Podcasts about Generous

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  • 4,973PODCASTS
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  • Aug 15, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Generous

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Latest podcast episodes about Generous

Excel Still More
Kindness is Powerful

Excel Still More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 19:58


Everybody knows that love is the most crucial spirit of God needed today. No one denies its's intense value. But kindness deserves some attention as well. In fact, you might categorize being kind as the way you express love in a transaction, interpersonal way. Kindness, from tiny little choices, to deep conversations, proves love. It shares love with others. Kindness is love. In that way, kindness is extremely powerful. It changes outcomes from a near fender bender to a 40 year marriage. Today's episode explores the definition of the word, the generic, everyday element of it, the methods for living it in your home, and five practical points to consider. I'll list those points below with the verse references.- Give a Gift - Acts 9:36-39 - What can you present to someone as a random act of kindness?- Make a Trip - Acts 10:30-33 - Who can you go visit simply to encourage and show love to them?- Build a Fire - Acts 28:1-3 - What need can you fill in the life of someone God has put in your life?- Be One Sided - Titus 3:4-5 - How can you go way above and beyond like God does with you?- Create a Habit - Eph. 2:6-7 - What can you start doing regularly to imbed kindness anew?

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte
When Being Generous Does More Harm Than Good

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 13:12


When is it a good idea to help people out financially in your family or in your sphere of influence? Since each person has dignity, we can't just give and help people on our own--we can't force the help on them. In our personal relationships with family and friends, we have to carefully navigate when to be generous and when to hold back. On Monday's Mornings with Eric and Brigitte, Moody Radio financial expert, Glenn Zimmerman, talks to us about ways we can be helpful without stifling a family member's growth, because struggling is part of growing up and maturing.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Become Who You Are
#252 Take The Next Exit To A Better Life; Buckle up for TNSH for August 21, 2022

Become Who You Are

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 26:52


And Someone said to him, "Lord, will those who are saved be few?" And he said to them, "Strive to enter by the narrow door; for many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able."From the 3S Highway to nowhere, take the next exit that leads through the narrow door. This is Tuesday Night at the Smith Home for August 21, a meditation on Luke 13:22-30link to Tuesday Night in the Smith HomePlease consider being a Sponsor! "The future of humanity passes by way of the family"--John Paul II.     The John Paul II Renewal Center 's goal was to raise $2500.00 a month to fund a new team member whose focus will be to support the culture of life by helping to support and educate parents and children.  We already have the person, a seasoned teacher who is ready to go...help us bring  her on board!Generous donors have  pledged $1,025.00 per month so far...$1475.00 to go! So please consider any amount!                                                  Our Goal is now met when we have added:                                                   5 monthly donors @  $100.00 Month                                                   6 monthly donors @  $  50.00 Month                                                   31 monthly donors @  $  25.00 MonthUpdated  donor address:John Paul II Renewal Center902 S Randall RoadSTE C #296St. Charles, IL. 60174Support the show     Also listen to podcast #227: "Woke" Neo-Marxists are Destroying Our Children's Future and Taking Down Our Country. A whole generation of teachers has been indoctrinated to believe that their role is no longer to teach children to think but to turn them into activists for "Woke" Neo-Marxists whose stated goal is to destroy the United States of America by taking down the traditional  family and infiltrating the culture with every sort of perversion imaginable. Jack's guest is Tom Hampson from the Truth Alliance Foundation.  "One in four girls and one in six boys have been sexually abused in the United States alone, and almost all of our children have been affected at multiple levels."Email me with questions!Contact Jack: BWYR Podcast is a production of the John Paul ll Renewal Center or email him at info@jp2renew.orgPlease share this with your friends and family!Don't forget to sign up for our Newsletter!!  JPll Renewal Center email listSupport the show

Kingsway Christian Church Sermons - Audio

Sermon Notes How bad can things really get? “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.” - Genesis 3:15 NIV “Adam made love to his wife Eve, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Cain. She said, “With the help of the Lord I have brought forth a man.” Later she gave birth to his brother Abel.” - Genesis 4:1-2 NIV “Now Abel kept flocks, and Cain worked the soil. In the course of time Cain brought some of the fruits of the soil as an offering to the Lord. And Abel also brought an offering—fat portions from some of the firstborn of his flock. The Lord looked with favor on Abel and his offering, but on Cain and his offering he did not look with favor.” - Genesis 4:2-5 NIV “So Cain was very angry, and his face was downcast.” - Genesis 4:5 NIV “Then the Lord said to Cain, ‘Why are you angry? Why is your face downcast? If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? But if you do not do what is right, sin is crouching at your door; it desires to have you, but you must rule over it.’” - Genesis 4:6-7 NIV “Now Cain said to his brother Abel, ‘Let’s go out to the field.’ While they were in the field, Cain attacked his brother Abel and killed him.” - Genesis 4:8 NIV “For this is the message you heard from the beginning: We should love one another. Do not be like Cain, who belonged to the evil one and murdered his brother. And why did he murder him? Because his own actions were evil and his brother’s were righteous.” - 1 John 3:11-12 NIV What is it about Cain’s Sacrifice that the Lord did not appreciate? “By faith Abel brought God a better offering than Cain did. By faith he was commended as righteous, when God spoke well of his offerings. And by faith Abel still speaks, even though he is dead” - Hebrews 11:4 NIV “But the Lord said to Samuel, ‘Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.’” - 1 Samuel 16:7 NIV “But the king replied to Araunah, “No, I insist on paying you for it. I will not sacrifice to the Lord my God burnt offerings that cost me nothing.” - 2 Samuel 24:24 “Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. Each of you should give what you have decided in your heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver. And God is able to bless you abundantly, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.” – 2 Corinthians 9:6-8 NIV Real faith in our hearts will produce faith-filled sacrifice. “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.” - John 3:16 NIV “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” – Ephesians 2:8-10 NIV

TILT Parenting: Raising Differently Wired Kids
TPP 088a: Jessica Lahey Talks About the Gifts of Failure for Our Kids

TILT Parenting: Raising Differently Wired Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 45:36 Very Popular


My guest is Jessica Lahey, an educator, writer, and speaker, and the author of one of my favorite parenting books, The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed. Jess shares her insights about how we can best prepare our kids for an independent, successful adulthood in the way we practice autonomy supportive parenting versus overparenting, what it means to let our kids “fail” to help them thrive, how we can help our kids learn how to “sit with frustration,” and much more.  Jessica Lahey is an educator, writer, and speaker. She is an English and writing teacher, correspondent for the Atlantic, commentator for Vermont Public Radio, and writes the “Parent-Teacher Conference” column for the New York Times.  Jessica earned a B.A. in Comparative Literature from the University of Massachusetts and a J.D. with a concentration in juvenile and education law from the University of North Carolina School of Law. She lives in New Hampshire with her husband and two sons.  Things you'll learn from this episodeThe difference between overparenting and “autonomy supportive parenting"How many parents underestimate their kids and might be unknowingly fostering learned helplessness in themHow we can build scaffolding for our kids What Jessica wishes parents of atypical kids knew about teachersJessica's advice for how we can best advocate for our kids in schoolHow we can foster more of a growth mindset in our children, especially those who are perfectionist, as well as how to NOT foster “learned helplessness” Resources mentioned about the gift of failureJessica Lahey's websiteThe Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed by Jessica LaheyWhy Parents Need To Let Their Kids Fail (The Atlantic article)Dr. Ross Greene Talks About Collaborative and Proactive Solutions (podcast episode)The Opposite of Spoiled: Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous and Smart About Money by Ron LieberAm Writing (Jessica's podcast)The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children by Dr. Ross GreeneJessica Lahey's speaking bibliographyWhen Children Say ‘I Can't,' But They Can, and Adults Know It (NY Times article by Jessica Lahey)Support the show

Text Talk
James 2: "Go in Peace, Be Warmed and Filled"

Text Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 16:14


James 2:14-17Payton Roth joins Edwin for today's conversation. They discuss having an active faith that does more than proclaim the promises of God and pray for them to be fulfilled. This faith sees us as an instrument of God's righteousness. We are to be doers, not merely hearers.Read the written devo that goes along with this episode by clicking here.    Let us know what you are learning or any questions you have. Email us at TextTalk@ChristiansMeetHere.org.    Join the Facebook community and join the conversation by clicking here. We'd love to meet you. Be a guest among the Christians who meet on Livingston Avenue. Click here to find out more. Michael Eldridge sang all four parts of our theme song. Find more from him by clicking here.   Thanks for talking about the text with us today.________________________________________________If the hyperlinks do not work, copy the following addresses and paste them into the URL bar of your web browser: Daily Written Devo: https://readthebiblemakedisciples.wordpress.com/?p=10462The Christians Who Meet on Livingston Avenue: http://www.christiansmeethere.org/Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/TalkAboutTheTextFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/texttalkMichael Eldridge: https://acapeldridge.com/ 

EC Podcast
A Generous Perspective

EC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 43:16


A Generous Perspective by Elevate Church

Text Talk
James 2: The Law of Liberty

Text Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 16:00


James 2:8-13Andrew and Edwin talk about the three uses of "law" in this paragraph. Andrew invites Edwin to share his take on what being judged under the law of liberty is. Get your Year of Jubilee hat on.Read the written devo that goes along with this episode by clicking here.    Let us know what you are learning or any questions you have. Email us at TextTalk@ChristiansMeetHere.org.    Join the Facebook community and join the conversation by clicking here. We'd love to meet you. Be a guest among the Christians who meet on Livingston Avenue. Click here to find out more. Michael Eldridge sang all four parts of our theme song. Find more from him by clicking here.   Thanks for talking about the text with us today.________________________________________________If the hyperlinks do not work, copy the following addresses and paste them into the URL bar of your web browser: Daily Written Devo: https://readthebiblemakedisciples.wordpress.com/?p=10452The Christians Who Meet on Livingston Avenue: http://www.christiansmeethere.org/Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/TalkAboutTheTextFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/texttalkMichael Eldridge: https://acapeldridge.com/ 

Path to Well-Being in Law
Path to Well-Being in Law - Episode 24: Kori Carew

Path to Well-Being in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 57:12


CHRIS NEWBOLD: Hello, wellbeing friends. Welcome to the Path To Well-Being In Law Podcast, an initiative of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. As you know, my name is Chris Newbold. I serve as executive vice president of ALPS Malpractice Insurance. You know, our goal here on the podcast is to introduce you to thought leaders doing meaningful work in the wellbeing space within the legal profession, and in the process, build and nurture a national network of wellbeing advocates intent on creating a culture shift within the profession. As always, I am joined by my co-host, Bree Buchanan. Bree, how are you doing today? BREE BUCHANAN: I'm doing great, Chris. Great to be here. CHRIS: Good, good. As you all know, Bree is the president of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. Bree, we have some really exciting news to share about the institute and the journey that we're on to engineer this culture shift. Would you maybe give us a clue as to the breaking news that I think that we were so excited about? BREE: Nobody could be more excited than me because you said, you know, Bree is the board president. Well, up until this news, I had two jobs. I was the acting executive director, so I am just delighted to let people know we have hired our first full-time staff person and that is our inaugural executive director. Her name is Jennifer DiSanza. She comes to us with a whole host of experience in wellbeing issues and particularly with the law students. For many reasons, we wanted to bring Jennifer on board, but also strategically, we really realized that's where she's coming from is the future of our profession. And also, aside of where we know there's a lot of behavioral health distress and stress on the youngest members of our profession and the law students. So we're just thrilled to have Jennifer on board. CHRIS: Yeah. See, I had the privilege of serving with you Bree on the hiring committee. Boy, we have a dynamic leader now that will be working day-to-day to think about advancing wellbeing in our profession. You know, there's so much work to be done as you well know. We're actually planning on having Jennifer as our next podcast guest, which will be awesome to be able to just talk about the vision, why she's passionate about this work. It will also happen to be after the conclusion of some strategic planning that we as a board will be doing. So things are just really aligning well with both what has transpired, where we're going, and then focusing on what lies ahead in terms of some big issues that we have to tackle as we think about the wellbeing of lawyers and legal professionals in the profession. With that, today we're going to circle back to, we've spent considerable time in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion. You know, we had anticipated a three part series on this, but sometimes you extend an offer and you get somebody who's so awesome that you sit there and go, we have to expand this even further. Right? BREE: Along came Kori. Yeah. CHRIS: That's right. Along came Kori. And when Kori came along, we're like, okay, we're breaking the rules. We're totally bringing Kori into the mix. And so we were really excited to welcome Kori Carew to the podcast. Bree, would you be so kind to introduce Kori? And again, this is I know a podcast that we've been very excited and looking forward to. BREE: Absolutely. So Kori is a people inclusion strategist, an advocate, a speaker, a writer, a status quo disruptor. Got to love that. Child of God, wife and mother of two curly-haired, wise, energetic, fierce, spitfire daughters. Her family is multi-ethnic, multi-racial, multi-religious and spans multiple nationalities. She brings a fierce love of community and belonging that transcends differences to work, ministry and life. She loves to sing, cook, entertain, dance in the hallways at work, we need a video component of that, and read. Equipping leaders to be inclusive, to interrupt bias and disrupt the status quo. At her day job, she focuses on developing and implementing strategies for individual career and diversity and inclusion success, and helps organizations build bridges across differences and improve inclusion. BREE: When she's not working, she focuses her voice and talent on issues of gender equity and rights, inclusion, and human and civil rights, serving in her church and community, and cherishing her phenomenal tribe and community. She's energized by helping people live their very best lives. Kori was the Director of Strategic Diversity Initiatives for seven years at Shook, Hardy. And then she came over to Seyfarth and is now the Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer there and oversees their really spectacular wellbeing program, Seyfarth Life, and a whole host of other initiatives we're going to hear about. So Kori, welcome to the podcast. CHRIS: Yay. KORI CAREW: Thank you. I appreciate you inviting me to be on this podcast and also very much the work that you are doing. This conversation of wellbeing for attorneys is such an important conversation. It's one that we probably started having too late, and it's one where diversity and inclusion, there's more work to be done than time. I'm super thankful for all that you do and all that you do to help our profession be better, so thank you very much. BREE: You bet. Kori, I'm going to start off. We ask all of our guests a variation of this question. What experiences in your life are drivers behind your passion for work around diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging and wellbeing? KORI: Thank you for that question. And of course, you're causing me to go down a bit of memory lane. You would think this is an easy question, but it actually is not. It's not as easy because it forces you to look in the rear view mirror and try to understand where the dots connected to where you are. Before I do that, I do want to make one small correction. Seyfarth Life is an incredible initiative at Seyfarth that I am super proud of and one of the things that energized me about joining the firm. It has a steering committee that leads it. It's four partners at the firm, all of whom have a connection to wellbeing and mindfulness. My department and my role actually does not oversee Seyfarth Life, but we do work very closely with them. Because as one of the founding members, Laura Maechtlen noted from the very beginning, there's that intersection between inclusion and diversity and belonging and wellbeing, and the two work very closely together. But my department does not oversee Seyfarth Life. So just wanted to make sure I give credit to the right people. BREE: Absolutely, give credit where it's due. KORI: You know, because they're awesome and they do great work. In fact, if I may brag on them, out of the steering committee members, one of them is the chair of the largest department in the firm and an executive committee member and co-chair of the national diversity and inclusion action team. Oh, wait a minute. No, that's not right. Three are office managing partners. They're part of this steering committee, this leadership group, because they actually practice wellbeing and mindfulness and meditation in their own personal lives and allow it to influence how they lead. So I know Seyfarth didn't pay me to do a promotion, but I felt like I needed to shout some guys out. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: Our talent team helps them quite a bit in terms of organizing programs and handling the administrative and logistic things. Okay. So to answer your question, what are the experiences? I often say this and it is true that when I look at my life in the rear view mirror, how I ended up where I am makes a lot more sense as I connect the dots in ways that I probably couldn't have foreseen. For example, I never intended to be a diversity and inclusion professional. I actually never intended to go to law school. I started my university career as an electrical engineering major. When I came to the U.S., I wanted to build planes. That was my thing. I wanted to be an aeronautical engineer. I wanted to build planes. I loved science. I could spend hours in the lab. One of the best gifts I ever got was a lab coat. My dad had a custom drawing board built for me when I was a teenager that I carried with me everywhere because technical drawing, engineering drawing was one of my top subjects. KORI: So a lot of things make sense in hindsight. I look at my family composition and my sisters and I were all born in different countries. We have different passports. We grew up in Nigeria, a country with over 300 different ethnic groups with different languages and traditions and customs, so there's that. My family is multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-national, multi-racial and there's just so much diversity there. You know, in the family tree, there's a granduncle that's a Methodist church bishop, and one that's an Imam. And my grandfather's father was a teacher, was a teacher of the Quran. And so all of that diversity is there in the family, but it probably influenced how my parents raised my sisters and I and how even through childhood, I was always the person who was connecting the dots between similarities between people. And today we would call that cultural fluency, this ability to recognize cultural differences and not judge them but just adapt to them and be able to say, okay, you know what? KORI: It looks to me like person A is looking through a lens that's different than person B, but they're looking at the same thing. So how can I get these two people to be on the same page? So there's that family dynamic. But another thing that happened when I was growing up that I do think influenced me quite a bit. I grew up in Nigeria. Most of my childhood, we had one military dictator after another. So I grew up with coos happening more often than I would prefer. There were times that things broke out into religious violence. You're talking about incidents where a few people are killed or a lot of people are killed and everything goes to standstill, everybody's on edge. You don't leave your home. When the students go on riots because they're protesting something and things get out of hand, you're turning off the lights in your home and sort of huddled together, trying to make sure that you stay together as a family until everything passes over. So that was also something that I grew up around and experiencing. KORI: And then my parents are from Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone is actually my home country. If you ask me where I'm from, I will tell you I was born in Canada, grew up in Nigeria, but I'm from Sierra Leone. Because in my culture, you're where your father's from. So my entire identity has always been that I am from Sierra Leone. In the '90s, Sierra Leone began to experience a very brutal civil war, which calling it a civil war is actually inaccurate. You have a bunch of people with weapons who terrorize the population for 11 years. And it's been one of the most brutal wars that the world has seen at least in recent times. And that impacted my family in the sense that we lost people, in the sense that I hadn't been back to Sierra Leone for a long time. And it kind of started with my mom not feeling it was safe enough for us to go and visit, with grandparents living on the run and being sick and dying and me not seeing them in a long time because of just this state of chaos. KORI: And all of this fueled how I ended up going to law school, wanting to do human rights work, wanting to be a human rights lawyer, feeling as if I learned so much about the American system and the role that the legal profession played in terms of maintaining democracy and freedom and wanting to multiply that. Right. But then I go to law school. I graduate. I fall in love with a boy who I actually started dating in college, and I ended up in Kansas City because I followed a boy. You know, career took a different turn, ended up being a defense lawyer. And then you fast forward to doing an evaluation and me going through a process of saying, okay, I've done a lot of the things I wanted to do. I've achieved a lot of the things I wanted to achieve. I wanted to try cases. I wanted to build this reputation. I wanted to be successful in A, B, C, D. KORI: And I started taking inventory of the things I was passionate about, the skills I developed, the experiences I had and where I was losing time. You know, where was I given my time in community? What were the things that I could lose myself doing in such deep flow that I don't even recognize that time has gone by? And that journey ended up leading me to inclusion and diversity work and I haven't turned back since. There's some aspects of the legal profession I miss. I miss trying cases. I miss solving problems for clients. It may sound like the weirdest thing, but boy, playing around with evidence, rules, and figuring out how to get things in or keep things out is a nerdy love of mine. And so those are just some of the experiences that I would say led me to this love for helping people build bridges and I'm empower people to succeed despite the challenges, and being able to create just a level of cultural fluency amongst groups of people so that we understand how much better we are together as opposed to isolated from one another. So that's a long answer. BREE: Well, what an amazing life you've had to date and an incredible background that informs your work at a depth that I know Chris and I can't even begin to imagine. CHRIS: For sure. Kori, how long have you been more squarely centered on the inclusion and diversity side of things? KORI: I have been for 11 years now full-time diversity. What I realized, you know, somebody asked me a question similar to this, how long have you been doing diversity work, which is different from what I usually hear. I actually did the inventory and realized that, you know, 29 years ago, when I first came to the U.S., that was when I actually started doing presentations. At the time, we called them multiculturalism. We started doing presentations on bridging differences, on being able to understand different cultures and how you navigate it. And so I've been actually teaching on diversity, inclusion, cultural fluency leadership topics now for 29, 30 years. But it being my full-time job, that happened when I left litigation and moved over to Shook, Hardy & Bacon. CHRIS: Okay. I think a good point to maybe start the conversation is, you know, again, your perspective is so unique and informed. For diverse members of the profession, can you talk to our listeners about some of the more challenging aspects of the last couple of years? KORI: Yeah. So the last couple of years have been tough for everyone. This pandemic, it's been brutal and it's impacted us in so many different ways. We've lost our sense of certainty to the extent that we didn't had any. We've lost our ability to have some kind of predictability, something that is a core need, a core need for many of us. Well, not for many of us, for everyone. It's actually a core human need. And so we've been sort of thrown into this whirlwind of uncertainty with no deadline, right? We went from thinking, well, I'll speak for myself. You know, since I'm not a scientist, I foolishly thought, well, maybe in two weeks I'll go back to the office. And then it was a month. And then I thought six weeks. And then I thought for sure by summer 2020 we'd be able to go out and about and things would be quasi under control. And here we are, you know, some 28, 29 months later and we still have COVID. I'm sick right now recovering from COVID after avoiding it for almost 30 months, I get it. KORI: So you have that benchmark that is impacting everyone and the uncertainty that we've seen with everything going on around us. But as with everything, I think people from historically underrepresented and marginalized groups, what happens is the things that... There's this saying that the things, and I'm going to probably say it wrong. And it may be an African American saying, but it's this thing that what gives some people a cold will give others the flu. And so what you've seen then is populations that have been historically marginalized and underrepresented and haven't had access to full equity, had been impacted very differently by the same storm that we're all in. So we're all in the same storm, but we're not in the same boat. We're experiencing it differently. So communities of color, we know got hit by COVID much harder. KORI: And you have that intersection between race, between housing inequity, between education inequity, between healthcare inequity and healthcare access, all of those things coming together to adversely impact some groups more. So if you are someone who is Brown or Black, or from one of these historically marginalized communities, and you are going to work during the pandemic, or you're working from home, you are more likely to have family members who have been directly impacted by COVID, right? You are more likely to have lost family members. You also, generally speaking are more likely to be in a position where you are in an extended family situation where you are responsible for more people than just yourself. You know, one of the things that we know, for example, that impacts generational wealth is that those of us from communities of color oftentimes are responsible not just for ourselves, but for extended family members. KORI: So you have that dynamic playing, then you have the racial pandemic, which has been going on, but in the last two years have come to fevered pitch. And so the daily trauma of dealing with racism and microaggressions then gets compounded by all the incidents, George Floyd, Charles Cooper, and all the other incidents that have been bombarding us from our television screens, from the news reports, from articles. And so now all of a sudden everything is right in your face and you're dealing with all of it at the same time. And so those are some of the things that are professionals from "diverse communities," from underrepresented marginalized communities have been dealing with. And our reserves have been tapped into and overstretched to where for some of us, it feels like it's been just too much. BREE: Absolutely. It's unimaginable just how much to carry on in that space. All of the things that you just described, this litany of horrors is on top of just the day-to-day difficulty as been expressed to me, and reading in my friends of people of color, just the microaggressions and just how hard it is. Just take away pandemic and everything else and the racial reckoning, how hard it can be just to get through the day. I can't even imagine. It is absolutely just too, too much. Kori, there's so much to unpack here. I wanted to kind of pushing us along here talking about diversity, equity, and inclusion and talking about belonging and overlaying that. I mean, when I started looking in the legal profession, we talk about DEI, it was diversity then DEI, and now we're getting into some of the really, to me, needy and interesting stuff around belonging. I know that you created a belonging project at Seyfarth. Could you talk to us about the importance of that, and also about this project that you got started at Seyfarth? KORI: Sure. Let me separate them out. Belonging is a conversation that more and more of us are having, and it is fairly new to the conversation when you're talking about diversity and inclusion. It started with we talked about diversity, and then we started talking about diversity and inclusion, and now we've included equity and belonging. Belonging goes to that sense, that feeling that each of us have when we belong and we feel like we are part of a group and that we belong to something that is bigger than us. It is also a core human need. Brené Brown has this phrase that she says that we have three irreducible needs, and they are to be loved, to connect, and to belong. What we know from the research is that when we don't have belonging, it impacts us. It is wired into our DNA to belong to something. KORI: So we will either have healthy belonging, or we will seek a belonging that may not be healthy and may not be good. This is where you can queue in hate groups and cult because they will do anything to belong. We will also conform to fit in so that we have a quasi sense of belonging. The problem though is that when we don't have belonging, we actually see physiological, physical, spiritual, mental, psychological impact on our wellbeing. It impacts our sense of health. Forget our sense of health. It actually impacts our health, right? We know that exclusion and the lack of belonging actually results in increased depression, increased high blood pressure, increased diabetes. Incidentally, a lot of the same things that racial trauma and microaggressions also causes on the human body. And so if we don't have that sense of belonging, then we are not able to actually actualize that sense of inclusion where everyone is able to be leveraged and their differences and their strengths leveraged so that they can succeed as they want to succeed. KORI: And without belonging, you don't get wellbeing. But conversely, without wellbeing, you can't cultivate that sense of belonging. And so those two things are intertwined as well as this concept of engagement, which also is in the mix, right? You can't create engagement unless you have social connection and belonging. And so all of these things come together. Unfortunately, in many of our organizations, they're treated as separate, right? In many organizations, you have the wellbeing function being managed in a way that it doesn't speak to diversity, doesn't speak to belonging at all. So imagine now we just talked about COVID and we talked about how COVID has impacted everyone. Then imagine you're developing a wellness initiative or a wellbeing initiative and you're not stopping to think, oh, wait a minute, because of diversity, this pandemic has impacted people in different ways. KORI: And so I can't just trot out a wellbeing program without factoring in diversity and how diversity has resulted in different people experiencing this pandemic differently. Similarly, we fail when we try to, for example, have a wellbeing initiative that doesn't stop and think, oh, wow, we're not talking about racial trauma. We're not talking about microaggressions. We're not talking about the impact of implicit bias and exclusion on the psychological and physical wellbeing of the people in our organization. And so what's happening is these concepts are tied together, but in our organizations and most of our organizations, we're not doing DEI and incorporating wellbeing and we're not doing wellbeing incorporating DEIB. Instead, we're acting as if they're completely separate and they're not. CHRIS: I mean, I think it goes without saying, we, I think as human beings, sometimes we compartmentalize of there's this and then there's that. I think that from the infancy of the institute, I think we've emphasized the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion as part of, has to flow through everything, every lens that we look at from the wellbeing perspective. But I have to admit, it's been more challenging than I think, than we've appreciated because sometimes we look a little bit myopically at some of these issues without broadening our lens. That's the perspective that I think that you can bring our listeners that, again, this intersection of diversity, equity, inclusion, belonging with wellbeing, I guess I'd be curious on just, how can we merge? Right? Because again, even the fact that there's organizations that work over here and organizations that work over here, and we really should be just the coalition and the umbrella and the totality of how it all works together is something that I don't know that we appreciate the magnitude of. KORI: Well, and the only way we can appreciate the magnitude is if we have these honest conversations. But we also have to have the conversations around the structural and the cultural underpinnings, right? How do we have conversations about wellbeing that take into consideration differences? That take into consideration, okay, we're telling people, hey, we have therapy or we have EAP, or we have whatever the organization offers. But how do you do that and also acknowledge that for some communities that there is a stigma around maybe going to a therapist? How do you have that conversation with those communities? Or that racial bias and racial aggressions are having an impact on people, but you have an entire generation of Black people, for example, who have survived by plowing through all the challenges that the world has put in front of us. And to sit down and talk about the way in which racism has impacted us is asking us to put our shields down, which means opening up ourselves to attack, which means possibly being accused of playing the race card. Right? KORI: All of things that you may have grown up in a time where we just didn't talk about that in mixed company, we only talked about that with each other. And so there are all these layers, all these layers. I recently listened to a friend of mine, Ratu Basin, and she was talking about how it feels for her as someone of Indian heritage to see how much yoga, for example, has been whitewashed. There's so many conversations to be had even in the wellbeing space, even when we're talking to people about things like self-care. Well, what are you recommending? Because some of the things we tell people to do for self-care, go get a massage, who can afford that? What culture support that kind of self-care? And is that really self-care or is that treating a symptom? Should self-care and wellbeing be about a way of life and a way of working such that we don't need these emergency [inaudible 00:32:26] like solutions to fix the symptoms, right? KORI: And that's the big conversation and that's the conversation I'm hearing some lawyers begin to ask where they say, the organization says they care about wellbeing, but we're getting these other messages that say it's productivity and hours and billables that matter, right? How do we shift the culture and how we're embracing these topics in a way that makes it more meaningful? I just realized, I didn't even answer your second question about the belonging project, but yeah, this is the stuff that to me, I see a lot of potential for us to have really good conversations that can lead to solutions that are more inclusive of a diverse profession. BREE: Kori, you're clearly such a thought leader and a visionary in this space. Can you talk a little bit about how do we get change to occur in a profession, the legal profession that is so reluctant to change? Even more so than general society. Where do you see the bright points of really being able to make some change? KORI: Can you repeat that question? BREE: Yeah. Just about how do we get change to occur in the legal profession? You know, this is a profession that is just so stayed and slow and bound up in tradition. This is the way we do it, that sort of thing. And here you are with these fabulous ideas, working with a very large law firm, having come from another very large law firm so you're in this space. What are your ideas for actually getting real change to occur? Where are the pressure points, I guess? KORI: Well, I think some of the pressure points are actually external. You asked me a question earlier about the last two years, something that I didn't mention that has impacted a lot. It's impacting individuals from underrepresented groups, but it's also impacting our organizations. Is this fake cultural war that is also going on, you know, regardless of what political party you're in, I think we can acknowledge that for the last six years, there has been an attack on everything that we are trying to accomplish in diversity and inclusion. White is now Black, Black is now white. And if we are in a state of being, for example, where I'll use Florida as an example where someone can say, we want to ban any training if it makes someone uncomfortable. What you're essentially saying is let's keep the status quo the way it is, even if the status quo supports white supremacy. KORI: Even if the status quo is inequitable. You would rather keep the status quo than have an uncomfortable conversation. When it comes to the legal profession, in particular, law firms, because of how we are constructed. A law firm essentially has multiple owners. It's not like a corporation that has a board of directors and has shareholders. Let's say you have a law firm of a thousand people and 300 of them are partners. You have 300 people running around who think that everybody should have an equal say in every single decision. It's one of the reasons that law firms function so differently from other companies and why decision making is so different. Everything we do is different. You know, we put people in leadership positions not because they're leaders, but because they're great trial attorneys or they're great business generators or whatever, whatever the criteria is, but rarely is it because someone actually is a good leader. KORI: And so we have this culture that we have built that really makes it difficult for us to have real hard conversations on the things that really matter, on the things that really can make change. So imagine that law firm now sitting in the last six years and even more so in the last three years. I can tell you when it comes to diversity, inclusion, many of us are throwing our hands up and saying, so how in the hell are we supposed to have this conversation then? If you're saying, oh, we can't talk about white privilege because someone says, oh, that offends me. Or we can't talk about systemic racism because someone's going to say, oh, wait a minute, if you say systemic racism is real, then that's anti-American. So we are living in a time where the terms racism, the terms CRT have been completely redefined to where they mean nothing that even resembles what they actually mean. KORI: And then we're over here arguing about these fictitious decisions, these fictitious definitions, and we're not actually doing the hard work that needs to be done, right. Because if you won't even acknowledge that systemic racism is real, then how do we evaluate the systems to see where we may be having inequitable results and then changing those systems? Because if you deny a thing exists, then we can't even address it. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: And so that's probably one of the biggest challenges I see, but also the biggest opportunity. And if anything is going to change when it comes to diversity, we have got to get more courageous about having difficult conversations, but conversations that are worthwhile, they are important. Nothing about creating equity is comfortable and cozy and touchy-feely, it's hard work. It requires us to say some things that we maybe may not have faced before, but we don't get to change what we won't face, what we won't acknowledge, and what we won't be honest about. It's like, you can't write a new end into the story if you won't acknowledge the truth of the story. That's the whirlwind that I think we are in now, not just as a profession, but as a country and a society. BREE: Absolutely. What an incredibly difficult place to be? Yeah, go ahead, Chris. CHRIS: Well, I was just going to say, I want to unpack that more. Let's do this. Let's take a quick break and come back because I mean, my burning question and Kori began to sort of thinking about it, which is what's the pathway to better, more productive, honest conversations, right? Because I think that you're right. The question is, how do we create the environments for ultimately that societal discussion to occur in the most productive way? So let's take a quick break and we'll come right back. — ADVERTISEMENT: Meet VERA, your firm's Virtual Ethics Risk Assessment Guide developed by ALPS. VERA's purpose is to help you uncover risk management blind spots from client intake to calendaring, to cybersecurity, and more. VERA: I require only your honest input to my short series of questions. I will offer you a summary of recommendations to provide course corrections if needed, and to keep your firm on the right path. Generous and discreet, VERA is a free and anonymous risk management guide from ALPS to help firms like yours be their best. Visit VERA at alpsinsurance.com/vera.   — CHRIS: Okay. We are back with Kori Carew, our esteemed guests and the chief inclusion and diversity officer at Seyfarth Shaw. Kori, we were just getting into the, I think the discussion. I feel like we're going deeper than even I had thought we would in the conversation, which I love. You know, as we think now about we need to have the honest conversations, right. And so I would just be curious on your opinion as what's the pathway to get there. If we appreciate that there's a lot of noise and the volume levels are high, and there's a lot of yelling, frankly, on both sides of the equation. What's the pathway toward problem solving, thoughtful discussion, intentional discussion that ultimately advances the dialogue? KORI: Thank you very much for that question. Honestly, it's one I've been thinking a lot about. You know, I did do a TEDx in 2017 and the impetus for that TED really was that question that you just asked, which was, there's a lot of yelling and not enough dialogue that allows us to move into action. Since I gave that TED, I've sort of watched what's been going on in organizations and in the country. I don't think I would change anything about that TED, except that there are a few more things that I would emphasize. One of the first things that we have to do if we truly want to make progress, and I'm going to steal a Nigerian thing, tell the truth and shame the devil. We are avoiding being honest with ourself about so many things. Whether it is just being honest about the experiences people have in the organization, or being honest about where the gaps are, or being honest about what the failures are, or even individual honesty. KORI: That self-awareness to say, you know Kori, you talk a lot about wellbeing and you talk a lot about leadership, but the reason you talk about those things is because you were searching for something that you did not have in the leaders that you grew up under, right? So you were trying to create something for others that you didn't have, but you are also trying to create it for yourself. And there are many days that you totally suck. There are many days that you are making very bad wellbeing decisions. There are days that you are not as inclusive as you would want to be, but it's okay. And the only way you're going to get better is by acknowledging where you're not doing it right. Now, think about that when we're talking about gender or race or LGBT inclusion or disability inclusion. If we as individuals and we as organizations are not willing to be honest about our history, what has happened and what is happening, then we don't even have a starting point. KORI: And the way that we do that is very, very cliché. Getting comfortable with what is uncomfortable. I remember when I first started saying that, when I was at Shook, Hardy & Bacon and it wasn't even a thing many people were saying, and now people say it so often that it has lost its meaning. But it truly is the beginning point. And in too many of our organizations, we are shutting down any discussion or any movement in the name of trying to get consensus, or in trying to water things so much that they're meaningless, right? Or being so hyperworried about future possible hypothetical litigation that somebody may have over something that they don't like that they heard as opposed to possible litigation over people who do not feel like they are being treated equitably. You know, it's like we have to choose our heart. And so it's either the heart of sitting in the discomfort and learning things we may not want to learn, challenging ourselves, reaching deep to say, you know what? I don't really like that. KORI: When you talk to me about Christian privilege, this is a true story. Okay. True story. A [inaudible 00:46:22] of mine talked about Christian privilege. We're talking about something. She said, "Yeah, but there's also Christian privilege and people never talk about that." And can I admit to you that I was like, "Oh, is she for real? We're talking about racism and she's talking about Christian privilege." That was my initial reaction. But I sat with it. You know what? She was right. Because she was Pagan and I'm Christian. I've never had to use PTO for Christmas. My holidays are respected, they are recognized, they are centered, they are prioritized. But other people in this country who are not Christian do not have those privileges. Now that's a benign example because it's not one that makes people get as upset as some of the other topics. KORI: But the first step has to be a commitment to sit through the discomfort, sit through what may rub you wrong, and acknowledge that just because something is uncomfortable or just because something offends you does not mean the thing is wrong or it is offensive. And in many of our organizations, we haven't even gotten past that first part. Then the next part has to be a commitment to learn more. We have to operationalize being able to say to each other, tell me more, and not just, oh, I didn't like that training, or I didn't like what I was learning. But to say to yourself internally, okay, I didn't like that. But rather than projecting how I'm feeling it in this moment, I'm going to put myself in the position of saying, tell me more, help me understand why that bothered you, help me understand why you feel that way. Because until we're willing to do that, we're not going to learn. KORI: And without knowledge, we have no opportunity for growth. Growth comes with new knowledge. Growth comes with practicing new skill sets. Growth comes with trying things that you haven't done before. But if you're more invested in protecting the status quo than you are fighting for change, then the status quo will always win. And the status quo right now, it's not working for a lot of people from a lot of underrepresented and marginalized communities. Those are some of the things that have to happen. Oh, Chris, something else I want to add. Both sides. We got to talk about this both sides thing. Not every opinion and argument is equal, and that's something else that we're not willing to address head on. We've allowed inclusion to be so redefined that some people think it means anything and everything is of equal footing, right. KORI: But someone saying in the workplace, we need to be more inclusive of people with disabilities is not the same as someone saying, I don't think disabled people should have to work here. And sometimes what is crouching in is people want to hide behind inclusion to spew hate or bigotry or an excuse not to make the change and growth that is consistent with the so-called values of our organizations. I'll pause there because you're about [inaudible 00:50:05]. BREE: Yeah. I just want to comment to our listeners Kori's TED Talk, just in your browser, put in Kori Carew and TED Talk. I really encourage people to check it out. It is powerful and profound. So Kori, I'm going to ask you a question here that we also tend to ask this sometimes near the end, if you could look for, I don't know, five years or even a decade. If we can do a decent job around changing hearts and minds and attitudes around diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging and wellbeing too, hopefully, how would the profession be different? What do you want to see? KORI: My goodness, my goodness, my goodness. Excuse me. That cough came up. If we could actually accomplish all these things that we've been talking about for 20 years, we would see leadership teams that are more humble in their approach, leadership teams that are people-centric, organizations that are listening to employees and actually care about what employees want. We would no longer be having conversations as if it's either you focus on the bottom line or you focus on employee happiness. Like we will understand that without happy employees who are engaged and doing fulfilling and meaningful work, we actually don't have a great bottom line to talk about. Right? Our organizations would look like inclusion and wellbeing and belonging, it's just part of the business strategy. It's not this separate siloed thing. It's not this thing that we talk about when we are worried about how the woman or the gays may react. Right. KORI: But it's just something that is operationalized into our values, into our competencies, into how we evaluate people, into how we promote people, and that we are constantly in humility, learning from each other. Right. So that even when somebody who's a chief inclusion and diversity officer, here's a phrase and someone says, "Did you realize that that was ableist?" That I would say, "I didn't. Tell me more." And once you tell me more, I changed my language, because we understand that we're always going to be moving. We're always going to be learning something new and there's always an opportunity to be better. And if we do that, we will also see different representation at all levels. We will actually have critical mass of diversity in our organizations. And then I would be unemployed. CHRIS: I was going to wrap up with this though, Kori, like if I was to serve up to you 500 managing partners, that were, again, I think one of the things that you've already mentioned is every individual in an organization is either additive or perhaps distracts from the culture that you're ultimately trying to create. A lot of the wellbeing discussion is about connecting and emphasizing wellbeing with decision makers and those who set the tone of organizations. And so my question to you is this, if I served up 500 managing partners of all sizes of firms around the country and they came and Kori was the keynote, what would be your message to them? KORI: My message to them would be that they are ridiculously in charge, that things happen in their organizations because they allow it, or they create it. And that by choosing to focus a hundred percent on their inclusive leadership skills and up in their ability to interrupt bias, to be culturally fluent, they could transform their organizations because where the leader goes, everyone else follows. BREE: Right. CHRIS: That's great. That's awesome. Well, again, Kori, you have certainly cultivated my curiosity, which I know is one of the things that you strongly advocate for. Couldn't be prouder to have you on the podcast and the sharing of your perspective. We got to get you more platforms for you to be able to shout loudly about these particular issues, because again, we got a lot of work to do, right. We know that there's a lot to be done in terms of realizing the potential of this profession, to realizing the potential of historically underrepresented and marginalized lawyers within our profession. Bree, I think that we all would agree that even as we pursue our wellbeing mission, that so much more has to be done on the diversity, equity, and inclusion perspective that integrates in the intersection there between those two that lanes need to merge in a much more substantive way. KORI: Thank you. CHRIS: Thank you, Kori. KORI: I appreciate it. I appreciate you having me. I appreciate you allowing Justin to come and hold my hand because she's my blinky today. I appreciate you inviting us to talk about what we're doing at Seyfarth and just my perspective as an individual separate from Seyfarth. Again, I've said this before, the work you're doing is so critically important. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for everything that you do to promote wellbeing in the profession. So important. CHRIS: Awesome. Well, again, thanks for joining us. We will be back with the podcast probably in a couple weeks with our executive director, Jennifer DiSanza, which we are so excited to be having her join us as we talk about the future of where this movement is going. Thanks again, Kori. And to all our friends out there, we will be back in a couple weeks.

Covenant Grace Church
Generous Design, Part 6: Marital Unfaithfulness (Aug. 7, 2022)

Covenant Grace Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 45:26


Every single marriage is at risk of what the Lord warns about in Malachi. And every one of us will benefit from seeing the beautiful covenantal nature of marriage and our beautiful covenantal God who is relentlessly faithful to us. Learn four ways to guard this precious gift of marriage. This message was preached by Erick Cobb on August 7, 2022.

Raw Data By P3
A Most Generous Mentor, w/ Microsoft's Dany Hoter

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 88:30


Today, we welcome to the show the most transparent international man of mystery, Dany Hoter. Working on his 5th stint with Microsoft and living his best life in his 8th decade, Dany brings both wisdom and fun to those around him. He brings a passion and joy for teaching to his training sessions and always manages to create a connection between people and technology. Of course, he also has a long-storied past with Rob, and together they share the responsibility for what some view as the most expensive trip billed to Microsoft by non-executives. From luxury accommodations to indulgent automobiles, they expensed it all. It wasn't all global jet setting, however, as these two comprised the Dream Team that put the polish on Power Pivot and laid the groundwork for Power Query. Their hard work and dedication paid off as Dany and Rob banded together in their shared time at Microsoft to save the world from an error-filled, rushed incarnation of bi-directional relationships. In retrospect, however, the conversation about this brought up a story that many may prefer to never hear. It seems that amidst all the jet setting, our dear host, Rob Collie, was busy launching a cruise missile with the sole purpose of pissing off the advanced pivot table users. What heinous act did he commit? Rob was directly involved in changing the default of pivot tables to compact.  While it did enlarge the user base by helping people feel more comfortable with pivot tables, advanced user rage is still alive and well on Twitter. All of this and more on this episode of Raw Data by P3 Adaptive, where data meets the human element. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to leave a review on your favorite platform to help others find us! Also on this show: Tinkering is a Way of Life w/ Darinee Louvau Yoda Chong and the Treehouse of Wonder, w/ Donald Farmer The Italians – Marco and Alberto Ikigai Venn Diagram Silicon Valley: Movember clip - mustache filter Kusto v SQL KQL - Kusto Query Language Cube Functions in Excel Rob on Twitter – to allow more bashing on the compact view

Heaven Bound
Generous or Stingy?

Heaven Bound

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 5:48


Jump start your week with a Jump Start REWIND, read by Roger Shouse.

Hill Country Bible Church Dripping Springs

Just like loving others, speaking truth and sharing our faith, generosity is a characteristic of a disciple of Jesus. Paul has shown that grace leads to repentance and repentance leads to joy. Now he shows that joy inspires generosity. Because we have been so richly blessed, we desire to be a blessing to others.

Celebration Church AU
We are a Family: That is Generous

Celebration Church AU

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 44:38


In todays message Pastor Benaiah talks about the power of recognising and establishing the call of God in others.

AJ Longreads
Murdered women: Sabina Nessa, ‘a kind and generous soul'

AJ Longreads

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 16:28


As part of Al Jazeera's series on murdered women, we explore the life and death of Sabina Nessa. Her family say she was ‘a kind and generous soul'. But they question why there was not wider media attention about her death and why some lives get more coverage than others. Written by Julie Bindel. Read by Laura Lockwood. 

Imago Dei Church
Jesus: More Generous and Less Useful Than We Think

Imago Dei Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 33:30


Bootstrapped
#229: Saying no to a generous acquisition offer, with Simon Bennett of SnapShooter

Bootstrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 31:27


Simon Bennett, founder of SnapShooter, returns to the show. We chat about a generous acquisition offer Simon recently received for his company - and why he ultimately decided to not to be acquired. We also chat about Simon's new podcast, Ship SaaS Faster.Mentioned in this episode:Simon's company, SnapShooterSimon's new podcast for SaaS founders, Ship SaaS FasterSnapShooter's podcast, Pushing to ProductionVersolyMy company, Feature UpvoteSimon on Twitter 

The Justin Aguirre Podcast
Are you a generous person? (Video Interview with Bob DePasquale)

The Justin Aguirre Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 42:02


Everyone has gifts and skills to make the world a better place. We should be radically generous with what have in order to improve the lives of others. The more stories we share about giving, the better place the world will be. How can we empower people to take action with the causes they feel passionate about? Meet Bob DePasquale. Bob had a terrible experience with life-threatening illness and terrorism at age 18. It took months to recover physically and mentally but years to find himself emotionally. Since that time, Bob has dedicated his life using what he has for good. Everyone deserves to experience the joy of giving. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/justinaguirre/support

Your Morning Mantra
Reflection - I am Generous

Your Morning Mantra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:20


This is a companion podcast for this moring's mantra - I am generousSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Your Morning Mantra
I am Generous

Your Morning Mantra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 2:58


Today's meditation is about generosity. When we are generous, we engage in not only our love for others, but also love for ourselves. Your morning mantra: I am generousSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

St. Paul Lutheran, Davenport
Generous pardon, 7.31.2022

St. Paul Lutheran, Davenport

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 27:20


Peter W. Marty preaches on the gift of forgiveness. Receiving the gift of forgiveness should prompt us to develop the kind of mindset of forgiveness. It should inspire in us a posture of generous pardon, to recognize how readily God reaches out beyond our deeds and how God looks beyond consequences to give us a second chance and from which we are to become new people. If we take seriously the Lord's mercy upon us - this Lord who abundantly pardons - we have to ask ‘what are we going to do or be because of that?' 

Rabbi Milstein's DMC'S
Tzedaka & Maaser 10 Generous Wife

Rabbi Milstein's DMC'S

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 4:56


Tzedaka & Maaser 10 Generous Wife

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff
E150: Wayne Weiten: The Complete Academic--Talented Teacher, Generous Scholar, Prolific Writer, Thoughtful Mentor

PsychSessions: Conversations about Teaching N' Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 94:56


In this 150th episode PsychSessions, Eric interviews Wayne Weiten from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas in Las Vegas, NV. Wayne reveals that he retired from teaching in December 2021, although he still plans to be a very active textbook author.  He shares his professional background and the very different institutions he served over his career, including UNLV where he truly enjoyed teaching graduate students how to teach psychology.  We discover that Wayne has a 'go it alone' perspective throughout much of his education and career, and he clearly thrives.  He tells his story of his early/young college teaching start, the substantial influence of MACTOP, his interest in introductory psychology and the corresponding research program, and more.  Self-confidence helped Wayne write two very successful textbooks, and that success eventually has meaningful benefits for the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP).  Wayne's deep knowledge of introductory psychology trends and the history of textbooks in this realm continues to be impressive to this day, and it's clear in Wayne's stories that he's deeply appreciative of those around him who have both collaborated and facilitated his success.

Marshfield Community Television
Let's Talk Business - Lee Generous

Marshfield Community Television

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 29:53


Lee Generous of Generous Wealth Management joins the podcast to talk about why he started his business and how is company approaches wealth management in a unique way

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast
How Generous Will We Be to Each Other?

Ken, Colleen, & Kurt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 5:50


Super fun morning with Rheya Spigner this a.m.!

Stony Point Podcast with Jim England
Summer Series: Building Christian Character - Gaius' Choice - 3 John 1, 2, 11

Stony Point Podcast with Jim England

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 30:33


1. Gaius's character A. Faithful to the truth B. Lived the truth C. Generous for the truth 2. The need for his generosity A. Helping God's servants B. Not accept help from non Christians C. Partnership in ministry 3. Choice to follow the prideful Diotrephes A. Nothing to do with John B. Gossiping maliciously about John C. Refuses to be generous D. Punishes those who are 4. Choice to follow Demetrious A. Great report from all who know him B. Consistent with the truth C. John recommends him --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/frank-england/support

CoastLife Church with Pastor Jason Warman
The Genius of Generosity- Summer Reading List- Dana Stoddard

CoastLife Church with Pastor Jason Warman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 42:52


Join us as Dana Stoddard closes our collection of talks, Summer Reading List. We hope this message encourages and inspires you!Want more like this from CoastLife Church?YouTube: CoastLife Church - YouTubeFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/mycoastlifechurchInstagram: https://instagram.com/coastlifechurch...GIVE: https://www.mycoastlifechurch.com/giveLooking to get connected? We'd love to meet you! We offer several different ways to connect and be in community: Join a Together Group, Register for CoastLife+, or become a part of our Serve Team today by visiting: CoastLife Connect Card - CoastLife Church (churchcenter.com)Give: To support and be a part of or growth and global impact click here: https://www.mycoastlifechurch.com/give

Canyon Ridge Christian Church Podcast
How We Give | Uncommon Life | July 31, 2022 | Mitch Harrison

Canyon Ridge Christian Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 36:15


When you hear about stories of generosity, it's an easy reminder of how we all want to help and do good. But being generous is more than just doing some good deeds now and then. Living a truly Uncommon Life and being generous will require more than just an occasional act of kindness. Generous people give a lot, often, and with a good heart. They are generous with their time, their resources, and their energy. And they do so to make a difference in the lives of others. No matter how generous you are, we can all take steps toward becoming more like Christ, who was the epitome of generosity. What will you do to be conspicuously generous to people and make a difference in your world?

Community Christian Church
A Generous Heart | The Life of David - Wk 9 - The Life of David

Community Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 39:22


Message from David Robinson on July 31, 2022

Blue Ridge Bible Church
The Good And Generous God

Blue Ridge Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 30:15


Sermon: Jack Gill Matthew 20:1-16 July 31, 2022

Platt Park Church Sermons & Messages
July 31 - Parable of the generous employer

Platt Park Church Sermons & Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 24:51


Suzie teaches about Matthew 20 and the workers' wages

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, America just isn't generous enough

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 8:30


Steve Gruber discusses news and headlines. 

Tell Me Somethin' Good!
Three Steps to Becoming More Generous

Tell Me Somethin' Good!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 20:52


In this episode of the Tell Me Somethin' Good podcast, Clint Swindall shares his thoughts on the connection between positivity and generosity. If we want to become more positive, we need to become more generous. He shares three steps to becoming more generous and answers a listener's question. Check it out! ---------- If you like the podcast, you'll love the Tell Me Somethin' Good! book. Check it out: Tell Me Somethin' Good! - https://www.tinyurl.com/yxcsg3sh ---------- Have Clint bring his message of positivity to your organization, either in person or virtually. Check out his demo video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7MXyGYizBY. ---------- Follow me: Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/clintswindall Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tmsg_clintswindall/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clintswindall2 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clintswindall LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/clint-swindall-csp-9047174/ ---------- Part of the Win Make Give Podcast Network

generous three steps clint swindall
The Product-Led Sales Podcast
Why CircleCI made its free plan even more generous | Sammy Shreibati, VP of Product, Growth at CircleCI

The Product-Led Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 28:14


How do you design the perfect SaaS free plan?CircleCI re-designed it's free plan recently, giving users up to 3x more credits and unlocking features that were previously only for paid users.While a ceiling on a free plan is better for conversion, sometimes optimizing for that one metric is too short-term.CircleCI made the decision to enhance their free plan after speaking to users.They realized that a better experience for these users would: - increase engagement- allow users to get a deeper experience of the product- help with users who are choosing between competing solutionsWe spoke to Sammy Shreibati, CircleCI's VP of Product, Growth about this decision. We discussed how to think about structuring your free plan based on your objectives and the nature of your product. Connect with Sammy on Linkedin for more information.Visit our Product Led Sales blog for more insights, and follow HeadsUp on Linkedin. If you have questions for me about PLG, growth, or marketing, here's my Linkedin and Twitter. 

Covenant Grace Church
Generous Design, Part 5: Marriage Roles (July 24, 2022)

Covenant Grace Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 44:11


Marriage is designed by God to be a Gospel reenactment. Wives reflect the roll of the church, the body of Christ. Husbands reflect the head of that body, Christ. Union with Jesus Christ and abiding in Him is the secret strength in marriage. This message was preached by Erick Cobb on July 24, 2022.

Words of Hope
Don't Get Even, Get Generous

Words of Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 1:59


Today's scripture is Proverbs 25:21-22, "If your enemy is hungry, give him bread to eat, and if his is thirsty, give him water to drink, for you will heap burning coals on his head, and the LORD will reward you."

Oak Hills Church (Video Podcast)

Week 3 of To Live Is Christ A sermon series featuring Travis Eades.

Oak Hills Church (Audio Podcast)

Week 3 of To Live Is ChristA sermon series featuring Travis Eades.

Eggplant: The Secret Lives of Games
95: (Rerun) Making Generous Games with Terry Cavanagh (Dicey Dungeons)

Eggplant: The Secret Lives of Games

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 87:58


We're taking a small summer break, so please enjoy one of our favorite episodes from a few years ago. And check out the new mobile version of Dicey Dungeons, and the free DLC! Terry Cavanagh (Super Hexagon, VVVVVV) joins us to talk about his fantastic roguelike deckbuilder, Dicey Dungeons. We discuss the thread of generosity in his game design, the challenges of working across genres, and what might be next for Terry! Show notes: Terry's distractionware.com Dicey Dungeons VVVVVV Super Hexagon Tiny Heist Stephen Lavelle Dream Quest 7 Day Roguelike Naya's Quest The Long Dark Super Hexagon playthrough at Fantastic Arcade Hearthstone Battlegrounds

Covenant Grace Church
Generous Design, Part 4: Marriage

Covenant Grace Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 45:45


What is marriage? There are many ways to answer this question, but Genesis 2:18-25 focuses in on marriage as a friendship first and foremost. In addition, marriage is a shared mission to extend God's kingdom through our ordinary families. This message was preached by Erick Cobb on July 17, 2022.

Grace CMA Sermons
The King is Generous

Grace CMA Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 33:33


Life Together
The Generous Community of Faith (feat. Dan Wootton)

Life Together

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 28:51


Mosaic - Erwin McManus
Generosity - Uprising | From the Archives

Mosaic - Erwin McManus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 50:56


This message finishes the Quest for Nobility in the popular Uprising series. In this message, Erwin Raphael McManus reminds us that great dreams demand great courage. You will not live a life commiserate to your dreams, talent, or ability - but equal to your level of courage. With nobility, you can be trusted with wealth, influence, and the lives of others. It begins in gratitude and finds completeness in generosity. Generous people are happier people who make the world better, while greedy people only focus on what they can take rather what they can give. Erwin reveals that despite what you can offer the world, becoming a generous person will end up being immeasurably more valuable for you as a human being than for anyone your generosity may affect. He leaves us with this question: what's the sacrifice you need to make that will make the world more beautiful? This message is drawn from Uprising, a book about taking on the character of God from Erwin Raphael McManus.

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope
God's Promise to the Generous - Part 3

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:59


Join Pastor Rick as he teaches what it means to store up treasure in heaven by making an eternal investment in others today.

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope
God's Promise to the Generous - Part 2

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 23:14


In this broadcast, Pastor Rick explains how being generous strengthens your faith and increases your happiness.

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope
God's Promise to the Generous - Part 1

Pastor Rick's Daily Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 21:39


Join Pastor Rick as he teaches how investing in others is the key to eternal happiness.