Podcasts about Bioethics

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  • 783PODCASTS
  • 1,766EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 25, 2022LATEST
Bioethics

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Best podcasts about Bioethics

Show all podcasts related to bioethics

Latest podcast episodes about Bioethics

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: Animals don't belong on our plates

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 42:51


Vegetarianism, Veganism, Pescetarianism, Flexitarianism. Never before have there been so many ways to define how and what we eat.  But are these choices simply a matter of personal taste, or do they reflect a broader ethical conundrum about what we put in our bodies? Ethicists, animal rights activists, and environmentalists increasingly argue that what we eat constitutes a moral choice.  Consuming animals or animal products is inherently unethical, depriving living, sentient beings from living full, productive, and happy lives.  Choosing to eat meat is not merely a preference, but an ethically dubious choice that ignores the health of the planet and the autonomy of other living things.  The only course is to eliminate animals from our diet entirely.  But others argue that the consumption of meat and animal products is not inherently wrong.  Animals can be raised humanely, and brought to our plates with greater attention to their wellbeing.  Humans have been consuming animal products for millenia, and raising livestock is part of the fabric of our shared history and culture.  Steps must be taken to minimize the impact of animal agriculture on the environment, and animals must be treated with respect and care.  But eliminating meat and dairy from our diets altogether is not the solution. Arguing for the motion is Peter Singer, Australian moral philosopher, currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University specializing in applied ethics, and author of Animal Liberation (1975) Arguing against the motion is Joel Salatin, Owner of Polyface Farm in Swoope, Virginia QUOTES: PETER SINGER “We need to start thinking of animals as beings with whom we share the planet and who have their own lives to lead without just being a means to our ends. JOEL SALATIN “You cannot eat without killing something. Something always has to die in order for you to eat.” SOURCES: NBC, CBS The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/ Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Jacob Lewis Editor: Reza Dahya Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja

A Health Podyssey
Katye Spector-Bagdady on Racial Diversity and Inclusion in Precision Medicine and Big Data

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 24:55


Precision medicine is built on a platform of big data, or large data bases that permit analysis of correlations among environmental and personal factors, treatments, and health outcomes.Data bases that once included only paper records now include tissue samples, air and water samples, and more. There's vast potential for significant advances in health care from precision medicine.But existing large data bases tend to be drawn almost entirely from European and Asian populations, limiting the reach of the benefits of precision medicine. Since big data analytics are often hidden from the patient (and sometimes even the clinician), non-representative data also contributes to mistrust in a health care system that has a long history of excluding certain people.Kayte Spector-Bagdady from the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine from the University of Michigan Medical School joins Health Affairs Editor-in-Chief Alan Weil on A Health Podyssey to discuss the representativeness of data banks and what to do about it.Spector-Bagdady and coauthors published a paper in the December 2021 issue of Health Affairs examining the lack of racial and ethnic diversity in data bank recruitment and enrollment at Michigan Medicine, a major academic medical center.They found failures of representation were in part due to recruitment practices and in part due to the disproportionate rate at which black, Asian, and Hispanic patients declined enrollment when offered, relative to non-Hispanic white patients.If you enjoy this interview, order the December 2021 Health Affairs issue.Pre-order the February 2022 Racism and Health issue.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 552 | "Big Fertility" & The Truth Behind The Surrogacy Industry | Guest: Jennifer Lahl

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 59:28


Today we're talking to Jennifer Lahl, an author and filmmaker and president of the Center for Bioethics and Culture. She is currently dedicated to raising awareness about the corruption of the surrogacy industry and the potential dangers of in vitro fertilization. Although many Christians support these things because they are pro-family, Jennifer explains why this method of having a family comes with a higher number of problems and victims and exposes the big money that the fertility and surrogacy industry rakes in. --- Today's Sponsors: A'del Natural Cosmetics is a family-run, holistic, handcrafted & toxin-free cosmetic company where ALL of their products are made in the USA. Go to AdelNaturalCosmetics.com & use promo code 'ALLIE' for 25% off your order! Carly Jean Los Angeles is more than just clothes — they want to make a difference in the lives of others through not only clothes that make you feel amazing, but through living with a heart of kindness & love for others. Go to CarlyJeanLosAngeles.com & use promo code 'ALLIEB' to save 20% on your first order of anything in their online store! Annie's Kit Clubs delivers an excellent way to encourage your kids' curiosity while providing fun activities in their Genius Box which explores exciting STEM themes like geology, chemistry, aerodynamics & more. Go to AnniesKitClubs.com/ALLIE & save 50% off your first box! --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Outer Limits Of Inner Truth
Humanity's Darkest Hour with Vera Sharav

Outer Limits Of Inner Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 62:24


Bruminating Evil & The Final Stand with Vera Sharav Mark Twain once said that history doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme. That being said, do you, as someone who is an awakened mind see some distributing similarities between today and one of the darkest periods in world history? Our featured guest Vera Sharav is going to help us understand the past so we can be more aware of the present and have an idea of what to likely anticipate in the future. This could very well be humanity's last stand. A public advocate for human rights is the founder and president of the Alliance for Human Research Protection (AHRP) which serves as an information resource and public interest watchdog organization whose goal is to unlock the walls of secrecy in biomedical research and bring accountability to that endeavor. AHRP Infomails have a wide following: they are read by physicians and scientists, public health officials, journalists, lawyers, and patient advocacy organizations. Her advocacy achievements include: suspension of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pesticide experiment (CHEERS) on children; complaint led to two federal investigations on the use of children in foster care as guinea pigs in experimental AIDS drug and vaccine trials; suspension of smallpox vaccine on children; suspension of “violence prediction” experiment that exposed 6–11 year old NYC boys of color to fenfluramine ; opened a public debate about the ethics of relapse-inducing experiments in schizophrenia patients. Organized families and victims of unethical research to join her in testifying before the National Bioethics Advisory Committee (NBAC) — re: unethical experimentation on mentally disabled psychiatric patients; those testimonies led to a prize-winning series in the Boston Globe, “Doing Harm: Research on the Mentally Ill” — ultimately resulting in the shutdown of 29 clinical trials at the National Institute of Mental Health (1999). Mrs. Sharav served on the Children's Workgroup of the National Human Research Protection Advisory Committee where she was the sole dissenter objecting to expanded use of children in high risk medical experiments. She has testified before public policy advisory panels including, the Institute of Medicine — against human pesticide experiments; against prison drug research; numerous FDA hearings, against misuse of psychotropic drugs for children. She has been an invited presenter at various professional and academic forums: World Federation of Science Journalists, London; National Academy of Sciences Policy Fellow program and National Public Health Association re: screening for mental illness; Consumers Institute for Medicines and Health, Stockholm — re: America's overmedicated children; Columbia University; NY Hospital, Cornell; U.S. military medical ethics forum; University of Texas. Her recent peer-reviewed publications include: Screening for Mental Illness: The Merger of Eugenics and the Drug Industry, Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry (2005); Conflicts of Interest in Biomedical Research Harm Children With and Without Disabilities,” Journal of Disability Policy Studies (2004); “The Impact of FDAMA on the recruitment of children for research,” EHPP (2003); “Children in Clinical Research: A Conflict of Moral Values,” American Journal of Bioethics (2003); The ethics of conducting psychosis-inducing experiments,” Accountability in Research (1999). LINK: About the Alliance for Human Research Protection Our Mission The Alliance for Human Research Protection (AHRP) is a national network of lay people and professionals who are committed to upholding the humanitarian values and ethical standards of medicine enshrined in the Hippocratic Oath: “First, do no harm”; the Nuremberg Code (1947): “The Voluntary informed consent of the human subject is absolutely essential”; and the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (2005): “Any preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic medical intervention is only to be carried out with the prior, free and informed consent of the person concerned, based on adequate information.” AHRP's mission is to ensure that the moral right of voluntary medical decision-making is upheld. To accomplish that mission, we engage in an educational campaign, providing relevant factual information including ethical, legal, technical reports, and media reports. We endeavor to counter widely disseminated false claims that exaggerate the benefits of medical interventions, while minimizing risks. Our educational efforts are directed at both professionals and the lay public, who may be unaware of a body of suppressed scientific evidence that refutes false promotional claims for drugs; including antidepressants, antipsychotics, statins; medical devices; and vaccinations, including those for Hepatitis B, HPV, and the flu. Our goal is to empower citizens with accurate information so that they can exercise their right to informed consent to medical research and medical procedures within clinical care. As a citizens' watchdog group, AHRP brings to public attention specific unethical violations of informed consent wherever they occur.

Ethics and Culture Cast
Episode 64: Fr. Matthew Schneider, LC

Ethics and Culture Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 26:35


Fr. Matthew P. Schneider, LC is a priest with the Legionaries of Christ ordained in 2013. He is currently writing a doctoral thesis in moral theology through Regina Apostolorum in Rome while living in the diocese of Arlington, Virginia. Since leaving his hometown of Calgary, Canada, he has ministered in various locations throughout the USA and Canada. He is also known for his online writing and social media, @FrMatthewLC across social media. Special Guest: Fr. Matthew Schneider, LC.

Mindful
12 Minute Meditation: A Practice to Reconnect with Yourself with Cynda Rushton

Mindful

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:27


Dr. Cynda Hylton Rushton, the Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics and Professor of Nursing and Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University Berman Institute of Bioethics and Schools of Nursing & Medicine, invites us to welcome whatever feelings are present right now and to trust what we discover in body and mind without judgment. Show notes:  More from Cynda Rushton on Mindful.org How Integrity Can Heal Burnout  Sign up for free: Healing Healthcare: A Global Mindfulness Summit

Intelligent Design the Future
Wesley J. Smith Sounds the Alarm on Germline Genetic Editing

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 22:28


On today's ID the Future, bioethicist Wesley J. Smith makes the case for passionate opposition to, and stricter bioethical regulations against germline genetic engineering that changes not only the genetics of the subject but also of all that subject's descendants. He and episode host Casey Luskin discuss germline genetic editing in China, the brouhaha that ensued when the experimental work by He Jiankui came to light, and why Smith is convinced that China's disapproving response is less than it appears on the surface. He's convinced, he explains, that the Chinese government wasn't upset that the Chinese scientist conducted the experiment. They surely knew about his work and allowed it, Smith says. Rather, they and the scientific establishment internationally were upset Read More › Source

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Arthur Caplan on Omicron Wave and Maura Quint on living in 2022 / Episode 510

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 107:21


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more All this month and next I will be promoting GiveWell.org and I hope you will consider sending them a donation. They will match new donors up to $250! Please go to GiveWell.org/StandUp at 33 mins in I start my latest talk with Dr Arthur Caplan who is currently the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Caplan was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. Caplan has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University.  He received his PhD from Columbia University Follow Dr Caplan on Twitter and let him know you heard him here! at 1:02 Today as I do most Monday's I welcome the great Maura Quint. Maura is a humor writer and activist whose work has been featured in publications such as McSweeneys and The New Yorker. She was named one of Rolling Stone's top 25 funniest twitter accounts of 2016. When not writing comedy, Maura has worked extensively with non-profits in diverse sectors including political action campaigns, international arts collectives and health and human services organizations. She has never been officially paid to protest but did once find fifteen cents on the ground at an immigrants' rights rally and wanted to make sure that had been disclosed. She was the co founder and executive director of TaxMarch.org  And she recently began a new gig at the Americans for Tax Fairness campaign director Do yourself a favor and follow Maura on Twitter if you aren't already -------------------------------------- SUPPORT THE SHOW BY SUPPORTING  one of the sponsors of the show!   GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup     Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

COVID Ethics Series Podcast
Systemic Racism and COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy

COVID Ethics Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:10


In this episode, Dr. Bryan Pilkington speaks with Dr. Kirk A Johnson on the impact COVID has had on American understanding of systemic racism, as well as the factors that influence vaccine hesitancy and mistrust in people of color. Dr. Kirk A Johnson a Professor at Montclair State University who teaches courses in Justice Studies, Medical Humanities, Bioethics, Global Issues, and Religion. He received his Masters of Divinity (MDiv) from Drew Theological School and his Doctorate in Medical Humanities (DMH) from Drew University. His recent books are "The Anti-Racism Resource Guide Volume One: Supporting Black Businesses and Economics" (Peculiar Capital, 2020) and “Medical Stigmata: Race, Medicine, and the Pursuit of Theological Liberation” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018).This episode was recorded on 8/30/2021.

From The Median featuring Molly Smith
2015 BABL Spotlight: “How to make the logical case for life” #2

From The Median featuring Molly Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 53:04


Dr. Patrick Lee Speaking at the 2015 Bringing America Back to Life Convention.  Dr. Lee holds the John N. and Jamie D. McAleer Chair of Bioethics and is the Director of the Institute of Bioethics at Franciscan University of Steubenville. “How to make the logical case for life”

Faith & Politics – South Dakota Catholic Conference
F&P Episode: 88 – Vaccines and Bioethics

Faith & Politics – South Dakota Catholic Conference

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021


On this episode Chris is joined by Cameo Anders, a South Dakota lawyer and bioethicist, and Dr. John DiCamillo, a staff ethicist at the National Catholic Bioethics Center. They take up the topic of vaccines, which have remained prominent in national and state political conversations. They discuss the moral analysis Read more…

The Cognitive Crucible
#76 Levin on the US Constitution and Institutions

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 44:41


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, Dr. Yuval Levin of the American Enterprise Institute discusses foundational concepts contained within the United States Constitution and institutions, in general. He also gives his opinions regarding strengths and weaknesses of the Constitution and interactions with institutions. In closing, Yuval makes the case for why it is important for information professionals to study the Constitution and institutional dynamics. Resources: Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville On Thinking Institutionally by Hugh Heclo Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-76 Guest Bio: Yuval Levin is the director of Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He also holds the Beth and Ravenel Curry Chair in Public Policy. The founding and current editor of National Affairs, he is also a senior editor of The New Atlantis and a contributing editor to National Review. Dr. Levin and scholars in the Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies research division study the foundations of self-government and the future of law, regulation, and constitutionalism. They also explore the state of American social, political, and civic life, while focusing on the preconditions necessary for family, community, and country to flourish. Dr. Levin served as a member of the White House domestic policy staff under President George W. Bush. He was also executive director of the President's Council on Bioethics and a congressional staffer at the member, committee, and leadership levels. In addition to being interviewed frequently on radio and television, Dr. Levin has published essays and articles in numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and Commentary. He is the author of several books on political theory and public policy, most recently “A Time to Build: From Family and Community to Congress and the Campus, How Recommitting to Our Institutions Can Revive the American Dream” (Basic Books). He holds an MA and PhD from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

The Big Five Podcast
Montreal bars and nightclubs party while they can, Plus: Covid etiquette for the asymptomatic!

The Big Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 24:33


Elias Makos is joined by Egbert Gaye, founder and editor of Montreal Community Contact and Dr. Vardit Ravitsky, Professor of Bioethics, School of Public Health, Université de Montréal and Harvard Medical School to weigh in on party etiquette, COVID etiquette, and gift etiquette. 

Essential Ethics
Deciding with Children 6: When children with chronic disease know more than you (Type 1 Diabetes)

Essential Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 62:01


We explore ways to involve children and young people when managing their chronic condition, using type 1 diabetes as an example. How do the small decisions that respect the child's preferences and values build towards an independent decision-maker? Given the level of responsibility that parents feel for the outcomes of their child's disease control, what role does a parent have in deciding with children? We also consider the clinician as holder of special knowledge about diabetes, and also as coach for the child and the parents to develop the independent decision-maker. Host: Prof John Massie. Guests: Dr Michele O'Connell, Endocrinologist at RCH; and Prof Lynn Gillam, Children's Bioethics Centre, RCH.

COVID Ethics Series Podcast
Bioethics & the Reprocessing and Reuse of Medical Equipment

COVID Ethics Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 22:21


The questions relating to medical equipment disposal and decommissioning are many and varied. In this episode, host Dr. Bryan Pilkington speaks with Jennifer Orth about her work as the lead of Re-MERGE, Reprocessing Medical Equipment: Rotarian Research Group for the Environment, through the International Rotary Fellowship of Healthcare Professionals. Jennifer is a Biochemistry and Philosophy double major in Seton Hall University's pre-medical program with a strong interest in bioethics and the medical humanities.

FedSoc Events
Showcase Panel IV: Law, Science, and Public Policy

FedSoc Events

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 63:59


The 2021 National Lawyers Convention took place November 11-13, 2021 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. The topic of the conference was "Public and Private Power: Preserving Freedom or Preventing Harm?". The final showcase panel explored "Law, Science, and Public Policy.""Science" as a concept enjoys the trust of the public. Indeed, some make "I trust the Science" a centerpiece for their appeal to the voting public, and this evidently has had some success. By contrast, others in the scientific community stress that scientific methods explicitly exclude "trust". The noted physicist Richard Feynman remarked that "science begins with the distrust of experts". Instead, process in science relies on an "ethic" of impersonal objectivity, respect for data, self-questioning, a willingness to stand corrected, and open discourse. Its methods involve constructing models for reality that best fit objective assessments of available data, followed by a search for data that might contradict those models. Scientists are therefore (supposed to be) anti-advocates, willing to concede when their models were wrong; the most successful scientists even enjoy conceding, as it means that knowledge has advanced.However, scientists, being human, are inherently imperfect practitioners of scientific methods. Historians document many examples where scientists have advocated their own (wrong) ideas over others simply because they were their own, obstructed opposing points of view, and otherwise behaved as 'politically' as in any other field of human endeavor. However, the process and its "ethic" has historically allowed models for reality to improve, and those improvements are known by the technology that has emerged based on them. As one example without science, improvements in civilized transport advanced haltingly over millennia. With science, citizens may now buy tickets to suborbital space flight.Consequently, public policy decision-makers often rely on science (or at least they say they do) when making laws and regulations in many areas, including economics, criminal law, environmental regulations technology and bioethics. However, the law is in many ways anti-science. Scientists, practicing their methods, commit to seeking out and weighting more heavily data that oppose their theory; they are (supposed to be) anti-advocates. In contrast, clients hire lawyers expressly to be their advocates.This creates a natural tension when scientists are called upon to advise public policy. Many who call themselves "scientists" are willing to participate as advocates in public policy. This has been shown clearly in fields like anthropogenic climate change, economic stimulus packages and, most recently, in the management of the COVID-19 pandemic. How should we as lawyers assure that science is used properly in the public space, to make policy conform to reality, and not for political goals?The panel will address two areas with this as background: The FDA, CDC, and public health regulation. The COVID pandemic uncovered many problems in the way medical science is used to manage public health crises. with public policy.Should scientific presentations be paternalistic? Is it ever justified to withhold, distort, or misrepresent science for fear that the truth will do damage by being misunderstood or misused? Featuring:Dr. Steven Benner, Distinguished Fellow, The Westheimer Institute at the Foundation for Applied State Room Molecular EvolutionProf. I. Glenn Cohen, James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law, Deputy Dean, and Faculty Director, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology & Bioethics, Harvard Law SchoolMs. Christina Sandefur, Executive Vice President, Goldwater InstituteModerator: Hon. Kenneth Lee, U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Arthur Caplan and Maura Quint Episode 496

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 109:09


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more All this month and next I will be promoting GiveWell.org and I hope you will consider sending them a donation. They will match new donors up to $250! Please go to GiveWell.org/StandUp at 39 mins in I start my latest talk with Dr Arthur Caplan who is currently the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Caplan was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. Caplan has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University.  He received his PhD from Columbia University Follow Dr Caplan on Twitter and let him know you heard him here! at  1:11 Today as I do most Monday's I welcome the great Maura Quint. Maura is a humor writer and activist whose work has been featured in publications such as McSweeneys and The New Yorker. She was named one of Rolling Stone's top 25 funniest twitter accounts of 2016. When not writing comedy, Maura has worked extensively with non-profits in diverse sectors including political action campaigns, international arts collectives and health and human services organizations. She has never been officially paid to protest but did once find fifteen cents on the ground at an immigrants' rights rally and wanted to make sure that had been disclosed. She was the co founder and executive director of TaxMarch.org  And she recently began a new gig at the Americans for Tax Fairness campaign director Do yourself a favor and follow Maura on Twitter if you aren't already -------------------------------------- Get your holiday gifts from one of the sponsors of the show!   GetQuip.com/STANDUP Indeed.com/STANDUP and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Essential Ethics
Deciding with Children 5: When the Stakes are High (Oncology)

Essential Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 47:45


This session considers what deciding with children looks like when a child has cancer. In this one we try to operationalise deciding with children. We explore ways to engage younger children in their medical decision-making and consider what types of decisions children with cancer can be encouraged to make for themselves. How serious would a decision need to be for the treating team to go against the child's known wishes? How would you deliver this decision to your patient? We consider if sub-optimal medical treatments are ever acceptable when they're preferred by the child. Host: Prof John Massie. Guests: Dr Molly Williams, Paediatrician, Oncology & Palliative Care, RCH and Jayne Harrison, Clinical Nurse Specialist, RCH Oncology.

The GP Show
#145 Behavioural Insights and Nudging with Dr Alex Gyani

The GP Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 65:03


Dr Alex Gyani is the Director of Research and Methodology for the Asia Pacific region at the Behavioural Insights Team, also known as the Nudge Unit. He has worked in a diverse set of fields around the world from domestic violence, energy regulation, health system efficiency, obesity, financial regulation, employment services and education. His PhD focused on encouraging people with anxiety and depression to seek treatment using a mobile phone app and encouraging psychological therapists to use evidence-based treatments. In 2018, he was named one of Apolitical's 100 Future Government Leaders.  As per the introduction, a paper on the ethics of nudging is: Bart Engelen (2019) Ethical Criteria for Health-Promoting Nudges: A Case-by-Case Analysis, The American Journal of Bioethics, 19:5, 48-59, DOI: 10.1080/15265161.2019.1588411 For the Master/Grad Diploma/Grad Cert in Lifestyle Medicine at James Cook University, check out: Sign up to the Webinar on January 24 to explore the courses further here  https://www.jcu.edu.au/courses/master-of-lifestyle-medicine/ https://www.jcu.edu.au/courses/graduate-diploma-of-lifestyle-medicine https://www.jcu.edu.au/courses/graduate-certificate-of-lifestyle-medicine If you find this podcast valuable, subscribing, sharing, rating it 5 stars and leaving a review is a huge help. If you would like to provide feedback or request a topic, please Contact Us. Thank you for listening and supporting.

New Books Network
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literature
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books in African American Studies
Karla FC Holloway, "Gone Missing in Harlem: A Novel" (Northwestern UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 31:12


Gone Missing in Harlem by Karla FC Holloway (TriQuarterly 2021) tells the story of an African American family trying to survive the early decades of the twentieth century. The Mosbys leave their life in Sedalia within hours after six-year-old Percy loudly notes that his father's boss has made a mistake in calculating what is owed. Percy's parents know what would happen if they stayed. They settle in Harlem, but the Spanish flu is raging around the globe, and Percy's father doesn't survive. His mother, DeLilah, is pregnant with Selma. Years later, Percy witnesses a murder in New York, and DeLilah sends him back to Sedalia. She does her best to make a home for her daughter, but Selma's childhood is cut short when a brutal rape leaves her pregnant. After her baby is kidnapped, the city's first ‘colored policeman', Weldon Haynie Thomas, vows that this kidnapping will not end like the Lindbergh kidnapping. Gone Missing in Harlem touches upon many things, including African American soldiers coming home from WWI, the Great Migration north, and the world of 1930's Harlem. Gone Missing in Harlem is historical, African American literary fiction and a mystery, but it's ultimately a novel about the lengths a mother will go to protect her family. Karla FC Holloway, Ph.D., M.L.S., is James B. Duke Professor Emerita of English and Professor of Law at Duke University. She is former Dean of Humanities and Social Science Faculty at Duke. Her research and teaching focused on African American cultural studies, bioethics, literature, and law. Her national and institutional board memberships have included the Greenwall Foundation's Advisory Board in Bioethics, the Trent Center for Bioethics and Humanities, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the College Board, and the Hastings Center. She is a co-founder of Duke University's John Hope Franklin Center for International and Interdisciplinary Studies and founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute. Professor Holloway is the recipient of national awards and foundation fellowships including the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Residency Fellowship and the Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute. Professor Holloway is the author of over fifty essays and ten books including Codes of Conduct: Race, Ethics and the Color of Our Character (1995), Passed On: African American Mourning Stories (2002), BookMarks: Reading in Black and White (2006), and Legal Fictions: Constituting Race, Composing Literature (2014). In her emerita years she has shifted to fiction and has published A Death in Harlem (2019) and Gone Missing in Harlem (2021) both with Triquarterly. She's at work on the final book in the “in Harlem” series, A Haunting in Harlem, and tweets on bioethics, law, society, and popular cultures from @ProfHolloway. When she's not tweeting, or writing, she's deep into reading fiction or painting miniature acrylic landscapes and abstract compositions. Anything, she says, with colors that swirl into cerulean. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Essential Ethics
Deciding with Children 4: Deciding with Adolescents

Essential Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 44:09


This episode explores how clinicians currently involve adolescents in their medical decision making, and how they should involve them. We unpack the tricky transitory space that exists between deciding for younger children, to deciding with these young people who have an increased capacity for reasoning, weighing choices and decision-making. We also consider how far paediatricians should go to promote decision making with adolescents. Host: Prof John Massie. Guests: Dr Mick Creati, RCH adolescent physician and Prof Lynn Gillam, Children's Bioethics Centre, RCH.

Science Friction - ABC RN
The Lost Family - how DNA testing is upending our lives

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 26:08


COVID Ethics Series Podcast
Long-Term Care, Nursing, and COVID-19 Safety

COVID Ethics Series Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 24:52


In this episode, Host Dr. Bryan Pilkington speaks to Dr. Sherry Greenberg, Associate Professor at Seton Hall University College of Nursing and nurse practitioner faculty consultant on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Age-Friendly Health Systems Action Community initiative.

Physician's Guide to Doctoring
Hacking the Placebo Effect with Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS

Physician's Guide to Doctoring

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 39:16


Luana Colloca, MD, Ph.D., MS, is a physician-scientist, professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Director of the TL1 program, Chair of the Pain and Placebo Special Interest Group for the International Association for Study of Pain Society (IASP), and steering member and treasurer for the Society for Interdisciplinary Studies of Placebo (SIPS). Prof. Colloca holds an MD, a Ph.D. in Neuroscience, and a masters in Bioethics.   She completed a post-doc training at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and a senior research fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, USA.  Prof. Colloca received several prestigious awards such as the IASP Wall Patrick Award for basic research on pain mechanisms. Prof Colloca leads an NIH-funded research portfolio on endogenous pain modulation including placebo/nocebo effects and other nonpharmacological interventions such as virtual reality at the School of Nursing, University of Maryland, Baltimore.    We talk about the placebo effect and its evil twin, the nocebo effect, and the dicey ethical territory that comes with recommending an intervention that you know only works if the placebo effect occurs. We also discuss the ethical dilemma of the nocebo effect, in which we prime patients to feel more pain by warning them about impending pain. Today's Sponsor is Locumstory. For more information visit: doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

Digital Health Today
Who's Responsible for Ethical Decision Making? Promoting Trust in Technology and Healthcare

Digital Health Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 27:59


Technology is under the microscope, as are the behaviors of the people who develop and deploy it. As technology impacts virtually every aspect of society, it's use within the life sciences goes beyond traditional bioethical topics.  This creates a host of questions for people and businesses working at the forefront of health innovation. In this episode, hear Nick Bott, Global Head, Bioethics and Technology Ethics at Takeda as we discuss: What is being done to ensure that the decisions around the use of technology for our health and wellbeing are carefully considered and applied?  Whose job is it to address the ethical questions in the development of AI and ML algorithms?  How can life science companies lead the way in setting standards for ethical development? What can we learn from Tony Stark - otherwise known as Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe? What is a 'consequence scanning workshop'? What is the role of regulation in setting standards and principles? Episode Links and Resources: Learn More About Ethics and Compliance at Takeda Notre Dame-IBM Technology Ethics Lab Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University About the Age of Ultron - a lesson in 'irresponsible innovation'? Hear the Coffee Talk about the Health Outcomes Observatory (H2O) Guest Host Links Connect with Nick Bott on LinkedIn Connect on Digital Health Today: Browse Episodes | Twitter | LinkedIn | Facebook | Instagram Connect on Health Podcast Network: Browse Shows | Linkedin | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram Digital Health Today is made possible by the support of our sponsors. Thank you to: Bayer G4A Roche Takeda

Farming Today
01/12/21 Gene-edited farm animals, uncertainty over new subsidy payments, shortage of farm workers in Northern Ireland

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 13:16


A paper from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics calls for a new international agreement to be reached around welfare in any future gene-edited farm animals - to ensure it doesn't cause them harm, or lead to farming methods with lower welfare standards. Later this week the Government will announce details about the new support payments for farmers, the Sustainable Farming Incentive. At an online conference yesterday for tenant farmers, run by the National Farmers' Union, the Farming Minister Victoria Prentis surprised delegates by saying that the details of subsidies in England "will change from year to year". And a Northern Ireland charity says that a lack of farm workers is causing a spike in calls to its helpline, with farmers there leaving the dairy industry because a lack of staff is making the job impossible. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “Whose Responsibility Is It to Address Bullying in Health Care?”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:45


Lindsey E. Carlasare joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Gerald Hickson: “Whose Responsibility Is It to Address Bullying in Health Care?”    Recorded October 4, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “Three Things Schools Should Do to Make Advancement Assessment Just”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:56


Dr Tonya Fancher joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Dr Marjorie Westervelt, Dr Darius Billingsley, and Maya London: “Three Things Schools Should Do to Make Advancement Assessment Just”   Recorded October 4, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “How Should Medical School Admissions Drive Health Care Workforce Diversity?”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:09


Dr Rosa Lee joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article: “How Should Medical School Admissions Drive Health Care Workforce Diversity?”  Recorded October 7, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Ethics Talk: Myths of “Merit-Based” Admissions

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 40:50


Senior editorial fellows Drs Jewel Mullen and David Henderson break down myths of “merit-based” admissions and explore how we should pursue diversity and inclusion as key educational and professional priorities in medicine.  Recorded August 12, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “How Should Medical Schools Foster Equity and Inclusion in Admissions?”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:33


Dr Adela Valdez joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Lala Forrest, Alessandra Jimenez, and Dr Kim-Thu Pham: “How Should Medical Schools Foster Equity and Inclusion in Admissions?”   Recorded September 24, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “What Is the Role of Accreditation in Achieving Medical School Diversity?”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:27


Dr Barbara Barzansky joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Dr Robert Hash Dr Veronica Catanese, and Dr Donna Waechter: “What Is the Role of Accreditation in Achieving Medical School Diversity?”  Recorded September 22, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “Living Histories of Structural Racism and Organized Medicine”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:02


Dr Matthew Wynia joins Ethics Talk to discuss his article, coauthored with Dr Robert Baker: “Living Histories of Structural Racism and Organized Medicine”  Recorded September 14, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “How Should We Build Disability-Inclusive Medical School Admissions?”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:40


Dr Lisa M. Meeks joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Dr Christopher Moreland: “How Should We Build Disability-Inclusive Medical School Admissions?”  Recorded October 20, 2021 

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: "What Does It Mean for Medical School Admissions to Be Socially Accountable?"

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 4:36


Dr Mark C. Henderson joins Ethics Talk to discuss his article, coauthored with Drs Charlene Green, PsyD, and Candice Chen: “What Does It Mean for Medical School Admissions to Be Socially Accountable?" Recorded October 21, 2021

AMA Journal of Ethics
Author Interview: “Why Disability Must Be Included in Medical School Diversification Efforts”

AMA Journal of Ethics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 6:50


Dr Dorothy W. Tolchin joins Ethics Talk to discuss her article, coauthored with Nicole D. Agaronnik, Shahin A. Saberi, Dr Michael Ashley Stein: “Why Disability Must Be Included in Medical School Diversification Efforts”  Recorded October 21, 2021 

Duke Theology, Medicine, and Culture initiative
John Swinton, BD, PhD, RMN, RNMD: "Theology and Mental Health: Bible, Spirit, and Church"

Duke Theology, Medicine, and Culture initiative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 58:29


The Theology, Medicine, and Culture Initiative (TMC) at Duke Divinity School and the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine at Duke held a seminar on November 12th, 2021 with John Swinton, BD, PhD, RMN, RNMD, professor in practical theology and pastoral care as well as chair in divinity and religious studies at the University of Aberdeen. He gave a talk titled "Thinking about Theology and Mental Health: Bible, Spirit, and Church." TMC Seminars are a semi-monthly gathering of faculty, students, clinicians, and others interested in the intersections of theology, medicine, and culture. For more information and recordings, visit https://tmc.divinity.duke.edu/seminar/​.

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd Episode 40: Suicide Epidemiology and Prevention with Dr. Juveria Zaheer

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:39


Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers suicide epidemiology, and prevention with Dr. Juveria Zaheer, a Clinician Scientist with the Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, and Education Administrator in the Gerald Sheff and Shanitha Kachan Emergency Department at CAMH in Toronto, Ontario. She is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. She utilizes both quantitative and qualitative methods to better understand suicide and identify areas of potential improvement.    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:   By the end of this episode, you should be able to… Develop an awareness of suicide risk and prevalence, as it pertains to the general population and psychiatric populations Incorporate additional contextual information into suicide risk assessment that goes beyond SADPERSONS and other list-based approaches  Develop a deeper understanding of how to approach and help individuals with suicidal thoughts and behaviours    Guest expert: Dr. Juveria Zaheer    Hosts: Dr. Chase Thompson (PGY4)   Episode production: Dr. Weam Sieffien, Dr. Vincent Tang, and Dr. Chase Thompson    Audio editing: Dr. Chase Thompson   Show notes: Dr. Chase Thompson   00:00 – Introduction 01:14 – Learning objectives 04:00 – Overview of suicide rates across populations 07:20 - Sex and gender differences in suicide 08:50 - Suicide following discharge from hospital 14:10 - Finding suitable dispositions for individuals dealing with suicidal thoughts and behaviors 20:50 - Meeting patients and families where they are at 23:30 - Suicide safety plans  28:30 - Evidence-based approaches to suicide prevention  32:30 - Commentary on strength of evidence for interventions in suicide prevention 38:40 - Addressing suicidality in borderline personality disorder 47:00 - Ethics of involuntary hospitalization for suicidality 50:00 - Future of suicide prevention  References: Borecky, A., Thomsen, C., & Dubov, A. (2019). Reweighing the ethical tradeoffs in the involuntary hospitalization of suicidal patients. The American Journal of Bioethics, 19(10), 71-83. Cipriani, A., Hawton, K., Stockton, S., & Geddes, J. R. (2013). Lithium in the prevention of suicide in mood disorders: updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Bmj, 346. Chung, D., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., Wang, M., Swaraj, S., Olfson, M., & Large, M. (2019). Meta-analysis of suicide rates in the first week and the first month after psychiatric hospitalisation. BMJ open, 9(3), e023883. Chung, D. T., Ryan, C. J., Hadzi-Pavlovic, D., Singh, S. P., Stanton, C., & Large, M. M. (2017). Suicide rates after discharge from psychiatric facilities: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA psychiatry, 74(7), 694-702. Guzmán, E. M., Cha, C. B., Ribeiro, J. D., & Franklin, J. C. (2019). Suicide risk around the world: a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies. Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology, 54(12), 1459-1470. Kessler, R. C., Bossarte, R. M., Luedtke, A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Zubizarreta, J. R. (2020). Suicide prediction models: a critical review of recent research with recommendations for the way forward. Molecular psychiatry, 25(1), 168-179. Mann, J. J., Apter, A., Bertolote, J., Beautrais, A., Currier, D., Haas, A., ... & Hendin, H. (2005). Suicide prevention strategies: a systematic review. Jama, 294(16), 2064-2074. Miller, I. W., Camargo, C. A., Arias, S. A., Sullivan, A. F., Allen, M. H., Goldstein, A. B., ... & Ed-Safe Investigators. (2017). Suicide prevention in an emergency department population: the ED-SAFE study. JAMA psychiatry, 74(6), 563-570. Sakinofsky, I. (2014). Preventing suicide among inpatients. The Canadian journal of psychiatry, 59(3), 131-140. Stanley, B., Brown, G. K., Brenner, L. A., Galfalvy, H. C., Currier, G. W., Knox, K. L., ... & Green, K. L. (2018). Comparison of the safety planning intervention with follow-up vs usual care of suicidal patients treated in the emergency department. JAMA psychiatry, 75(9), 894-900. Zaheer, J., Jacob, B., de Oliveira, C., Rudoler, D., Juda, A., & Kurdyak, P. (2018). Service utilization and suicide among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Schizophrenia research, 202, 347-353. Zaheer, J., Links, P. S., & Liu, E. (2008). Assessment and emergency management of suicidality in personality disorders. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 31(3), 527-543. CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association (CPA). For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information, visit our website at psychedpodcast.org.

Intelligent Design the Future
Richard Weikart on Scientific Racism and the War on Humanity

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 31:44


Today's ID the Future again spotlights The Comprehensive Guide to Science and Faith. Historian Richard Weikart and host Casey Luskin discuss Weikart's contribution to the new anthology, his essay “How Evil Has Been Done in the Name of Science.” As Weikart explains, over the past century and a half, science has been misused to fuel racist policies and undermine human rights. Darwinian ideas helped lay the groundwork for Nazi ideology in Germany. And we shouldn't imagine the problem was restricted to Nazi Germany. Scientific racism also reared its head in the United States, including in the long-running and infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment. More broadly, a marriage of scientism and evolutionary thinking continues to undermine the idea of inherent human worth Read More › Source

New Books Network
Brandy Schillace, "Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul" (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:02


Today I talked to Brandy Schillace about her book Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul (Simon and Schuster, 2021). In the early days of the Cold War, a spirit of desperate scientific rivalry birthed a different kind of space race: not the race to outer space that we all know, but a race to master the inner space of the human body. While surgeons on either side of the Iron Curtain competed to become the first to transplant organs like the kidney and heart, a young American neurosurgeon had an even more ambitious thought: Why not transplant the brain? Dr. Robert White was a friend to two popes and a founder of the Vatican's Commission on Bioethics. He developed lifesaving neurosurgical techniques still used in hospitals today and was nominated for the Nobel Prize. But like Dr. Jekyll before him, Dr. White had another identity. In his lab, he was waging a battle against the limits of science and against mortality itself--working to perfect a surgery that would allow the soul to live on after the human body had died. This "fascinating" (The Wall Street Journal), "provocative" (The Washington Post) tale follows his decades-long quest into tangled matters of science, Cold War politics, and faith, revealing the complex (and often murky) ethics of experimentation and remarkable innovations that today save patients from certain death. It's a "masterful" (Science) look at our greatest fears and our greatest hopes--and the long, strange journey from science fiction to science fact. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Brandy Schillace, "Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul" (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:02


Today I talked to Brandy Schillace about her book Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul (Simon and Schuster, 2021). In the early days of the Cold War, a spirit of desperate scientific rivalry birthed a different kind of space race: not the race to outer space that we all know, but a race to master the inner space of the human body. While surgeons on either side of the Iron Curtain competed to become the first to transplant organs like the kidney and heart, a young American neurosurgeon had an even more ambitious thought: Why not transplant the brain? Dr. Robert White was a friend to two popes and a founder of the Vatican's Commission on Bioethics. He developed lifesaving neurosurgical techniques still used in hospitals today and was nominated for the Nobel Prize. But like Dr. Jekyll before him, Dr. White had another identity. In his lab, he was waging a battle against the limits of science and against mortality itself--working to perfect a surgery that would allow the soul to live on after the human body had died. This "fascinating" (The Wall Street Journal), "provocative" (The Washington Post) tale follows his decades-long quest into tangled matters of science, Cold War politics, and faith, revealing the complex (and often murky) ethics of experimentation and remarkable innovations that today save patients from certain death. It's a "masterful" (Science) look at our greatest fears and our greatest hopes--and the long, strange journey from science fiction to science fact. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in Medicine
Brandy Schillace, "Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul" (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:02


Today I talked to Brandy Schillace about her book Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul (Simon and Schuster, 2021). In the early days of the Cold War, a spirit of desperate scientific rivalry birthed a different kind of space race: not the race to outer space that we all know, but a race to master the inner space of the human body. While surgeons on either side of the Iron Curtain competed to become the first to transplant organs like the kidney and heart, a young American neurosurgeon had an even more ambitious thought: Why not transplant the brain? Dr. Robert White was a friend to two popes and a founder of the Vatican's Commission on Bioethics. He developed lifesaving neurosurgical techniques still used in hospitals today and was nominated for the Nobel Prize. But like Dr. Jekyll before him, Dr. White had another identity. In his lab, he was waging a battle against the limits of science and against mortality itself--working to perfect a surgery that would allow the soul to live on after the human body had died. This "fascinating" (The Wall Street Journal), "provocative" (The Washington Post) tale follows his decades-long quest into tangled matters of science, Cold War politics, and faith, revealing the complex (and often murky) ethics of experimentation and remarkable innovations that today save patients from certain death. It's a "masterful" (Science) look at our greatest fears and our greatest hopes--and the long, strange journey from science fiction to science fact. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in History
Brandy Schillace, "Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul" (Simon and Schuster, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:02


Today I talked to Brandy Schillace about her book Mr. Humble and Dr. Butcher: A Monkey's Head, the Pope's Neuroscientist, and the Quest to Transplant the Soul (Simon and Schuster, 2021). In the early days of the Cold War, a spirit of desperate scientific rivalry birthed a different kind of space race: not the race to outer space that we all know, but a race to master the inner space of the human body. While surgeons on either side of the Iron Curtain competed to become the first to transplant organs like the kidney and heart, a young American neurosurgeon had an even more ambitious thought: Why not transplant the brain? Dr. Robert White was a friend to two popes and a founder of the Vatican's Commission on Bioethics. He developed lifesaving neurosurgical techniques still used in hospitals today and was nominated for the Nobel Prize. But like Dr. Jekyll before him, Dr. White had another identity. In his lab, he was waging a battle against the limits of science and against mortality itself--working to perfect a surgery that would allow the soul to live on after the human body had died. This "fascinating" (The Wall Street Journal), "provocative" (The Washington Post) tale follows his decades-long quest into tangled matters of science, Cold War politics, and faith, revealing the complex (and often murky) ethics of experimentation and remarkable innovations that today save patients from certain death. It's a "masterful" (Science) look at our greatest fears and our greatest hopes--and the long, strange journey from science fiction to science fact. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Boys In The Cave
Episode 97 - Islamic Bioethics, Gene Editing & Linguistics | Heraa Hashmi

Boys In The Cave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 129:01


Embryos, DNA, Ethics, Secularisation, Science, Philosophy, Language,  We touch on all these diverse topics with Heraa Hashmi. Best known for her project, Muslims Condemn. Heraa Hashmi is a law student based in the US with a background in Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Biology and Linguistics. Her interests include the Islamic sciences, cognitive linguistics, and bioethics. She is also a founding member and contributor at Traversing Tradition, an online publication geared towards examining modern society through an Islamic worldview. Hosts : Tanzim Please email us your comments, feedback, and questions at: boysinthecave@gmail.com, and leave a review and 5-star rating on iTunes!   Follow us on: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/boysinthecave/   Instagram – @boysinthecave   Twitter - @boysinthecave   Become a Patreon today! https://www.patreon.com/boysinthecave --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The BTWN Network
Biblical BioEthics

The BTWN Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 59:26


Preached by Pastor Austin Hetsler on October 3rd, 2021 (Sunday Morning) "Situational Ethics, as it is called, is a totally pagan philosophy." A special message wherein a Biblical worldview is applied to Covid-19 vaccine mandates. Watch the video of the Sermon Here: https://youtu.be/ukk3a2x_aiw

Strong Women
78. How Should Christians Think about Surrogacy? with Maria Baer

Strong Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 54:09


Maria Baer is an experienced reporter, writer, and podcaster and she co-hosts The Colson Center's weekly podcast, BreakPoint this week. In this episode, we hear Maria's story and how she got into journalism. We also talk to Maria about the topic surrogacy and what she has learned from her research and reporting on the topic. This episode will help you apply the Christian worldview to this delicate issue of surrogacy.   Maria Baer Show Notes:  Maria Baer's Website: https://mariaebaer.wordpress.com/  BreakPoint: https://breakpoint.org/  Christianity Today: https://www.christianitytoday.com/  The Gospel Coalition: https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/profile/maria-baer/  Focus on the Family: https://www.focusonthefamily.com/  Books by James Dobson: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/james%20dobson  Brio Magazine: https://www.focusonthefamily.com/parenting/brio-magazine/  Harriet the Spy: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dvd-harriet-the-spy-michelle-trachtenberg/3634216?ean=0032429285164  WORLD Magazine: https://wng.org/authors/maria-baer  WORLD Journalism Institute: https://www.worldji.com/  The World and Everything in It: https://wng.org/podcasts/the-world-and-everything-in-it  Center for Christian Virtue: https://www.ccv.org/  Kenyans Erased for Lucrative Baby Business BreakPoint by Maria Baer: https://www.breakpoint.org/kenyans-erased-for-lucrative-baby-business/  Anderson Cooper and the New Normal BreakPoint by Maria Baer: https://www.breakpoint.org/anderson-cooper-and-the-new-normal/  Them Before Us by Katy Faust: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/them-before-us-katy-faust/1137397382?ean=9781642935967  The Center for Bioethics: https://cbhd.org/  Rod Dreher's Website: https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/  Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/consider-the-lobster-david-foster-wallace/1102259129?ean=9780316013321  Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/barnes-noble-leatherbound-classics-wuthering-heights-emily-bronte/1106658816?ean=9781435159662  The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-hiding-place-corrie-ten-boom/1116615493?ean=9780800794057  Join Strong Women on Social Media: https://linktr.ee/strongwomencc  Erin and her husband, Brett, run Maven which “exists to help the next generation know truth, pursue goodness, and create beauty, all for the cause of Christ.” Check out more about Maven here: https://maventruth.com/   The Strong Women Podcast is a product of the Colson Center which equips Christians to live out their faith with clarity, confidence, and courage in this cultural moment. Through commentaries, podcasts, videos, and more, we help Christians better understand what's happening in the world, and champion what is true and good wherever God has called them.  Learn more about the Colson Center here: https://www.colsoncenter.org/   Visit our website and sign up for our email list so that you can stay up to date on what we are doing here and also receive our monthly book list: https://www.colsoncenter.org/strong-women     

The Good Fight
Peter Singer on How to Reduce Suffering

The Good Fight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 57:25


Peter Singer, the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, is one of the most influential philosophers of the past fifty years. A leading exponent of utilitarianism, he has often explored how individuals can improve the lot of those in need with their own choices.    In this week's conversation, Peter Singer and Yascha Mounk discuss what utilitarianism gets right, whether the effective altruism movement is effective, and why freedom of inquiry is crucial to improving the world. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity. Please do listen and spread the word about The Good Fight. If you have not yet signed up for our podcast, please do so now by following this link on your phone. Email: podcast@persuasion.community  Website: http://www.persuasion.community Podcast production by John T. Williams, and Brendan Ruberry Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Connect with us! Spotify | Apple | Google Twitter: @Yascha_Mounk & @joinpersuasion Youtube: Yascha Mounk LinkedIn: Persuasion Community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Catholic Answers Live
#10317 Bioethics - Fr. Tad Pacholczyk

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Questions Covered: 13:50 – If someone created a truly artificially intelligent being, would it be a sin to kill it?  18:30 – My husband had a brain aneurysm and I ended up donating some of his organs but I never talked to a priest about it. Would you be able to tell me how to discern this matter?  23:50 – Could you define what the church means by “extraordinary means to support life”?  29:26 – What does the Catholic Church teach about Catholics practicing Yoga? I have heard about how just doing the poses can invite demons.  33:25 – Could you elaborate on the Catholic response towards someone who's “brain dead”? My stepdad passed away with oxygen to his brain. I wanted to talk about this experience and was wondering if Father could talk about what happened.  43:15 – Could you talk about the pneumonia and shingles vaccines and the use of aborted fetal cells in them?  45:32 – A patient asked me to prescribe Cialis, but I knew he was using it with a mistress. Was it wrong to give it to him? I also had a patient whose parents were going to place her in an institutional setting, and they wanted to put her on birth control so she wouldn't become pregnant in case she was raped. Was it wrong to give it to her?  …