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Latest podcast episodes about intentional

West Franklin Talks
West Franklin Talks Intentional Innovation

West Franklin Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 21:04


Dave and Matt dive into intentional innovation and why it's imperative for the church on today's episode of West Franklin Talks. Although rabid alligators and electrically charged handles are mentioned in this episode, the best definition of intentional innovation is being married to the mission of sharing the good news of Jesus Christ, but dating the methods. It's going to be an exciting week at West Franklin and we hope you join us for all of the fun! Thanks for letting us be a part of your day! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/west-franklin/message

500 Seconds To Joy | Mom Life Encouragement
187. Is Social Media a Good Use of Time? Chat w/ Corey + Bethany from The Millennial Mission Podcast

500 Seconds To Joy | Mom Life Encouragement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 24:09


Intentional. Present. Close to God. We want these things and we strive for them each day. Where does social media and phone use fit into this? And is social media a good use of our time? Listen in to a genuine conversation with yours truly, and Bethany + Corey from The Millennial Mission Podcast as we explore these questions together. This is a thought-provoking and encouraging conversation, lovely lady. May it bless you and get you thinking. Here's to living intentionally and for God! XOXO Stephanie EMAIL BETHANY + COREY —> bethany@millennialmission.co LISTEN TO THE MILLENNIAL MISSION PODCAST —> https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-millennial-mission-podcast-parenting-personal/id1470339924 CONNECT WITH STEPH —> bit.ly/monthlyhappymail ☺️ EMAIL STEPH —> 500secondstojoy@gmail.com

Your Home Story
Ep 192: Intentional Living with Shelby Goodman

Your Home Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 29:16


The queen of thrifting, Shelby Goodman, is chatting with me today. From thrifting pointers to how she keeps her heart in check as she's creating an intentional life... you don't want to miss this one. See all the photos of Shelby's projects, links to her blog and socials and more!

The Shaun Tabatt Show
701: David Amerland - How to Be Intentional About Living, Loving, Working, and Playing with Meaning

The Shaun Tabatt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 71:58


Live your life the way you want to. Manage stress better. Be more resilient and enjoy meaningful relationships and better health. We all want that. Such life leads to better choices, better jobs, loving romantic partners, more rewarding careers, and decisions that are fully aligned with our aims. What stops us from getting all that is the complexity of our brain and the complicated way in which the external world comes together. The misalignment between the internal states we experience and the external circumstances we encounter often leads to confusion, a lack of clarity in our thinking and actions that are not consistent with our professed values. David Amerland's new book Intentional is a game plan. It helps us connect the pieces of our mind to the pieces of our life. It shows us how to map what we feel to what has caused those feelings. It helps us understand what affects us and what effects it has on us. It makes it possible for us to determine what we want, why we want it, and what we need to do to get it. Resources mentioned in this episode: Intentional: How To Live, Love, Work and Play Meaningfully The Sniper Mind: Eliminate Fear, Deal with Uncertainty, and Make Better Decisions Find out more at DavidAmerland.com. The Shaun Tabatt Show is part of the Destiny Image Podcast Network.

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

It's one of the hardest things you'll face—your child leaving the faith. And you begin to question whether you raised them right or… you blew it. Coming up, Dr. Randy walks you through the difficulty of My Child Has Left the Faith. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s an Intentional BLOG […]

Brentwood Baptist Church Podcast
Intentional Innovation | Vision '22

Brentwood Baptist Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 24:21


Brentwood Baptist Church Buzzsprout-9429267 Mon, 25 Oct 2021 12:00:00 -0400 1461 full false web@brentwoodbaptist.com (Brentwood Baptist Church)

Flip the Switch by EngageMint
Being Present, Authentic and Intentional w/ Scott O'Neil

Flip the Switch by EngageMint

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 51:26


This episode features industry legend Scott O'Neil.  In his most recent role, Scott was the CEO of Harris Blitzer Sports and Entertainment, overseeing the New Jersey Devils and the Philadelphia 76ers.  Prior to that, he held positions of Senior Vice President of the NBA's Team Marketing and Business Operations division and President of Madison Square Garden Sports.  Throughout the podcast, Scott charmed us with stories as he and David dive into a number of insights that influenced his career and became the foundation for his new book, “Be Where Your Feet Are: Seven Principles to Keep You Present, Grounded and Thriving.”  Show Notes3:23  Putting Life in Perspective from Mozambique7:31  Scott's Favorite Insight - “Assume Positive Intent”10:11  Instilling Positive Intent into Your Culture17:06  Balancing Accountability and “The Best Work Environment”  18:58  How to Fire Someone Gracefully21:28  Millennials' Social Contract24:25  Creating a Hybrid Work Environment26:19  Building Culture and Connections in a Hybrid Work Environment29:01  Defining the “Greatest Place to Work”30:14  The Thin Line Between Work and Home34:38  Developing Staff Personally and Professionally39:01  You Can't Manage for the Masses40:25  Maintaining An Attitude of Gratitude When the Team Isn't Winning48:54  Parting Advice----For More on Topics Referenced in This Episode:For more insights on being present, passionate and intentional, grab Scott's book: Be Where Your Feet AreTed Lasso | Leadership Lessons from Ted Lasso -----Connect with Scott on LinkedIn or Twitter-----Want more from EngageMint? Subscribe to our newsletter

Rich State of Mind
Episode 68: How to Accomplish Goals By Being Intentional ft. Ian Brooks

Rich State of Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 50:34


Dr. Ian Brooks is the chief executive and founder of Rhodes Smith Consulting, leading transformations of people and organizations for over 24 years. Ian has extensive experience in executive and leadership development, change management, business performance consulting, and communication planning. His new book Intention offers a practical guide to transformational change through meaningful action.Ian Brooks links:Book: https://amzn.to/3vGDO2yWebsite: https://rhodessmith.com/ Rich State of Mind Links:Website: www.richstateofmind.comInstagram : @rich_statebrand and @rich_invests_Podcast links: https://linktr.ee/anthanerichiePlease like and subscribe to our channel.See our cool wealth building and real estate T-shirt designs in the links below :Rich State of Mind Store :https://bit.ly/RichState

Check Your Aesthetic Podcast
Ep. 55: Relatable Content + Intentional Self-Care w/ Abby Asselin

Check Your Aesthetic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 55:15


This week Katie and Alexis had Youtuber and podcaster, Abby Asselin on to talk about managing life in grad school with creating consistent content. Abby discussed how she strives to create relatable content for people who struggle with similar issues to her, and how she tries to keep herself to a strict schedule in order to stay productive and motivated. Check out Check Your Aesthetic on Instagram Check out Alexis on Instagram Check out Alexis on Tik Tok Check out Alexis's Etsy Check out Katie on Instagram Check out Katie on Tik Tok Check out Katie's website Check out Abby's podcast Check out Abby on Instagram

The Rising Man Podcast
MMM 174 - Intentional or Committed?

The Rising Man Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 7:24


These two powerful concepts are thrown around often in men's work and self improvement spaces, but which is more important? Jeddy explains why intentions are only half the story and makes the case for taking inspired action in today's illuminating Monday Morning Meditation. Rising Man Links:   Fire Circles | Are you ready to join other men JUST LIKE YOU who have found a way to RISE ABOVE life's challenges and create a life of purpose and fulfillment? Join our online men's circle!    Elements | 3 Day Wilderness Immersion for men ready to reconnect with the wild man inside.   Ignite | 12 week online program designed to ignite your purpose and propel you into freedom. Features weekly calls, online modules, growth assignments, and community support!    Fire Circles | Are you ready to join other men JUST LIKE YOU who have found a way to RISE ABOVE life's challenges and create a life of purpose and fulfillment?   Initiation | Compass Program - 4 day 4 night Vision Fast in the wilderness, with preparation and incorporation calls in the months before and after.    Website | RisingMan.org   Instagram | @risingmanmovement Instagram | @jeddyazuma   YouTube | The Rising Man Movement - featuring videos of each Monday Morning Meditation episode and clips from the interviews!  

The Nathan Barry Show
053: Kimberly Brooks - Taking Intentional Breaks To Reignite Creativity

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 66:51


Kimberly Brooks is a contemporary American artist and author. Kimberly integrates landscape, figuration and abstraction to address subjects of history, memory and identity. Her work has been exhibited and featured internationality.Kimberly received her bachelor's degree in literature from U.C. Berkeley, and was Valedictorian. She has taught art as a lecturer and adjunct faculty instructor, and was a featured speaker at TEDx Fullerton.In this episode, I talk with Kimberly about her work as an artist, author, and editor. We talk about how she uses ConvertKit to reach and grow her audience. We talk about what people can learn from fine art, and apply it to their newsletters. We also cover the path to becoming a successful creator, and much more.In this episode, you'll learn: The secret to achieving your breakthrough moment A job most creators should charge for, but rarely do What you should be doing instead of blogging Should you be posting on Instagram? Links & Resources Huffington Post ConvertKit Craft and Commerce Steve Jobs John Baldessari Adobe Photoshop Adobe Leonard Shlain Milton Glaser Macworld Walt Disney's Imagineering Warner Music Group Seth Godin Leonardo da Vinci Arianna Huffington Huffington Post: Fine Art Later Anderson Ranch Arts Center Otis College of Art and Design Kimberly Brooks's Links Find Kimberly on Instagram Kimberly's website Kimberly's Ted Talk Huffington Post article, “The Gap Logo, New Coke and the Legendary Walter Landor” Kimberly's book, The New Oil Painting Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Kimberly:The fundamental way to learn is, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise with anything. You're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times, and you can't give up. You have to say, “Okay, well, I don't care if it sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Let's just go on.”[00:00:29] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Kimberly Brooks. She is a fine artist. So, painting, she has all of her art in galleries, that whole world, which is super fascinating to me. She also plays in the creative world. Newsletters, podcasts, and interviews.She built the whole art editorial section of the Huffington Post. She built that to millions of readers. She's done all kinds of things in the design community from the early days. So, we riff on that; Mad Men-style ad agencies in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Some great stuff.Then she brings it all the way through to talking about what she does with ConvertKit. How she sets up her sequences, and everything else, and things that people can learn from fine art, and apply to their email newsletters and sequences.So, it's a fun episode. We have to do a part two, because we filled up all the time we had, and I think I only got through half my questions.So, anyway, I'm going to get out of the way and dive in. So, here we go.Kimberly, welcome to the show.[00:01:37] Kimberly:Thank you for having me, Nathan.[00:01:39] Nathan:There's so many things I to talk about, because you come to the creator world from a different perspective than I do, though we both share a love for Photoshop.[00:01:50] Kimberly:Oh, yeah.[00:01:51] Nathan:We'll start with where we met. It was at Craft and Commerce, some number of years ago.I can't even think. Three years ago? Four?[00:02:01] Kimberly:I think it was three years ago, and it was such a random whim. I don't even know how I ended up finding it. I fell in rabbit hole. And then I came upon ConvertKit.I was actively looking for a better way to send art show announcements. Because I'm a painter, I'm an artist.I just felt after my previous experiences, I knew how important having a subscriber-based service was. I don't want to get too nerdy, but I didn't really like the competitor who shall remain unnamed. But, I found you guys, and I started getting the advertisement for the conference, and it was in Boise, Idaho.And so I thought, I'll just go. It was like a Ted conference for really creative nerdy people like me, but it was exactly what I was wanting. It was about marketing, which is really such a weird word because it's really about sharing, and I loved the title.I loved everything about it. I met some of the people that I'm really, really close with now. Then the next year it was canceled because of the pandemic, but it was amazing, and I met you, actually.[00:03:28] Nathan:And, and we had a really fun conversation. one thing that I want to talk about, for you is the intersection between fine art, right. And painting and that world. And then now you're also in this world of being a writer and a creator in the sense, right. You you've been a writer and creative for a long time, but, but it's, it's like a different world of the selling things to your audience.And. Earning money directly in that way. And so I want, like, I want to hear that as you like weave in and out of these two worlds and then just your experience there.[00:04:02] Kimberly:Yeah, it's interesting. I, when I was in elementary school, we had a really competitive game of tetherball constantly going on on the playground. And it was just sort of that pole with a ball attached to a rope we would, people would line up and we would get it, and it was, see how many times, and it was just sort of like, it was very intense and I always felt like being an artist.Being an art to me was it was the pole, you know? So like my pole is art is making art and everything about what I do. I write about it. I interview people about it. I interview other artists about their work. I make paintings 90% of the time in my studio. Like, it's all about art, you know? So that's like the beginning.So I do see myself sashaying between different worlds. And I think everybody kind of does that. And then as the bicycle of technology was being built to use kind of like a vague reference to like Steve jobs is, you know, what happens if you put a man on a bicycle and you know, like how fast can he, as the bicycle was kind of entering our world, I thought, what if you kind of mixed art with the bicycle?You know, what, what happens if you, you know, Make an artist's website. So I was like one of the first people I knew that made an artist's website. And I remember, it was, I had, was having lunch with my mentor. Who's, the late John Baldessari. He was a great, great, great artist. And, he's famous for, you know, he burned all this stuff and graduate school and then became a conceptual painter, you know, very, you know, Howard work in, you know, conceptual anyway.So I brought my laptop to this Mexican restaurant in Venice, and I said, I wanted to show you something. I made a website and our studios were really near each other. And he said, Oh, I, I don't know if I would do that. If I were you, I was like, why not? He said, because you're, you'll piss off the dealers, the galleries, the galleries, you shouldn't be selling directly.It's going to take away from what their job is. You know, when you hang a show and you have art in the gallery, the gallery is selling the artist and it's their job, you know, and artists are supposed to be kind of this, you know, semi mute, black turtleneck wearing, you know, mysterious, mystical ShawMan goddess.I call it goddess on the hill. Like you're not supposed to really get in the way of what your artists about. And so I thought, oh gosh, you know, this is, and I had put the paintings for a show was about to have. And so I started making, so my postcard for that show had the name of the show and it had the name of the website, cause no galleries had website.Then this is in like the two thousands, you know, this is a long time ago. And I remember meeting people when I handed them a postcard. If like I felt comfortable with them, I would like secretly write a password so that they could see the website,[00:07:20] Nathan:Oh was you were, you had the website, but it was[00:07:24] Kimberly:Yeah. So I password protected it. I password protected it because John Baldessari told me that it's probably not a good idea to have a website.This is again, no artists ad website.[00:07:35] Nathan:How did the galleries and the community[00:07:37] Kimberly:The galleries didn't have websites either. And the galleries, I remember. They started it. Like some of them had websites, but it was super janky. It was like sometimes most of the time they did an, and it was just sort of this mysterious world that 99.9, nine, 9% of the public didn't understand.Doesn't understand it's better now. And you'd have to be walking down the street or you'd have to know somebody who knows somebody, you know, it's, it was just a different world then.[00:08:08] Nathan:But did any of those negative things come about? Like, did anyone look down on you on it for having a website and for[00:08:14] Kimberly:No, no, no. Eventually I just said, screw it. And I took the password off.And, interestingly, I don't want to date myself, but I think I already have, but the at the time flash was very. sexy. And it was like, and so artists would have, if they did have website, firstly, they would be horribly designed and they would have like a flash animation of a curtain opening and a door.And it was very like CD rom mentality. Like, you know, it was pre-internet thinking, you know, anyway, like I said, the big nerd here.[00:08:48] Nathan:Flash was big until 2000, like the iPhone 2007.[00:08:52] Kimberly:Until Steve jobs killed it, just took a knife. He took a sword and he just, during a keynote, just, you know,[00:09:01] Nathan:Yeah. Oh, and the two biggest reasons were, that the bandwidth of the phones couldn't handle it. And then also the battery life on the phones couldn't handle it.[00:09:10] Kimberly:Wasn't there another reason there was another technical reason that had to do with plays well with others. I can't remember exactly what it was,[00:09:20] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, it was a restricted technology. Like it was owned Macromedia. And so probably that apple was trying to do to get to play. And Adobe was playing hardball and apple was probably like, okay,[00:09:31] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:09:32] Nathan:You know, we'll play this[00:09:33] Kimberly:Yeah. It was, was, it was, it was just the evolution of, you know, of Photoshop and Adobe products. And so I grew up with Adobe. I learned I was an early adopter, always, you know, I just sort of like analogy. Yeah.[00:09:49] Nathan:I want to dive into all kinds of things. I want to talk about, more in the financial world and the business of that and everything else. But back and maybe start earlier in your career.[00:10:01] Kimberly:Than elementary school.[00:10:04] Nathan:I guess we didn't go to elementary school a little bit after elementary school. What what did the early days of your career look like[00:10:12] Kimberly:I was a, you know, I'm a first, or I guess I'm a second generation American, so, and I'm Jewish. So of course I was supposed to be a doctor. So my, we used to get, you can be anything you want just as long as you're a surgeon first. So I got the makings of a woman's surgeon and, you know, it was just like, as a book that was a book that I received many times in my middle school years.And then, you know, it was like, that's great, you're so talented. But you know, you really, you know, after you get out of medical school, you can, it was just sort of what you did in my family. And, and my father he was a well-known surgeon and he became an, I don't want to say artist. He became a writer, so he's a well-known writer.And he started writing. So he kind of became an artist before my eyes, you know, so as I was getting out, as I was graduating college, he published his first bestselling. That was just, and I would like sit at the book, you know, when he gave a lecture at an art gallery, because it was called art and physics.His name is Leonard Shlain so I would like sell, watch him, sell the books, you know, like give a lecture and then I would check out and I would get, take people's cash and then give them a book, you know, at the end of the lecture. And he used to tell me, he used to say, honey, you have to be shameless.You have to be willing to just talk in front of four people. It doesn't matter. You just need to do it. If it's just, it was just a big, it did. It made an imprint on me because I was watching him grow out of his own discomfort zone, which I still struggle with of talking to people like instead of through your paintings or, you know, talking to an audience saying being on video, it took me six months to figure out how to be on video, but I'm getting ahead of it.So you asked me like my CR about my career. So I was an English major. I went to an English, major architecture, minor at UC Berkeley. And at the time that I was graduating, painting was considered dead. And I know that that for artists today, they don't quite appreciate that. But after abstract expressionism, there was sort of this mood in the art world that everything had been done and like, forget about figuration was the last thing people wanted to see, you know, and I wanted to paint people.So I just figured, okay, I'm going to just do that on my own, but I'm going to, I love reading. I love writing. So I became an English major and I was valedictorian of, of the UC Berkeley English department. And so my first job, I wanted to combine my love for art and literature. So my first job was.Design. So my, so I, was mentored by a gentleman named Walter Lander, who is the founder of landlord associates. And he was sort of the west coast, Milton Glaser, Milton Glaser from a design point of view, like he was, he just recently passed in the last five or so years, but he like did the, I love New York, you know, like he's this famous, famous graphic designer because the field of graphic design is, is relatively new.It's relatively, it's like a century old, you know, like th the serious field of it. And Walter was a pioneer in it. And he did, you know, my first job was like working cause I, cause I minored in architecture was, helping design the shell oil, gas station, you know,So I was doing like architecture design, and then he asked me to write speeches.And so they had, their company was kind of designed like a brain. So they had like a language division and they had like the design division, like they did the loose soon milk and they were so famous then such leaders. They had 1800 people in offices all over the world and it was like a big deal. And they had an office on a ferry boat.So that was my first job out of college. I was a speech writer for Walter and I was in the, I was in the word department. Like I think I designed, I helped name, a cigarette, you know, like was just a weird, but it was fascinating, you know? And it was meeting fascinating people. The grateful dead would like come over on the boat after it was, it was, it was a wild time at, in San Francisco in the late eighties, early nineties.Totally wild. So, So I was like, so all the designers are starting to learn Photoshop. So there was this thing called Photoshop because they were doing everything by hand, you know? And then I was like, oh, so I got Photoshop 1.0, you know, and then I had th there was no layers. So you had to do everything in alpha channels.And it's interesting just to be a big nerd. Cause you're a designer too, right? I mean that's yeah. Yeah. So if you can try to imagine there was Photoshop without layers, it meant that you had to do everything inside the masking tool that's built in that nobody really uses or knows about now called alpha channels.So I had to create everything using masks, but it was very oddly more similar to what you did with your Exacto knife and ruler, know, I still think one of the biggest, the saddest things about Photoshop. I mean, I think everybody should know it, but it has some feature bloat, but I think it kind of buries the power of alpha channels.And I think that if people knew how to use it, it would like, it's like a little thing to know that would hugely leap them out of the more artificial aspects of doing those filters on things.[00:16:00] Nathan:Right.[00:16:01] Kimberly:Anyway, like I you have to be careful with me because I can go into real. I can crawl real deep into these nerdy things.But anyway,[00:16:08] Nathan:Are there other things from those early days of, of the graphic design art agency, like that kind of world, that you still take with you today[00:16:19] Kimberly:Thousands of Gillian percent. One of them is the four DS that every project is discover, design develop, deploy. And I know I lost that. I also saw that, like, if you could name it, you could charge it.[00:16:32] Nathan:Is there a story behind that? If you could name it, you could charge for it.[00:16:35] Kimberly:You know, you'd see these hundreds of thousands of million dollar contracts going out to these major people. And I used to have to help write the proposals and I would see how they would divide they'd phase out, like a lot of designers. Again, I don't, I hope we're so not too off topic, but a lot of designers will not charge for discovery.You know what I mean? Because they haven't named it. They didn't name it They'd Just be like, oh, let me Research all about your company. And then you're going to pay me to give you some designs, and then I'll give you the designs and then hopefully they're smarter. Anyway, like I said, big, big topic.[00:17:10] Nathan:Yeah. But think there are a lot of people listening who are in the either freelance or agency space and they, provide services to newsletters or creators or they're growing their own on the side. And I think it's a really important point that, if you're if you're structuring your proposals and all your interactions with clients around the deliverable, then you're failing to talk about a substantial portion of the work And probably the part of the work that differentiates you from the other freelancers who are just like, oh, you need a logo. And they dive like right into Photoshop or whatever tool. Whereas if you're good at what you do, you're probably taking a step back and looking at the whole landscape and spending probably more than half of your time in that Research discovery and learning stage rather than the deliverable stage.[00:17:56] Kimberly:It's actually the most important time intensive stage of any project. And so not just design. I mean, I think you saw my Ted talk, the creative process in eight stages. And I think I talked about how as an artist, I don't want to give anybody whiplash, but like you, as an artist, you have, a period of time where it's like a rest in music where you don't, you're not making work.It doesn't look like you're doing anything on the outside, but that's the most important part. And it's when. Gathering, but you're doing it in a subconscious, like in many different ways when I'm, when I'm making a painting, I'm having to listen a lot, you know, you have to listen and look and just inhale before you can exhale.So anyway, that, but I mean, we could, I think, I think we could do a whole hour on Landour. Cause that was just a, such an interesting, you know? And, and I was actually, I was actually there, I dunno. Well, you're, you probably weren't born, but there was a, Coke released a new design and they, they, and Landour was the leader of this new design.And I was like in the boardroom, in my. In pantyhose. Cause that's what we that's what, like you had aware that it was very far, it was like mad men. It was like mad men where like everybody smoked and the women were gorgeous and the men would like have these glass offices on the side of the boat. And they would like go in and light up a cigarette and call London, you know, like they were like, or Japan and, and they had, it was just extreme, chic, crazy environment, very male dominated.And I was like, I'll often the lone woman in a room, you know, but anyway, that's a separate side conversation and they were introducing the new Coke and it was a flop. It was like, it was like, there was a backlash against the new design because it had like big fat. It was like, whereas the old Coke kind of has that Victorian, which they still use now that, that very Sarah fee or Nate almost like your create above your head, but more, you know, whereas.Where the new version they were doing was super kind of chunky. It was like new Coke, you know, anyway. But, it was a wild experience. I wrote an essay about it and I'll, I'll give it to you if you, if[00:20:35] Nathan:Yeah, we'll put it the Shona[00:20:36] Kimberly:Yeah,[00:20:38] Nathan:On time on that.[00:20:39] Kimberly:Yeah, no, the whole, here's the thing. I wanted to be an artist, and a lot of times I believe a lot of, and I believe there's a lot of people who have an artist inside them and a lot of times they will, work in a field that brings them near art decisions to make themselves feel better.That they're not being an actual artist. And I was one of those people.[00:21:08] Nathan:Okay. So how did that play out for you of your you're close to the design and that sort of[00:21:14] Kimberly:I was like, yeah, it was, I couldn't be closer. I was like, I was like in, I was behind the curtain of Oz doing the, with the, with the best people and everything. Again, this is so long ago, but, but I felt like technology at the time, again, Photoshop was just starting. There was no whatever. I was like, you know, I needed, I need a break.I need to like push the table over. So I quit. I moved to Paris to paint for a year. I played piano in bars at night. That was like a whole other wild. We could do a whole show on that, but, you know, then I was like, well, I can't, I'm not going to be able to make a living doing this. Like I was painting, I was sitting at the sore bone and I was like, I had this little gig in this bar, but it was a couple of Franks and I wasn't legal in Paris.And I just had this big because of my literature background I have does such a, you know, I love you. I was so somewhat of afraid.[00:22:11] Nathan:So how old were you when you[00:22:14] Kimberly:I was in my early twenties.[00:22:16] Nathan:Okay. When you, quit and said it's time to do painting.[00:22:20] Kimberly:Yeah. I was like, it wasn't a straight line. And that's another thing. Like most artists don't like some artists grow up and everybody goes, oh, you're so talented.Which by the way, like hate that expression. I must like tell people, like don't ever tell people they're talented. Say you have great raw material, you know, just say, you know, just like great mom material, but like, you have to like do it for eight hours a day in order to like express something. Great. And then, then we'll talk about talent, but in any case, so some people have parents that say, you're honey, you're so talented.I want to send you to art school. I want to spend a couple hundred grand and I'm going to send you to art school. Undergrad, let's say a good, let's say a typical artist, a college education is this amount. And then I want you to get an MFA from Yale or the best school and have that checked off. And then I want you to go get in galleries and be an artist there's 0.01% of artists have that route.They have parents that say, we support this. This is good. This is a good plan. I would say that's like a very rarefied small group. Cause you have to have, well, there's so many things that need to happen in order to have that setup. Most people, most artists, even artists that I know, like one of my good friends Enrique he was a PA getting his PhD in physics read my dad's book, art and physics and decided he wanted to be a painter[00:23:49] Nathan:Okay,[00:23:50] Kimberly:So like, there's a whole bunch of artists that were doctors that were lawyer, you know, that, that, that they, they were catching the train of you know, the I'm a good student, I'm a diligent worker and they, they, you get routed onto a track and then you're on that track. And then suddenly you wake up at at 30 or whatever, and you say, you know, I'm here and I'm super successful, but this isn't necessarily really how I want to be spending my time.You know? I mean, th this is the conversation, right? You know, how do you, how do you decide and what you can want changes in your life? You know, but if you know what you're pull, the tether poll is like, if you know what, your deep inner core desires. are And, you know, and you, you have, you're remotely in touch with that and you, you need to go, you need to go towards that light.You need to go towards that center then everything will radiate out from you afterwards.[00:24:58] Nathan:Was there a catalyst that pushed you, you know, you were thinking about it, you're feeling this, but what was the thing that made you go like, all right, I'm[00:25:06] Kimberly:Well, okay. Like I said, we don't have enough time to get into all of this, but there were, I made three huge dramatic, you know what? I don't know. Maybe it's a Monty Python movie, I don't know. But like when you push the table over and you throw all the plates and you break everything, like you just come, it's not a reboot, it's way more violent than that.Just kind of like you take the tablecloth out and you just say I'm out of here. You know, I think I did that three times before I got closer to. You know what it is. And one of them was moving to LA after moving to Paris, I moved to New York and then, then I moved to LA and I was like, okay, this time is going to be it I'm being artist.Like, and you know, it's a couple of years later, it's after Paris. Like, you know, cause you have to get, you have to, I had to make money. You know, I had to make a, I had to have a job. And so I had to kind of like do, do design work and stuff like that. So when I moved to LA, my first, I went to a Mac conference, like it was like 60 booths.It was so small, like Mac was seen a teeny little thing and, and Microsoft was the big thing windows and,[00:26:18] Nathan:Yeah.[00:26:19] Kimberly:And I made a business cards and I said, it said artist. And then when I, I walked, went to this conference and I was practically like often the only woman, you know, and I would say, yeah, I'm an artist.And I know. And so the first job I got was making the first CD rom for apple computer that they said distributed to every single apple. So they distributed over 2 million copies worldwide, and my name was on it. And that kind of, that was a huge breakthrough because suddenly I was being offered insane jobs.And next thing you know, I was anyway, like, I don't want to dwell on this because we haven't talked about newsletters yet.[00:27:01] Nathan:That is okay. that is okay. So you just made a leap from, I went to this conference to,[00:27:08] Kimberly:Yeah, by the way speaking, we started with going to a conference.Yeah.[00:27:12] Nathan:A big deal. We are we talking about that as well, but this leap from going to the conference to your work, being on the CD,[00:27:19] Kimberly:Well, so they were, it was like, again, I was on the bleeding edge. I could not explain to my father Who would come down and visit me. In the warehouse. I, it was, it was an artist and a coder who, but they had both met in art school and they brought me on to be the creative director.And it was like, it was almost no money at first. And then it became like a bigger thing and apple, the more that apple saw it, the more they were like, wow, this is really good. so then the next conference I went to was in San Francisco was Macworld and my art was everywhere, everywhere, and I got job offers from Imagineering. They wanted me to design why the Disney, they wanted to be the head. Of Warner music was doing a new interactive division and digital don't digital.I can't remember the names, but it was very, it was a very heady time. It was very, it was very fun. I felt like, wow, I found this place that has it's the intersection of art design, narrative and technology. And it was exactly where I want it to be. And that was just, that was sort of, and I set up an easel in my office, I had a lot of people working for me and it was just, it got very, it got very fancy, you know, and I, and I took a lot of, I took a lot of like what I knew at Landour to attach in this before email this before the internet.[00:28:45] Nathan:You're talking early nineties at this point,[00:28:48] Kimberly:Yeah. Like you no, like a mid yeah. Mid nineties, you know, 96, maybe. So, yeah. So I took a lot of my, knowledge that I gleaned from working at land or like the discover design develop, deploy to whip these engineers and designers into shape, you know? And anyway, I was still stalking what I really wanted to do, you know?[00:29:10] Nathan:Okay. So tell me more about the difference between what you wanted to do and what you were doing, because you just described your art being on everything.[00:29:17] Kimberly:No, no, no, actually, honestly, honestly like I would listen to like Liz fairs, exile in Guyville, as I drove downtown by the toy factory in downtown Los Angeles back and forth, like every day, like at these, I was a big album listener.And when I was designing, I would listen to full albums and I was just like, wow, this is it. I am so excited and energized and everything. then I started studying painting again. So I started so like I had taken a hiatus. And then I got into the, Otis, which is the art school here, You know, when you get professional, when you become a professional in anything, even being an artist, there's a, single-minded rigor focus and clarity. one brings their whole self to what they're doing, you know? And if you know that if If you've been successful in anything else or anything like that, you can, if you bring that to your art, there's literally nothing that can stop.You. You become a wire cutter. It's like, you're going to munch through like, I, you know, really understanding, painting in the deepest way possible. Like I was thinking if I can understand alpha channels, I can figure out how to tone a canvas. You know, just like I just, because painting is a technology, honestly.I took everything in my being to it. And that was like a third moment. Like that was like another moment I skipped some moments, but there was like where I was knocking at the door, knocking at the door. And then I knew that in my art would become the, that I had when I started painting in full force.Like not just having it in my office, but saying this is what I'm going to do. And I'm going to do it as so ferociously, like stand back, everybody, nothing is going to get in my way.[00:31:13] Nathan:So you were painting, I mean, you had is this like painting a few hours a week, a few hours a day, and then you dove into doing that, just like.[00:31:22] Kimberly:This is like 40 hours. I mean, I basically gave myself an assignment and my assignment was I was going to paint a hundred new. Because that's the hardest thing to do as a body. Cause you have to deal with the translucency of skin. And I could literally talk about painting all day, but you have to deal with light form and shadow and thinking in three dimensions and it creates it's.I don't want to knock marketing and technology and the stuff that you do, but painting is that most people do, but painting is a true, like you have to really, it's a very intellectual as well as mindful and spiritual, but it's a very, it's a very deep, deep, deep way to approach the world. And when you become a painter or you actually like listen to the little voice inside you that says that they want to learn this.It's a skill, it's a skill. And when you do that, your brain expands and your world expands and you see things differently. So it's a very transformative thing and it takes years. It takes years and years. So my assignment was I'm going to paint a hundred nudes and, and if I have like 10 good ones, I can have a show.[00:32:41] Nathan:So I want to tie that to maybe the experience that other creators listening would have, or anyone who's on the fence about getting started. Right. It might not be painting that they're trying to do, but they've had these fits and starts of like, I'm going to, learn to code, start a podcast, start a newsletter, any of these things, you know, learning to play an instrument, whatever it is.And then like start and it goes, maybe it goes well for a week or a month, or like what, what advice would you[00:33:11] Kimberly:Isn't there, isn't there like a guru isn't there like a guru in the subject that calls it, the. Who's that guy. Do you know what I'm talking about? Yeah. Somebody told me that, cause I was saying this to somebody and they were like, oh yeah, that's somebody's Seth, Godin's the dip. But yes. You know, when I was younger and all through all through my, you know, middle school and high school and college, I played piano quite seriously.I was a classical pianist and whenever I would learn a difficult piece, I would play it over and over and over again. And I would have to, like, I would start to suck. I would get better, but then I would start to suck and I'd have to walk away and then come back at it the next day before I would be able to play it perfectly.Like, I mean, you know,[00:34:01] Nathan:Yeah.[00:34:04] Kimberly:Learning an instrument actually teaches you this better than anything, because if you make a painting at first and it sucks, you can be easily thwarted, like a, you know, a drawing or whatever. But, but in order to like worry the bone of like how to get that legato, right. And that Greek piano concerto or something like you got to just sort of do it again and again, and again and again, you know, like it's, the fundamental way to learn is you, you imitate, assimilate, and then you can improvise.So you have to like, you play these pieces. And so with anything, you're going to be thwarted in the beginning many times and you can't give up, you have to say, okay, well, I don't care if it even sucks. I don't care if I'm going to fail. If I'm gonna fail, I'm gonna fail big. Like I'm[00:34:52] Nathan:Right[00:34:52] Kimberly:Go all out.Let's just go on.[00:34:54] Nathan:But that specific assignment that you gave yourself of painting 100 nudes, do you think that an assignment like that is a good way to go as a creator of saying this is the commitment that I'm going to make, I'm going to get to a hundred podcast episodes or I'm going to, I don't know, write a hundred blog posts, and then I can decide if this is something I actually want to pursue.[00:35:13] Kimberly:Absolutely. I think that when you make a commitment like that, to devote your energy into building a body of work of any kind in any media, you, your life will change everything. You are going to gain skills that involve every facet of that media. So like, if you're a podcaster and let's say you record in iMovie you're going to learn iMovie or whatever they, whatever they edit podcasts.In And, and I think if, you know, if Leonardo DaVinci were alive today, trusts me. He would know Photoshop He would know he would be all over this stuff, you know, he would love, he would love it in this nether world space, because there's, I'm, I'm going off topic a little bit because there's a little bit of a prejudice in the art world where people were thinking they were resisting the newer technological versions of artwork.But back to process, what you were saying is that if you do something in a committed way and you basically measure it and say, I'm going to do it until I get to this point, I think a hundred might be excessive, but you're going to get the hang of it.[00:36:28] Nathan:Yeah[00:36:28] Kimberly:I mean, I haven't mixed feelings though, about blogging cause I started a blog again, when I was, really getting into.Consuming. I mean, consuming isn't the right word. When I was throwing my entire body into the art world, one of the things that I did to expand my own knowledge was to write about other artists. And I think that's also something that's super unspoken, especially in the art world, because a lot of artists are just saying Me me me I want attention.I want to get people to focus on my show and my work, and I want a gallery and I want this and that. And I think one of the most important, aspects of breaking through to any next level of anything is generosity. Generosity of your attention to other people who are doing the same thing. And that for me, that general, I mean, I didn't think of this.This is red, this is a in retrospect, but at the time when I look back on it, I was airlifting artists that nobody had heard of and writing about them along with other big art, you know? And so I had a successful weekly column where I was keeping a blog again, this was before social media and that's how, and then the Huffington post came along and then I started publishing it, the, having a post.And that's how I said, I was asked by Arianna Huffington to be the, to found an art section. And so I was like, I was perfectly positioned because I was, I was a big nerd. I had had these other experiences. I was a full-on painter. I was having shows galleries the whole thing. And then she was building this incredible Site to celebrate bloggers. And I was one of the bloggers So I had to build an audience from zero to 10 million people within two years. I didn't have to that's what happened.[00:38:26] Nathan:Right.I have so many things that I want to ask about in this, one thing that I want to highlight that you talked about is as you're doing the painting, there's the side of it, of, Research where you're researching other painters, learning from them and all that. Most people keep that Research to themselves, right?That is not a public thing that happens. And I think a lot of the most successful creators that I see are the ones who do that recent. And, and share their notes and share that and work in public and do the interviews and all of that that you were doing. because it does a couple things. One people follow you, not only for your own work, but then also for your notes on other people.And then too, it's incredible for meeting people. Like when you do a profile, either if they're a, say an upcoming artist or someone who's established either way, they're going to be like, when you, you know, when you send them an email, they'll like respond and be interested and engaged. And, you know, I mean, that's a reason that I do this podcast is so that I can meet and hang out with people that I want to more aboutIt's amazing for network.[00:39:30] Kimberly:Yes. I think you're exactly spot on. This is no different than what I did with artists, this, except for I wasn't involving video, I was writing about it and interviewing them. You're right. You're absolutely right. I also think that you can get too carried away with that though. Like you have to be careful, you have to make sure that you're, you know, I can become easily like Clydesdale the horse.I'm like, well, that's another month and I have to do another,[00:39:57] Nathan:It becomes more important than the art, which was the[00:40:00] Kimberly:Well, yeah,[00:40:01] Nathan:It feels more time than[00:40:02] Kimberly:Yeah, yeah. Like, so eventually I had to leave, because it was just sort of eclipsing. It became so much bigger than everything else I was doing that I had to like go, okay, this isn't, you know, I've got a show coming up. I can't devote all this time and energy. And then of course, social media kind of made it all really different.[00:40:24] Nathan:Like in what way?[00:40:25] Kimberly:Well, because not only we could, you know, writing a really thoughtful piece about an artist and looking at their work and, you know, relating it with art history. And I also found that if I could relate it to like a contemporary event, like there was this one painter who painted battle scenes and we were just going to war with Iraq, I think, anyway, we were going to war somewhere.You know, it was a horrible time, but like, I would talk about going, you know, this contemporary news event. And I would link it with the artist who was painting these battle scenes. And then seeing that it went, go.[00:41:04] Nathan:Right.[00:41:04] Kimberly:Was another, that was another big learning lesson is like, if you put a number in a headline, like 10 things, you, you should tell, you know, 10 rules for your kids and screens, you know, then people would read that more.So I could see the analytics of what people clicked on. You know, that was like a interesting learning experience. But when social media happened, then suddenly you also had to tweet it. You had to post it on Facebook and then you had to tweet about it and then it just got to be social media. here's my take, if I could just say one thing, because I want to get it out there.I think social media is great for first impressions so that when people see you for the first time they're going to go that person's like a real artist or they're a real whatever, and they're legit. And they don't just have like three things that they've said about the subject. They've actually like, I trust that they've done some deep things.Like me painting a hundred nudes, you know, like this person knows how to paint.So I think social media, it's just so easy to get carried away. I hope one day it goes away. Is that terrible to say? I think emails should be everything. It should just go away.[00:42:14] Nathan:I don't think it's terrible to say at all. You have something in your Ted talk. you talked about like the compulsion to paint being taken away by your smartphone and these distractions, And I'd love for you to talk about that because I think there's so many things of like, if I'm on Twitter or checking my email, or even interacting with the ConvertKit team 2,700 times a day, you know, it makes it so much harder as a creator.And so I like, I just want to hear more of your experience there.[00:42:45] Kimberly:Well, I mean, in order to even get into my zone mentally to paint, I have to like have at least 90 minutes where I haven't spoken with anybody. Like I just need to kind of like clear it. Like I need to, I mean, I can be in it and I've got all these, you know, because people everybody's different. Some people like beginnings, some people like middles, other people's like ends.So you have to get in touch with which person you are, you know? So I, I love middles and beginning. I actually like all of them, but like, I'm better at certain things. So whenever I go into the studio, I have to start in paintings that are in the middle, that many going on at once. so you have to get in touch with like what time of day you're best at.And I always begin things at the end of the day when I'm already like nice and a well-oiled machine, well-oiled creating Machine.I never begin things in the morning. I always begin. at the end of the day, I never begin paintings in the morning. I was beginning, you know, I mean, I, I'm not, I know I'm not answering your question.Your question is, compartmentalizing your time to protect it away from social media. I teach a master class and I teach a Masterclass with artists who are building their first body of work, or they, they want to build a body of work in the masterclass.I make them take an oath an Instagram oath Instagram is it's so draining psychologically, emotionally, mentally, and the effort that you put into it that you really have to like commit and, and, and artists feel pressure to post their progress and post once a day and stuff like that.And the truth is, that algorithm, the algorithm is so fraught right now because you really only see the last 20 people that you liked more often than not. And you're not, it it's just, it's not healthy. It's not healthy for a visual artist Because you'll be on it. You check it like a diabetic checking their insulin level.It's just like, oh, did it get enough? Likes all that. It's like, Ugh. So I use, later to post once a week because I don't really want to deal with it. So I'll do like four months at a time. But if like I have a museum show opening up on Saturday, so I have to make a post this week. And so that that's like in my brain, oh God, I got to make a post this week.And when my book was coming out, like that's a whole other topic about promote, you know, how to tell people and that a book is coming out. yeah. So I just kind of look at it like, you know, kind of like a creative sinkhole,[00:45:15] Nathan:Yeah. And so it[00:45:15] Kimberly:So it[00:45:15] Nathan:Makes sense to avoid it. I think we hear that advice from a lot of talented creators and it's easy to be like, yeah. Yeah. But I can, I'm the person who can sit down and write with a moment's notice, you know? And then you you get totally stuck on writer's block or whatever thing, because you're like, you actually didn't create that space.And, like you talked about in the Ted talk of that time to like daydream and to actually be there, present with yourself and your thoughts.[00:45:42] Kimberly:Yeah, it's true. I mean, there's this thing in neuroscience called empathetic mirroring. Do you know about[00:45:48] Nathan:I don't know.[00:45:49] Kimberly:It's this, it's like when you see somebody, for example, write on a chalkboard, the neurons in your brain, I'm not going to say this. Right? So if a neuroscientist says I'm like slightly wrong, but like, it, it, it has this effect where you feel like you're doing it, you know, like, and it's, that's why people love to watch people write things.That's why a chalkboard is an excellent device for, I actually have a chalkboard in my office because I started to. Take videos of me make with my talking points of me writing it on a chalkboard, because even though it's considered like, you know, yesteryear technology, it actually helps people receive the information better to see it written[00:46:34] Nathan:Rather than being next[00:46:36] Kimberly:Rather than just show a PowerPoint slide.Yeah. And so this, the act of seeing it rhythm, but so if, if you think about the power of empathetic mirroring, that's going on in your brain, when you look at something happening, think about how much it can pollute your brain. If you're watching a stream of all these things happening in your Instagram feed or your Facebook feed, it's like dangerous.Like you have to be protective of what is going inside your mind. It's that they say like garbage in, garbage out, you know,[00:47:04] Nathan:I want to hear about you getting into the world of, of like teaching classes and that side of it, and then you have a book as well. There's a lot.[00:47:12] Kimberly:Oh yes. So I have this book,[00:47:15] Nathan:There[00:47:15] Kimberly:So, you know, around a decade into, you know, being a serious painter, I started to feel bad from the fumes because painting isn't really taught the way other things are taught. Painting is sort of like, there's, there's been this somewhat mystical, you know, here's a bunch of art supplies go to the art store and then let's see what you come up with.And then the, the, the classes tend to be more about critiques, about what you've done versus about,[00:47:45] Nathan:How do something.[00:47:46] Kimberly:About the, the true, true granular house, you know, the, how, like the basics, like things that you should know. And, so I started to get sick and I happened to be the arts editor at the time of the Huffington post.And I reached out to, and blogging was a very interesting, it was around 2004 or five, I think. Maybe, maybe it was a little bit later, but it was an interesting time because other people were thinking what I was thinking and I could see it in search for it. Whereas I couldn't, I couldn't have done that a decade earlier.And so I would reach out to leaders in the field, scientists, whatnot, to write about this topic of safety, you know, like that. And, but then when I read and I had, by the way, been consuming, Disneyland books, everything about painting, and I just saw this huge gaping hole of knowledge of how. Communicated. So I started writing this book all about painting and the book that I ended up publishing with Chronicle books is just one small piece of it because it was kind of too big.It was like James Joyce's Ulysses, you know, it was like a tone. It was like a Magnum Opus. and it's one of the key things that people don't realize is that you don't need to use solvent's P many people believe that you need to have like an open can of turpentine or some kind of solvent to dip your brush and defend the oil paint.So it's like super basic and most people when they go to the art store, and this is just my short, my short, skinny on the book. As most people, when they go to the art store, it would be like only buying canned or prepackaged. They don't know what's in it, you know, they don't know like that you don't need all those things.Like, but if you were like learning how to cook, you would know the difference between a garlic and a shallot and when to use canola oil or olive oil extra-virgin, you know, so I wanted to create, to start a book called the Y that was like Strunk and White's elements of style, but for oil paintings. So that's like the famous book that most writers use and just sort of shows you.And it's funny, actually, it's like a great book. So I wrote that book and that's called the new oil painting and it's published by Chronicle and it came out in June and it's like staying at the top, like five books of oil painting, which is great, you know? So I'm very excited about that. But in any way, in that journey of writing the book, the book, the book deal I got was two years ago.It was like a while ago. And so Susan. Did that I thought, you know, I would be a fool to not have a class that went with the book. So to the summer of 2019, I had, I had like four solo exhibitions in a row and I thought, okay, I'm going to devote six months and I'm going to record videos and I'm going to do that.You know? So I created this class that I wish that I had, and it was way bigger than the book. It was like everything I've ever thought about oil painting and that's called oil painting, fluency and flow. And, so yeah, so I launched a class, so the classes are out there[00:50:52] Nathan:Are the classes something that, you know, you're teaching in an online course? Are you there in person or through a partnership with.[00:50:58] Kimberly:So once I, once I learned about. That you can oil paint anywhere like you, Nathan tomorrow could decide, you know what? I w I've got an artist in me. I want to, I want to learn how to paint and you could set it up next year, you know, like in a little side table next to your computer, and there would be no fumes, no nothing.And it's much better for the environment it's not made out of plastic. It's like, you know, you could do it. So I wanted to get the word out. And, so my first class is, and so I was started teaching at major institutions. So the Anderson ranch in Colorado and the Otis where I actually took lessons, I taught there.And then, I just thought to myself, you know, this is highly inefficient because I have to like schlep over there and go there for, you know, hours at a time. And I could reach so many more people if I recorded. Instruction. And so I made these recordings, that's a hybrid of recordings and live sessions and critiques.And I have, you know, I have about 78 students right now. They're from all over the world and it's like the boast enriching wonderful, fabulous thing I've ever done[00:52:08] Nathan:Yeah.[00:52:09] Kimberly:To being an artist, you know,[00:52:11] Nathan:And so how does that interact with the newsletter that you have?[00:52:14] Kimberly:Well, I mean, so all of my experience, just as an artist has taught me that you, your value that you bring to any situation is the people that you can tell about what you do. It's like a tree falls in the forest. Nobody knows you're having a show. You know, you can't just rely on your art dealer.And the The dynamic has changed where. People don't have one, rarely do people have one gallery that represents them. And then they've got a bunch of satellite galleries. So you kind of have to be a little bit more entrepreneurial as an artist. And so you need to gather an email list. And so I stopped blogging and instead I have a newsletter because I want, you know, and I I have a narrative of stories that I tell about creativity about, about like I'll crawl deeply inside the making of a single painting of mine, or maybe another one.And I, and each email I send out, I spend a lot of time on, and it's like a work of art by itself because it's, again, it may be a different thing. a newsletter may be slightly different than a blog, but it's still words and image and it's just how. It's like another work of art, it's another work of art.And I love, using ConvertKit. I mean, I really, really do I tell people about it. I tell people about it all the time, because I think it's, it's the first software I've encountered that, allows you to very easily create a sequence. And, you know, you can I tell people, I say like, if you want to think about it, you could unspool Tolstoy's war and peace.If you wanted, like you could, every week you could give like a little section and you can start at the beginning and it takes the pressure off needing to constantly have every email be a first impression. So you can really get, let people to get, to know you in a much deeper, more personal way, because you create a sequence of letters to them that[00:54:23] Nathan:Right[00:54:24] Kimberly:Over time.[00:54:24] Nathan:Well, I think that's a really important point about starting at the beginning, because when you're sending these one-off emails to your newsletter, you don't know where people are joining. Some people for years and other people that is the very first thing. And so every time I find myself adding these caveats are like, Hey, if you're new here, you know, any of those things and with a, an email sequence, you know, the automated series, it starts at the beginning every time and it works people through it.And so I've had that. I've had so much fun creating those because you can chip away at them. Like I have one that I'm kind of writing now on, I guess it's on personal finance, you know? And it's just things that I wish that I had known as like, Moderately successful creator. Like, Hey, you're now earning a full-time living, what what's next?And so I can just write about that when I feel like it and add to this, that's now like 10 or 12 emails long.[00:55:20] Kimberly:And what's your frequent.[00:55:22] Nathan:That one I said to every week, but if I don't write for it, everyone just kind of pulls up at the end and weights, you know, for the next email. So it's 10 emails And then I add to it. And so like last week I didn't add a new one. And so now there's like a hundred people that are all the way at the end and they didn't get an email last week,[00:55:41] Kimberly:Yeah, no, I have that situation. I have a two year sequence[00:55:45] Nathan:Oh, wow.[00:55:45] Kimberly:I mean, I know like I sound, I probably seem super extroverted and voluble and everything like that, but like, I, I, it's very difficult for me to sell. It's very, it's very not. It's not cool for an artist to be. So like, I mean, it's just hard.It's also just hard for me. It's my personality. Like I even posting on Instagram is like a stressful thing for me. It's like, did I get everything that, you know, like I just, it's just not, I'm not one of those people that just casually throw stuff out there. I just, I'm very thoughtful and I want it, you know, it to be meaningful.And, but anyway, I was having trouble announcing that a workshop was over. Like serious trouble. Like I would put it off and I'd say, I can't do it. I can't press the send button. Like I just, even though you have the schedule feature on the broadcast, I was like, I can't do it. I can't do it. And you know, I, I can't remember the name of the marketing guru who was, have the five day sequence or, you know, basically a launch sequence is a series of emails where you first email is all about it.The second email might address one's reservations about it. The third Emile email might be testimonials. And then the fourth and fifth email are like last chance to get it. Like that to me is like, I would rather have needle eyes surgery than do that, you know, so I built it in, so I basically have the sequence where every quarter there's a launch sequence.Is that crazy[00:57:13] Nathan:No, it's fantastic[00:57:14] Kimberly:Because then, so, so that way, like I can just set it and forget it, like back to the Crock-Pot thinking like, you know, like, you know, just set it and forget it. You're going to sign up. You're going to get an announcement for a walk shop, a workshop a couple months after you've gotten to know me.[00:57:30] Nathan:Do you think that, well actually I guess really quick, the thing that I love about that is you can be completely immersed in your painting, right? And there you are selling a workshop and you're like, you don't, you have to think about it or know about it. Cause you did that work once and now you've finished a whole day of, of painting.Start something new at the end of the day. Cause that's the way that you roll. And then also you can say like finish up and check those sales and check that engagement. See, oh, people.[00:57:58] Kimberly:Yyeah, yeah. I mean, it's, it's just, it's I think people before they're going to buy anything, need to feel. Most people need to feel, you know, a level of comfort about what that person is about. so, you know, I haven't touched you tube. I haven't really, I honestly, I haven't made, I haven't made a huge effort because I've had the book coming out and I F I ha I had a big exhibition in June because, I designed a series of, excuse me.I designed, I painted a series of abstract paintings, for the cover of the book, because I wanted the cover, the book to be stellar and represent like a specified stroke, like hanging in air, like, to just convey the idea of painting and not be like a landscape, because for some crazy reason, if you, if you look up oil, painting, all the books, About oil painting are so poorly designed.It's like, it's strange because you would think people who are artists would care about design, but it's like pink pallet, Tino, bold 14 point font over like a green sunset. it's[00:59:07] Nathan:Yeah, well, design and painting are not necessarily the same thing you happen to come from a world where you have a lot of this. Even those two worlds have intertwined for you a lot over your career. So it makes sense to[00:59:18] Kimberly:Yes, but, but when, when, but if you get, but the painting books, like if you see a PA a painting book that has like a landscape on it, what if you don't like the landscape or they all have a landscape, or it has like the, the, you know, a face that's loosely drawn with, you know, painted with turbine, you know, Alla prima anyway.I've had so many exhibitions and like, I have a, I have a show coming up on Saturday and I've got to tell people about it. So like, I have to be, I'm already out there as an artist. So I have two different sequences and newsletters. I've got like a workshops for people who express interest in a workshop within the main newsletter.Like if, if, like, I'll say like I have this one great newsletter where the subject line is, who is this gorgeous woman? And then I show a picture cause they used to paint these beautiful renditions of the faces of the Egyptian mummies inside the sarcophagus, like beyond gorgeous. Like if you looked it up, you'd say, oh my God, this most beautiful painting I've ever seen.And it looks a lot like Francesco Clemente, which is an artist that like paint uses the same aspect ratio. It's like, you sort of go, oh, that's where that guy got that idea, you know? But. I'll talk about the pigments and that they used to, like, they used to burn mummies and then take the ashes and make a pigment called mummy brown.I know that sounds really kind of gross, but like, but, but they that's what they did. And I I'll say like, if this interests you, you might be interested in like a workshop. then if they say yes, then they'll go into my workshop sequence and they'll get notified when I open them.[01:01:00] Nathan:Are there other things that you do with email and with your newsletter[01:01:04] Kimberly:Yeah. Like I, like, I really want, I really want people to easily update their preferences. So I created a jot form like that simple select, you know, check box check if you're no longer interested in, workshops. No problem. Let me know. And I don't get enough work. Ominous, but hopefully, hopefully you'll put that feature in soon.[01:01:30] Nathan:We're actually working on building that feature now. So,[01:01:33] Kimberly:Are you kidding? When does it come out[01:01:34] Nathan:It's one of those asking where the paintings are done. It'll be done when it's done.[01:01:40] Kimberly:The other thing that I do is I really think gifts are important. And I think the marketer, the marketing community is really cheesy about it. Like they always do like outtakes from friends for reaction shots.And it's just so horrible, but I mean, it's just corny and you know who I'm talking about, but, you know, anyway, a gift is a beautiful thing because it's a movie that plays automatically and it doesn't have sound and. it can be so beautiful and subtle, you know, so every time I make a news that I usually have like an, it's like a work of art to me, you know?And sometimes if I want to emphasize a word, I'll paint a picture of that word and I'll integrate it in it. So like I really spend, I really love making them special. Yeah. I have one about the creative process and about not, not the Ted talk that you saw, but like I have one that's on the lead up to talking about the masterclass.Where it's called the curse of perfection. And I show, I talk about how, when I was a kid, my mother used to always like, she would sometimes wear like super smudge makeup and it was psych, it was called the smoky eye. I mean, they still do it now, but now the beauty people make it super specific, but then it was not that it was a little bit more like, woo.And I found a beautiful GIF of like a smokey eye, like slowly opening and closing. And I then go off on this whole subject about how, you know, it's as a painter, you have to let go of that, of the chains of perfection. You have to let it go in order to.[01:03:22] Nathan:Yeah. Well, I love that you're taking a medium that you know, of email or gifts or any of these things that a lot of people use in one way. And you're bringing those styles in that like class and sophistication and really just the level of effort. I think a lot of people are like hearing. Oh, I'm supposed to have, images or gifts.I'm supposed to be funny. And so they just look for something and slap it in there. And there's a level of effort that's not happening there, but because you're doing these automated sequences and you know that if you put this effort into it, it will last and work for you for years, then it's worth it.You can do a custom painted, you know, word or something like that to illustrate a point.[01:04:04] Kimberly:I mean, I have the luxury of having hundreds of paintings, and pieces of paintings, and video of—there's nothing sexier and more beautiful than watching somebody mix paint. There's literally nothing more gorgeous than that—So, I'm lucky.And I understand that other creators have to find other things, but there's a way to do things that have like a metaphorical—I here's what I would say. I would recommend that people seek to enhance their ability to think in metaphor when they write.So if they're gonna talk about a subject, and they're talking about a roadblock, instead of drawing a boulder on a road, find some other image or GIF. I use a lot of GIFs from ballet. You can find beautiful GIFs just by searching “Swan Lake” GIF, and it implies a physical movement.It goes back into that empathetic mirroring, where you feel that your own body is doing these movements that are surrounding this idea. It's not directly about what you're talking about, but it's like a little bit to the left, or it's just kind of a metaphorical version of it. It creates the space in between what you're literally saying, and what you're actually seeing that ignites the imagination and the view.[01:05:35] Nathan:Yeah. I love that. Just putting that extra bit of effort into defining the thing that's adjacent, rather than blatantly the first thing that came to mind. I think that makes a huge difference.[01:05:46] Kimberly:Yeah,[01:05:46] Nathan:We need to do a part two, because I have like 25 more questions to ask you, and we're out of time.[01:05:52] Kimberly:I'm in. I'm in.[01:05:54] Nathan:This has been amazing. Where should people go to subscribe to the newsletter?[01:05:58] Kimberly:They should go to KimberlyBrooks.com. The newsletter's right there in the footer and on the top. I really love communicating this way, and it's been an honor to be on this podcast, because I really love the product you've created. I really couldn't do it without you—without ConvertKit.So, I just, I'm such a fan, and I'm an evangelist, so kudos to you.[01:06:19] Nathan:Wow, thank you.Well, we're exci

Practically Speaking Mom: Intentional Mom, Strong Family
Obstacles are Opportunities: Preparing Our Kids to SOAR Series - Episode 109

Practically Speaking Mom: Intentional Mom, Strong Family

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:34


As parents, our tendency is to want to make life easy for our kids.  However, a life of constant and immediate happiness, doesn't bring GROWTH.  If we want our kids to be strengthened, we must help them embrace challenges and obstacles as OPPORTUNITIES for their world to expand and  for their abilities to increase.  Comfort zones are pretty dull places to live.  And, usually God's design for our lives, is far bigger than our comfort zone. In this episode,  I'm joined by my daughter Abby to discuss the benefits of stepping out of our comfort zone, overcoming obstacles, and the good changes that can come from challenges.This is the third week of the series on Preparing our Kids to SOAR.  See episodes 107 and 108 for parts one and two of the series.Bible Verse Philippians 4:8

The Church at Avenue South Podcast
Intentional Innovation

The Church at Avenue South Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 31:02


The Church at Avenue South Buzzsprout-9423199 Sun, 24 Oct 2021 13:00:00 -0400 1862 full false web@brentwoodbaptist.com (Brentwood Baptist Church)

The Church at West Franklin Podcast
VISION22 | Intentional Innovation | The Church at West Franklin | Sermon

The Church at West Franklin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 35:52


Sunday October 24, 2021

Soon To Be Esquire
Soon to Be Intentional

Soon To Be Esquire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 30:51


How would you use 24 hours in a day to invest in yourself? In this episode of the podcast, I talk about how to maximize yourself in the 86,400 seconds that we're all given, being intentional in your relationships and with yourself, and embracing a sense of gratitude. Tune it to this week's episode of the podcast.

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

Are you married? Do you have opposite sex friends? Dr. Randy wants to help you be intentional in your opposite sex friendships, to keep them healthy and open, and NOT ruin your marriage. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s an Intentional Living Minute for Inspiration! What is Intentional Living? At Intentional […]

Mamas Con Ganas Podcast
Overcoming Mommy Guilt

Mamas Con Ganas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:43


An honest conversation for mothers about the stigma of mommy guilt. I talk vulnerably about how to better process the thoughts of mommy guilt. This includes observing our thought patterns, challenging ourselves to see things from an opposite perspective, and becoming very intentional in choosing our thoughts. If you ever struggle with feeling like you aren't a good enough mom, this episode is for you. Follow us on social media @mamasconganas www.mamasconganas.com/109 

The Game Changer Life
#278: Intentional Mindset Minute: October 22, 2021

The Game Changer Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 2:07


Structure makes you stronger.

Trylove
Episode 141: UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES (2010)

Trylove

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 89:50


When was the last time a movie made you consider who you were before, during, and after watching it? Or where those people came from? Or what you do with those thoughts? The final installment in Apichatpong Weerasethakul's "Primitive" project, UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES is an oft-cited example of slow cinema and the movie that made Weerasethakul a darling on the international stage. In this episode, we try to go further than the ‘WTF' reactions and knee-jerk defenses we found on the internet. We just so happen to pick up a few ghosts along the way and leave little versions of ourselves behind – like the text you're reading or the podcast you might listen to in a few minutes. Say hello to those guys for us, would you? Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/trylovepodcast and email us at trylovepodcast@gmail.com to get in touch! Buy tickets and support the Trylon at https://www.trylon.org/. Theme: "Raindrops" by Huma-Huma/"No Smoking" PSA by John Waters. Music: “Acrophobia” by Jettamon Malayota (Penguin Villa) from the UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES soundtrack. 0:00 - Episode 141: UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES (2010) 2:19 - The episode actually starts 3:01 - The Patented Aaron Grossman Summary (franchised by Harry Mackin) 6:06 - Jason's thoughts 9:54 - Cody's thoughts 14:34 - Harry's thoughts 20:38 - Boonmee and modes of being 34:06 - Understanding the movie's impact on three levels 37:54 - Haunting mundanity 41:31 - The power of images 46:54 - Boonmee dies as he lived: A man 50:33 - Intentional, necessary abstraction & ambiguity 53:43 - A lamentation for the end of the film 1:03:03 - Final thoughts 1:08:43 - Cody's Noteys: Uncle Notey (trivia)

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

Hope, like love, has become seriously watered down. But hope is not something that you just wish would happen. It's something that you can really experience. And it can radically change your perspective, and your life. Dr. Randy wants to hear how you've experienced hope. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s […]

Fig & Farm (at home) - Design Happy Living
Ep. 24: The holidays are right around the corner: The importance of creating and being intentional with your family traditions

Fig & Farm (at home) - Design Happy Living

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:33


The holidays are right around the corner and we're kicking off this holiday season with a reminder of the important role traditions play in the lives of families.   Why do traditions matter so much and how can we be more intentional when creating them for our own families? We're exploring that through the lense of the nearest holiday, Halloween.  Traditions are an important part of your family culture. They nurture family connections, bridge the gap between generations, provide meaning to our celebrations, provide structure that kids thrive on and, most simply, can be a lot of fun! Traditions by their very nature are repetitive, something to look forward to. Understanding them a little better can help you understand why they're worth repeating year after year.  And...you get my top 5 favorite family Halloween traditions. You might be surprised that this home decorator doesn't include decorating for Halloween in those top 5! Enjoy! Links mentioned in show: website:>> figandfarmathome.com Facebook group:>> bit.ly/design101group

Raising 8: A couple of sinners trying to raise saints

A lot of losing going on, including Michael losing sleep due to one of the cats. Lori and Michael talk about being intentional spending time with each child in the family.

The Queen's Lair
Be Intentional: Write It Down! - Season 22 Episode 7

The Queen's Lair

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 17:41


You can help us on our quest to bring a visual element to our podcast! All donations will go directly to buying equipment and hiring of staff to expand our platform. Thank you so much for your continued support! Please visit: https://ko-fi.com/onyxqueenmedia . Any reproduction, duplication, or distribution of The Queen's Lair in any form, is expressly prohibited. You MUST have written permission. The Queen's Lair Podcast may contain affiliate links and will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. Thank You! |Press inquiries: E-mail - info@onyxqueenmedia.com | © 2012-2021 OnyxQueen Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Asking Better Questions
EP 37 | Jenny Rearick: Intentional Communication

Asking Better Questions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 62:27


Jenny is a communication and presentation skills coach, gym owner, personal trainer, and educator. She is obsessed with communication and has dedicated her career to exploring, practicing, and teaching what she knows. Episode Details:Communication and Effectiveness How can fitness professionals and coaches alike be more intentional with their communication?How do we make GREAT first impressions?Presence - Verbal and Non-Verbal SkillsIn person vs. VirtuallyActive ListeningAsking focused and earnest questionsListening in difficult conversationsEmotions and conversation via textsHow does ego play a role within communicationHow do you identify who you are talking to?Rudimentary vs. Intellectual CommunicationFiller WordsWhat If you lose your thought?PausingKnowing what to say but not planning itArticle Referenced: https://betterhumans.pub/how-to-remember-everything-you-want-from-non-fiction-books-df17096d517fTo learn more about Jenny and her coaching, you can find her at https://fit-to-speak.com/ @fit_to_speak

Sportsradio 1310 and 96 7 FM The Ticket
Dallas Cowboys Head Coach Mike McCarthy Joins Intentional Grounding with Robert Wilonsky and David Moore

Sportsradio 1310 and 96 7 FM The Ticket

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 29:12


10-20-2021 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

Intense loss can cause you to encounter great waves of grief, and be overwhelmed. Joining Dr. Randy today is grief counselor Bobbi Rill, and they not only want to help you grapple with your grief, but discover ways to overcome it. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s an Intentional BLOG for […]

Being The Balance
Growth, introspections + reaping the harvest

Being The Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:53


Hi dope friends! It's S2:E4 and we're dropping gems for our favs. We're discussing #meditation, #goals with intention, and the spectrums of fixed, growth, and benefit mindsets. Y'all know we're on this journey to be in the space to embrace growth. Our recent convo with Sistas of the Soil intertwined the beauty in physically growing and harvesting something and the mental and emotional correlations. And of course, gardening is about more than growing food. Our dope friends shared their beautiful mission, cleared up some misconceptions about urban #farming, and helped us (i.e. Shari) understand the errs of her gardening (or lack thereof) ways.#plantlove

Square Stories
Rob Napoli leads his life in a very curious, intentional, gritty, smart way.

Square Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 60:55


Rob, founder & CEO of Rise Up Coaching knows that when you are curious you learn, when you learn you build and when you build with intention you build authentically.  In his first book, coming soon, 'The Social Soul, Mastering Your Personal and Professional Brand with Intentionality and Authenticity', Rob highlights the process for building your network across all platforms.

Real Talk With Deb & Nia
The Intentional Budget: Funding Your Goals

Real Talk With Deb & Nia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 74:27


What are you waiting for? The benefits of budgeting are endless, and now you (and your partner) can discuss money without the tension. Join our conversation with Financial Coach Amy Scott to find out how you can create a financial plan that considers preferences, preserves relationships and supports the achievement of your life goals.

French Kiss Life
255: Intentional Thoughts

French Kiss Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 16:43


Discover how to start thinking intentional thoughts. I'm sharing the awareness you will need to develop in order to start creating intentional thoughts, and why taking action without working on thought-creation is never going to move you forward.   Get full show notes and more information here: https://schoolofselfimage.com/255

Classical Theism Podcast
Ep. #167 - Anscombe & God's Intentional Act of Creation w/ Dr. Kerr

Classical Theism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 74:21


What is classical theism? Can the simple, immutable God of classical theism do any actions? And even if so, can He act intentionally? How can we account for such intentional action without contradicting divine simplicity or immutability? What did Anscombe and Davidson argue regarding intentional action? How are these accounts relevant to the questions about God? Dr. Gaven Kerr joins us to share some of his recent research on intentional action. The Classical Theism Podcast aims to defend Catholic Christian ideas in conversation. With the help of various guests, I defend three pillars of the Catholic Christian worldview: (1) the God of classical theism exists, (2) Jesus is our Messiah and Lord, and (3) He founded the Catholic Church. We place a strong emphasis on the first pillar, defending classical theism, drawing upon the work of Thomistic philosopher Dr. Edward Feser and many others. John DeRosa www.classicaltheism.com/support   Check out my book One Less God Than You: How to Answer the Slogans, Cliches, and Fallacies that Atheists Use to Challenge Your Faith >> www.classicaltheism.com/newbook

How Success Happens
Maria Shriver & Patrick Schwarzenegger, Co-Founders of MOSH, on being Intentional about Brain Health

How Success Happens

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:31


The mother son duo of Maria Shriver & Patrick Schwarzenegger are the Co-Founders of Mosh. Mosh is a new and revolutionary company that focuses on products that improve brain health.

Jesus Culture Podcast
Episode 75: Discipleship and The Intentional Father

Jesus Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Jon Tyson, Pastor of Church of the City New York, joins Phil and Becky to discuss the importance of discipleship and the role of fathers in our lives, as we develop in leadership. You can purchase Jon's new book, “The Intentional Father”, online and where books are sold.

Jump Start Your Joy
Intentional Comfort and Joy (Jump Start Your Joy Season 7 Kick Off)

Jump Start Your Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 23:34


Comfort and Joy is the new theme for Season 7 and I'm thrilled to sharing all about "intentional comfort." After spending time in the messy middle, over the last 18 months our nervous system needs a pause and a reset and some intentional comfort. So that's what we're looking at in this episode. Here's what you'll find: 1. Intentional Comfort: It's the mindful activity of embracing comfort, and finding down time for yourself. It's important because we're all been in a "trauma vortex" since early 2020. (hat tip Ilene Smith) 2. What's the messy middle? (it's this weird undefined time we've been in, where we don't fully know when this pandemic will end, and know that we can't get back to where we were.) 3. It's time drop the idea that we should embrace "courage over comfort" or "living your big bold life" without balance of intentional comfort. 4. Introverts and highly sensitive people need to slow down and embrace comfort to be in a good place in their lives. 5. That we need comfort for comfort's sake. We need to rest for the sake of resting and wellness. (And not so that we can go do anything else. Just because.) 6. Finding intentional comforts, and the difference between comfort and numbing out. Comfort is affirming, nurturing and is taking care of oneself. Numbing out is doing something to an extreme, and losing oneself in the activity. Comfort is making space for life. Numbing out is usually an activity that takes over one's life. 7. Inspiration for the idea of Intentional Comfort: Tami Hackbarth of 100% Guilt Free Self Care Podcast, and guest on Jump Start Your Joy The Nap Ministry of Instagram Jennifer L. Scott, author of the Madame Chic series of books. Also on YouTube.  Stasia Savasuk, Jump Start Your Joy guest and founder of Stasia's Style School Jackie of Super Enthused, on YouTube and Instagram Sonya Renee Taylor, author of The Body is Not an Apology, leader, poet, activist, and guest on Jump Start Your Joy. Buy Jump Start Your Joy: Heart-Centered Ways to Find Joy in The Messy Middle on Amazon (affiliate link) Follow Jump Start Your Joy on Apple Podcasts Follow Jump Start Your Joy on Spotify    

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

I suspect that the good stories outweigh the horror stories by a whole bunch, but… there is SOME truth behind those in-law stories. If you've got some in-law relationships you need sorting out, this program is for you. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s an InTENtionals Inspiration What is Intentional Living? […]

How to Be Human
05: Self Expression

How to Be Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 50:12


What is the definition of self-expression? According to Lexico, self-expression is “the expression of one's feelings, thoughts, or ideas, especially in writing, art, music, or dance”. It is an important aspect of mental health because self-expression is an excellent way to find the real version of oneself, become more balanced, and lead a happier life. Reconnecting with your inner child can help you rediscover what you love to do as a result.We begin self-expressing in childhood but usually forget how freeing it is as we grow older. Caring too much about the result and acceptance by peers is to blame. Anna and Nina share some personal experiences from when they were little, and we learn that they have a creative background in dancing and singing, respectively. Both Anna and Nina still love to do intuitive movement between client sessions to release the tension and feel lighter. They discuss the misconception that you need to be good at something to fully enjoy it. Instead, focusing on getting the feelings out should be your goal. Being a little bit dramatic is also a form of self-expression, and these extreme emotions could be a way to open up a dialogue with people around you. Feeling all kinds of emotions is perfectly okay, and taking a day off to be sad might help you get better instead of keeping everything inside. Connecting with other creatives is a way to encourage you to accept self-expression as it is and do what you want in that particular moment. Just letting your feelings out without any objective in mind can be very freeing. You might feel a bit uncomfortable because, after all, you are creating something and might want to share it with the world later on. Honesty is the key here. Your work should reflect your intentions, and it will be evident if you created something to express your true feelings or made it for an audience. Anna and Nina firmly believe that every person has a creative streak, and chasing perfection could hinder your self-expression. Anna shares her experience on how self-expression helped her build her circle of friends who all share similar interests.Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, or on your favorite podcast platform.Topics Covered:The definition of self-expressionSelf-expression and mental healthNarrow conceptions of creativityBeing truthful and using it for self-expressionPushing past the fear and rediscovering self-expressionResources Mentioned:BCCSLexicoCharles HarbuttSpecial offer:Listeners get two weeks of our membership platform free by going to the website and using the How to Be Human option in the dropdown.Follow Us:How To Be HumanInstagramThe SoulUnity

Your Simply Big Life
Cultivating an Intentional Marriage with Lindsey Maestas

Your Simply Big Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 69:59


Lindsey Maestas is a wife, mom to two sweet boys, a podcaster, & speaker newly based in Franklin, TN. She is passionate about speaking vulnerably about relationships, faith, and real (hard) life with her community of tens of thousands of women. She shares hope, laughter, practical wisdom, and her favorite go-to products by means of her podcast, The Living Easy Podcast, email list, and social media platforms. In 2021 she created and launched The Wife Project, an online course created for women who desire to have a Godly marriage. It will be launching for the final time in November of 2021!   In this real and raw conversation we talk about:    * communication styles *working on our own heart first *bringing fun(and sexy back) into our marriage! ;)    You won't want to miss this one ladies!    Connect with Lindsey   IG @livingeasywithlindsey & @lindsey.maestas Podcast: The Living Easy Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-living-easy-podcast/id1481805272   The Wife Project: https://sparrowsandlily.com/the-wife-project/   Connect with Sarah    www.yoursimplybiglife.com PRE ORDER THE PLANNER    Instagram: @your_simplybiglife FB Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/yoursimplybiglife/  

Grace Church Orlando
Grace Is Intentional - Bill Snell

Grace Church Orlando

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 34:56


Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

When's the last time you had a meaningful conversation with your spouse. You DO know that a couple of “How are yous” and a couple of “I'm fines” does not constitute a meaningful conversation, right?. Dr. Randy helps you to have great communication. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE THING CHALLENGE. Here’s an Intentional […]

VickiLKemp's podcast
COURAGEOUS AND INTENTIONAL! "Featuring Therapist Javon Kemp"

VickiLKemp's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 48:43


Hey Shugs, welcome back! We have a powerful episode featuring special guest Javon Kemp who is an Associate Professional Clinical Counselor and a Behavioral Health Therapist. We learn from him the clinical and spiritual aspects of rest. We discuss being courageous and intentional. Rest and meditation are powerful. Allow your mind and thinking process to rest. It's ok to say no! To connect with him for therapy you may email him at Javon2258@gmail.com or 951-268-4006. Connect with me at VickiLynneKemp.com or Instagram @LadyVickiLKemp. I own no rights to the music.

Kairos Audio Podcast
Intentional Innovation | Kairos Vision '22

Kairos Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:06


Mike Glenn Buzzsprout-9387954 Mon, 18 Oct 2021 10:00:00 -0400 1746 full false web@brentwoodbaptist.com (Kairos Nashville)

D6 Podcast
#283 Discipleship in Grandparenting - Jim Wideman

D6 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:08


Intentional inter-generational discipleship is possible, and our guest, Jim Wideman, gives personal examples of ways that he incorporates discipleship into his relationships with his grandchildren and his adult children. 

Inclusion Catalyst
Intentional Disinvestment Requires Intentional Investment, with L. Brian Jenkins

Inclusion Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 20:53


This episode originally aired as a Nonprofit SnapCast episode in August of 2021. Brian Jenkins has impacted thousands of youth and adults through his nonprofit, Entrenuity. Founded in 1999, Entrenuity began with direct youth services in entrepreneurship education and then expanded to include adult entrepreneurs and returning citizens, as well as training Facilitators to teach entrepreneurship using StartingUp Now: 24 Steps to Launch Your Own Business, written by Brian. Additionally, Entrenuity operates the first Black-owned, enterprise level coworking space in Chicago, with special emphasis on providing vital business resources to Black, Brown, and Women entrepreneurs, as well as two craft coffee shops directed by the only certified Black female Coffee Director in Chicago. Brian is also the author of Know More Nonprofits: Moving From Dependency to Sustainability, and a founding partner of Renew Pavement Solutions, providing employment to returning citizens and underemployed. We talk about the issues of race, equity, and why supporting minority-owned business is critically important to any thriving American community. Inclusion Catalyst invites you to become our next guest host. Learn more here: http://inclusioncatalyst.com/join-us-as-a-guest-host/ Support Inclusion Catalyst by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/inclusion-catalyst This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

The Tea, Please
The Benefits of Breathwork and Intentional Breathing

The Tea, Please

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:45


We don't have to think about breathing, our bodies do it intuitively. But what if we did think about it? What if we brought intention and awareness to our breath and used our own breath to calm our nervous systems and heal? That's what we're exploring in today's episode with Haley Navarro, an LA-based breathwork facilitator who has seen and experienced how intentional breathing can improve symptoms of anxiety and depression. I dare you to take 5 deep breaths during this episode and tell me you don't feel better! https://www.instagram.com/theteapleasepodcast/ (Follow @theteapleasepodcast ) https://www.instagram.com/iamhaleynavarro/ (Follow @iamhaleynavarro) https://haleynavarro.com/ (Visit Haley's website )

Grace Pulpit Sermon Podcast
Salt: Intentional and Impactful Influence

Grace Pulpit Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 56:26


Harry Walls • Matthew 5:13 • Sermon Notes (Video)

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

Sermon Recording Sermon OutlineSpeaker: Rev. Scott StrickmanSermon Series: Spiritual Vitality1 Peter 1:3-9 (ESV)3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, 4 to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, 5 who by God's power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. 6 In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, 7 so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire—may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ. 8 Though you have not seen him, you love him. Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, 9 obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.Sermon OutlineFor genuine faith to mature, you need to be:1. Specific where you place itv4 “to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you” v5 “who by God's power are being guarded through faith...”2. Persistent in using itv6 “though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials”v7 “so that the tested genuineness of your faith—more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire…”3. Intentional about enjoying it v8  “Though you have not seen him, you love him.”v8-9 “Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls.”v6 “ In this you rejoice”Prayer of ConfessionAlmighty God, we appeal to you for mercy. We are filled with faith, but our faith is misplaced. Our faith in you is immature and weak. We are unstable. We experience fear and skepticism. Joy is lacking, and instead we experience anger, resentment, jealousy, and many other indicators that we need your help. We thank you that Jesus has secured an inheritance for us. We thank you that we are being guarded by your power. We believe. Help our unbelief. Through faith, may the reality of what Jesus has done for us become a growing spring of strength and encouragement in us. We appeal to you in his name. Amen.Questions for Reflection1 Peter 1:8 “[you] rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory”.  Do you want that?  What do you pursue in life that you hope will bring you something of that?Do you have inexpressible joy, filled with glory?  On a scale of 1-10, how much joy do you typically experience?How is faith connected to how you experience life?  What sorts of beliefs shape how you understand what happens?  What beliefs or convictions enable you to face hardship?  What wrong beliefs make life harder?What are somethings the Bible tells us to believe in that are sure, unchanging, solid?When you are discouraged because your faith doesn't seem genuine or sufficient, what can you do?  How can you avoid the trap of focusing on your faith, rather than focusing your faith on what will help you?How should you be applying faith in your daily life?  How should faith inform the kinds of decisions you frequently make?When you are in a difficult period or facing something hard, how can you exercise faith even while faith doesn't feel genuine?What is promised to you in Christ that should be a source of joy?  How can the act of rejoicing become something that is a more regular part of your life?  What can you weave into your daily life to practice rejoicing in Christ and the hope we have in him? Think of specific parts of your day and specific practices and try to develop a new discipline to add practicing joy into your routine.

Calvary Sunday Messages
Submit your plans to God's will as an Intentional Act of Faith

Calvary Sunday Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 46:18


The Christian Worldview radio program
Has the (Intentional) Economic Meltdown Begun?

The Christian Worldview radio program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 53:59


GUEST: DAN CELIA, CEO/president, Financial Issues Stewardship Ministries You've noticed it at the gas pump, grocery store, and elsewhere—prices are rising. But of course they are—the supply of dollars can't be increased through printing more without the value and buying power of an individual dollar decreasing. The Wall Street Journal reported that inflation rose more the last 12 months than it has in 13 years. More is likely to come, with rampant spending being proposed. And it's not just inflation. Have you noticed shortages on shelves…and at the car dealership? The government-ordered lockdowns of the economy over COVID and people not working has led to scarcity of goods and delays in transporting them. Meanwhile, the Biden Administration and the Left are doing everything they can to pass a $3.5T “Infrastructure Bill”, which has very little to do with roads and bridges and very much to do with expanding the power of government and dependency on it. It all sounds like a prelude to the inflation and scarcity described in the End Times in Revelation 6, when a global leader and government takes control.

Intentional Living with Dr. Randy Carlson

Have you ever said to your kids, “Don't do what I do, do what I say”? The Bible has a word for that—it's called hypocrite. Ouch! Dr. Randy helps you to become a person of integrity, where saying and doing agree, and your kids “catch” the right stuff. Sign up for Dr. Randy’s INTENTIONAL ONE […]

The Game Changer Life
#277: Intentional Mindset Minute: October 15, 2021

The Game Changer Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 1:52


Look for the 1%.