by The Washington Post's Michael Lee to talk about the Bucks hot start in the East, Giannis vs. Luka for MVP, what happens with Kevin Durant this season, Kawhi missing a lot of time with the Clippers, John Wall's return, if the Lakers would really trade Anthony Davis, Lebron and Miles Davis similarities and much more (1:00). Then, Stats By Will joins the program to talk about Tennessee's big opening win, Tyreke Key being a bucket, USC's embarrassing loss to FGCU, Houston looking awesome, Drew Pember Hive, Graham Ike being out for Wyoming, the horrible Louisville Cardinals and much more (60:00). Host: Chase Thomas Guests: Michael Lee & Stats By Will Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Composers Datebook
Senor Rodrigo's popular Concierto

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 2:00


Synopsis The world's most popular classical guitar concerto, the “Concierto de Aranjuez” by Joaquin Rodrigo, had its first performance on today's date in 1940, in Barcelona. Joaquin Rodrigo was born in Spain in 1901 and lost his sight at the age of three. He wrote all of his music on a Braille music typewriter. The “Concierto de Aranjuez,” inspired by a small town of that name thirty miles south of Madrid, remains his signature piece, though he wrote a number of other successful works. Rodrigo died on July 6th, 1999, at the age of 97. In 1959, a friend had played a recording of Rodrigo's concerto for the American jazz trumpeter Miles Davis. Miles Davis said, “After listening to it for a couple of weeks, I couldn't get it out of my mind.” So, Miles Davis played it for his friend, jazz composer and arranger Gil Evans, and in short order the two collaborated on their own 16-minute version of Rodrigo's score. Their collaboration was included on their classic 1960 Columbia LP entitled “Sketches of Spain.” At the recording session, Miles paid Rodrigo this compliment: “That melody is so strong that the softer you play it, the stronger it gets…” Music Played in Today's Program Joaquin Rodrigo (1902-1999) Concierto de Aranjuez Manuel Barrueco, guitar; Philharmonic Orchestra; Placido Domingo, conductor. EMI 56175

Mistconceptions Podcast
Tales To Inspire S1E11: Haus der Kunst Part 1

Mistconceptions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 95:13


The members of Operation: American Defense encounter a British super that has some classified intel on the whereabouts of Adolf Hitler. The heroes decide to combine their efforts to bring an end to the leader of the Third Reich. FEATURING SPECIAL GUEST @Drakoniques AS RED REVENANT! Join our Discord: https://discord.gg/PxbfcpTJu2 Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mistconceptionspod Use the coupon code "estherhateschristmas" to get $10 off your order from our store at www.mistconceptionspod.com/shop/ Cast: David (he/him; @MrBananaSocks) as the Editor in Chief, Mitch (he/they; @mitchbustillos) as Omission (he/him), Marlo (she/her; @boggwitch) as Crystal Gazer (she/her), Phil (he/them; @BMCPHILANTHROPY) as Torchbearer (he/him), Kristie (she/her; @PolishKristie) as Geiger Gwen (she/her), Occam (they/them; @occamsockemrobo) as Dr. Fusion (he/him), Kari (she/her) as Mother Midnight (she/her) Music in this episode: Uptown Rhapsody by Teddy Hill, Basie Boogie by Count Basie and his Orchestra, Au Revoir, L'Amour by Paul Whiteman, Flamenco Sketches by Miles Davis

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma
Ep 302: The Life and Times of Teesta Setalvad

The Seen and the Unseen - hosted by Amit Varma

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 302:17


She began as a journalist in the pursuit of truth. She went on to embrace activism in the pursuit of justice. Teesta Setalvad joins Amit Varma in episode 302 to talk about all that she learnt from her life and work. (For full linked show notes, go to SeenUnseen.in.) Also check out: 1. Teesta Setalvad on Twitter, Facebook and Amazon. 2. Foot Soldier of the Constitution -- Teesta Setalvad. 3. Beyond Doubt: A Dossier on Gandhi's Assassination -- Teesta Setalvad. 4. Gujarat: Behind the mirage -- Edited by Teesta Setalvad. 5. Citizens for Justice and Peace. (Also see their About and Twitter pages..) 6. Sabrang India. 7. Teesta Setalvad | A powerful voice for India's human rights movement -- Video feature by Sabrang India. 8. A half baked secularism -- Teesta Setalvad. 9. Hopes for tomorrow -- Teesta Setalvad's speech in Nuremberg. 10. Courts keep me Busy -- Teesta Setalvad. 11. My Hindu Hriday Samrats -- Teesta Setalvad. 12. Teesta Setalvad Refuses to be Silenced. 13. It's vital to recall the sparks of hate that burst into Gujarat's brutal 2002 riots -- Teesta Setalvad. 14. Teesta Setalvad empowers citizens and questions modalities with regards to NRC -- CJP team. 15. Wrong intention, wrong rationale, wrong method -- Teesta Setalvad on CAA-NPR-NRC. 16. Teesta Setalvad addresses massive crowd on CAA, NPR-NRC -- CJP Team. 17. What next for those left out of the NRC? -- Teesta Setalvad. 18. A Home Behind Bars -- Teesta Setalvad. 19. Prisoner of Conscience Teesta Setalvad -- Feminist Dissent. 20. Forced confinement is loss of dignity, says Teesta Setalvad -- Sonam Saigal. 21. The pandemic has put the spotlight on inhumane conditions in Indian prisons -- Teesta Setalvad. 22. Teesta Setalvad's First Interview After Bail by Arfa Khanum Sherwani. 23. My Life: Law and Other Things -- MC Setalvad. 24. Javed Anand in the Indian Express. 25. Basavanna, Narayana Guru, Kabir, Guru Nanak, Eknath, Namdev, Tukaram and the Bhakti Movement. 26. Nanak Was Here -- Episode 166 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Amardeep Singh). 27. Savitribai Phule, Jyotirao Phule and BR Ambedkar. 28. Jogan, starring Nargis, on YouTube and IMDb. 29. Mirabai and Janabai. 30. The Poverty of India -- Dadabhai Naoroji. 31. Dadabhai Naoroji and the Fight for India -- Episode 187 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Dinyar Patel). 32. The Indigo Revolt, the Santhal Rebellion, the Tebhaga Movement and Birsa Munda. 33.  The Collected Writings and Speeches of Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar. 34. Caste, Capitalism and Chandra Bhan Prasad — Episode 296 of The Seen and the Unseen, 35. Picture of Arvind Kejriwal with portraits of Babasaheb Ambedkar and Bhagat Singh in the background. 36. India: Legacies and Challenges of the Land & Forest Rights Movement -- Ashok Chowdhury, Teesta Setalvad, Roma and Divya Kapoor. 37. Forest Rights Act, 2006. 38. The Pathalgadi Movement. 39. Stan Swamy profiled by Scroll, India Today, the Wire, the Times of India and Hindustan Times. 40. The Indianness of Indian Food — Episode 95 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Vikram Doctor). 41. Understanding India Through Its Languages — Episode 232 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Peggy Mohan). 42. The Refreshing Audacity of Vinay Singhal -- Episode 291 of The Seen and the Unseen. 43. Romila Thapar and KM Panikkar on Amazon. 44. Romila Thapar interviewed by Teesta Setalvad. 45. The Gita Press and Hindu Nationalism — Episode 139 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Akshaya Mukul). 46. Gita Press and the Making of Hindu India — Akshaya Mukul. 47. The Ideas of Our Constitution — Episode 164 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Madhav Khosla). 48. India's Founding Moment — Madhav Khosla. 49. P Sainath interviewed by Teesta Setalvad. 50. A People's Constitution — Rohit De. 51. All the President's Men -- Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. 52. The Citizenship Battles — Episode 152 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Srinath Raghavan). 53. The Tragedy of Our Farm Bills — Episode 211 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Ajay Shah). 54. The Nellie Massacre. 55. The Life and Times of Vir Sanghvi — Episode 236 of The Seen and the Unseen. 56. A Rude Life — Vir Sanghvi. 57. The BJP Before Modi — Episode 202 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Vinay Sitapati). 58. Jugalbandi: The BJP Before Modi — Vinay Sitapati. 59. The Importance of the 1991 Reforms -- Episode 237 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Shruti Rajagopalan and Ajay Shah). 60. Gyan Prakash on the Emergency — Episode 103 of The Seen and the Unseen. 61. Emergency Chronicles — Gyan Prakash. 62. The Decline of the Congress -- Episode 248 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Rahul Verma). 63. The Incredible Curiosities of Mukulika Banerjee — Episode 276 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Mukulika Banerjee). 64. The Pathan Unarmed — Mukulika Banerjee. 65. Private Truths, Public Lies — Timur Kuran. 66. Episodes of The Seen and the Unseen on the creator economy with Roshan Abbas, Varun Duggirala, Neelesh Misra, Snehal Pradhan, Chuck Gopal, Nishant Jain, Deepak Shenoy and Abhijit Bhaduri. 67. Maharashtra Politics Unscrambled — Episode 151 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Sujatha Anandan). 68. Prabodhankar Thackeray's life and literature. 69. From Cairo to Delhi With Max Rodenbeck — Episode 281 of The Seen and the Unseen. 70. Jerry Pinto on Amazon and Instagram. 71. HM Seervai on Amazon and Wikipedia. 72. Dilip D'Souza on Amazon, Twitter and his blog. 73. The Reflections of Samarth Bansal -- Episode 299 of The Seen and the Unseen. 74. Don't Choose Tribalism Over Principles -- Amit Varma. 75. Khabar Lahariya. 76. Tamas (the book) -- Bhisham Sahni. 77. Tamas (the film) -- Govind Nihalani. 78. Being Muslim in India — Episode 216 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Ghazala Wahab). 79. Hussain Haidry, Hindustani Musalmaan -- Episode 275 of The Seen and the Unseen. 80. Muslims and I -- Vijay Tendulkar. 81. Whatever happened To Ehsan Jafri on February 28, 2002? — Harsh Mander. 82. Undercover: My Journey into the Darkness of Hindutva -- Ashish Khetan. 83. A World of Stopped Watches — Amit Varma. 84. The Banality of Evil. 85. Her rapists were sentenced to life in prison. Now they're free, and she's in hiding -- CNN report on the Bilkis Bano case. 86. The Jyotsna Yagnik judgement in Communalism Combat. 87. Rights and Wrongs: Ordeal by Fire in the Killing Fields of Gujarat -- Editors Guild Fact Finding Mission Report by Aakar Patel, Dileep Padgaonkar and BG Verghese. 88. The Srikrishna Commission report. 89. The Sarkari Mussalman: Life and travails of a soldier educationist -- Lt Gen Zameer Uddin Shah. 90. India's Security State — Episode 242 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Josy Joseph). 91. The Silent Coup: A History of India's Deep State — Josy Joseph. 92. Karan Thapar's interviews with AP Shah and Dushyant Dave. 93. Flogging in Kheda. Rape in Kannauj. 94. Rukmini Sees India's Multitudes — Episode 261 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Rukmini S). 95. Whole Numbers and Half Truths — Rukmini S. 96. The Intellectual Foundations of Hindutva — Episode 115 of The Seen and the Unseen (w Aakar Patel). 97. Aakar Patel Is Full of Hope — Episode 270 of The Seen and the Unseen. 98. The Scalpel, the Sword: The Story of Doctor Norman Bethune -- Ted Allan and Sydney Gordon. 99. Eduardo Galeano and Orhan Pamuk on Amazon. 100. The Framing of India's Constitution -- Edited by B Shiva Rao. 101. The Constituent Assembly Debates. 102. Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Mallikarjun Mansur and Bhimsen Joshi on Spotify. 103. Satyajit Ray, Ingmar Bergman and Charlie Chaplin. Check out Amit's online course, The Art of Clear Writing. And subscribe to The India Uncut Newsletter. It's free! Episode art: ‘The Scales of Injustice' by Simahina.

Cougar Sports Saturday
Injury Report for BYU vs Boise State

Cougar Sports Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 5:45


Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte breakdown the injury report for BYU vs Boise State. The guys discuss injuries to Kody Epps, Max Tooley, Miles Davis and others. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jazz After Dark
Jazz After Dark, Nov. 1, 2022

Jazz After Dark

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 58:00


On tonight's show: Sarah Vaughan & the Hugo Peretti Orchestra, Tommy Flanagan and Paul Chambers with Pepper Adams, Kenny Burrell & Kenny Clarke, Johnny Richards, Clark Terry with Paul Gonsalves, Horace Silver, Gene Ammons, Dave Brubeck, Mose Allison, Ella Fitzgerald, the Benny Carter All-Star Sax Ensemble, and Miles Davis with Quincy Jones.

The Women in Vinyl Podcast
Episode 34 - Cheryl Pawelski, Omnivore Recordings

The Women in Vinyl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:13


Today we're joined by Cheryl Pawelski co-founder of Omnivore Recordings and two time Grammy® Award-winning producer. Cheryl has had almost every job you can imagine in the music business, starting at the legendary Capitol Records, and moving her way through Rhino Entertainment, Concord Music Group, Warner Music Group, iTunes, Sony Legacy, BMG and the Universal Music Group. A true trailblazer and champion of the complete discography, Cheryl has compiled, curated and created more legendary and comprehensive collections, than we can begin to list here, but some of the highlights are Wilco, Aretha Franklin, Miles Davis, Otis Redding, Willie Nelson and John Coltrane… just to name a few. Cheryl Pawelski: https://cherylpawelski.com/Omnivore: http://omnivorerecordings.com/about-omnivore-recordings/Interview with Henry Rollins: https://www.udiscovermusic.com/news/henry-rollins-omnivore-cheryl-pawelski/ Huge thank you to Vinylux Records and the Fleabops for the use of their song ‘Sinner Not Saint' off the upcoming record ‘Get In, Sit Down, Shut Up, Hold On'. For more visit www.vinylux.com THANK YOU TO OUR AWESOME SPONSORS!The ones that make your vinyl needs even more accessible with so many great codes and resources. Other Record Labels - Who've gifted our listeners - you! - a 50% code in their store for the myriad of resources compiled there using the code WIV50 at checkout! https://www.otherrecordlabels.com/store Selektor Record Bags - Our new favorite record bag: https://www.theselektor.com/us/Koeppel Design (pronounced Kep-ul) - Sleek and sophisticated, handmade record collection organization! Get $10 off your first order of $85 using the code WOMENINVINYL at checkout! https://koeppeldesign.com/Eargasm - High fidelity ear plugs! keep your hearing protected in style! Eargasm has a great deal for you with 10% off your order using, you guessed it, discount code: WOMENINVINYL at checkout. www.eargasm.com/ Glowtronics - Custom slip mats - you already love the WIV branded slipmat, but think, you can make your own! Get 15% off using the code: WOMENINVINYL15 at www.glowtronics-store.com/ Nugen Audio - Innovative, intuitive, award-winning professional audio plugins and software for all your creative music producing and sound design needs! Use code WOMENINVINYL for 20% off at check out: https://nugenaudio.com/womeninvinyl/ Vinyl Revolution Record Show - Attend one of the longest running record shows out there. 55 dealer tables filled with vendors from all over the east coast and tons of rare and collectible vinyl records! Find more at: https://www.instagram.com/vinylrevolutionrecordshow/ Want to be a sponsor too? Email us: info@womeninvinyl.com As always, join the conversation on Instagram or send us a note at: media@womeninvinyl.comCheck out www.womeninvinyl.com for past episodes, the store, job board, and the growing library of resources!Don't forget to like, subscribe and give us a review on your favorite podcast delivery method! You can also contribute to furthering our mission at https://www.patreon.com/womeninvinylWhere you'll find all of the B-Sides, Deep Cuts and amazing extras, including longer episodes and contribute to the creation of scholarships and educational opportunities to further the demystification and infiltration of more Women and Non-Binary identifying humans into the Vinyl Making Space!

Rockonteurs with Gary Kemp and Guy Pratt
S3E8: Darryl Jones

Rockonteurs with Gary Kemp and Guy Pratt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 64:58 Very Popular


This week on Rockonteurs we chat with one of the all-time great bass players and part of the inner sanctum of The Rolling Stones since 1994, we welcome Darryl Jones to the podcast. Darryl has enjoyed a remarkable career thus far. He started playing with Miles Davis in the '80s before working with Sting in 1985. In 1993 he auditioned to join the Stones after Bill Wyman retired and since 1994, he's recorded and played with the band since. In this episode, he talks with such warmth about his special relationship with Charlie Watts, playing with Miles and Sting and his new documentary ‘In The Blood', which is out now on Amazon Prime. Rockonteurs is produced by Ben Jones for Gimme Sugar Productions. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

You'll Hear It - Daily Jazz Advice
Finding Your Identity

You'll Hear It - Daily Jazz Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 14:05 Very Popular


Find your inner pianist with some help from Adam Maness and Peter MartinCheck out Russell Ferrante and see some serious piano chops. Ever heard that Miles Davis track Peter was referring to? Check it out here. Did you miss Peter's rant video? You can find that here. Have a question for us? Leave us a SpeakPipe Checkout courses from Adam, Peter and more at Open Studio Let us know what you think by leaving a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ review, or head over to our YouTube channel.Follow us on Twitter | Instagram

The Principal Liner Notes Podcast
Episode 92: Jamming to the Gifts & Strengths Of Others

The Principal Liner Notes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 21:29


In this episode, we explore the collaborative synergy that happens when you play to the strengths of others. We connect with musical examples from The Allman Brothers Band, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and The Beatles. This episode is also available in video format on Spotify.

Money Making Conversations
Emayatzy Corinealdi, Jax Stewart on Hulu's REASONABLE DOUBT, discusses working with Kerry Washington, Michael Ealy and more!

Money Making Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 24:22


Emayatzy Corinealdi, Jax Stewart on Hulu's REASONABLE DOUBT, discusses preparing for set, taking charge of your career as an actor, and her next goals.Topics Discussed● Series is loosely based on Celebrity attorney Shawn Holley, who is a co-executive producer.● When we first meet Jax, she's going through all these crises but still managing her life as well asgetting into this new case with Brayden Mitchell.● The idea of code switching doesn't mean that one version is real and the other version is not -you can be both versions and both of them be authentic.● There are so many different kinds of characters on the show and we truly just get to see thecharacters exist.● Jax is trying to juggle it all – as a mother, as a wife – and as a career-oriented person; she'sunapologetically ambitious and unapologetically in her powerMore About Emayatzy CorinealdiEmayatzy can currently be seen as powerful attorney Jax Stewart on Hulu's REASONABLE DOUBT produced by Kerry Washington and Larry Wilmore. Emayatzy was last seen as “Candace Brewer” opposite Dwayne Johnson in the HBO comedy series BALLERS as well as “Tia Young” in THE RED LINE.Corinealdi was previously best known for her breakout performance opposite David Oyelowo in the critically acclaimed Sundance feature MIDDLE OF NOWHERE, which was nominated for the "Grand Jury Prize" and won "Best Director" for Ava DuVernay. Named one of IndieWire's "Top Ten Faces to Watch for the Fall" out of the Toronto International Film Festival, Emayatzy went on to win "Breakthrough Actor" at the Gotham Awards and received a nomination for "Best Actress" at the Independent Spirit Awards.Corinealdi also starred as the female lead opposite Don Cheadle in the Miles Davis biopic MILES AHEAD for Sony Pictures Classics, which premiered at the 2015 New York Film Festival and screened at Cannes, Sundance, Berlin and SXSW. Emayatzy also appeared in the highly-anticipated History Channel adaptation of Alex Haley's mini-series ROOTS, which received an Emmy nomination for “Outstanding Limited Series”. Corinealdi was also seen as "Tessie" in the Amazon original series HAND OF GOD opposite Ron Perlman for executive producers Marc Forster and Ben Watkins in addition to starring in Karyn Kusama's psychological thriller THE INVITATION opposite Logan Marshall Green, Tammy Blanchard and Michiel Huisman, which premiered opening night of the 2015 SXSW Film Festival and was acquired by Drafthouse Films.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 156: “I Was Made to Love Her” by Stevie Wonder

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “I Was Made to Love Her", the early career of Stevie Wonder, and the Detroit riots of 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "Groovin'" by the Young Rascals. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, I've put together a Mixcloud playlist of all the recordings excerpted in this episode. The best value way to get all of Stevie Wonder's early singles is this MP3 collection, which has the original mono single mixes of fifty-five tracks for a very reasonable price. For those who prefer physical media, this is a decent single-CD collection of his early work at a very low price indeed. As well as the general Motown information listed below, I've also referred to Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: The Soulful Journey of Stevie Wonder by Mark Ribowsky, which rather astonishingly is the only full-length biography of Wonder, to Higher Ground: Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and the Rise and Fall of American Soul by Craig Werner, and to Detroit 67: The Year That Changed Soul by Stuart Cosgrove. For Motown-related information in this and other Motown episodes, I've used the following resources: Where Did Our Love Go? The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound by Nelson George is an excellent popular history of the various companies that became Motown. To Be Loved by Berry Gordy is Gordy's own, understandably one-sided, but relatively well-written, autobiography. Women of Motown: An Oral History by Susan Whitall is a collection of interviews with women involved in Motown. I Hear a Symphony: Motown and Crossover R&B by J. Andrew Flory is an academic look at Motown. The Motown Encyclopaedia by Graham Betts is an exhaustive look at the people and records involved in Motown's thirty-year history. How Sweet It Is by Lamont Dozier and Scott B. Bomar is Dozier's autobiography, while Come and Get These Memories by Brian and Eddie Holland and Dave Thompson is the Holland brothers'. Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life and Music of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson by "Dr Licks" is a mixture of a short biography of the great bass player, and tablature of his most impressive bass parts. And Motown Junkies is an infrequently-updated blog looking at (so far) the first 694 tracks released on Motown singles. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I begin -- this episode deals with disability and racism, and also deals from the very beginning with sex work and domestic violence. It also has some discussion of police violence and sexual assault. As always I will try to deal with those subjects as non-judgementally and sensitively as possible, but if you worry that anything about those subjects might disturb you, please check the transcript. Calvin Judkins was not a good man. Lula Mae Hardaway thought at first he might be, when he took her in, with her infant son whose father had left before the boy was born. He was someone who seemed, when he played the piano, to be deeply sensitive and emotional, and he even did the decent thing and married her when he got her pregnant. She thought she could save him, even though he was a street hustler and not even very good at it, and thirty years older than her -- she was only nineteen, he was nearly fifty. But she soon discovered that he wasn't interested in being saved, and instead he was interested in hurting her. He became physically and financially abusive, and started pimping her out. Lula would eventually realise that Calvin Judkins was no good, but not until she got pregnant again, shortly after the birth of her second son. Her third son was born premature -- different sources give different numbers for how premature, with some saying four months and others six weeks -- and while he apparently went by Stevland Judkins throughout his early childhood, the name on his birth certificate was apparently Stevland Morris, Lula having decided not to give another child the surname of her abuser, though nobody has ever properly explained where she got the surname "Morris" from. Little Stevland was put in an incubator with an oxygen mask, which saved the tiny child's life but destroyed his sight, giving him a condition called retinopathy of prematurity -- a condition which nowadays can be prevented and cured, but in 1951 was just an unavoidable consequence for some portion of premature babies. Shortly after the family moved from Saginaw to Detroit, Lula kicked Calvin out, and he would remain only a peripheral figure in his children's lives, but one thing he did do was notice young Stevland's interest in music, and on his increasingly infrequent visits to his wife and kids -- visits that usually ended with violence -- he would bring along toy instruments for the young child to play, like a harmonica and a set of bongos. Stevie was a real prodigy, and by the time he was nine he had a collection of real musical instruments, because everyone could see that the kid was something special. A neighbour who owned a piano gave it to Stevie when she moved out and couldn't take it with her. A local Lions Club gave him a drum kit at a party they organised for local blind children, and a barber gave him a chromatic harmonica after seeing him play his toy one. Stevie gave his first professional performance when he was eight. His mother had taken him to a picnic in the park, and there was a band playing, and the little boy got as close to the stage as he could and started dancing wildly. The MC of the show asked the child who he was, and he said "My name is Stevie, and I can sing and play drums", so of course they got the cute kid up on stage behind the drum kit while the band played Johnny Ace's "Pledging My Love": [Excerpt: Johnny Ace, "Pledging My Love"] He did well enough that they paid him seventy-five cents -- an enormous amount for a small child at that time -- though he was disappointed afterwards that they hadn't played something faster that would really allow him to show off his drumming skills. After that he would perform semi-regularly at small events, and always ask to be paid in quarters rather than paper money, because he liked the sound of the coins -- one of his party tricks was to be able to tell one coin from another by the sound of them hitting a table. Soon he formed a duo with a neighbourhood friend, John Glover, who was a couple of years older and could play guitar while Stevie sang and played harmonica and bongos. The two were friends, and both accomplished musicians for their age, but that wasn't the only reason Stevie latched on to Glover. Even as young as he was, he knew that Motown was soon going to be the place to be in Detroit if you were a musician, and Glover had an in -- his cousin was Ronnie White of the Miracles. Stevie and John performed as a duo everywhere they could and honed their act, performing particularly at the talent shows which were such an incubator of Black musical talent at the time, and they also at this point seem to have got the attention of Clarence Paul, but it was White who brought the duo to Motown. Stevie and John first played for White and Bobby Rodgers, another of the Miracles, then when they were impressed they took them through the several layers of Motown people who would have to sign off on signing a new act. First they were taken to see Brian Holland, who was a rising star within Motown as "Please Mr. Postman" was just entering the charts. They impressed him with a performance of the Miracles song "Bad Girl": [Excerpt: The Miracles, "Bad Girl"] After that, Stevie and John went to see Mickey Stevenson, who was at first sceptical, thinking that a kid so young -- Stevie was only eleven at the time -- must be some kind of novelty act rather than a serious musician. He said later "It was like, what's next, the singing mouse?" But Stevenson was won over by the child's talent. Normally, Stevenson had the power to sign whoever he liked to the label, but given the extra legal complications involved in signing someone under-age, he had to get Berry Gordy's permission. Gordy didn't even like signing teenagers because of all the extra paperwork that would be involved, and he certainly wasn't interested in signing pre-teens. But he came down to the studio to see what Stevie could do, and was amazed, not by his singing -- Gordy didn't think much of that -- but by his instrumental ability. First Stevie played harmonica and bongos as proficiently as an adult professional, and then he made his way around the studio playing on every other instrument in the place -- often only a few notes, but competent on them all. Gordy decided to sign the duo -- and the initial contract was for an act named "Steve and John" -- but it was soon decided to separate them. Glover would be allowed to hang around Motown while he was finishing school, and there would be a place for him when he finished -- he later became a staff songwriter, working on tracks for the Four Tops and the Miracles among others, and he would even later write a number one hit, "You Don't Have to be a Star (to be in My Show)" for Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr -- but they were going to make Stevie a star right now. The man put in charge of that was Clarence Paul. Paul, under his birth name of Clarence Pauling, had started his career in the "5" Royales, a vocal group he formed with his brother Lowman Pauling that had been signed to Apollo Records by Ralph Bass, and later to King Records. Paul seems to have been on at least some of the earliest recordings by the group, so is likely on their first single, "Give Me One More Chance": [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Give Me One More Chance"] But Paul was drafted to go and fight in the Korean War, and so wasn't part of the group's string of hit singles, mostly written by his brother Lowman, like "Think", which later became better known in James Brown's cover version, or "Dedicated to the One I Love", later covered by the Shirelles, but in its original version dominated by Lowman's stinging guitar playing: [Excerpt: The "5" Royales, "Dedicated to the One I Love"] After being discharged, Clarence had shortened his name to Clarence Paul, and had started recording for all the usual R&B labels like Roulette and Federal, with little success: [Excerpt: Clarence Paul, "I'm Gonna Love You, Love You Til I Die"] He'd also co-written "I Need Your Lovin'", which had been an R&B hit for Roy Hamilton: [Excerpt: Roy Hamilton, "I Need Your Lovin'"] Paul had recently come to work for Motown – one of the things Berry Gordy did to try to make his label more attractive was to hire the relatives of R&B stars on other labels, in the hopes of getting them to switch to Motown – and he was the new man on the team, not given any of the important work to do. He was working with acts like Henry Lumpkin and the Valladiers, and had also been the producer of "Mind Over Matter", the single the Temptations had released as The Pirates in a desperate attempt to get a hit: [Excerpt: The Pirates, "Mind Over Matter"] Paul was the person you turned to when no-one else was interested, and who would come up with bizarre ideas. A year or so after the time period we're talking about, it was him who produced an album of country music for the Supremes, before they'd had a hit, and came up with "The Man With the Rock and Roll Banjo Band" for them: [Excerpt: The Supremes, "The Man With The Rock and Roll Banjo Band"] So, Paul was the perfect person to give a child -- by this time twelve years old -- who had the triple novelties of being a multi-instrumentalist, a child, and blind. Stevie started spending all his time around the Motown studios, partly because he was eager to learn everything about making records and partly because his home life wasn't particularly great and he wanted to be somewhere else. He earned the affection and irritation, in equal measure, of people at Motown both for his habit of wandering into the middle of sessions because he couldn't see the light that showed that the studio was in use, and for his practical joking. He was a great mimic, and would do things like phoning one of the engineers and imitating Berry Gordy's voice, telling the engineer that Stevie would be coming down, and to give him studio equipment to take home. He'd also astonish women by complimenting them, in detail, on their dresses, having been told in advance what they looked like by an accomplice. But other "jokes" were less welcome -- he would regularly sexually assault women working at Motown, grabbing their breasts or buttocks and then claiming it was an accident because he couldn't see what he was doing. Most of the women he molested still speak of him fondly, and say everybody loved him, and this may even be the case -- and certainly I don't think any of us should be judged too harshly for what we did when we were twelve -- but this kind of thing led to a certain amount of pressure to make Stevie's career worth the extra effort he was causing everyone at Motown. Because Berry Gordy was not impressed with Stevie's vocals, the decision was made to promote him as a jazz instrumentalist, and so Clarence Paul insisted that his first release be an album, rather than doing what everyone would normally do and only put out an album after a hit single. Paul reasoned that there was no way on Earth they were going to be able to get a hit single with a jazz instrumental by a twelve-year-old kid, and eventually persuaded Gordy of the wisdom of this idea. So they started work on The Jazz Soul of Little Stevie, released under his new stagename of Little Stevie Wonder, supposedly a name given to him after Berry Gordy said "That kid's a wonder!", though Mickey Stevenson always said that the name came from a brainstorming session between him and Clarence Paul. The album featured Stevie on harmonica, piano, and organ on different tracks, but on the opening track, "Fingertips", he's playing the bongos that give the track its name: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (studio version)"] The composition of that track is credited to Paul and the arranger Hank Cosby, but Beans Bowles, who played flute on the track, always claimed that he came up with the melody, and it seems quite likely to me that most of the tracks on the album were created more or less as jam sessions -- though Wonder's contributions were all overdubbed later. The album sat in the can for several months -- Berry Gordy was not at all sure of its commercial potential. Instead, he told Paul to go in another direction -- focusing on Wonder's blindness, he decided that what they needed to do was create an association in listeners' minds with Ray Charles, who at this point was at the peak of his commercial power. So back into the studio went Wonder and Paul, to record an album made up almost entirely of Ray Charles covers, titled Tribute to Uncle Ray. (Some sources have the Ray Charles tribute album recorded first -- and given Motown's lax record-keeping at this time it may be impossible to know for sure -- but this is the way round that Mark Ribowsky's biography of Wonder has it). But at Motown's regular quality control meeting it was decided that there wasn't a single on the album, and you didn't release an album like that without having a hit single first. By this point, Clarence Paul was convinced that Berry Gordy was just looking for excuses not to do anything with Wonder -- and there may have been a grain of truth to that. There's some evidence that Gordy was worried that the kid wouldn't be able to sing once his voice broke, and was scared of having another Frankie Lymon on his hands. But the decision was made that rather than put out either of those albums, they would put out a single. The A-side was a song called "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1", which very much played on Wonder's image as a loveable naive kid: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "I Call it Pretty Music But the Old People Call it the Blues, Part 1"] The B-side, meanwhile, was part two -- a slowed-down, near instrumental, version of the song, reframed as an actual blues, and as a showcase for Wonder's harmonica playing rather than his vocals. The single wasn't a hit, but it made number 101 on the Billboard charts, just missing the Hot One Hundred, which for the debut single of a new artist wasn't too bad, especially for Motown at this point in time, when most of its releases were flopping. That was good enough that Gordy authorised the release of the two albums that they had in the can. The next single, "Little Water Boy", was a rather baffling duet with Clarence Paul, which did nothing at all on the charts. [Excerpt: Clarence Paul and Little Stevie Wonder, "Little Water Boy"] After this came another flop single, written by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Janie Bradford, before the record that finally broke Little Stevie Wonder out into the mainstream in a big way. While Wonder hadn't had a hit yet, he was sent out on the first Motortown Revue tour, along with almost every other act on the label. Because he hadn't had a hit, he was supposed to only play one song per show, but nobody had told him how long that song should be. He had quickly become a great live performer, and the audiences were excited to watch him, so when he went into extended harmonica solos rather than quickly finishing the song, the audience would be with him. Clarence Paul, who came along on the tour, would have to motion to the onstage bandleader to stop the music, but the bandleader would know that the audiences were with Stevie, and so would just keep the song going as long as Stevie was playing. Often Paul would have to go on to the stage and shout in Wonder's ear to stop playing -- and often Wonder would ignore him, and have to be physically dragged off stage by Paul, still playing, causing the audience to boo Paul for stopping him from playing. Wonder would complain off-stage that the audience had been enjoying it, and didn't seem to get it into his head that he wasn't the star of the show, that the audiences *were* enjoying him, but were *there* to see the Miracles and Mary Wells and the Marvelettes and Marvin Gaye. This made all the acts who had to go on after him, and who were running late as a result, furious at him -- especially since one aspect of Wonder's blindness was that his circadian rhythms weren't regulated by sunlight in the same way that the sighted members of the tour's were. He would often wake up the entire tour bus by playing his harmonica at two or three in the morning, while they were all trying to sleep. Soon Berry Gordy insisted that Clarence Paul be on stage with Wonder throughout his performance, ready to drag him off stage, so that he wouldn't have to come out onto the stage to do it. But one of the first times he had done this had been on one of the very first Motortown Revue shows, before any of his records had come out. There he'd done a performance of "Fingertips", playing the flute part on harmonica rather than only playing bongos throughout as he had on the studio version -- leaving the percussion to Marvin Gaye, who was playing drums for Wonder's set: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] But he'd extended the song with a little bit of call-and-response vocalising: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] After the long performance ended, Clarence Paul dragged Wonder off-stage and the MC asked the audience to give him a round of applause -- but then Stevie came running back on and carried on playing: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] By this point, though, the musicians had started to change over -- Mary Wells, who was on after Wonder, was using different musicians from his, and some of her players were already on stage. You can hear Joe Swift, who was playing bass for Wells, asking what key he was meant to be playing in: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Fingertips (Parts 1 & 2)"] Eventually, after six and a half minutes, they got Wonder off stage, but that performance became the two sides of Wonder's next single, with "Fingertips Part 2", the part with the ad lib singing and the false ending, rather than the instrumental part one, being labelled as the side the DJs should play. When it was released, the song started a slow climb up the charts, and by August 1963, three months after it came out, it was at number one -- only the second ever Motown number one, and the first ever live single to get there. Not only that, but Motown released a live album -- Recorded Live, the Twelve-Year-Old Genius (though as many people point out he was thirteen when it was released -- he was twelve when it was recorded though) and that made number one on the albums chart, becoming the first Motown album ever to do so. They followed up "Fingertips" with a similar sounding track, "Workout, Stevie, Workout", which made number thirty-three. After that, his albums -- though not yet his singles -- started to be released as by "Stevie Wonder" with no "Little" -- he'd had a bit of a growth spurt and his voice was breaking, and so marketing him as a child prodigy was not going to work much longer and they needed to transition him into a star with adult potential. In the Motown of 1963 that meant cutting an album of standards, because the belief at the time in Motown was that the future for their entertainers was doing show tunes at the Copacabana. But for some reason the audience who had wanted an R&B harmonica instrumental with call-and-response improvised gospel-influenced yelling was not in the mood for a thirteen year old singing "Put on a Happy Face" and "When You Wish Upon a Star", and especially not when the instrumental tracks were recorded in a key that suited him at age twelve but not thirteen, so he was clearly straining. "Fingertips" being a massive hit also meant Stevie was now near the top of the bill on the Motortown Revue when it went on its second tour. But this actually put him in a precarious position. When he had been down at the bottom of the bill and unknown, nobody expected anything from him, and he was following other minor acts, so when he was surprisingly good the audiences went wild. Now, near the top of the bill, he had to go on after Marvin Gaye, and he was not nearly so impressive in that context. The audiences were polite enough, but not in the raptures he was used to. Although Stevie could still beat Gaye in some circumstances. At Motown staff parties, Berry Gordy would always have a contest where he'd pit two artists against each other to see who could win the crowd over, something he thought instilled a fun and useful competitive spirit in his artists. They'd alternate songs, two songs each, and Gordy would decide on the winner based on audience response. For the 1963 Motown Christmas party, it was Stevie versus Marvin. Wonder went first, with "Workout, Stevie, Workout", and was apparently impressive, but then Gaye topped him with a version of "Hitch-Hike". So Stevie had to top that, and apparently did, with a hugely extended version of "I Call it Pretty Music", reworked in the Ray Charles style he'd used for "Fingertips". So Marvin Gaye had to top that with the final song of the contest, and he did, performing "Stubborn Kind of Fellow": [Excerpt: Marvin Gaye, "Stubborn Kind of Fellow"] And he was great. So great, it turned the crowd against him. They started booing, and someone in the audience shouted "Marvin, you should be ashamed of yourself, taking advantage of a little blind kid!" The crowd got so hostile Berry Gordy had to stop the performance and end the party early. He never had another contest like that again. There were other problems, as well. Wonder had been assigned a tutor, a young man named Ted Hull, who began to take serious control over his life. Hull was legally blind, so could teach Wonder using Braille, but unlike Wonder had some sight -- enough that he was even able to get a drivers' license and a co-pilot license for planes. Hull was put in loco parentis on most of Stevie's tours, and soon became basically inseparable from him, but this caused a lot of problems, not least because Hull was a conservative white man, while almost everyone else at Motown was Black, and Stevie was socially liberal and on the side of the civil rights and anti-Vietnam movements. Hull started to collaborate on songwriting with Wonder, which most people at Motown were OK with but which now seems like a serious conflict of interest, and he also started calling himself Stevie's "manager" -- which did *not* impress the people at Motown, who had their own conflict of interest because with Stevie, like with all their artists, they were his management company and agents as well as his record label and publishers. Motown grudgingly tolerated Hull, though, mostly because he was someone they could pass Lula Mae Hardaway to to deal with her complaints. Stevie's mother was not very impressed with the way that Motown were handling her son, and would make her opinion known to anyone who would listen. Hull and Hardaway did not get on at all, but he could be relied on to save the Gordy family members from having to deal with her. Wonder was sent over to Europe for Christmas 1963, to perform shows at the Paris Olympia and do some British media appearances. But both his mother and Hull had come along, and their clear dislike for each other was making him stressed. He started to get pains in his throat whenever he sang -- pains which everyone assumed were a stress reaction to the unhealthy atmosphere that happened whenever Hull and his mother were in the same room together, but which later turned out to be throat nodules that required surgery. Because of this, his singing was generally not up to standard, which meant he was moved to a less prominent place on the bill, which in turn led to his mother accusing the Gordy family of being against him and trying to stop him becoming a star. Wonder started to take her side and believe that Motown were conspiring against him, and at one point he even "accidentally" dropped a bottle of wine on Ted Hull's foot, breaking one of his toes, because he saw Hull as part of the enemy that was Motown. Before leaving for those shows, he had recorded the album he later considered the worst of his career. While he was now just plain Stevie on albums, he wasn't for his single releases, or in his first film appearance, where he was still Little Stevie Wonder. Berry Gordy was already trying to get a foot in the door in Hollywood -- by the end of the decade Motown would be moving from Detroit to LA -- and his first real connections there were with American International Pictures, the low-budget film-makers who have come up a lot in connection with the LA scene. AIP were the producers of the successful low-budget series of beach party films, which combined appearances by teen heartthrobs Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello in swimsuits with cameo appearances by old film stars fallen on hard times, and with musical performances by bands like the Bobby Fuller Four. There would be a couple of Motown connections to these films -- most notably, the Supremes would do the theme tune for Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine -- but Muscle Beach Party was to be the first. Most of the music for Muscle Beach Party was written by Brian Wilson, Roger Christian, and Gary Usher, as one might expect for a film about surfing, and was performed by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, the film's major musical guests, with Annette, Frankie, and Donna Loren [pron Lorren] adding vocals, on songs like "Muscle Bustle": [Excerpt: Donna Loren with Dick Dale and the Del-Tones, "Muscle Bustle"] The film followed the formula in every way -- it also had a cameo appearance by Peter Lorre, his last film appearance before his death, and it featured Little Stevie Wonder playing one of the few songs not written by the surf and car writers, a piece of nothing called "Happy Street". Stevie also featured in the follow-up, Bikini Beach, which came out a little under four months later, again doing a single number, "Happy Feelin'". To cash in on his appearances in these films, and having tried releasing albums of Little Stevie as jazz multi-instrumentalist, Ray Charles tribute act, live soulman and Andy Williams-style crooner, they now decided to see if they could sell him as a surf singer. Or at least, as Motown's idea of a surf singer, which meant a lot of songs about the beach and the sea -- mostly old standards like "Red Sails in the Sunset" and "Ebb Tide" -- backed by rather schlocky Wrecking Crew arrangements. And this is as good a place as any to take on one of the bits of disinformation that goes around about Motown. I've addressed this before, but it's worth repeating here in slightly more detail. Carol Kaye, one of the go-to Wrecking Crew bass players, is a known credit thief, and claims to have played on hundreds of records she didn't -- claims which too many people take seriously because she is a genuine pioneer and was for a long time undercredited on many records she *did* play on. In particular, she claims to have played on almost all the classic Motown hits that James Jamerson of the Funk Brothers played on, like the title track for this episode, and she claims this despite evidence including notarised statements from everyone involved in the records, the release of session recordings that show producers talking to the Funk Brothers, and most importantly the evidence of the recordings themselves, which have all the characteristics of the Detroit studio and sound like the Funk Brothers playing, and have absolutely nothing in common, sonically, with the records the Wrecking Crew played on at Gold Star, Western, and other LA studios. The Wrecking Crew *did* play on a lot of Motown records, but with a handful of exceptions, mostly by Brenda Holloway, the records they played on were quickie knock-off album tracks and potboiler albums made to tie in with film or TV work -- soundtracks to TV specials the acts did, and that kind of thing. And in this case, the Wrecking Crew played on the entire Stevie at the Beach album, including the last single to be released as by "Little Stevie Wonder", "Castles in the Sand", which was arranged by Jack Nitzsche: [Excerpt: Little Stevie Wonder, "Castles in the Sand"] Apparently the idea of surfin' Stevie didn't catch on any more than that of swingin' Stevie had earlier. Indeed, throughout 1964 and 65 Motown seem to have had less than no idea what they were doing with Stevie Wonder, and he himself refers to all his recordings from this period as an embarrassment, saving particular scorn for the second single from Stevie at the Beach, "Hey Harmonica Man", possibly because that, unlike most of his other singles around this point, was a minor hit, reaching number twenty-nine on the charts. Motown were still pushing Wonder hard -- he even got an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in May 1964, only the second Motown act to appear on it after the Marvelettes -- but Wonder was getting more and more unhappy with the decisions they were making. He loathed the Stevie at the Beach album -- the records he'd made earlier, while patchy and not things he'd chosen, were at least in some way related to his musical interests. He *did* love jazz, and he *did* love Ray Charles, and he *did* love old standards, and the records were made by his friend Clarence Paul and with the studio musicians he'd grown to know in Detroit. But Stevie at the Beach was something that was imposed on Clarence Paul from above, it was cut with unfamiliar musicians, Stevie thought the films he was appearing in were embarrassing, and he wasn't even having much commercial success, which was the whole point of these compromises. He started to get more rebellious against Paul in the studio, though many of these decisions weren't made by Paul, and he would complain to anyone who would listen that if he was just allowed to do the music he wanted to sing, the way he wanted to sing it, he would have more hits. But for nine months he did basically no singing other than that Ed Sullivan Show appearance -- he had to recover from the operation to remove the throat nodules. When he did return to the studio, the first single he cut remained unreleased, and while some stuff from the archives was released between the start of 1964 and March 1965, the first single he recorded and released after the throat nodules, "Kiss Me Baby", which came out in March, was a complete flop. That single was released to coincide with the first Motown tour of Europe, which we looked at in the episode on "Stop! In the Name of Love", and which was mostly set up to promote the Supremes, but which also featured Martha and the Vandellas, the Miracles, and the Temptations. Even though Stevie had not had a major hit in eighteen months by this point, he was still brought along on the tour, the only solo artist to be included -- at this point Gordy thought that solo artists looked outdated compared to vocal groups, in a world dominated by bands, and so other solo artists like Marvin Gaye weren't invited. This was a sign that Gordy was happier with Stevie than his recent lack of chart success might suggest. One of the main reasons that Gordy had been in two minds about him was that he'd had no idea if Wonder would still be able to sing well after his voice broke. But now, as he was about to turn fifteen, his adult voice had more or less stabilised, and Gordy knew that he was capable of having a long career, if they just gave him the proper material. But for now his job on the tour was to do his couple of hits, smile, and be on the lower rungs of the ladder. But even that was still a prominent place to be given the scaled-down nature of this bill compared to the Motortown Revues. While the tour was in England, for example, Dusty Springfield presented a TV special focusing on all the acts on the tour, and while the Supremes were the main stars, Stevie got to do two songs, and also took part in the finale, a version of "Mickey's Monkey" led by Smokey Robinson but with all the performers joining in, with Wonder getting a harmonica solo: [Excerpt: Smokey Robinson and the Motown acts, "Mickey's Monkey"] Sadly, there was one aspect of the trip to the UK that was extremely upsetting for Wonder. Almost all the media attention he got -- which was relatively little, as he wasn't a Supreme -- was about his blindness, and one reporter in particular convinced him that there was an operation he could have to restore his sight, but that Motown were preventing him from finding out about it in order to keep his gimmick going. He was devastated about this, and then further devastated when Ted Hull finally convinced him that it wasn't true, and that he'd been lied to. Meanwhile other newspapers were reporting that he *could* see, and that he was just feigning blindness to boost his record sales. After the tour, a live recording of Wonder singing the blues standard "High Heeled Sneakers" was released as a single, and barely made the R&B top thirty, and didn't hit the top forty on the pop charts. Stevie's initial contract with Motown was going to expire in the middle of 1966, so there was a year to get him back to a point where he was having the kind of hits that other Motown acts were regularly getting at this point. Otherwise, it looked like his career might end by the time he was sixteen. The B-side to "High Heeled Sneakers" was another duet with Clarence Paul, who dominates the vocal sound for much of it -- a version of Willie Nelson's country classic "Funny How Time Slips Away": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Funny How Time Slips Away"] There are a few of these duet records scattered through Wonder's early career -- we'll hear another one a little later -- and they're mostly dismissed as Paul trying to muscle his way into a revival of his own recording career as an artist, and there may be some truth in that. But they're also a natural extension of the way the two of them worked in the studio. Motown didn't have the facilities to give Wonder Braille lyric sheets, and Paul didn't trust him to be able to remember the lyrics, so often when they made a record, Paul would be just off-mic, reciting the lyrics to Wonder fractionally ahead of him singing them. So it was more or less natural that this dynamic would leak out onto records, but not everyone saw it that way. But at the same time, there has been some suggestion that Paul was among those manoeuvring to get rid of Wonder from Motown as soon as his contract was finished -- despite the fact that Wonder was the only act Paul had worked on any big hits for. Either way, Paul and Wonder were starting to chafe at working with each other in the studio, and while Paul remained his on-stage musical director, the opportunity to work on Wonder's singles for what would surely be his last few months at Motown was given to Hank Cosby and Sylvia Moy. Cosby was a saxophone player and staff songwriter who had been working with Wonder and Paul for years -- he'd co-written "Fingertips" and several other tracks -- while Moy was a staff songwriter who was working as an apprentice to Cosby. Basically, at this point, nobody else wanted the job of writing for Wonder, and as Moy was having no luck getting songs cut by any other artists and her career was looking about as dead as Wonder's, they started working together. Wonder was, at this point, full of musical ideas but with absolutely no discipline. He's said in interviews that at this point he was writing a hundred and fifty songs a month, but these were often not full songs -- they were fragments, hooks, or a single verse, or a few lines, which he would pass on to Moy, who would turn his ideas into structured songs that fit the Motown hit template, usually with the assistance of Cosby. Then Cosby would come up with an arrangement, and would co-produce with Mickey Stevenson. The first song they came up with in this manner was a sign of how Wonder was looking outside the world of Motown to the rock music that was starting to dominate the US charts -- but which was itself inspired by Motown music. We heard in the last episode on the Rolling Stones how "Nowhere to Run" by the Vandellas: [Excerpt: Martha and the Vandellas, "Nowhere to Run"] had inspired the Stones' "Satisfaction": [Excerpt: The Rolling Stones, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"] And Wonder in turn was inspired by "Satisfaction" to come up with his own song -- though again, much of the work making it into an actual finished song was done by Sylvia Moy. They took the four-on-the-floor beat and basic melody of "Satisfaction" and brought it back to Motown, where those things had originated -- though they hadn't originated with Stevie, and this was his first record to sound like a Motown record in the way we think of those things. As a sign of how, despite the way these stories are usually told, the histories of rock and soul were completely and complexly intertwined, that four-on-the-floor beat itself was a conscious attempt by Holland, Dozier, and Holland to appeal to white listeners -- on the grounds that while Black people generally clapped on the backbeat, white people didn't, and so having a four-on-the-floor beat wouldn't throw them off. So Cosby, Moy, and Wonder, in trying to come up with a "Satisfaction" soundalike were Black Motown writers trying to copy a white rock band trying to copy Black Motown writers trying to appeal to a white rock audience. Wonder came up with the basic chorus hook, which was based around a lot of current slang terms he was fond of: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] Then Moy, with some assistance from Cosby, filled it out into a full song. Lyrically, it was as close to social comment as Motown had come at this point -- Wonder was, like many of his peers in soul music, interested in the power of popular music to make political statements, and he would become a much more political artist in the next few years, but at this point it's still couched in the acceptable boy-meets-girl romantic love song that Motown specialised in. But in 1965 a story about a boy from the wrong side of the tracks dating a rich girl inevitably raised the idea that the boy and girl might be of different races -- a subject that was very, very, controversial in the mid-sixties. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Uptight"] "Uptight" made number three on the pop charts and number one on the R&B charts, and saved Stevie Wonder's career. And this is where, for all that I've criticised Motown in this episode, their strategy paid off. Mickey Stevenson talked a lot about how in the early sixties Motown didn't give up on artists -- if someone had potential but was not yet having hits or finding the right approach, they would keep putting out singles in a holding pattern, trying different things and seeing what would work, rather than toss them aside. It had already worked for the Temptations and the Supremes, and now it had worked for Stevie Wonder. He would be the last beneficiary of this policy -- soon things would change, and Motown would become increasingly focused on trying to get the maximum returns out of a small number of stars, rather than building careers for a range of artists -- but it paid off brilliantly for Wonder. "Uptight" was such a reinvention of Wonder's career, sound, and image that many of his fans consider it the real start of his career -- everything before it only counting as prologue. The follow-up, "Nothing's Too Good For My Baby", was an "Uptight" soundalike, and as with Motown soundalike follow-ups in general, it didn't do quite as well, but it still made the top twenty on the pop chart and got to number four on the R&B chart. Stevie Wonder was now safe at Motown, and so he was going to do something no other Motown act had ever done before -- he was going to record a protest song and release it as a single. For about a year he'd been ending his shows with a version of Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind", sung as a duet with Clarence Paul, who was still his on stage bandleader even though the two weren't working together in the studio as much. Wonder brought that into the studio, and recorded it with Paul back as the producer, and as his duet partner. Berry Gordy wasn't happy with the choice of single, but Wonder pushed, and Gordy knew that Wonder was on a winning streak and gave in, and so "Blowin' in the Wind" became Stevie Wonder's next single: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder and Clarence Paul, "Blowin' in the Wind"] "Blowin' in the Wind" made the top ten, and number one on the R&B charts, and convinced Gordy that there was some commercial potential in going after the socially aware market, and over the next few years Motown would start putting out more and more political records. Because Motown convention was to have the producer of a hit record produce the next hit for that artist, and keep doing so until they had a flop, Paul was given the opportunity to produce the next single. "A Place in the Sun" was another ambiguously socially-aware song, co-written by the only white writer on Motown staff, Ron Miller, who happened to live in the same building as Stevie's tutor-cum-manager Ted Hull. "A Place in the Sun" was a pleasant enough song, inspired by "A Change is Gonna Come", but with a more watered-down, generic, message of hope, but the record was lifted by Stevie's voice, and again made the top ten. This meant that Paul and Miller, and Miller's writing partner Bryan Mills, got to work on his next  two singles -- his 1966 Christmas song "Someday at Christmas", which made number twenty-four, and the ballad "Travellin' Man" which made thirty-two. The downward trajectory with Paul meant that Wonder was soon working with other producers again. Harvey Fuqua and Johnny Bristol cut another Miller and Mills song with him, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday": [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "Yester-Me, Yester-You, Yesterday"] But that was left in the can, as not good enough to release, and Stevie was soon back working with Cosby. The two of them had come up with an instrumental together in late 1966, but had not been able to come up with any words for it, so they played it for Smokey Robinson, who said their instrumental sounded like circus music, and wrote lyrics about a clown: [Excerpt: The Miracles, "The Tears of a Clown"] The Miracles cut that as album filler, but it was released three years later as a single and became the Miracles' only number one hit with Smokey Robinson as lead singer. So Wonder and Cosby definitely still had their commercial touch, even if their renewed collaboration with Moy, who they started working with again, took a while to find a hit. To start with, Wonder returned to the idea of taking inspiration from a hit by a white British group, as he had with "Uptight". This time it was the Beatles, and the track "Michelle", from the Rubber Soul album: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Michelle"] Wonder took the idea of a song with some French lyrics, and a melody with some similarities to the Beatles song, and came up with "My Cherie Amour", which Cosby and Moy finished off. [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "My Cherie Amour"] Gordy wouldn't allow that to be released, saying it was too close to "Michelle" and people would think it was a rip-off, and it stayed in the vaults for several years. Cosby also produced a version of a song Ron Miller had written with Orlando Murden, "For Once in My Life", which pretty much every other Motown act was recording versions of -- the Four Tops, the Temptations, Billy Eckstine, Martha and the Vandellas and Barbra McNair all cut versions of it in 1967, and Gordy wouldn't let Wonder's version be put out either. So they had to return to the drawing board. But in truth, Stevie Wonder was not the biggest thing worrying Berry Gordy at this point. He was dealing with problems in the Supremes, which we'll look at in a future episode -- they were about to get rid of Florence Ballard, and thus possibly destroy one of the biggest acts in the world, but Gordy thought that if they *didn't* get rid of her they would be destroying themselves even more certainly. Not only that, but Gordy was in the midst of a secret affair with Diana Ross, Holland, Dozier, and Holland were getting restless about their contracts, and his producers kept bringing him unlistenable garbage that would never be a hit. Like Norman Whitfield, insisting that this track he'd cut with Marvin Gaye, "I Heard it Through the Grapevine", should be a single. Gordy had put his foot down about that one too, just like he had about "My Cherie Amour", and wouldn't allow it to be released. Meanwhile, many of the smaller acts on the label were starting to feel like they were being ignored by Gordy, and had formed what amounted to a union, having regular meetings at Clarence Paul's house to discuss how they could pressure the label to put the same effort into their careers as into those of the big stars. And the Funk Brothers, the musicians who played on all of Motown's hits, were also getting restless -- they contributed to the arrangements, and they did more for the sound of the records than half the credited producers; why weren't they getting production credits and royalties? Harvey Fuqua had divorced Gordy's sister Gwen, and so became persona non grata at the label and was in the process of leaving Motown, and so was Mickey Stevenson, Gordy's second in command, because Gordy wouldn't give him any stock in the company. And Detroit itself was on edge. The crime rate in the city had started to go up, but even worse, the *perception* of crime was going up. The Detroit News had been running a campaign to whip up fear, which it called its Secret Witness campaign, and running constant headlines about rapes, murders, and muggings. These in turn had led to increased calls for more funds for the police, calls which inevitably contained a strong racial element and at least implicitly linked the perceived rise in crime to the ongoing Civil Rights movement. At this point the police in Detroit were ninety-three percent white, even though Detroit's population was over thirty percent Black. The Mayor and Police Commissioner were trying to bring in some modest reforms, but they weren't going anywhere near fast enough for the Black population who felt harassed and attacked by the police, but were still going too fast for the white people who were being whipped up into a state of terror about supposedly soft-on-crime policies, and for the police who felt under siege and betrayed by the politicians. And this wasn't the only problem affecting the city, and especially affecting Black people. Redlining and underfunded housing projects meant that the large Black population was being crammed into smaller and smaller spaces with fewer local amenities. A few Black people who were lucky enough to become rich -- many of them associated with Motown -- were able to move into majority-white areas, but that was just leading to white flight, and to an increase in racial tensions. The police were on edge after the murder of George Overman Jr, the son of a policeman, and though they arrested the killers that was just another sign that they weren't being shown enough respect. They started organising "blu flu"s -- the police weren't allowed to strike, so they'd claim en masse that they were off sick, as a protest against the supposed soft-on-crime administration. Meanwhile John Sinclair was organising "love-ins", gatherings of hippies at which new bands like the MC5 played, which were being invaded by gangs of bikers who were there to beat up the hippies. And the Detroit auto industry was on its knees -- working conditions had got bad enough that the mostly Black workforce organised a series of wildcat strikes. All in all, Detroit was looking less and less like somewhere that Berry Gordy wanted to stay, and the small LA subsidiary of Motown was rapidly becoming, in his head if nowhere else, the more important part of the company, and its future. He was starting to think that maybe he should leave all these ungrateful people behind in their dangerous city, and move the parts of the operation that actually mattered out to Hollywood. Stevie Wonder was, of course, one of the parts that mattered, but the pressure was on in 1967 to come up with a hit as big as his records from 1965 and early 66, before he'd been sidetracked down the ballad route. The song that was eventually released was one on which Stevie's mother, Lula Mae Hardaway, had a co-writing credit: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] "I Was Made to Love Her" was inspired by Wonder's first love, a girl from the same housing projects as him, and he talked about the song being special to him because it was true, saying it "kind of speaks of my first love to a girl named Angie, who was a very beautiful woman... Actually, she was my third girlfriend but my first love. I used to call Angie up and, like, we would talk and say, 'I love you, I love you,' and we'd talk and we'd both go to sleep on the phone. And this was like from Detroit to California, right? You know, mother said, 'Boy, what you doing - get off the phone!' Boy, I tell you, it was ridiculous." But while it was inspired by her, like with many of the songs from this period, much of the lyric came from Moy -- her mother grew up in Arkansas, and that's why the lyric started "I was born in Little Rock", as *her* inspiration came from stories told by her parents. But truth be told, the lyrics weren't particularly detailed or impressive, just a standard story of young love. Rather what mattered in the record was the music. The song was structured differently from many Motown records, including most of Wonder's earlier ones. Most Motown records had a huge amount of dynamic variation, and a clear demarcation between verse and chorus. Even a record like "Dancing in the Street", which took most of its power from the tension and release caused by spending most of the track on one chord, had the release that came with the line "All we need is music", and could be clearly subdivided into different sections. "I Was Made to Love Her" wasn't like that. There was a tiny section which functioned as a middle eight -- and which cover versions like the one by the Beach Boys later that year tend to cut out, because it disrupts the song's flow: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] But other than that, the song has no verse or chorus, no distinct sections, it's just a series of lyrical couplets over the same four chords, repeating over and over, an incessant groove that could really go on indefinitely: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This is as close as Motown had come at this point to the new genre of funk, of records that were just staying with one groove throughout. It wasn't a funk record, not yet -- it was still a pop-soul record, But what made it extraordinary was the bass line, and this is why I had to emphasise earlier that this was a record by the Funk Brothers, not the Wrecking Crew, no matter how much some Crew members may claim otherwise. As on most of Cosby's sessions, James Jamerson was given free reign to come up with his own part with little guidance, and what he came up with is extraordinary. This was at a time when rock and pop basslines were becoming a little more mobile, thanks to the influence of Jamerson in Detroit, Brian Wilson in LA, and Paul McCartney in London.  But for the most part, even those bass parts had been fairly straightforward technically -- often inventive, but usually just crotchets and quavers, still keeping rhythm along with the drums rather than in dialogue with them, roaming free rhythmically. Jamerson had started to change his approach, inspired by the change in studio equipment. Motown had upgraded to eight-track recording in 1965, and once he'd become aware of the possibilities, and of the greater prominence that his bass parts could have if they were recorded on their own track, Jamerson had become a much busier player. Jamerson was a jazz musician by inclination, and so would have been very aware of John Coltrane's legendary "sheets of sound", in which Coltrane would play fast arpeggios and scales, in clusters of five and seven notes, usually in semiquaver runs (though sometimes in even smaller fractions -- his solo in Miles Davis' "Straight, No Chaser" is mostly semiquavers but has a short passage in hemidemisemiquavers): [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Straight, No Chaser"] Jamerson started to adapt the "sheets of sound" style to bass playing, treating the bass almost as a jazz solo instrument -- though unlike Coltrane he was also very, very concerned with creating something that people could tap their feet to. Much like James Brown, Jamerson was taking jazz techniques and repurposing them for dance music. The most notable example of that up to this point had been in the Four Tops' "Bernadette", where there are a few scuffling semiquaver runs thrown in, and which is a much more fluid part than most of his playing previously: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "Bernadette"] But on "Bernadette", Jamerson had been limited by Holland, Dozier, and Holland, who liked him to improvise but around a framework they created. Cosby, on the other hand, because he had been a Funk Brother himself, was much more aware of the musicians' improvisational abilities, and would largely give them a free hand. This led to a truly remarkable bass part on "I Was Made to Love Her", which is somewhat buried in the single mix, but Marcus Miller did an isolated recreation of the part for the accompanying CD to a book on Jamerson, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, and listening to that you can hear just how inventive it is: [Excerpt: Marcus Miller, "I Was Made to Love Her"] This was exciting stuff -- though much less so for the touring musicians who went on the road with the Motown revues while Jamerson largely stayed in Detroit recording. Jamerson's family would later talk about him coming home grumbling because complaints from the touring musicians had been brought to him, and he'd been asked to play less difficult parts so they'd find it easier to replicate them on stage. "I Was Made to Love Her" wouldn't exist without Stevie Wonder, Hank Cosby, Sylvia Moy, or Lula Mae Hardaway, but it's James Jamerson's record through and through: [Excerpt: Stevie Wonder, "I Was Made to Love Her"] It went to number two on the charts, sat between "Light My Fire" at number one, and "All You Need is Love" at number three, with the Beatles song soon to overtake it and make number one itself. But within a few weeks of "I Was Made to Love Her" reaching its chart peak, things in Detroit would change irrevocably. On the 23rd of July, the police busted an illegal drinking den. They thought they were only going to get about twenty-five people there, but there turned out to be a big party on. They tried to arrest seventy-four people, but their wagon wouldn't fit them all in so they had to call reinforcements and make the arrestees wait around til more wagons arrived. A crowd of hundreds gathered while they were waiting. Someone threw a brick at a squad car window, a rumour went round that the police had bayonetted someone, and soon the city was in flames. Riots lasted for days, with people burning down and looting businesses, but what really made the situation bad was the police's overreaction. They basically started shooting at young Black men, using them as target practice, and later claiming they were snipers, arsonists, and looters -- but there were cases like the Algiers Motel incident, where the police raided a motel where several Black men, including the members of the soul group The Dramatics, were hiding out along with a few white women. The police sexually assaulted the women, and then killed three of the men for associating with white women, in what was described as a "lynching with bullets". The policemen in question were later acquitted of all charges. The National Guard were called in, as were Federal troops -- the 82nd Airborne Division, and the 101st Airborne from Clarksville, the division in which Jimi Hendrix had recently served. After four days of rioting, one of the bloodiest riots in US history was at an end, with forty-three people dead (of whom thirty-three were Black and only one was a policeman). Official counts had 1,189 people injured, and over 7,200 arrests, almost all of them of Black people. A lot of the histories written later say that Black-owned businesses were spared during the riots, but that wasn't really the case. For example, Joe's Record Shop, owned by Joe Von Battle, who had put out the first records by C.L. Franklin and his daughter Aretha, was burned down, destroying not only the stock of records for sale but the master tapes of hundreds of recordings of Black artists, many of them unreleased and so now lost forever. John Lee Hooker, one of the artists whose music Von Battle had released, soon put out a song, "The Motor City is Burning", about the events: [Excerpt: John Lee Hooker, "The Motor City is Burning"] But one business that did remain unburned was Motown, with the Hitsville studio going untouched by flames and unlooted. Motown legend has this being down to the rioters showing respect for the studio that had done so much for Detroit, but it seems likely to have just been luck. Although Motown wasn't completely unscathed -- a National Guard tank fired a shell through the building, leaving a gigantic hole, which Berry Gordy saw as soon as he got back from a business trip he'd been on during the rioting. That was what made Berry Gordy decide once and for all that things needed to change. Motown owned a whole row of houses near the studio, which they used as additional office space and for everything other than the core business of making records. Gordy immediately started to sell them, and move the admin work into temporary rented space. He hadn't announced it yet, and it would be a few years before the move was complete, but from that moment on, the die was cast. Motown was going to leave Detroit and move to Hollywood.

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I Love Rock & Roll Podcast
"Get Laid on the Dance Floor" - Darryl Jones with Bennett Miller

I Love Rock & Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 63:30


Ghost Hounds bassist Bennett Miller returns to talk about the extraordinary life of The Rolling Stones bass player, Darryl Jones. How did playing with Miles Davis help secure him a job with the World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band? Why, after thirty years, isn't he a full-fledged member? What exactly is a pocket and the art of weaving? Bennett breaks it all down for us! Give it a listen!

Whiskey, Jazz and Leadership
Uncle Nearest, Miles Davis & Kappa Alpha Psi with Clayton Evans (Part 1)

Whiskey, Jazz and Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:39


Clayton Evans and I go all the way back to our Fraternal Days in college. Clayton Evans is Senior Vice President, Community Affairs Officer with Simmons Bank. Clayton is currently an active board director with the Metro STL Community Reinvestment Association, Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis, Girls, Inc., and Kappa League Scholarship Fund. Clayton shares advice on accumulating and maintaining wealth. He shares his rich jazz history while I sip on Uncle Nearest's 1884 For additional content and exclusives, become a VIP on Patreon Subscribe to our newsletter to find out more about our upcoming guests, jazz and whiskey favorites, and, updates from the show. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Linkedin @whiskeyjazzandleadership  #whiskey #jazz #Leadership #whiskeyjazzandleadership Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rooks and Becords Podcast
Episode 61: Popdose New Music Report October 2022

Rooks and Becords Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 61:38


Woo hoo! Back with episode 61 of the 'cast! Ted Asregadoo and Popdose writer Keith Creighton talk new music releases for October 2022! The post Episode 61: Popdose New Music Report October 2022 first appeared on Planet LP Podcast.

Bklyn Combine Podcast
Mr. Lee Episode Part 1

Bklyn Combine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 78:42


This week The Bklyn COmbine continues our East Africa series with our final installment, Mr. Lee. A legend in his own right and a humble, yet larger-than-life figure, this Harlem expat has lived life fully and we are honored to have him as a guest. We are the Brooklyn Combine, a non-profit community organization. We work with schools, community organizations, and dedicated city officials to help provide mentorship, critical education, leadership, and social support programs to youth and young adults in low-income and underserved communities. 1. I Apologise by Billy Eckstine 2. Sometimes I'm Happy (Sometimes I'm Blue) by Nat King Cole 3. Four [The First Recording] by Miles Davis

Troubled Men Podcast
TMP215 MATT TECU MEETS MR. HOLLYWOOD

Troubled Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 83:12


The Grammy-nominated drummer has worked with artists including Neil Young, Beck, Daniel Lanois, and Manny’s Hollywood party band, Too Free Stooges. He was also the house drummer for the “Echo in the Canyon” film and tour revisiting the heyday of the Laurel Canyon music scene with Jakob Dylan, Brian Wilson, Cat Power, and Fiona Apple. Matt hasn’t spoken to Manny in 25 years, but he knows from experience what he’s in for. Some things never change. Topics include the Carlo Nuccio tribute, a prank, the rest of the story, Wadzilla’s passing, Tito Puente Day, meeting by accident, long odds, airport access, a reunion, a last meeting, a successful career, Silver Lake, a mountain lion, Zander Schloss, St. Louis, a Miles Davis gig, little criminals, a hippie boarding school, an acid trip, the Unconscious, an opening gig, a backstage video, Dick Rude, Alvarado St., a Club Lingerie show, a rockstar audience, a downward spiral, Mr. Hollywood, the Circle Jerks, Doug Belote, session acumen, New Orleans drummers, the Meters, playing Tipitina’s, Dig, the Kibitz Room, Andy Slater, a period piece, society, Ryan Adams, a Dylan endorsement, Joe Strummer, Matt Groening, and much more. Intro music: "Just Keeps Raining" by Styler/Coman Break Music: "You Showed Me" (featuring Jakob Dylan & Cat Power) from "Echo in the Canyon" Outro Music: "Quick Fix" from "Concrete and Mud" by Sam Morrow Support the podcast: Paypal or Venmo Join the Patreon page here. Shop for Troubled Men’s Shirts here. Subscribe, review, and rate (5 stars) on Apple Podcasts or any podcast source. Follow on social media, share with friends, and spread the Troubled Word. Troubled Men Podcast Facebook Troubled Men Podcast Instagram Iguanas Tour Dates René Coman Facebook Matt Tecu Facebook Matt Tecu Instagram Too Free Stooges Live / YouTube

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música
Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música - Quietud, calma - 19/10/22

Cuando los elefantes sueñan con la música

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 59:04


Más canciones de 'Quietude' (Quietud, calma), el nuevo disco de la pianista y cantante Eliane Elias: 'Bahia com H', 'Olha', 'Tim tim por tim tim' y 'Saveiros' -a dúo con Dori Caymmi-. Del disco del clarinetista Gabriele Mirabassi y el acodeonista Simone Zanchini 'Il gatto e la volpe' los instrumentales 'Felliniano' y 'Our spanish love song' de Chalie Haden. Y del disco de Lady Blackbird 'Black acid soul' las canciones 'Blackbird', 'It´s not that easy' y 'Fix it'. Despedida con Miles Davis y la versión larga de 'Time after time' del disco 'That´s what happened 1982-1985'.Escuchar audio

Sarah Hagan Backstage
Sarah Hagan Backstage with Omar Hakim

Sarah Hagan Backstage

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 64:41


Omar Hakim is a drummer, producer, arranger, and composer with an exceptional career in the music industry spanning 50 years! Omar has worked with a who's who of artists and acts including Weather Report, David Bowie, Foo fighters, Sting, Madonna, Dire Straits, Bryan Ferry, Journey, Kate Bush, Miles Davis, Daft Punk, Mariah Carey, David Lee Roth, and Celine Dion for example. We are going to talk about his amazing career, what he is up to now, the recent Taylor Hawkins tribute shows that he helped put together, and we will get some invaluable advice for the next generation. Come along with me as I catch up with Omar Hakim.  Follow Omar on Instagram: Omar Hakim

Whiskey, Jazz and Leadership
Uncle Nearest, Miles Davis & Kappa Alpha Psi with Clayton Evans (Part 1)

Whiskey, Jazz and Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 29:39


Clayton Evans and I go all the way back to our Fraternal Days in college. Clayton Evans is Senior Vice President, Community Affairs Officer with Simmons Bank. Clayton is currently an active board director with the Metro STL Community Reinvestment Association, Scholarship Foundation of St. Louis, Girls, Inc., and Kappa League Scholarship Fund. Clayton shares advice on accumulating and maintaining wealth. He shares his rich jazz history while I sip on Uncle Nearest's 1884 For additional content and exclusives, become a VIP on Patreon Subscribe to our newsletter to find out more about our upcoming guests, jazz and whiskey favorites, and, updates from the show. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Linkedin @whiskeyjazzandleadership  #whiskey #jazz #Leadership #whiskeyjazzandleadership Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RIFFIN' on JAZZ powered by KUDZUKIAN

On this episode of Riffin on Jazz, Howard, Chuck and Debra give you power plays of Jazz as we hear from greats like Miles Davis, Nina Simone and more, so make sure to tune into this brand new episode of Riffin on Jazz on the KUDZUKIAN App, Kudzukian.com or your favorite podcast provider.  

Anhedonic Headphones Podcast 2 - Electric Boogaloo
Look Out A Window And Have Thoughts

Anhedonic Headphones Podcast 2 - Electric Boogaloo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 117:02


Season eight continues with its third episode, and the 46th episode of the show overall, and the guests continue to nothing but illustrious as Kevin welcomes multi instrumentalist Tom Morris to the show. Tom primarily makes music under the band name Swim Camp, but this fall he went on tour playing drums for Victoria Park's project Pictoria Vark. Tom talks about his love of both jazz music and downer indie rock, and they give Phil Collins his flowers. For information about Tom's project Swim Camp, take a listen to his output on Bandcamp, or follow him on Instagram and Twitter; For additional information about Anhedonic Headphones, please click here.  Episode Musical Credits Intro Music: "Brooklyn Zoo (instrumental)," written by Russell Jones, Dennis Coles, and Robert Diggs; originally performed by Ol' Dirty Bastard. Taken from the Get On Down reissue of Return to The 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version, 2011.  Outro Music: "What Does Your Soul Looks Like (Part 4)," performed by DJ Shadow. Endtroducing..., Mo Wax, 1996.   "Self Portrait in Three Colors," written and performed by Charles Mingus. Mingus Ah Um, Columbia, 1959. "Fields of Gold," written by Gordon Sumner; performed by Sting. Ten Summoner's Tales, A&M, 1993. "Solsbury Hill," written and performed by Peter Gabriel. Peter Gabriel 1: Car, ATCO, 1977. "Nefertiti," written by Wayne Shorter; performed by Miles Davis. Nefertiti, Columbia, 1968 "Glass," written and performed by Blue Smiley. Return, self-released, 2016. "Steps - What Was," performed by Chick Corea. Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, Solid State, 1968. "Inside Out," written and performed by Duster. Stratosphere, Up, 1998. "Graceland," written and performed by Paul Simon. Graceland, Warner Brothers, 1986. Vordhosbn," written by Richard D. James; performed by Aphex Twin. Drukqs, Warp, 2002. "M," written by Emily Sprague; performed by Florist. Emily Alone, Double Double Whammy, 2019.

Cougar Sports Saturday
Injury Update for BYU vs Arkansas

Cougar Sports Saturday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 7:41


Mitch Harper and Matt Baiamonte give an injury update for BYU vs Arkansas. Jaren Hall will be good to go this week, after playing hurt last week against Notre Dame. Gunner Romney is hopeful, as is running back Miles Davis. Wide receiver Chase Roberts was a full participant in practice this week. For the Razorbacks, quarterback KJ Jefferson is expected to be back, as is their top two cornerbacks. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Million Dollar Session
La dernière d'ARNO

Million Dollar Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 59:54


Billie Swan, Arno & Mireille Mathieu, Robin Mc Kelle, Miles Davis, Keith Jarrett, Azziza Mustafa Zadeh, Eliane Ellias, Johnny Haliday, Bobby Woomack...

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

2 https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seems to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

2 https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seems to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

Jazz Focus
WETF Show - Miles on the side - Miles Davis recording as a sideman in the 1950's with Lee Konitz, Al Cohn and Cannonball Adderley

Jazz Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 55:47


Miles on the side - Miles Davis recording as a sideman in the 1950's with Lee Konitz, Al Cohn and Cannonball Adderley - with Sal Mosca, Billy Bauer, Max Roach, Kenny Clarke, Art Blakey, Zoot Sims, Sonny Truitt, Hank Jones, John Lewis and others! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-clark49/support

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Kevin Eubanks - October 11th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 63:55


https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist, and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seem to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

Arts & Ideas
Miles Davis and On The Corner

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 44:47


From James Brown to Stockhausen, the influences which fed into Miles Davis's 1972 album On The Corner are explored by Matthew Sweet and guests, 50 years after its release. Bill Laswell, Chelsea Carmichael, Kevin LeGendre and Paul Tingen join Matthew to celebrate an album that was dismissed by some jazz critics as evidence of Davis 'selling out' when it came out, but that has gone on to be appreciated as an important and influential milestone. Producer: Torquil MacLeod Bill Laswell's many recordings and productions include Panthalassa: The Music of Miles Davis 1969-1974. Chelsea Carmichael is a saxophonist and composer. Her most recent album is The River Doesn't Like Strangers. Paul Tingen is the author of Miles Beyond: The Electric Explorations of Miles Davis, 1967-1991. Kevin Le Gendre is one of the presenters of BBC Radio 3's J to Z broadcast Saturdays at 5pm You can hear Matthew and Kevin exploring the politics, history and music which fed into Marvin Gaye's What's Going On in a previous episode of Free Thinking https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011l7t Radio 3 will be broadcasting a range of programmes from the London Jazz Festival between Nov 11th and 20th https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0011l7t

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America by Cody Keenan

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 37:36


Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America by Cody Keenan From Barack Obama's chief speechwriter Cody Keenan, a spellbinding account of the ten most dramatic days of the presidency, when a hate-fueled massacre and looming Supreme Court decisions put the character of our country on the line, and a president's words could bring the nation together or tear it apart. A white supremacist shooting and an astonishing act of forgiveness. A national reckoning with race and the Confederate flag. The fate of marriage equality and the Affordable Care Act. GRACE is the propulsive story of ten days in June 2015, when Obama and his chief speechwriter Cody Keenan composed a series of high-stakes speeches to meet a succession of stunning developments. Through behind-the-scenes moments—from Obama's suggestion that Keenan pour a drink, listen to some Miles Davis, and “find the silences,” to the president's late-night writing sessions in the First Family's residence—Keenan takes us inside the craft of speechwriting at the highest level for the most demanding of bosses, the relentlessly poetic and perfectionist Barack Obama. GRACE also delivers a fascinating portrait of White House insiders like Ben Rhodes, Valerie Jarrett, Jen Psaki, and the speechwriting team responsible for pulling it all off during a furious, historic stretch of the Obama presidency—including a gifted fact-checker who took Keenan's rhetoric to task before taking his hand in marriage. GRACE is the most intimate writing that exists on the rhetorical tightrope our first Black president had to walk, culminating with an unforgettable high point: Obama stunning everybody by taking a deep breath and leading the country in a chorus of “Amazing Grace.”

Foundation Radio
Cody Keenan

Foundation Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 34:52


Adam's guest today is the Former Director of Speechwriting for President Barack Obama, Cody Keenan! Adam and Cody discuss Cody's new book, "Grace: President Obama and Ten Days in the Battle for America", key points during and after the most consequential ten days of a presidency, what it takes to be a speechwriter for a president, and what Miles Davis taught him about finding the quiet moments. Pick up Cody's book by clicking here, and follow him on Twitter and Instagram. Special thanks to The Dugout - customized and vintage apparel. Use promo code FOUNDATION at checkout and receive 15% off of your entire order! Don't forget to follow them on Instagram. Special thanks to 10th Ward Barbershop - Proudly serving the historic 10th Ward in Lawrenceville and surrounding areas, 10th Ward Barbershop is a full service barbershop offering quality haircuts, beard trims, and hot shaves. Schedule your appointment with "The Fiend" Bray Wyatt and Corey Graves' favorite barbershop today! Find the show online here, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Follow Adam on Twitter here, and on Instagram here. Advertising requests can be sent to adam@foundationradio.net. Hosted and produced by Adam Barnard Executive Producers: Adam Barnard and Sam Krepps Engineer: Carl Pannell Special Thanks: Greg Mead, Joe Keane, Geoff Quinn, Dr. Ruth Almy Intro Music: "Ugly" by Dumb Ugly Outro Music: "Rug Burn" by Dumb Ugly Musical Accompaniment: Enrichment --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/foundationradio/support

Live at the Bop Stop
Celine Iris and Eddie Henderson

Live at the Bop Stop

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 104:34


All music used with permission by Celine Iris and Eddie Handerson       Love For Sale - Porter Moanin' - Golson So Near So Far - Davis Be Cool - Henderson Bluesette - Gimbel/Thielemans Misterioso - Monk Up Jumped Spring - Ramsey Phantoms - Barron The Creator Has a Master Plan - Sanders     New York-based jazz vocalist Céline Iris is a recent graduate from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, studying privately with vocalist La Tanya Hall and trumpet player Eddie Henderson. Growing up on swing records from the 1930's and 40's, Céline traces her musical roots to traditional jazz. She is also influenced by a wide variety of music, ranging from bebop to funk to classic rock. Fluent in French, Spanish, and English, Céline enjoys using language as a tool to tell a good story, and approaches music as a medium to connect with her audience and fellow musicians. For this performance, she's joined by two of jazz's giants. Dr. Eddie Henderson is a legendary trumpet player who has toured and worked extensively with Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Art Blakey. 2022 NEA Jazz Master Billy Hart works and tours extensively at universities across America and has served alongside Miles Davis, Wes Montgomery and Billy Smith, among others. With Eli Naragon on bass, Roger Friedman on piano and a hosts of guests on this March 22nd, 2022 performance, it's Celine Iris, Eddie Henderson and Billy Hart – Live at the Bop Stop. This program is recorded at the Robert Conrad Studios at the Bop Stop in Cleveland, Ohio with additional production by Graham Rosen and editing for WOBC and WNPA provided by Dr. Pete Naegele and for our podcast and other affiliates by Shawn Gilbert and Carsen Gilbert at GilAzar Media.  The Executive Producer is Daniel Peck.   For extended versions of all our shows –our Live at The Bop Stop podcast can be found on your favorite podcast app.   Want to Support The Bop Stop?  Donate here!   Contact us here

ON THE CALL
ON THE CALL - VOODO FE

ON THE CALL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 19:31


VOODO FE: born in Brooklyn, of Haitian heritage, is a prolific Renaissance Artist with over 7,000 works of art in multiple mediums: visual art, music, fashion design, graphic design, digital art, jewelry, brand collateral, and invented products. As a musician, Voodo Fe and his band opened for Run DMC, Naughty by Nature, played at Amsterdam's High Times Festival and more. He is a creative edgy, apparel designer, painter, musician, producer and writer, currently designing a fashion and art collection with the Miles Davis estate, as well as Rohan Marley's Lion Order (Roots Luxury Brand), to start, with more on the horizon. He has designed for: Calvin Klein, DKNY, the NFL, the NBA, Echo, Avirex, and commissioned by Beyonce. His art in the homes of Janelle Monae, Tiger Woods, Dave Chappelle, Talib, and others. One of Voodo Fe's mantras is: Exhibit, Experiment, Experience when it comes to his Spot For Art store on Myrtle in Brooklyn, the only NFT store in Brooklyn, where he experiments with the effects of color theory and art on health, through his ArtScience program. His passion and advocacy is for the artist, so he is working on programs to teach them how to align artistry and industry with economics. Through his personal challenges with various addictions since the age of 12, Voodo Fe has endured much in the way of physical and mental pain, and was able to go cold-turkey later. He has been able to navigate around bi-polar and other issues without being on the chemical highway, via meditation, good sleep and cleanliness, eating on time, exercise and being around those that care, recognize and support his needs. With weak lungs, a heart condition, and over 10 surgeries, Voodo Fe has a 100 year succession plan written out to keep his dream moving forward, with the help from his team, spiritual guides and the Law of Attraction methodology. A force to be reckoned with on many levels including kinetically........Check him out here: IG- @voodofe @thespotforart and at www.spotforart.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ozzie-stewart/support

This Classical Life
Jess Gillam with... Cosmo Sheldrake

This Classical Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 27:56


Jess Gillam is joined by composer and multi-instrumentalist Cosmo Sheldrake for a listening party. Music includes Gil Evans and Miles Davis's take on Concierto de Aranjuez, and Thomas Tallis's Spem in Alium. Playlist: Rodrigo arr. Gil Evans - Concierto de Aranjuez [Miles Davis] JS Bach arr. Siloti - Prelude (BWV.855a), transc. for piano in B minor (orig. in E minor, '48' no.10) [Vikingur Olafsson] Mariah - Shinzo No Tobira Sibelius - Symphony No. 5 in E flat major, Op. 82 - III Allegro molto [Sakari Oramo, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra] Britten - Friday afternoons Op.7 for children's voices and piano: Cuckoo! [Choir of Downside School, Purley, Viola Tunnard] Bremer/McCoy - Drommer Tallis - Spem in alium for 40 voices [Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips] Courtney Pine - Haiti

Rock N Roll Pantheon
The Age Old Question: What Is The Greatest Record Label? (part 3)

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 40:38


• Intro to the topic - part 3 of in the series on "Greatest Label of All-Time"• Blue Note - the label that brought the "cool" and "vibe" of jazz to the world (Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, Art Blakey, John Coltrane, Horace Silver, Grant Green, Herbie Hancock, Miles Davis, Kenny Clarke, Freddie Roach and more) and its revival including Norah Jones and Amos Lee.• Island Records - with legends like Jimmy Cliff, Toots, Bob Marley & The Wailers, Richard Thompson, John Martyn, Cat Stevens, Nick Drake and U2.

The Age Old Question
What Is The Greatest Record Label? (Part 3)

The Age Old Question

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 40:38


• Intro to the topic - part 3 of in the series on "Greatest Label of All-Time"• Blue Note - the label that brought the "cool" and "vibe" of jazz to the world (Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, Art Blakey, John Coltrane, Horace Silver, Grant Green, Herbie Hancock, Miles Davis, Kenny Clarke, Freddie Roach and more) and its revival including Norah Jones and Amos Lee.• Island Records - with legends like Jimmy Cliff, Toots, Bob Marley & The Wailers, Richard Thompson, John Martyn, Cat Stevens, Nick Drake and U2.

Perpetual Good
The Good of Good Improv

Perpetual Good

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 23:31


Live performances are the epitome of a jazz musician's work. When everything is flowing and the audience is responding, there is so much satisfaction and fulfillment for the musician. But you also run the risk of something unexpected. Such is the story as told by Herbie Hancock, while playing live with Miles Davis. Herbie made, to him, the error of all errors that could have ruined the song being played, but as it turned out, learned a valuable lesson in perspective and opportunity, from none other than Miles Davis himself. We take Herbie's lesson and apply it to our lives to help us find good in even the worst of situations. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kennethdhopkins/message

Working Drummer
388 - Chris Parker: Decades on the New York Scene, Playing with Dylan, Stuff, and G.E. Smith, Performing on SNL

Working Drummer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 77:09 Very Popular


Born in Chicago, Chris was playing drums at age three and began performing his first professional gigs at eleven. At nineteen, Parker began recording and touring with blues great Paul Butterfield and then broke into the New York studio scene in 1970,doing records, movie scores and filling the drum chair at Saturday Night Live. Toph, as friends know him, recorded platinum, gold and Grammy winning albums and CDs with many artists, including, Bob Dylan, Cher, Natalie Cole, Donald Fagen, Ashford and Simpson, Aretha Franklin, Freddie Hubbard, James Brown, Stuff, Miles Davis, Patti LaBelle, Michael Bolton, Lionel Hampton, Billie Holiday, Tony Bennett, and Quincy Jones who has written liner notes for the latest cd, ”Blue Print.” Currently leading his own band, the Chris Parker Trio with Kyoko Oyobe, piano and Ameen Saleem, bass, Parker has just recorded “Blue Print,” a new cd dedicated to Arif Mardin and produced by Arif's son, Joe. This new work features Randy Brecker on three tracks as well as Parker's original compositions. In this episode, Chris talks about New York scene in the 70s, when he was getting serious about music His 50 year association with bassist Will Lee His work with Stuff, and playing double drums in the band with Steve Gadd Seeing numerous drum legends over and over at New York clubs, and receiving mentorship from them in different ways How an impromptu rehearsal/jam with Bob Dylan unknowingly served as an audition Adapting to the many different ways Dylan wanted to interpret songs in the moment How his passion for drawing and painting has informed his musical approach

Jazz Bastard Podcast
Jazz Bastard Podcast 250 - Twenty-One to Forty

Jazz Bastard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 126:12


Two fifty is as good an artificial milestone as any, so the boys decide it's time for a GOAT episode.  First they wrestle a top-twenty artist list into shape, arguing that there's so much consensus out there little work remains to be done and still taking an hour doing it.  Then it's on to the tricky bit - picking out 21 through 40.   Totems will get tumbled, weird choices will get made, and hearts will get broken.  Mostly Mike's.  No pop matters this time as two hours of rampant opinion slinging should be enough for any listener.  

Papa's Basement
If Losing Your Wallet Is Cool, Consider Me Miles Davis — Episode 731

Papa's Basement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 41:12


Hear all about how, in the span of under two weeks, I've managed to lose my wallet twice. Click here to listen to the latest episode of Papa's Basement in your browser. Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify Stitcher YouTube Follow this episode's cast on Twitter and Instagram: Mollie Heckerling - Twitter - @MollieSchmollie, Instagram - @MollieHeckerling John Papageorgiou - Twitter - @PapasBasement, Instagram - @PapasBasement

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)
9-26-22 - Hour 3 - Should Miles Davis be RB 1?

Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle (BYU)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 77:53


Today's Co-Hosts: Ben Criddle (@criddlebenjamin) Subscribe to the Cougar Sports with Ben Criddle podcast:Apple Podcastshttps://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle/id996764363Google Podcastshttps://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuc3ByZWFrZXIuY29tL3Nob3cvMTM2OTkzOS9lcGlzb2Rlcy9mZWVkSpotifyhttps://open.spotify.com/show/7dZvrG1ZtKkfgqGenR3S2mPocket Castshttps://pca.st/SU8aOvercasthttps://overcast.fm/itunes996764363/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddle-byuSpreakerhttps://www.spreaker.com/show/cougar-sports-with-ben-criddleStitcherhttps://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=66416iHeartRadiohttps://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-cougar-sports-with-29418022TuneInhttps://tunein.com/podcasts/Sports-Talk--News/Cougar-Sports-with-Ben-Criddle-p731529/

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay
Hopscotch Harvest

Debts No Honest Man Can Pay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 170:33


On this week's show, we...  celebrate celebrate 40 years of Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska spend quality time with the new Horsegirl record  present our wrap-up of the 2022 Hopscotch Music Festival All this & much, much less! Debts No Honest Man Can Pay is over 2 rock-solid hours of musical eclectica & other noodle stories. The show started in 2003 at WHFR-FM (Dearborn, MI), moved to WGWG-FM (Boiling Springs, NC) in 2006 & Plaza Midwood Community Radio (Charlotte, NC) in 2012, with a brief pit-stop at WLFM-FM (Appleton, WI) in 2004.