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Geographic region in the Americas

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Latest podcast episodes about central american

The Trip That Changed Me
Belize with Jessica Blotter: sustainable tourism, becoming a conscious tourist, and making a positive travel impact

The Trip That Changed Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:39


Jessica Blotter is a born entrepreneur and journalist who spent her early 20s trying to figure out how she was going to leave her mark on the world. The answer came during a cruise trip to Belize with her partner's family. Jessica adored the Central American country but was struck by the poverty, animal exploitation, and lack of sustainable ways to offer support. From this experience sprung Kind Traveler, the world's first socially conscious give-and-get hotel booking and media platform. When travelers book a hotel using Kind Traveler, they donate $10 to a local non-profit and in return, they receive exclusive rates and perks from the hotel; it's a win all-around. On this episode, Jessica and Esme discuss the moment some stray dogs gave Jessica the idea for Kind Traveler, how the heart-opening effects of travel encourage a more giving mindset, and why leading with a curious spirit is the best way to find your purpose.   You can learn more about Kind Traveler by following them on Instagram @kindtraveler and visiting their website kindtraveler.com.   Learn more about Full-Time Travel by visiting fulltimetravel.co and follow us on Instagram @full_time_travel. Be sure to rate, review, and follow so that you don't miss out on travel tips, inspiration, and your potential next adventure!    

FIVE MINUTE NEWS
New COVID variant stokes concern across the globe.

FIVE MINUTE NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 7:15


New COVID variant #omicron stokes concern across the globe. Central American migrants form caravan in Mexico to look for work. Protestors demonstrate at Amazon warehouses on Black Friday. You can subscribe to Five Minute News with Anthony Davis on YouTube, with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker, or enable Five Minute News as your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing skill.  Subscribe, rate and review at www.fiveminute.news  Five Minute News is an Evergreen Podcast, covering politics, inequality, health and climate - delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news, daily. 

Tech Tent
A volcano-powered Bitcoin city?

Tech Tent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 23:43


El Salvador's president made Bitcoin legal tender, now he wants to build a city. Joe Tidy speaks to Salvodoran-American cryptocurrency enthusiast and investor Gerson Martinez about the Central American country's experience with Bitcoin since its introduction earlier this year. Plus 193 member states of the UN agency Unesco say they want a more ethical approach to the development of artificial intelligence. We hear from Unesco's Gabriella Ramos about the problems with AI use today. And our own Jane Wakefield investigates the community of tweeters and YouTubers helping others find the latest Playstation and XBox consoles amid a global computer chip shortage in the run-up to Christmas.

Migration Policy Institute Podcasts
World of Migration: Thinking Regionally to Act Locally in Immigration Policy

Migration Policy Institute Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 23:54


With migration a dynamic phenomenon in the Americas—with significant Central American flows to the U.S. border, and much smaller but growing numbers of South Americans and others traveling north—the U.S. government increasingly is realizing that migration management cannot occur only at the U.S.-Mexico border and must include cooperation with Mexico, Central America, and other countries in the hemisphere such as Canada, Costa Rica, and Panama. This recognition of migration as a regional system requires a new set of policies and ways of engagement with countries across the Americas, as Migration Policy Institute (MPI) President Andrew Selee discusses with colleague Andrea Tanco. The conversation also turns to the evolution of the immigration debate over the past two decades and the challenges and opportunities ahead.

The Washington Times Front Page
November 24, 2021

The Washington Times Front Page

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:58


On today's Front Page: President Biden has ordered the release of 50 million barrels of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, A new study finds Central American migrants are coming to the U.S. illegally not because of violence or natural disasters but because of jobs, and more.

Crypto News with Coinmonks
Fraudsters strip people of over $4 million in Bitcoin | IMF Warns of Economic Instability | Coinmonks News #13

Crypto News with Coinmonks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 8:51


An impostor posing as MicroStrategy's Michael Saylor has been able to defraud victims of over $4 million in a giveaway scam. El Salvador is encouraged to limit the scope of its Bitcoin legislation, according to the conclusion of the IMF's annual staff visit to the Central American country.

Midnight Train Podcast
The Banana Massacre - Yep, bananas. Happy Thanksgiving 2021

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 90:05


So we're gonna get into something a bit different this week. Not really truecrime, not unsolved, but definitely crazy. This is another one we got from a listener that we had no clue ever happened. While the official death toll of this incident is usually put at around 45, some estimates say it could be up to 2000. Those bodies are said to either have been dumped in the sea or buried in mass graves. So what was the incident about you ask? Well, long story very short… Bananas. We're gonna dive into what is simply known as the Banana massacre,  a crazy tale of a government squashing a banana strike with excessive force and what came after. Buckle up guys, here we go!   Before we start, I want to acknowledge the great sources of info for this episode. 90% of the information on this week's episode came from two amazing sources that had tons of info that we couldn't find anywhere else. First a paper by Jorge Enrique Elias Caro and Antonino Vidal Ortega on the website scielo.org was our source for the actual massacre info while an article called Rotten Fruit by Peter Chapman on the Financial Times website was our source for the company history.  So, let's start by talking about a fruit company. United Fruit company to be exact. United Fruit began life in the 1870s when Minor Cooper Keith, a wealthy young New Yorker, started growing bananas as a business sideline, alongside a railway line he was building in Costa Rica. Both ventures took off, and by 1890 he was married to the daughter of a former president of Costa Rica and owned vast banana plantations on land given to him by the state. The bananas were shipped to New Orleans and Boston, where demand soon began to outstrip supply.Keith teamed up with Andrew Preston, a Boston importer, and in 1899 they formed United Fruit. Bananas sold well for their tropical cachet: they were exotic, a luxury only affordable to the rich. But the rapidly rising output of United Fruit's plantations brought down prices. The company created a mass market in the industrial cities of the US north-east and Midwest. The once bourgeois banana became positively proletarian.   By the 1920s, United Fruit's empire had spread across Central America. It also included Jamaica, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. In South America the company owned chunks of Colombia and Ecuador. It came to dominate the European as well as the US banana markets with the help of its Great White Fleet of 100 refrigerated ships, the largest private navy in the world.   There are more than 300 varieties of banana, but United Fruit grew only one: the Gros Michel or ”Big Mike”. This variety suited most tastes; it was not too big or too small, too yellow or too sweet - if anything, it was a little bland. This was the forerunner of the transnational products we have today.           But mass production took its toll. In 1903, disease hit United Fruit's plantations in Panama. An array of pathogens kept up the attack, and the banana was discovered to have a genetic weakness. Its seeds are ill equipped for reproduction, so growers take cuttings from one plant to create another. The banana is a clone, with each inbred generation less resilient.    Although the banana was diseased, United Fruit marketed it as a product that exemplified good health. Banana diseases did not affect humans, and the fruit was said to be the cure for many ills: obesity, blood pressure, constipation - even depression. In 1929, United Fruit set up its own ”education department”, which supplied US schools with teaching kits extolling the benefits of the banana and the good works of the company. Meanwhile, United Fruit's ”home economics” department showered housewives with banana recipes.   One of United Fruit's most successful advertising campaigns began in 1944, designed to boost the banana's profile after its scarcity during the war. It featured Senorita Chiquita Banana, a cartoon banana who danced and sang in an exuberant Latin style. Senorita Chiquita bore a close resemblance to Carmen Miranda, the Brazilian entertainer who, in her ”tutti-frutti” hat, wowed Hollywood at the time. Sales soon regained prewar levels.   By the 1960s, the banana had become an inseparable accompaniment to the morning cereal of most American children. And today, in countries such as the US and Britain, it has ousted the apple as the most popular fruit. In the UK, figures indicate that more than 95 per cent of households buy bananas each week, and that more money is spent on them than on any other supermarket item, apart from petrol and lottery tickets.    Soooo sounds like a pretty typical big business rise to power by providing a wholesome treat to the people right? Wrong… There was more going on than almost everybody knew.    Over the years, United Fruit fought hard for low taxes and light regulation. By the beginning of the 20th century, troublesome anti-trust laws had been passed in the US to crack down on business behaviour such as price-fixing and other monopolistic practices. Taxes on large corporations were increased to fund welfare benefits in the US and fully fledged welfare states in Europe. But, with a centre of operations far from the lawmakers of Washington DC, United Fruit largely avoided all this.   The company also gained a reputation as being ruthless when crossed, and acted to remove governments that did not comply with its wishes. United Fruit had first shown its tough nature in the invasion of Honduras in 1911, which was planned by Sam ”The Banana Man” Zemurray, a business partner of United Fruit who later headed the company. Efforts by Zemurray and United Fruit to set up production in Honduras had been blocked by the Honduran government, which was fearful of the power it might wield. United Fruit was not so easily deterred. Zemurray financed an invasion, led by such enterprising types as ”General” (self-appointed) Lee Christmas and freelance trouble-shooter Guy ”Machine Gun” Molony. Thanks to United Fruit, many more exercises in ”regime change” were carried out in the name of the banana.   In 1941, the company hired a new consultant, Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had adapted the early disciplines of psychoanalysis to the marketplace. Bernays is known as the ”father of public relations” following his seminal 1928 book, Propaganda, in which he argued that it was the duty of the ”intelligent minority” of society to manipulate the unthinking ”group mind”. This, Bernays asserted, was for the sake of freedom and democracy.   United Fruit had become concerned about its image. In Central America, it was commonly known as el pulpo (the octopus) - its tentacles everywhere. In the US, United Fruit's territories were seen as troubled and forbidding. Under Bernays' guidance, the company began issuing a steady flow of information to the media about its work, rebranding the region as ”Middle America”.   America”.   In 1954, Bernays exercised his manipulative powers to get rid of the Guatemalan government. Democratically elected, it had taken some of United Fruit's large areas of unused land to give to peasant farmers. Bernays' response was to call newspaper contacts who might be amenable to the company view. Journalists were sent on ”fact finding” missions to Central America and, in particular, Guatemala, where they chased false stories of gunfire and bombs. In dispatches home, Guatemala became a place gripped by ”communist terror”.   The company looked, too, to friends in high places, both in the corridors of power and in the offices where the big decisions were made. During the Guatemalan crisis, John Foster Dulles, one of the world's most esteemed statesmen, was secretary of state. His brother, Allen Dulles, was head of the CIA. Both were former legal advisers to United Fruit. Together, the Dulles brothers orchestrated the coup that overthrew Guatemala's government in 1954.   Despite its ugly reputation, United Fruit often made philanthropic gestures.  Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company, played a part in coining the term ”corporate social responsibility” when, in reference to earthquake relief sent to Nicaragua in 1972, he extolled the company's deeds as ”our social responsibility”.  And in the 1930s, Sam Zemurray donated part of his fortune to a children's clinic in New Orleans. He later gave $1m to the city's Tulane University to finance ”Middle American'' research; he also funded a Harvard professorship for women. Philanthropy, however, did not prevent United Fruit's abuses, and, in the 1950s, the US government decided it had to act. The company's activities had caused such anti-US feeling in Latin America that leftwing revolutionaries such as Fidel Castro and Che Guevara had prospered. And so Washington began to take away some of United Fruit's land.   Ironically, Castro had benefited from the presence of United Fruit in Cuba. His father, a sugar planter, leased land from the company, and had made enough money to afford a good upbringing for his children. Guevara had fought both United Fruit and the CIA during the Guatemalan coup; he maintained thereafter that Latin America had no choice but ”armed struggle”. At New Year 1959, Castro and Guevara seized power in Cuba and kicked out the US-supported regime of Fulgencio Batista.   Like an ailing dictator, United Fruit lashed out - and nearly took the world with it. In 1961, it lent part of its Great White Fleet to the CIA and Cuban exiles in the US who were plotting to overthrow Castro. When the Bay of Pigs invasion failed, Castro, fearing another attack, ushered in armaments from the Soviet Union, prompting the missile crisis of 1962.   United Fruit battled on through the 1960s, its product ever more the victim of disease. Big Mike flagged, died and gave way to the dessert banana most of the developed world eats today, the Cavendish. It was said to be ”disease resistant”. Now that's dying, too.   Eli Black took over the company in 1970, imagining he could turn it back into the colossus it once was. The early 1970s, however, were a terrible period for the image of multinational corporations. Chief among them, oil companies made huge profits from the crisis after the 1973 Middle East war, to the inflationary ruin of rich and poor countries alike. United Fruit became an embarrassment. It was weak where others, such as the oil moguls, remained strong. When its stock market value crashed and regulators moved in, it looked like natural selection.   Early on Monday February 3 1975, a man threw himself out of his office window, 44 floors above Park Avenue, New York. He had used his briefcase to smash the window, and then thrown it out before he leapt, scattering papers for blocks around. Glass fell on to the rush-hour traffic, but amazingly no one else was hurt. The body landed away from the road, near a postal service office. Postmen helped emergency workers clear up the mess so the day's business could carry on.    This jumper was quickly identified as Eli Black, chief executive of the United Fruit Company.   It emerged that Black, a devout family man, had bribed the Honduran president, Oswaldo Lopez Arellano, with $1.25m to encourage him to pull out of a banana cartel which opposed United Fruit. The story was about to come out in the US press. United Fruit's Central American plantations were also struggling with hurricane damage and a new banana disease. Facing disgrace and failure, Black took his own life. His death was shocking, not least because he had the reputation of a highly moral man. Wall Street was outraged, the company's shares crashed and regulators seized its books to prevent ”its further violation of the law”. The company subsequently disappeared from public view and was seemingly erased from the collective mind.   After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, in a born-again spirit of globalisation, the world's main banana companies picked up the free-market banner once carried by United Fruit. The companies - Chiquita, Del Monte and Dole from the US, and Noboa from Ecuador - did not have anything like the force of United Fruit individually, but they were still a formidable presence. Together they were known to their critics, if not to themselves, as the ”Wild Bunch”.   In the 1990s, the US took its case to the World Trade Organisation, the new high court of globalisation. The companies protested that west European countries unfairly protected the producers of so-called ”Fairtrade” bananas in former European colonies through a complex system of quotas and licences. The Wild Bunch characterised this as revamped colonialism and outmoded welfare state-ism and, instead, promoted their own ”Free Trade” bananas.   In the new millennium, after what had become a general trade war, the Europeans backed down and agreed to concessions. They did so with some rancour, protesting that Washington had again allowed itself to be manipulated by narrow interests. Some spoke of a return of the ”old and dark forces”. They were thinking of United Fruit.   Ok so that's kind of a basic history of United Fruit company to get us going in the right direction to talk about one of the most brutal things they carried out on their workers. You've seen the connection they had and the power they had.. Pretty nuts for a fucking banana company.    On the evening of October 5, 1928, the delegates for Colombia's banana workers in Magdalena gathered to discuss their grievances. Among their concerns were their long hours and low pay; one worker, Aristides López Rojano, remembered: “We worked from six in the morning until eleven and then from one in the afternoon until six.... The contractor paid the salary and reserved up to thirty percent for himself.” Erasmo Coronel (the one wearing the bowtie in the group portrait) spoke in favor of a strike, and the others agreed. At around five in the morning on October 6, 1928, the workers issued the United Fruit Company a list of nine demands.   Stop their practice of hiring through sub-contractors   Mandatory collective insurance   Compensation for work accidents   Hygienic dormitories and 6 day work weeks   Increase in daily pay for workers who earned less than 100 pesos per month   Weekly wage   Abolition of office stores   Abolition of payment through coupons rather than money   Improvement of hospital services   The strike turned into the largest labor movement ever witnessed in the country until then. Radical members of the Liberal Party, as well as members of the Socialist and Communist Parties, participated.   The workers wanted to be recognized as employees, and demanded the implementation of the Colombian legal framework of the 1920s.   After U.S. officials in Colombia and United Fruit representatives portrayed the workers' strike as "communist" with a "subversive tendency" in telegrams to Frank B. Kellogg, the United States Secretary of State, the United States government threatened to invade with the U.S. Marine Corps if the Colombian government did not act to protect United Fruit's interests. The Colombian government was also compelled to work for the interests of the company, considering they could cut off trade of Colombian bananas with significant markets such as the United States and Europe.   As there was no agreement the Government militarized the zone. The newspaper "La Prensa" published the following:   "MORE TROOPS FOR THE BANANERA REGION. We have been informed that the leaving of the Commissioner sent by the Industry Ministry due to the existing conflict between the workers and the company has turned the situation critical. For this reason, the War Ministry ordered the concentration of more troops in Ciénaga. Therefore, yesterday night, a numerous contingent was dispatched from here on a special ship"   By the end of November the Magdalena Agriculture Society tried to find a solution to the situation. They named a Commission and along with the Chief of the Work Office and the workers' delegates would have a meeting with the UFC since the conflict was affecting everyone's interests. The multinational rejected meeting the Commission stating that the workers were out of the law. The representatives of the workers left for Ciénaga with the aim of convincing their fellow workers to abandon the region. They also demanded the arbitration as a last legal resort.   Social Party (PSR) founded in 1927 in Bogotá. The strike was also supported by the national and departmental union leaders ascribed to the Magdalena Workers Federation, the Magdalena Worker Union and the General Union of Workers of the Union Society (popularly known as the Yellow Union which integrated railway, port and construction workers of Santa Marta).   The first week of December everything was at a standstill, without a solution. The company hired a steamboat and brought 200 military men and took over the town hall without the mayor's authorization. To this respect the Ciénaga newspaper "Diario del Córdoba" noted:   "We do not know who ordered changing the town house into a campsite of troops, but we are certain that the municipality spokesman was not consulted for this illegal occupation. He would have certainly opposed it since there was no alteration of public order according to the norms in force. We see that the procedures here are "manu militari", without any consideration under the obvious alarm of these peoples, panic in society and business."   Military roadblocks were displayed. Trains were searched and the army prevented strikers from using them33. Tension increased and temporary workers started to return to their hometowns. Military pressure blocked the communication systems and the mail, telephones, telegraph and even the press stopped working. The strikers seized the train from Ciénaga to the plantations and they prevented its exit during the day.   On December 3rd, the press was conscious of the extreme situation: The situation of the Banana Strike is worse than ever. Especially because of the uneasiness caused by the Governor's Office for having called the Army. Any kind of meeting was banned, as it was assumed that they questioned the state legitimacy and stability and the government decisions. This measure outraged workers, because some detentions took place in Ciénaga and they were justified by the police since some documents of an apparently communist campaign were confiscated.   From this moment on, American Diplomats started to worry for the security of the American employees up to the point that the Government of the United States sent a ship to Santa Marta for the protection of their citizens as was stated by the US ambassador in Bogotá. He made clear that it was not a war cruise. Anyhow, it was possible to confirm that in the ports of Ciénaga and Santa Marta war ships docked with the aim of reinforcing troops.    To break the strike, on December 2nd, a military contingent of 300 men arrived in Ciénaga from the interior of the country. The major of the zone considered that these soldiers would be better at facing the situation than those native of the region. At the same time that same day some municipalities protested against the disposition of the governor's office. The workers exodus continued, the general situation of commerce aggravated, many commercial houses closed and some of them stopped paying their debts alleging the scarce security conditions and low sales. Similarly occurred with the stores of the UFC which closed due to lack of business activity. There was a total lack of supplies of basic products in the banana zone.   With the excuse that in Ciénaga the strikers were committing all kinds of outrages, the army seized the train to mobilize troops to the different towns, preventing normal circulation; this information proved false and the train returned to Cienaga during the first hours of the next day. The community remained isolated and without the possibility to use the train as a transportation means. The train was used by the militaries for the surveillance of plantations.   A State of Siege declaration was expected and this increased tension among strikers who organized collective bodies in different locations to prevent the work of producers. Detentions continued. The train detention by the military and the impossibility to take bananas out due to the positions of the strikers and small landowners, the harvested fruit began to rot.   The Workers Union used the newspaper Vanguardia Obrera and other pasquinades to inform about their position and to keep public opinion updated. On December 5th, alleging that the strikers had managed to get weapons, the government decreed the State of Siege. This was not made public to the workers and for this reason they became more exacerbated.   A pressure mechanism used to obtain the support of merchants was the fact of creating solidarity to boycott the public market stores and other commercial firms if the transaction was not authorized by the Workers Union. This way, merchants could not sell if they did not have the "permission". To accomplish this policy the union had 5.000 workers acting as vigilantes. This situation led the UFC to ask the government if the State was in condition to protect its interests. The State response was dubious. In its effort to reach an equilibrium between the pressure of the company and that of the workers, it submitted a communication where it stated that it would analyse the situation and would take the corresponding steps.   The workers' unrest for not feeling the State support led them to radicalization of their protest and since that moment, seizures of banana farms took place in different municipalities. There were confrontations between land owners, the military and the workers. It is worth mentioning the events in Sevilla, where workers detained a group of soldiers.   As the tension increased with this last event the Ministry Council declared general alteration of public order on December 5th, and gave special faculties to Minister Arrazola to act as a mediator between the parties and positioned General Cortés Vargas as Civil and Military Chief. This intervention was justified by the economic losses of the socio-economic and political system of the nation because it had been estimated that up to that moment the losses exceeded one million dollars and given the fact that the fierce position of the workers had stopped communications and transportations and even there had been seizures in several localities and there was fear concerning the situation of Santa Marta.   The government sent information to the United Press as follows: "The government has decreed the State of Siege in the Province of Santa Marta where the workers of the United Fruit Company maintain a strike lasting several days. General Carlos Cortés Vargas has been appointed Civil and Military Chief". On the other hand, the national press and especially that of the capital announced: " there has never been a longer and more numerous strike in the country than this of the workers of Magdalena. Thirty-two thousand workers have been in total inactivity for more than thirty days in the banana region, there are no signs that this situation will have a favourable solution"   Events reached their peak in Ciénaga. The workers had concentrated for a pacific demonstration in the evening of the 5th of December. The Governor Nuñez Roca decreed the dispersion of the demonstration. The workers did not receive this well; they declared that authorities had taken this decision with the support of the UFC and the militaries without the presence of workers' representatives. This made clear to them that authorities were defending the interests of the Company and the local "bananacracy"and not theirs as Colombian workers. The concentration ended in a protest.   The militaries obeyed the orders of the Governor and it was authorized to follow orders and demand the workers to dissolve the demonstration as it was not authorized.   The text was read in the square and at the same time the troop took positions. There were approximately 1.500 strikers in the square.   The army gave the strikers 15 minutes to disperse and the workers' answer was a the massive agitation of the Colombian flags and shouts related to the workers movement. The army responded with drumbeats and the menace to repel the strikers. Three bugle warnings were given, but nevertheless the strikers remained in their positions. A deep silence reigned in the square and the menace of the army became an unfortunate reality when the shout "Shoot" was uttered. Rifles and machine guns were discharged against the defenceless and unarmed demonstrators. In minutes the ground of the square was tinted with blood.   Once the attack of the army against their own fellow citizens ended, the sight was dantesque. The cadavers, the wounded and their relatives were troubling scenes. These events took place at the dawn of December 6th: a brutal aggression against a workers' demonstration.   The news invaded the media and the first chronicles appeared with living information about the tragic balance of the events. The first report on the newspaper "La Prensa" from Barranquilla informed of 8 people killed and 20 wounded. After a week, the same newspaper mentioned 100 dead and 238 wounded. Meanwhile official sources and diplomatic communications signalled the number of people killed as being 1.000. This number, and along with other kind of testimonies collected, agree that the number of killings was over a thousand and that the militaries loaded the trains with the corpses and buried them in mass graves in inaccessible areas and up to the present times they have not been localized.   This repression caused a massive exodus of the terrified population. They abandoned the zone and migrated to different parts of the country for fear of military persecution and arrestment. Many of them left their scarce possessions behind.   National and international media widely covered this event. Both the UFC and the government tried to manipulate the information to protect their image. The press echoed and broadcasted the sometimes biased news, informing about "combats" between the army troops and the "revolutionaries" and that as a result of these combats, 8 "bandits" were killed and 20 were wounded. The War Ministry insisted that "in Magdalena there was no strike, but a revolution".   Other newspapers such as "La Prensa" from Barranquilla, issued their edition of December 8th in red characters as a reference to this event that brought mourning to the entire country and as a symbolic commemorative act.   Referring to a communication sent to the United Press, the War Ministry informed officially that in the attack of the strikers against the troops there had been 8 dead and 20 wounded and that in order to control the revolutionary outbreaks against state order, the immediate mobilization of more troops had been ordered. They would arrive from cities of the interior of the country. It also emphasised the position of the government that the workers' situation in Magdalena was delicate and that vigorous decisions had to be taken in order to solve this issue. It also informed that beside Ciénaga, other localities had to be intervened.   The Times from New York informed in a biased and extended way that the turmoil in the Colombian Banana Region was provoked by Mexican incendiaries, who had led the process of the Mexican Revolution, two decades earlier. It also gave details about the aspects of the banana strike that were consequences of the expiration of the Barco Concession .   At the same time the UFC issued a press communication to the New York agencies and the worldwide correspondents declaring: "the difficult situation experienced during the past days in the Colombian banana region, where the company has valuable interests, has quite improved in the last 24 hours and the dispatches sent from the scene, give rise to expectations for a prompt solution of the conflict surged between the workers and the company which ended in an extended strike of revolutionary nature".   While the American press provided biased information, trying to defend the multinational interests and that of their government, the national press analysed the situation with greater objectivity. The daily newspaper "El Tiempo" from Bogotá commented in an extended note that most of the claims of the strikers were righteous improvement of working conditions. Nevertheless, due to its conservative position, the editorial stated that they did not agree with the strike since they considered that the workers had a bad leadership and they made the leaders responsible for what had happened. They reminded the authorities that force is not the supreme reason as the only system to solve a conflict since violence is not a valid option to impose certain vindications.   In response to these events and as a protest for the massacre, several offices of the United Fruit and the railway were set on fire and destroyed. The hard situation caused by the army repression and the lack of jobs led to the assault of the company's stores where people seized food.    "It is not about fixing anyhow a difficult situation, it is about avoiding more critical events in the immediate future. Therefore we need a wise, prudent, political Colombian, who does not forget the circumstances regarding the conflict. Someone who does not forget how the United Fruit Company manipulates the political and civil life of Magdalena and who does not think it indispensable to send troops for hunting workers as animals. Someone who will not be hard and inflexible with them and subordinated and honey mouthed with the company agents"   After the massacre, the workers who managed to escape emigrated to other areas of the region and new versions of the events started to become public. It was the version of the defeated. This version informed the public opinion about the concentration in the Ciénaga square and not in farms as had been informed by authorities to justify the fact of not being able to notify the exact number of deaths.   On December 10th after a convulsed weekend, the headings announced "the revolutionaries' flee in stampede to the Sierra Nevada," "government troops completely defeated the strikers "; the War Minister informs that there were more deaths during the last combats". In general, the press informed about a revolutionary movement which confronted the military forces and that the army was responding with rigor, but that there had not been any excess on their part. The banana zone was returning to normal, as well as the train service between Ciénaga and Santa Marta and the steam boat service between Ciénaga and Barranquilla. They also informed that since public order had been reestablished, businesses had already opened and that the exodus of the population had ended.   General Cortés Vargas issued a decree through which the revolutionaries of Magdalena were declared a gang of outlaws. The decree consisted of three articles and in one section, as a justification, it was stated that the rebel strikers committed all kinds of outrages: arson in public and private property, pillage, interruption of telegraphic and telephonic communications, destruction of railways, assault of citizens who did not agree with their communist and anarchist doctrine. This was the justification for decreeing martial law to give security to citizens and to re-establish public order. On the other hand the workers' leaders and accessories should be prosecuted to face their responsibilities. And to finish, the public force was authorized to use their guns.   At the same time troops were sent to avoid the surviving strikers' flee to the Sierra Nevada and the Departament of Atlántico. To accomplish this all the towns neighbouring the banana zone were alerted. Numerous detentions occurred and the prisoners were sent to Ciénaga to be judged by a Martial Court.   Wow…. Fucking bananas caused all this shit… Well obviously not than JUST bananas but holy shit man.    So the crazy thing is United Fruit company continued to operate did so long after this incident until eventually after the the suicide of Eli Black things unraveled and the company went away. Or did it? Well it did not. In fact the company is now still a huge banana company called… Chiquita! But at least all that bullshit is on the past… Oh wait wait… No it's not!    While Chiquita is not actively massacring people, in 2007, it admitted to paying $1.7 million to the United Self-Defense Forces of Columbia (A.U.C.), a far-right paramilitary group responsible for thousands of killings and some of the worst massacres in Colombia. The A.U.C. was designated by the United States as a terrorist group at the time and Chiquita was forced to pay $25 million for violating counterterrorism laws. In particular, the A.U.C. targeted labor leaders, liquidated problem employees, and removed people from lands needed for cultivation.   “They are so bad that in 2001, even the Bush administration was forced to designate them as a terrorist organization,” said Terry Collingsworth, a Labor and Human Rights Attorney. He proceeds to say that multinational corporations had automatically aligned with the A.U.C. “They've made it safe for business here. That's what they do.” Collingsworth states, from his and his associates' reporting, that Chiquita likely paid much more than $1.7 million to the A.U.C.   Over much of the 20th century, banana companies like United Fruit effectively took over governments in countries like Guatemala and Honduras, leading to the countries' model being known as “banana republics”. A banana republic would describe politically unstable countries economically dependent on bananas as a sole export and product, and it has been diversified to include other limited-resource products. The CIA would strong-arm these governments to protect the business interests of banana companies at the expense of workers and people who lived in those countries, often propping up repressive regimes. With a historic priority of keeping the costs of bananas low, banana companies were willing to do whatever it took to keep prices low, from stifling labor movements, keeping wages low, and strong-arming governments. The United Fruit Company did it then, and Chiquita Brands does it now.   In 1999, President Clinton apologized to Guatemala, saying that “support for military forces and intelligence units which engaged in violence and widespread repression was wrong, and the United States must not repeat that mistake.” Movies:   Horror movies about killer food   https://screenrant.com/funniest-horror-b-movies-murderous-food/

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
Radio National de Nicaragua - November 9, 1978 5950 Khz 0543 UTC

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


In terms of sheer bloodshed per square mile, there were few countries that could touch Nicaragua in the 1970's. Like Salvador, there were periods of unrest that were sustained and violent, costing lives in the tens of thousands. At the time, radio was the sole social media for getting word out on what was happening on that particular day or week. State radio tended to tow the party line and stations that did not would often just “vanish” from the air… often along with their staff and radio personalities. The Nicaraguan Revolution was a decades-long process meant to liberate the small Central American country from both U.S. imperialism and the repressive Somoza dictatorship. It began in the early 1960s with the founding of the Sandinista National Liberation front (FSLN), but didn't truly ramp up until the mid-1970s. It culminated in fighting between the Sandinista rebels and the National Guard from 1978 to 1979, when the FSLN succeeded in overthrowing the dictatorship. The Sandinistas ruled from 1979 to 1990, which is considered to be the year the Revolution ended.There was, in the 70's, an incredible opportunity to document a lot of the activities via the shortwave spectrum - sadly, I got little more than snippets - but this one is a powerful one. Have a listen.

The Critical Hour
Dems Blame Racism & Sexism on VP's Ratings Collapse; Will Germany Freeze Over Nordstream 2 Rejection?

The Critical Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 115:12


Steve Poikonen, national organizer for Action4Assange, joins us to discuss the horrific polling numbers for the leaders of the Democratic Party. Presidential spokesperson Jen Psaki is getting backlash after she blamed sexism and racism on the precipitous drop in polling numbers for embattled Vice President Kamala Harris. Also, the Democratic Party is struggling to find competent popular leadership as upcoming elections look bleaker by the day.John Burris, civil rights attorney, joins us to discuss legal cases in the US. A defendant who fatally shot Ahmaud Arbery argues that he feared for his life after he and several other men chased Arbery and cornered him with a loaded shotgun. Also, the prosecution in the Kyle Rittenhouse case is in deep and serious trouble after holding back high-definition drone footage.Martin Sieff, senior fellow at the American University in Moscow, joins us to discuss Eastern Europe. Russia has released diplomatic cables showing that France and Germany rejected a peace plan for the Donbass region in Eastern Ukraine. Also, John Bolton argues for overt regime change in Belarus.Gerald Horne, professor of history at the University of Houston, author, historian, and researcher, joins us to discuss Africa. There is a danger of US military intervention in Ethiopia as the US state department warns pilots of surface-to-air fire in the war-torn nation. Observers are concerned that the African nation may be the latest target for regime change as neocons begin their usual regiment of propaganda against the sitting government.Laith Marouf, broadcaster and journalist based in Beirut, joins us to discuss the Middle East. The US has floated a temporary nuclear deal to Israeli officials for approval before presenting it to an Iranian diplomatic corp that is sure to reject the hapless plan. Also, the Yemen war may be coming to an end as Saudi mercenaries are forced to withdraw from areas that have been seized by Houthi fighters.George Koo, journalist, social activist, and international business consultant, joins us to discuss China. International security observers are concerned that the US TV show "60 Minutes" operates as a mouthpiece for the Washington neocons by pushing absurd propaganda about a potential Chinese invasion of Australia. Wyatt Reed, Sputnik News analyst, joins us to discuss Nicaragua. The US and its regime change proxy, the Organization of American States, are pushing another coup attempt against Nicaragua by refusing to recognize its elections. Also, a bipartisan sanctions regime levied against the people of the Central American nation is designed to cause misery and starvation.Dan Lazare, author, investigative journalist and author of "America's Undeclared War," joins us to discuss fuel problems in Europe. Germany's failure to quickly certify the Nordstream 2 pipeline could guarantee a long and brutal winter for its citizens. In a self-defeating move, the fuel-starved European power is prolonging the certification of its fuel lifeline to Russia, and the people and industries of Germany are likely to pay a dear price throughout the cold season.

Real Estate Investing For Cash Flow Hosted by Kevin Bupp.
#349: Central American Markets, Foreign Lending, and so much more! - with Michael Cobb

Real Estate Investing For Cash Flow Hosted by Kevin Bupp.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 42:41


Michael Cobb is a real estate expert and international developer. After success in the computer industry, Michael formed ECI Development in 1996. This residential resort development company builds communities in Belize, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, El Salvador, and Mexico. Tropical neighborhoods include homes, condominiums, golf courses, and hotels in beach, agricultural, and mountain locations. Michael serves on the board of several multinational companies, charitable foundations, holds a CIPS certification, is a past International Director for NAR, and heads the International Referral Network (IRN) for Realtors. Michael and his wife, Carol, lived as expats, raising two daughters overseas, from 2002 through 2016. Quote: “We started a mortgage company to provide financing to North Americans.. and that business ultimately grew into a bank, but we are still largely a mortgage company.” “Understanding that thin slicing of the marketplace is really important but also [is] understanding your goals and objectives.” “To me, the biggest form of asset protection is diversification, and not just in terms of asset classes.” Highlights: 02:00 - Michael tells listeners more about life with his family in Nicaragua, culture shock, and raising children outside of him and his wife's native country. 07:24  - Michael discusses his shift from the technology industry into the real estate world and how ECI Development came to be. 12:54 - Michael tells us the reasons why his company doesn't have many competitors. 15:23 - Michael lists some reasons why Central American real estate is so appealing. 28:50  - Michael talks about asset protection when owning real estate in Central America. 34:21 -  Michael touches on ECI's current real estate developments. 40:23 - Michael describes the process of someone touring properties. Guest Website: https://www.ecidevelopment.com/ Recommended Resources:  Check out our company and our investment opportunity by visiting www.SunriseCapitalInvestors.com  Self Directed IRA Investment Opportunity –  Click Here To Learn More About How You Can Invest With Us Through Your SDIRA  Accredited Investors  Click Here  to learn more about partnering with me and my team on Mobile Home Park deals!  Grab a free copy of my latest book “The 21 Biggest Mistakes Investors Make When Purchasing their First Mobile Home Park…and how to avoid them MobileHomeParkAcademy.com  Schedule your free 30 minute "no obligation" call directly with Kevin by clicking this link https://www.timetrade.com/book/KV2D2  

Old Man Yells at Music
Episode #85: October 17. 1998

Old Man Yells at Music

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 45:51


At long last Roger looks back at the CanUKUS charts of the fall of '98. While the Yankees were winning yet another championship, the pop scene contained songs about mother love, being as cool as a deposed Central American dictator, life at the end of a thousand-year period, romantic rivalry, love of all shapes and sizes, and teenage crises of faith. Listen and watch along on YouTube: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDWLXjsOJPQknenNA3m4ItQfbHgp-q43H And you can support the show on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=35903110&fan_landing=true This podcast sounds better with you.

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
As Nicaragua Resists Regime Change, The US Ramps Up Its Economic Warfare

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 60:01


The United States has tried to control the poor Central American country, Nicaragua, for more than 100 years. John Bolton designated Nicaragua as part of the "Troika of Tyranny" along with Cuba and Venezuela for daring to defend its sovereignty. Since the failed violent coup attempt in 2018, the US foreign policy establishment has focused on preventing President Daniel Ortega's reelection using a variety of tactics. Ben Norton, associate editor of The Grayzone, who is based in Managua, describes those tactics, the complicity of corporate media and social media and how Nicaragua is working to protect its democratic institutions. Norton outlines the US playbook in Nicaragua, including what to expect after the election. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

Reporters
Costa Rica: A climate success story

Reporters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:28


In the space of just a few years, the small Central American nation of Costa Rica has become a global laboratory for decarbonisation. Costa Rica is the world's only tropical country that has managed to reverse the process of deforestation: forests now cover more than half its surface. It's also one of the few countries to get almost all its electricity (99 percent) from renewable sources. Costa Rica's inspiring and bold example reflects badly on major world powers, which have considerably more resources available to achieve their climate goals. Our regional correspondents Laurence Cuvillier and Matthieu Comin report.

MTR Podcasts
Jessy DeSantis

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:26


Raised in a Nicaraguan household in Miami, FL and currently living in Baltimore City, Jessy DeSantis is a self-taught emerging artist creating meaningful, vibrant work. Her painting's stark contrast of vibrant color and white space draws the viewer into her subjects. She is inspired by her connection to nature, family, and her Central American roots. Her paintings are more than just visually beautiful. They carry in them intention with a story to be told. She seeks to pass on these stories of heritage and truth with all of it's complexities to her children and future generations.★ Support this podcast ★

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio
Thousands of migrants heading for U.S. southern border

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 28:24


Thousands of Central American migrants are heading north through Mexico on their way to our southern border.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lead With Your Brand!™
S2E41 : Branding the Story, Liberty Zabala, Reporter & Weather Anchor, FOX 5 San Diego

Lead With Your Brand!™

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:36


Jayzen is excited to welcome Liberty Zabala to the show. As a seasoned reporter and television anchor, Liberty brings her amazing personal brand to every story. From interviewing Oprah to covering mass tragedies, Liberty has an incredible career story that has earned her four Emmy awards. Liberty is a graduate of the "FBI Citizens Academy" at the FBI San Diego Field Office during Spring 2019. Liberty is currently on the Dean's List at American Military University while pursuing her Master of Arts in Homeland Security with a concentration in Counterterrorism. Guest Bio Liberty Zabala Reporter & Weather Anchor, FOX 5 San Diego Liberty Zabala is a 4x Emmy-winning Reporter & Weather Anchor for FOX 5 San Diego. She was awarded the Vada and Colonel Barney Oldfield National Security Reporting Fellowship by the Radio Television Digital News Foundation for her work covering Marines, sailors, active duty service members and veterans in the nation's largest military town, San Diego. Some of her most memorable stories include leading breaking news coverage of the Central American immigration crisis, covering devastating firestorms that burned across San Diego County, covering the San Bernardino terrorist attacks and most recently, the Las Vegas mass shooting. Her coverage also earned two San Diego Press Club awards. In November 2016, Liberty was honored as one of 100 Comcast NBCUniversal employees selected from across the country to take part in (Morning Joe) Mika Brzezinski's "Know Your Value" program in association with MSNBC. Prior to that, she was one of four reporter trainees selected from across the country for the NBC Reporter Development Program. Under the program, she went through intensive multimedia training workshops alongside NBCUniversal's top media executives, talent and coaches at NBC 5 Dallas, NBC 10 Philadelphia, and NBC 4 New York under the direction of The Poynter Institute's Al Tompkins. She has conducted several high profile interviews including presidential candidates Rand Paul, Ron Paul & Newt Gingrich, Senator Kamala Harris, 37th Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert B. Neller, world champion boxer Manny Pacquiao, comic creator Stan Lee and media mogul Oprah. She is a graduate of California State University, Northridge with a degree in journalism and collateral in political science with an emphasis in international relations. She is a dedicated member of Asian American Journalists Association where she served as a board director for the Los Angeles chapter and currently serves the San Diego chapter as president. Liberty is a graduate of the "FBI Citizens Academy" at the FBI San Diego Field Office during Spring 2019. Liberty is currently on the Dean's List at American Military University while pursuing her Master of Arts in Homeland Security with a concentration in Counterterrorism. Links To learn more about Lead With Your Brand and the Career Breakthrough Mentoring program, please visit: LeadWithyYourBrand.com To book Jayzen for a speaking engagement or workshop at your company, visit: JayzenPatria.com

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst
Episode 97: Fuel Your Firm's Growth by Tapping into the Hispanic Market with Founder and President of Abogados NOW

Law Firm Marketing Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 23:40


What you'll learn in this episode:   How tapping into the Spanish-speaking market can fuel new growth for law firms   Why simply translating a website or marketing copy into Spanish isn't enough to connect with the Hispanic market Why a Spanish-language marketing strategy that works in Los Angeles may not work in San Antonio or Miami  When to create a Spanish sister website and brand strategy for your firm How to work with Spanish-speaking clients—even if you don't speak Spanish      About Hugo Gomez Hugo Gomez is Founder and President of Abogados NOW, a national bilingual digital marketing consultancy exclusively exclusive to attorneys. The company was founded in Los Angeles in 2018 and has since expanded nationally to help law firms reach Spanish-speaking markets throughout the U.S.  Additional resources: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hgomezmktg/  Abogados NOW website: https://www.abogadosnow.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abogadosnow Twitter: https://twitter.com/abogados_now  Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast Spanish speakers in the U.S. need lawyers, and lawyers need new clients—but these two groups often fail to connect due to barriers in language and culture. Hugo Gomez set out to solve this problem by founding Abogados NOW, a legal marketing firm that specializes in the bilingual market. Hugo joined the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast to talk about why Spanish digital media presents a cost-effective opportunity for growth; how to choose the best website and brand strategy to reach bilingual clients; and how you can reach Spanish speakers, even if you don't speak Spanish yourself. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Welcome to the Law Firm Marketing Catalyst Podcast. Today, my guest is Hugo Gomez, founder of Abogados NOW. The firm specializes in legal marketing, working with their client law firms to help them maximize their share of the bilingual market. Today, we'll hear all about Hugo's path and how the firm works with clients. Hugo, welcome to the program. Hugo: Thank you so much for having me, Sharon. I'm super excited to be here. Sharon: I'm so glad to have you. Tell us about your career path. Did you want to go into law? Hugo: No, I was actually working in personal and commercial finance for most of my early career, doing a lot of high-volume lead generation. Those are great organizations I worked with. They were super fun, but having done most of what I could do in the financial sector, I wanted a new challenge. I was fortunate enough to get a role as a director at one of the nation's largest lead generators for attorneys. What I learned very quickly was that there's an opening in the market to advertise in Spanish on behalf of attorneys. After learning about the legal industry a little more, I decided to start Abogados NOW to empower smaller firms, sole practitioners and medium-size firms to own their marketing, to grow on their own terms, essentially to have their own lead generation sources in Spanish that most attorneys simply do not have. Sharon: Do they not have it because they think it's going to cost too much, they're too small, they don't know how to do it? What is the opening you saw? Hugo: Yeah, most attorneys largely advertise in English because digital marketing agencies, all they know is advertising in English. The opening we saw was that the fastest-growing audience segment is Spanish-speaking consumers in the United States, and there wasn't anyone really giving attorneys specific strategies to connect with these consumers authentically. And I say authentically because a lot of attorneys, when they attempt to advertise in Spanish, they'll simply translate their marketing into Spanish. We all know what works in Spanish won't work in English, and vice versa. The opening we saw, the opportunity we saw, was the ability to connect attorneys to these communities the right way, the authentic way, so that attorneys who don't have that footprint in these communities can be trusted authorities. Sharon: I can imagine people might hand off website copy to somebody who can translate it and say, “Translate it into Spanish.” You don't know what's actually happening or whether they're doing it right, or whether I need to get out my high school Spanish book. Hugo: Precisely. Sharon: I would assume all attorneys today know that digital marketing is important, that online marketing is important, so I assume they have some sort of program in place when they call you in. Is that true? What's your first step in terms of O.K., let's take a look at this? Hugo: Typically speaking, when we onboard a new member, we onboard them after discussing a few qualifying questions. We want to know if they are on a growth path. If an attorney or a firm wants steady business, we're probably not the right fit. We're more equipped for hypergrowth strategies. We want that solo practice to grow, to find new revenue, so we reverse engineer their business goals. As much as we are a digital marketing partner, I think we are a great business partner as well. It all comes down to what the end goal is. Are you pointing yourself to an exit? Are you trying to increase the valuation of your company? Are you simply trying to grow for growth's sake? There are many different goals attorneys have, so we try to determine what that goal is.  More often than not, the low-hanging fruit is Spanish media online, because Spanish media online is competitively priced. Online marketing for attorneys in English is quite competitive. We hear the horror stories from attorneys who don't do well on Google search for this very reason. We're able to hedge against that reality by owning Spanish-speaking consumers when they're looking for an attorney. Sharon: Is that mostly when they're looking for a plaintiff attorney? Do you work with defense attorneys, intellectual property attorneys? What kind of practices do you work with? Hugo: That's a great question. We work with a variety of practices areas. We're most popular in personal injury, workers' comp, immigration, bankruptcy and criminal defense. Anything that hits a large mass of the population, we're able to generate qualified calls, forums, chats, etc. for attorneys looking to grow their practice. Sharon: How do you measure that? Do you help them? Do you work with them on lead intake, or do you just get the phone to ring and they're on their own after that? Hugo: It's pretty inclusive. We don't consider ourselves an agency. We believe we have way more value than most agencies do in that the marketing, the lead generation aspect, that's standard. That's something everybody gets in our program, and we're very proud to do that quite well and competitively priced. Now, what happens when those calls are generated? A variety of things. A firm may have an intake center that's bilingual already on site, which is amazing. We love to hear that. Sometimes they only have a receptionist, which is fine if they're a low-volume player in the beginning, but if they're confused or they're not really familiar with intake operations, we connect them to the right partners for intake.  There are amazing answering services for attorneys. We work directly with LEX Reception—they are our official service partner—so for any attorney who is worried about answering calls in Spanish, we have a high degree of confidence saying, “Hey, we already have a solution for you; they are Abogados NOW's certified answering service partner.” They'll answer your calls 24/7. They'll walk you through the script. They already know the best practices in getting personal and sensitive information from these markets. We're proud to say that as much as we are a digital marketing partner, we are a great business operations partner. Sharon: You would come in and say, “Let's see what we would do in terms of your strategy, your positioning.” You're working from the ground up. Hugo: Absolutely. More often than not attorneys don't have a Spanish strategy, and if they do, 99 percent of the time we have to break it down and build it from scratch again. It's because the market's changing quite fast. The census data that was released I believe a month ago, the 2020 census data, shows that this market has a very high purchase power. They make a lot of life decision on their mobile phones. Even the Pew Research Center confirmed that the vast majority of Spanish speakers use their phones as a primary source for the web, at a higher rate than the general English-speaking population. That surprises a lot of people, but the data supports that you really have to understand the market and build a strategy for them in that particular metro market, because the strategies that work in California will oftentimes not work in San Antonio and Miami and Newark, New Jersey. They're very different markets, and you have to have a deep understanding of the value systems in these metro areas to build the right marketing program for them. Sharon: So, you work across the county. Hugo: Yeah, we're national now. We started in California. That's where our headquarters are, here in Los Angeles County. We knew the demand was there. Sometime late last year, we did a soft launch nationally. Just a few months ago, we announced our official national rollout. Right now we're in nine or 10 states. Sharon: Do you have people in San Antonio and Miami, or somebody that understands that market as opposed to Long Beach? Hugo: Yeah, absolutely. We are fundamentally a post-Covid organization. Sharon: I'm sorry; I didn't hear that. Hugo: We are fundamentally a post-Covid organization. Sharon: Post-covid? Hugo: Yeah, we're nearly fully remote. Most of our team members work from the comfort of their own home offices or at libraries, wherever they feel most comfortable. We've made it work. We have a great culture that's virtual. Our team loves the flexibility of working on their terms, but with strict standards and deadlines.  Because of that, we're able to say, “We're not that familiar with the Spanish-speaking market in Louisiana. Maybe we should reach out to some copywriters or designers out there who are part of the community and get a sense of what the market's like.” Again, the Spanish-speaking market is not a monolith. What we do is not a translation exercise; it's a brand positioning exercise within your local community. To answer your question, we're able to find great talent based on our infrastructure. Sharon: That's very interesting. I know markets vary, but I hadn't thought that the Hispanic market in Miami might be very different from the market here. Hugo: It is. Just by definition, if you look at the numbers, there are more Dominicans and Cuban-Americans per capita in South Florida than there are in Southern California, where it's largely Mexican, Central American and, to various degrees, South American as well. Those value systems are very different because of how relatives, your immigrant roots, immigrated to the United States. They all came through various channels and have different political systems. The way in which you land in this country will set the tone for your values and potentially the values of future generations after you. Sharon: It's very interesting and I'm sure very, very true. I'm thinking about people like me, whose ancestors came over at the turn of the century from Eastern Europe, and it still echoes today. Are your clients ever bilingual? Do they ever call in and say, “Hey, this is just too much for me”? Hugo: The majority of our members do not speak Spanish. I think that's why they choose us as their digital marketing and business partner, because they realize that in order to scale, you have to find other markets. You have to find lead generation sources. You have to find other media channels that your competition has not figured out yet, and because marketing in Spanish isn't a translation exercise, the bar is quite high to do it the right way. We often tell attorneys at the very beginning, “It's O.K. if you don't speak Spanish; however, someone on your staff should.” That is a requirement. Whether you have a partner who comes to every Zoom or in-person meeting with you, or you have a paralegal who might be bilingual, that is a requirement in our program. Otherwise, there's no way the Spanish-speaking market is going to be able to communicate effectively with your practice. We do make that a requirement, to have bilingual staff, but it is certainly not a requirement for attorneys to speak Spanish. Sharon: We've worked with quite a few law firms, and they've been great law firms, but they're like, “We should go after this ethnic market. Nobody here speaks anything but English, so who can find someone who knows something?” What do you do? Do you say, “We'll assign somebody”? How do you handle that? Hugo: If the attorney is at the point that their firm does not have a Spanish-speaking resource, that's when we immediately default to our answering service partners. What we've learned is—and this is a really interesting phenomenon—that a Spanish speaker will handle the call wonderfully. They'll establish trust. They'll get the personal information. They'll set up the engagement. What our answering service partner is very effective at doing is telling that person, “Hey, you might want to bring a relative who speaks English,” and more often than not, they will. The consumer will bring someone who speaks English, whether it's a loved one, a neighbor, a friend. So, there's always a way to market effectively in these languages, but it really does start with the strategy. If you don't have a credible website, credible advertising, a credible message, you're never going to be able to establish that communication they're after. Sharon: If the firm already has their website, will you then build—I'm not saying translate directly—but will you build a parallel site in Spanish for them? Hugo: There are a few options. Depending on how well their website is built, we may be able to add what we call a “translation switch.” It's a deceiving name because there are no translations happening. You'll see the “en Español” button on the website, and when you click it, you'll see the interpretations, not direct translations, of the English copy throughout the site. It's almost like you have two websites in one. That is a popular option; however, this also depends on the market.  We oftentimes recommend a sister website because of the state bar Rules of Professional Conduct as they relate to advertising, because some states do not allow different trade names. If trade names are allowed, like separate trade names where an attorney can incorporate or use a DBA or do something legally to file that name, we absolutely recommend that. I'll give you an example. Javaheri & Yahoudai, they're two personal injury attorneys in Los Angeles. They've been with us for over three years now, and their name—we had an honest discussion—is kind of difficult to say quickly, difficult to memorize. So, we pared it down to J&Y, and that's their English strategy; J&Y, Javaheri & Yahoudai. They're known as J&Y Law, and they're very successful in arguably the most competitive PI market in the country.  However, in Spanish, we don't use the J&Y name, because in California we could use separate trade names. So, we created Abogados Campeones, which means “Champion Attorneys.” This separate trade name has a completely different marketing angle, branding, website, video strategy, ad strategy. The way we describe it to potential members is we're not just building this marketing program; we're effectively building a new business that's tacking onto your existing infrastructure.  Abogados Campeones does extraordinarily well. Some months, it outperforms their English marketing. That name came about after many discussions with the brand team, many discussions with development, many discussions with the firm to find the values we want to evoke. In Southern California, we've done a lot of polling. The immigrant population likes to win, win at all costs, so we knew this name was going to be a homerun. When we acquired it, it essentially established the model for how we operate today. We try to find out that value system, the right branding. We know that if we pump some ad dollars behind all that research, you're going to have a successful launch in Spanish. Sharon: I can see how a name like that would be compelling. Do your clients call you in when they feel like, “O.K., I'm spending a fortune on Google. I've maxed it out. I have been effective at competing with everybody and his brother, but I've been spending millions every month on paperwork. I want to find a different way. I think there's more here.” What are they saying to you? Hugo: The majority of clients that are members who sign up for an employment with us, I would say four out of five times they are very unhappy with the way things are going in their current marketing. The feedback we hear—and we're very glad to hear—is that attorneys see the value in working with a consultancy that only works with attorneys, that essentially doubles the value of your marketing reach because of English and Spanish. Attorneys see that we're all native English speakers, but we also come from Latin American countries; we all come from Spanish-speaking families and we're all fully bilingual. I think the logic with attorneys, what they oftentimes tell us is, “We're not happy with the way things are going, and we see a lot of value in being fully bilingual rather than focusing on this one area of the market that's super-crowded.” Sharon: You mentioned several times that you have members. I'm trying to think of some of the other legal membership groups. They escape me, but is this something where you're calling your clients members, or is this a membership program? Hugo: The reason we don't use clients is because the nomenclature gets confusing, because we generate clients for our clients. We just established that if you're a part of Abogados NOW, you are a member of our program. There's no network referral opportunity. There is a community of sorts, an unofficial one, but generally speaking, there's no formal discussion board or anything of the like. We are working towards that. We do anticipate having our first in-person event in Q2 next year to further establish our reach in person, just because we've been so virtual the last four years. Our members are members mainly because of the nomenclature, but also we do feel they're part of something new. They're part of something that's original that hasn't been established anywhere else in the country. Sharon: Do you track your success by whether they're increasing the number of leads? Everybody's going to ask that—“How do I measure success with you?” Hugo: I think this is why we don't sign everybody, because we like to ask these questions day one. What are you looking for? Then, how do you and I agree on the metrics or key performance indicators that are going to tell us whether we're winning or losing? Oftentimes attorneys say, “I don't know. I don't know how many more clients I want,” and then we'll schedule another call, but I love it when an attorney is ready with their game plan for the next quarter, the next year, the next five years. We do focus on what we call the frontend metrics. Yes, there are costs per lead; there are costs per click. Ultimately, we never really get into these discussions with attorneys. What they're most interested in is, “How much have I invested in advertising and what was my direct output?” I think attorneys appreciate that because they know we're not just celebrating cost-per-lead goals. Cost per lead is all relative. All that matters is how many are you converting, how many are you signing and what value each signed client has for your firm. Sharon: That's very true. What's the value? If you're not getting quality people calling in, quality meaning—it sounds awful, but a serious brain injury, that's what every personal injury attorney wants. Not to make fun of anybody, but there's a lot of money in that. Hugo, thank you so much. This is very, very interesting.  Hugo: Thank you so much. For any attorneys listening who are serious about scale, who are serious about making that trusted connection with your Spanish-speaking community, please make an appointment with us on our website. We're at AbogadosNow.com. You can create a meeting invite per your availability and we can discuss your goals. That's what we want to talk about. We want to talk about how to grow your business and then work backwards from there. Thank you so much, Sharon. I appreciate your time. Sharon: I greatly appreciate yours. Thank you so much.

The Spiritual Edge
Sacred Steps: Calling on ancient Maya wisdom to heal Guatemalan widows

The Spiritual Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 24:24


The Central American country of Guatemala promotes its indigenous heritage to tourists. At the same time, its government has historically marginalized and discriminated against the Maya, many of whom endured terrible violence during a decades-long civil war. Twenty five years after the war's end, human rights leader Rosalina Tuyuc is promoting healing for her people based on ancient Maya wisdom.

The Spiritual Edge
Sacred Steps: Calling on ancient Maya wisdom to heal Guatemalan widows

The Spiritual Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 24:24


The Central American country of Guatemala promotes its indigenous heritage to tourists. At the same time, its government has historically marginalized and discriminated against the Maya, many of whom endured terrible violence during a decades-long civil war. Twenty five years after the war's end, human rights leader Rosalina Tuyuc is promoting healing for her people based on ancient Maya wisdom. Through these teachings she began to understand, “That it's good not to feel defeated. That we should keep moving  forward, loving life, and our existence.”

AlertsUSA Homeland Security Weekly Update
Homeland Security Weekly Update - Oct 23, 2021

AlertsUSA Homeland Security Weekly Update

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 10:49


This week's update looks at a shocking report from Panama's Foreign Minister that the small Central American nation has apprehended 52 individuals biometrically identified as having ties to Al Qaeda and who appeared on the terrorist watch list. These individuals were headed to the U.S. border as part of a much larger caravan. An expanded written version of this update can be found within our weekly Threat Journal newsletter. You can subscribe for FREE by simply visiting https://www.ThreatJournal.com . A link to this issue will immediately be sent to you via email.AlertsUSA Homepagehttp://www.AlertsUSA.com – (Emergency Alerts for Mobile Devices) Now in our 19th year!AlertsUSA on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/alertsusaAlertsUSA on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/alertsusaThreat Journal on Gettrhttps://gettr.com/user/threatjournalThreat Journal on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/threatjournalThreat Journal Homepage (For Daily News)https://www.ThreatJournal.comEnter to win ONE MONTH of Mountain House Emergency Foodhttps://Signup.ThreatJournal.com

Sofa King Podcast
Episode 609: Operation Condor: State Sanctioned Terror

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 90:15


On this episode of the world famous Sofa King Podcast, we talk about an international terrorist conspiracy known as Operation Condor. This horrible operation was set up by eight South and Central American countries. It was responsible for the death, detention, assassination, murder, and disappearance of tens of thousands of people across multiple borders. People were even assassinated in Washington, D.C. And, of course, the CIA was involved. The whole thing was part of a strategy used by dictators such as Augusto Pinochet to keep power and destroy leftist thought. How much did the US know? How much was it involved? Which country had it worst? What was the Dirty War? How were most of the bodies disposed of? Listen, laugh, learn.   Visit Our Sources: https://medium.com/exploring-history/operation-condor-u-s-and-latin-americas-dirty-war-d59a7cfff77c https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Condor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirty_War https://www.theguardian.com/news/2020/sep/03/operation-condor-the-illegal-state-network-that-terrorised-south-america http://www.cels.org.ar/especiales/plancondor/en/#una-asociacion-ilicita-para-reprimir-opositores http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/chile/operation-condor.htm  

theCrossroads UPC
Special Service - Missions Session with Lynne Jewett and Colleen Carter

theCrossroads UPC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 85:51


Special Missions Service with Missionaries Lynne Jewett to Guatemala and Colleen Carter to Gabon. About the Missionaries: Lynne Jewett Lynne first went to Guatemala in 1989 as an AIMer under the supervision of Bro. T. W. Drost. In 1992 she followed the Drost family to Mexico where she worked in the national office, Bible school and children's ministries for seven years. She eventually returned to her "first love", Guatemala. She became a fully appointed missionary in 1996 and has been working in Bible schools and children's ministries ever since. In 2002, she was appointed as the children's ministries coordinator for the Central American & Caribbean Region. She has traveled to many nations promoting children's ministries, teaching seminars and holding children's crusades. Her goal has been to see Sunday school established in every Pentecostal church in the region. In 2003 she received her career missionary appointment after serving for fourteen years. Most of those years, she has had the privilege to work side by side with Brad and Regina Thompson, who she feels are great missionaries and true friends. She has served as a Bible school administrator for nearly twenty years, with over 500 Bible school students each year and twenty-four schools in operation around the country. This past term she began a new adventure with the establishment of an orphanage. HOME International (A Home for Orphans, Ministry and Education), received their first child in October 2016. HOME is a fully accredited children's home working with Child Protective Services for the abused and abandoned children of Guatemala. This has literally been a dream come true! Sis. Lynne was an orphaned child from New Brunswick, Canada, that the Lord has used to provide a place of healing to every child that steps through the doors of HOME. Colleen Carter Colleen Carter was on the Associate In Missions program for eight years to Ghana, West Africa, with the Jim Poitras and Nick Sisco families. As an AIMer, Colleen helped with MK schooling, taught at ACTS Ghana, operated the Pass the Word printing office, was involved in Reaching Africa's Children while assisting the missionaries in many other ways. She received her intermediate missionary appointment to Ghana in September 2007. After deputation and upon arrival in 2010, she continued the aforementioned tasks. In 2012 she moved to the north where she resided in Tamale for almost six years. She assisted with the growth of the church primarily throughout the three northern regions while working to further growth throughout the nation as a whole. Colleen taught at the extension Bible school in Tamale, coordinated the Pass the Word printing office, and was involved in training adults and children throughout the northern regions. She served as the northern regional Children's Ministry director and the northern regional ACTS representative. In June 2014 she received her Bachelor of Arts in Religious Education through distance education with Global University, Springfield, MO. At the beginning of her second term in 2015, Colleen upgraded to career missionary. She continued with the aforementioned tasks and also ministered at the female prison in Tamale. In November 2017, she relocated back to the capital city of Accra. She continues to fulfill her numerous duties while teaching again at ACTS Ghana. She is the Bible Quizzing Coordinator for the nation, and also serves as the West Africa Sub-regional missions secretary/treasurer and the Africa Aflame literature coordinator. In September 2018, Regional Teaching Ministry was added to Colleen's appointment. And in 2019 her field was changed to Gabon. Her profound love for teaching God's Word is now spanning nations of the Africa region. Colleen Carter is originally from New Brunswick, Canada. To Support Either Missionary go here: https://app.mobilecause.com/form/EEdpTQ?vid=mfefl Connect with Us: https://flow.page/thecrossrds Streaming License # CCLI: CSPL043706

Radio Cachimbona
US' Obsession With Central America

Radio Cachimbona

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 95:45


On this episode, Yvette and fellow Salvi lawtina Yessenia Medrano discuss Farabundo Martí's biography "Farabundo Martí : Rebelión En El Patio Trasero." They discuss the devolution of the FMLN from guerilla resistance group to corrupt political party, celebrate the revitalization of government obscured Salvadoran history and note the larger failings of the Central American left in incorporating indigenous issues into their platforms and goals. To support Radio Cachimbona, become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/radiocachimbona?fan_landing=true Continue the conversation with me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook: @radiocachmimbona

American Diplomat
Nicaragua, Nicaragüita

American Diplomat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:54


"Never, ever allow free and fair elections" is Fidel's advice to Daniel Ortega, today's strongman leader of Nicaragua. Bob Callahan describes today's authoritarian regime in this Central American nation.

Bean to Barstool
Chocolate and Witch Trials with Megan Giller (Ep. 28)

Bean to Barstool

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:02


“Chocolate acted as a central vehicle of women's ritual power, and was a flashpoint for women's disorderly behavior in public settings.” - Martha Few in her article “Chocolate, Sex, and Disorderly Women in Late 17th and Early 18th Century Guatemala” as quoted by Megan GillerChocolate is a plant-based food or drink in which the main ingredient—the seed of a tropical tree—is ground and melted and mixed into something wholly new. Sometimes spices or botanicals are added, and in the past this was all done by hand. This sounds almost like making a potion, right? That's certainly what some folks in 17th and 18th century Mexico and Central America thought. It turns out many women were prosecuted at that time for reportedly casting spells with chocolate or outright poisoning people with chocolate potions.In the last episode, we spoke with Dr. Christina Wade about the connections between Medieval alewives—female brewers who made part or all of their living brewing and selling unhopped beer known at the time as ale—and our modern depictions of fairy tale witches with cauldrons, cats, broomsticks, and pointy hats.In this episode we'll talk with Megan Giller, a chocolate writer and educator. Megan will tell the story of women in 17th and 18th century Mexico and other Central American countries who were accused of using chocolate in their witchcraft. Grab yourself some tasty bean to bar chocolate and follow along for this spellbinding tale.This episode was inspired by Megan article “Poison Your Lover with Chocolate and Other Advice from 17th Century Witches” in issue three of Cacao Magazine. Also referenced in this episode is Martha Few's article “Chocolate, Sex, and Disorderly Women in Late 17th and Early 18th Century Guatemala” in the journal Ethnohistory Volume 52, Issue 4 in fall 2005.The beers referenced in this episode were Fibonacci Brewing Pepo Pumpkin Porter and Hulu Fresh Hop Ale. The chocolate mentioned in this episode was from Cultura Chocolate.The music for this episode was sampled from an instrumental version of the song “200 Miles” written and performed by indie folk musician Anna ps from her 2016 album Umbrella. You can find out more about Anna at her website.Megan Giller is a chocolate journalist and educator living in Brooklyn. Her food writing has appeared in The New York Times, Food & Wine, and numerous other publications, and her website Chocolate Noise was a 2016 Saveur Food Blog Awards finalist. Her book Bean to Bar Chocolate: America's Craft Chocolate Revolution was published in 2017.

The Feedfeed
What's For Dinner? @artisanbryan joins the show to talk about his Honduran roots and his affinity for sourdough bread!

The Feedfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 46:28


In this episode, Feedfeed Food Editor Alexa Santos virtually sits down to dinner with Bryan Ford AKA @artisanbryan on social media. Bryan is a Central American master baker, best-selling cookbook author, and TV host. He is one of the leading resources for sourdough recipes, and his cookbook was one of the major forces responsible for the sourdough baking trend last year. He's known for pulling inspiration from his Honduran heritage and New Orleans upbringing.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support The Feedfeed by becoming a member!The Feedfeed is Powered by Simplecast.

KQED’s Forum
System Challenges Ever Present for Central American Asylum Seekers

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 20:56


In the latest installment of Forum's series on asylum seeking in the U.S., we'll take a look at what challenges Central American refugee communities in the Bay Area face. Many struggle to have their cases and stories heard. We'll also check in on the Central American Minors initiative allowing Central American migrant children to enter the country legally, which the Biden administration revived earlier this month. Community advocates Esmeralda Mendoza of East Bay Sanctuary Covenant and Vanessa Velasco of CARECEN SF join us.

Night-Light Radio
Ancient Mexico-Georgia Connections with Richard Thornton - host Mark Eddy

Night-Light Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 119:14


Architect and city planner RICHARD THORNTON returns to discuss his latest publication "Native American Encyclopedia of Georgia."  We will be examining thousands of years of ancient engineering feats (Kolomoki Mounds), biographies of chiefs (Osceola), and the evolution of Native languages.  Many root words have connections to Central American words.  We will look at Old World words and rituals that appear in Native customs.  Why was Georgia an international destination?  We will also discuss de Soto's observations of his travels throughout the South.  Richard's book contains many computer graphics that depict the layouts of the villages.  This is American history we were not taught.https://www.lulu.com/en/us/shop/richard-thornton/native-american-encyclopedia-of-georgia/paperback/product-njg8dd.html?page=1&pageSize=4

Marketplace All-in-One
The “dysfunctional” US refugee system

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 24:52


The U.S. in the middle of resettling tens of thousands of Afghan citizens around the country. At the same time, it’s turning away Haitians and Central Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border. What gives? “The reasons why they may be migrating are very similar, in terms of fleeing persecution, war, violence; the difference is where they seek that legal relief,” said Krish O'Mara Vignarajah, the president and CEO of Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, a nonprofit organization that’s helped resettle refugees for decades. On the show today, we’ll dig into the U.S. refugee system, how it got to be this way and how we can rebuild a system that is more just. We’ll also talk about a major victory for garment workers in California and what that might mean for their counterparts nationwide. Plus, we’ll get an update on the debt troubles of China’s Evergrande and hear from listeners about their parent-child “Make Me Smart” listening teams. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain why Costco hot dogs are so cheap, the fight over Apple’s app store and the economic consequences of hurricanes. Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Afghan refugees and Haitians at the Texas border: Who’s worthy of US protection?” from Vox “The Biden administration will raise the cap on refugee admissions to 125,000” from The New York Times “The evacuation of Afghan refugees is over. Now what?” from The Brookings Institution “California Ends ‘Piece Rate’ Work For Garment Workers, Guaranteeing Minimum Hourly Wage” from HuffPost “Garment Workers, Paid Per Piece, Say They’ll Keep Fighting to Change System” from NBC News “Evergrande Bondholders Mull Next Steps in Wake of Missed Payment” from The Wall Street Journal  “Yellen tells Congress that U.S. will run out of debt ceiling flexibility on Oct. 18”  from The Washington Post

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The “dysfunctional” US refugee system

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 24:52


The U.S. in the middle of resettling tens of thousands of Afghan citizens around the country. At the same time, it’s turning away Haitians and Central Americans at the U.S.-Mexico border. What gives? “The reasons why they may be migrating are very similar, in terms of fleeing persecution, war, violence; the difference is where they seek that legal relief,” said Krish O'Mara Vignarajah, the president and CEO of Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, a nonprofit organization that’s helped resettle refugees for decades. On the show today, we’ll dig into the U.S. refugee system, how it got to be this way and how we can rebuild a system that is more just. We’ll also talk about a major victory for garment workers in California and what that might mean for their counterparts nationwide. Plus, we’ll get an update on the debt troubles of China’s Evergrande and hear from listeners about their parent-child “Make Me Smart” listening teams. When you're done listening, tell your Echo device to “make me smart” for our daily explainers. This week we'll explain why Costco hot dogs are so cheap, the fight over Apple’s app store and the economic consequences of hurricanes. Also, don't forget to subscribe to our newsletter! You can find the latest issue here. Here’s everything we talked about today: “Afghan refugees and Haitians at the Texas border: Who’s worthy of US protection?” from Vox “The Biden administration will raise the cap on refugee admissions to 125,000” from The New York Times “The evacuation of Afghan refugees is over. Now what?” from The Brookings Institution “California Ends ‘Piece Rate’ Work For Garment Workers, Guaranteeing Minimum Hourly Wage” from HuffPost “Garment Workers, Paid Per Piece, Say They’ll Keep Fighting to Change System” from NBC News “Evergrande Bondholders Mull Next Steps in Wake of Missed Payment” from The Wall Street Journal  “Yellen tells Congress that U.S. will run out of debt ceiling flexibility on Oct. 18”  from The Washington Post

Origin Compass
Coffee Talks • Coffee: A Conduct to Connect With Your Heritage

Origin Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 34:28


Amaris is the Director of Roasting for Joe Coffee Company. She is also the founder of The Women in Coffee Project, a project that sheds light on equity and women in coffee as well as focusing on the complex and challenging world of coffee. Her coffee career and path have been uniquely influenced by her Central American roots and heritage, especially thanks to her direct ties to Nicaragua. She has applied her academic degree in English literature, her training, and years of experience in the science of roasting, quality control, and comprehensive knowledge of sourcing specialty green coffee around the world.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: Thousands Of More Migrants Look To Enter The United States From Mexico

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 12:47


Before migrants entered the United States through Del Rio, Texas, they came into Mexico via its southern border city of Tapachula. Tapachula, a city bordering Guatemala, has long been a weigh station for Central American migrants and now has tens of thousands of migrants wanting to reach the United States with an estimated half of them being from Haiti. FOX's Eben Brown speaks to FOX's Griff Jenkins, in Tapachula, Mexico, where he has spoken to migrants trying to make the nearly thousand mile trek to the United States.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Evening Edition: Thousands Of More Migrants Look To Enter The United States From Mexico

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 12:47


Before migrants entered the United States through Del Rio, Texas, they came into Mexico via its southern border city of Tapachula. Tapachula, a city bordering Guatemala, has long been a weigh station for Central American migrants and now has tens of thousands of migrants wanting to reach the United States with an estimated half of them being from Haiti. FOX's Eben Brown speaks to FOX's Griff Jenkins, in Tapachula, Mexico, where he has spoken to migrants trying to make the nearly thousand mile trek to the United States.

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition
Evening Edition: Thousands Of More Migrants Look To Enter The United States From Mexico

Fox News Rundown Evening Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 12:47


Before migrants entered the United States through Del Rio, Texas, they came into Mexico via its southern border city of Tapachula. Tapachula, a city bordering Guatemala, has long been a weigh station for Central American migrants and now has tens of thousands of migrants wanting to reach the United States with an estimated half of them being from Haiti. FOX's Eben Brown speaks to FOX's Griff Jenkins, in Tapachula, Mexico, where he has spoken to migrants trying to make the nearly thousand mile trek to the United States.

KQED’s Forum
The History and Evolution of U.S. Asylum Decisions

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 55:30


Images of border patrol agents on horses forcibly beating back Haitian asylum seekers at the Mexican border have been igniting outrage. It's just the latest refugee crisis that critics say the U.S. has handled poorly. This week on Forum we'll talk with members of the Bay Area's Haitian, Afghan, and Central American communities to discuss conditions in their countries and the struggle to gain refugee status. First, to launch the series, we look at the origins of international asylum policy, which was established after the US rejected Jews fleeing the Holocaust. We'll discuss how the U.S asylum rules have morphed over the decades and how we've made decisions about who should be let in and why.

The Be More Today Show
EP 75: "Inch By Inch" featuring Track and Field Olympian Samyr Laine, Esq.

The Be More Today Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 53:27


As a track and field athlete representing Haiti in international competitions for nearly a decade, Samyr Laine was not only among the very best athletes that Haiti has ever seen, he was very easily among the best in the world in his discipline: the triple jump. He is Haiti's national record holder with a jump of 17.39 meters (just over 57 feet), won multiple medals for Haiti at various international competitions (one bronze and one gold at the Central American and Caribbean Games as well as a silver at the Pan American Sports Festival to name a few) and represented Haiti at 3 Pan American Games, 7 World Indoor or Outdoor Championships and 1 Olympic Games. Many times, Samyr was the lone Haitian athlete to qualify for those global championships but he didn't merely attend, he qualified for the finals at the 2012 Olympic Games and the 2013 World Championships, finishing 11th at both global competitions. On several occasions he finished in the top 10 on the world ranking list of top triple jump distances in a particular year, and year in and year out he was a staple on the IAAF Diamond League circuit, which is the top competitive circuit in the sport. Before representing Haiti, Samyr was an NCAA All-American in college, and held the Ivy League conference record for a time; he still holds the Harvard University school record in the triple jump to this day. Aside from his athletic accomplishments, Samyr earned degrees from the aforementioned Harvard University, as well as a master's degree from The University of Texas and a law degree from Georgetown University; the latter of which he earned while traveling the world, competing as a professional athlete and representing Haiti. He is a member of the New York State Bar and is currently the Senior Vice President of Operations and Strategy at Westbrook Inc. where he heads up the company's Good Goods division and oversees all consumer brand incubation, and licensing. Prior to joining Westbrook Inc., Samyr was the Senior Director of Operations for Roc Nation. There, he spearheaded the operations for key growth initiatives for Roc and some of its affiliated companies, launched their new literary division as a partnership with Penguin Random House ,and managed several notable multi-platinum recording artists. Before Roc Nation, Samyr was the Director of Player Relations and Competition for Major League Soccer. He is a published author and also spent several years as an adjunct professor at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. More important than anything mentioned already is Samyr's work as a member of the board of directors of l'Ecole de Choix (a school in Mirebalais, Haiti), and formerly as an advisory board member of the Business of Sports School (a Career and Technical Education school in Manhattan). Beyond that, he works with a number of organizations in and related to Haiti and hopes to have a lasting impact on the lives of children there, particularly through sport and education; although he frequently works with high schools and mentors student-athletes here in the U.S. as well. Follow his story on IG @iamsamyrlaine. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bemoretoday/support

Global Security
Unaccompanied minors are among the thousands evacuated from Afghanistan

Global Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021


There were hugs, smiles and a tight embrace at Toronto airport earlier this month as a 3-year-old Afghan boy reunited with his father.The boy, who was not named because he is a minor, was separated from his family on Aug. 26, when there was a suicide attack at the Kabul airport in Afghanistan.He was put on a plane out of the country and spent two weeks at an orphanage in Qatar, according to Qatari and Canadian media reports. Officials with the UN as well as the Qatari government helped reach his family in Canada, and he was able to reunite with them.Related: 'We are still here': Afghan UN employees worry about their safetyBut this boy is lucky.In the chaos of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan and the mass evacuation from Kabul, a number of unaccompanied minors ended up on flights out of the country. Now comes the difficult task of reuniting them with their families or, for those who don't have any relatives, helping them find new homes.Right now, there are at least 300 Afghan children who were separated from their families during the evacuation, according to Wendy Young, president of Kids in Need of Defense, an organization that provides support for unaccompanied minors.“We know of children whose parents were killed in the process, and we know of children who were separated and placed on a different flight than their parent or their guardian and the child is in one country and the parents in another.” Wendy Young, Kids in Need of Defense, president“We know of children whose parents were killed in the process, and we know of children who were separated and placed on a different flight than their parent or their guardian and the child is in one country and the parents in another,” she said.Related: Minerals, drugs and China: How the Taliban might finance their new Afghan governmentYoung said that has spurred a global effort to help reunite Afghan children separated from their parents and also find housing for unaccompanied minors — children who evacuated with a friend or relative and also some who are orphans. The US State Department and the Department of Health and Human Services didn't respond to questions from The World about which countries unaccompanied Afghan minors have been relocated to, but earlier this month, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken visited some of them at Ramstein Air Base in Germany.Some unaccompanied Afghan minors have started arriving in the US. This week, about 75 unaccompanied minors arrived in Chicago, according to city and federal officials, the Chicago Sun Times reported.Others are staying at the Fort Bliss military base in El Paso, Texas, where Barbara Ammirati, deputy director for child protection in emergencies with Save the Children, has been part of the team offering support.Ammirati said that when the children arrive and it is determined they are unaccompanied, they are immediately separated from the general population at the base and placed in shelters.“It's a very temporary accommodation,” she said. “It's a small home — one room — and we've set it up. ... it looks like a bedroom with a welcoming living space.”No more than two minors, she said, stay in these facilities at a time and most of the minors she has worked with are between 15 and 17.Ammirati said these Afghan kids have been through a traumatic experience, but they are ready to start their new lives in the US.Related: Afghan women sidelined under new Taliban rule: ‘This country places no value on me as a woman'“They are happy to be in the United States. The first questions are, ‘Can I go to school, if I go here, will I go to school?' A university student is desperate to get back to classes,” she said.Need for a more permanent statusYoung, from Kids in Need of Defense, said she is concerned about the children's immigration status because Afghan children fall into a unique category.“They've been evacuated but they haven't been processed and vetted as the rigorous and, frankly, bureaucratic and lengthy process that normally happens through refugee resettlement,” she said. “They haven't spontaneously arrived here, so this is why they're in parole status.” (An individual who is ineligible to enter the US as a refugee, immigrant or nonimmigrant may be "paroled" into the US by the Secretary of Homeland Security.)Related: The Taliban want international recognition. Countries are debating.That means they face a lot of uncertainty. Earlier this month, Young's organization published a set of guidelines to protect Afghan children arriving in the US.Meanwhile, people from Afghan communities in the US have been springing into action. For example, the Afghan American Foundation recently hosted a Zoom session to explain what becoming a foster parent entails.Nadia Hashimi, a pediatrician and writer, started off the conversation.“For these children, this may be an event in their lives that stays very fresh. I think trauma does that. Trauma has a very deep footprint on the soul and so the easier, and the more comforted we can have these children feel in this moment and this process, the better it is.”Nadia Hashimi, pediatrician and writer“For these children, this may be an event in their lives that stays very fresh,” she said. “I think trauma does that. Trauma has a very deep footprint on the soul and so the easier, and the more comforted we can have these children feel in this moment and this process, the better it is.”About 800 people across the country were on the call, Hashimi said.Unaccompanied children arriving in the US is nothing new.Young said in recent years, the official US response has been more about law enforcement than child protection. In the case of these Afghan children, she said, the approach is still a work in progress.“What I hope happens is that we'll look back at it and figure out what lessons learned there are because what we see whether you're looking at the Central American situation or the Afghan situation is that these kids need our help,” she said. “And we owe it to them to have a system in place that kicks in rapidly and ensures that they get everything that they need including family reunification where appropriate.”

Ethical Schools
Malign neglect: School systems fail immigrant students

Ethical Schools

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 27:30


We welcome back Stephanie Carnes, a school social worker who has worked extensively with Central American immigrant students and their families. School systems are designed for homogenous student populations, rather than the diverse reality. Despite new immigrants' high motivation levels, they often fail for lack of support. School social workers could help design asset-based programs but often aren't given a seat at the table.

LA Soccer Hub
LA Galaxy Celebrate Central American Heritage Night

LA Soccer Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 16:15


The LA Galaxy celebrated Central America Night and were there to get fans reactions of their thoughts on what this day means to them and more. https://twitter.com/GioGarciaLA https://twitter.com/LASoccerHub https://www.instagram.com/lasoccerhub/

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
Biden shut a migrant camp. Then this bigger one appeared

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 19:55


Right now, migrant camps are popping up on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. They're filled with people who escaped dire circumstances in their home countries and seek a chance at officially living in the United States. But the Biden administration is telling these people, much like in the Trump years: Better luck next time.Today, we launch the first in a two-part series on these camps. We start in Reynosa, Mexico, where about 2,000 Central Americans wait for their U.S. amnesty cases to be heard. Later this week, we'll head to Del Rio, Texas, where more than 16,000 Haitians have gathered — and are currently getting deported. L.A. Times Houston bureau chief Molly Hennessy-Fiske explains the situation. More reading:Biden vowed to close a border migrant camp, then a worse one emerged under his watchSupreme Court rules Biden may not end Trump's ‘Remain in Mexico' policyWhat's next for the ‘Remain in Mexico' immigration policy?

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL
Shooting at Bronx party celebrating Central American independence leaves one dead, 3 injured

1010 WINS ALL LOCAL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 5:20


All Local Morning 9-19-21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Go Full Crypto
76: Social Implications of Bitcoin with Katerina Dikaios

Go Full Crypto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 73:09


Our friend Katerina Dikaios joins us to talk about the social implications of Bitcoin. Katerina holds a masters in psychology from Dalhousie University and has close ties to Central American countries such as Guatemala. In this episode, we talk about Katerina's story for entering the world of crypto, we contextualize the usefulness of Bitcoin in addressing the problems faced by El Salvadorans in light of the legalization of bitcoin, we explore whether or not bitcoin is actually helping change things, or if it is a publicity and power play, and touch on what side of the political spectrum Bitcoin falls in.   Timestamps: (00:00) - Introduction (03:25) - Katerina's journey in pursuit of financial literacy (08:11) - Talking about Katerina's crypto journey (15:27) - Katerina's central American experience, and how Bitcoin Beach resonated with her (22:54) - Would a Bitcoin based economy work in a place like Guatemala?  (33:23) - Politics, religion, and culture in Central America (50:30) - Bitcoin, where it stands on the political spectrum, and trust in the government (1:08:58) - Does Katerina see herself Going Full Crypto? And Closing Thoughts   Katerina Dikaios Social Links Katerina Twitter Katerina LinkedIn Go Full Crypto Social Links Keegan Francis Newsletter GoFullCrypto.com MrugaksheePalwe.com keeganfrancis.com Keegan Twitter Mrugakshee Instagram   Edited and Mixed by Kaushik Sethunath. Visit the Go Full Crypto website at: https://www.gofullcrypto.com  

The Holden Village Podcast
Faith-Based Accompaniment and Solidarity with Michael Ramos

The Holden Village Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 12:59


Michael Ramos came to the Pacific Northwest 37 years ago as a Jesuit Volunteer to work with people on the streets at a day drop-in center in Tacoma. He proceeded to work with housed and un-housed Central American refugees in Seattle. He has continued bringing a faith lens to working alongside people and communities experiencing marginalization for most of the last three decades, and was involved in the formation of the Interfaith Movement for Human Integrity. He currently serves as Executive Director of the Church Council of Greater Seattle. In this capacity, he has been engaged in direct service, education, advocacy, and organizing efforts for living wages, with people experiencing homelessness and alongside recent immigrants.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Ancient Civ: Central America with Dr. David S. Anderson - Ruins 73

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 65:13


On this episode of A Life In Ruins Podcast, we are joined by an early A Life in Ruins guest, Dr. David S. Anderson, to talk about the Origins of early states in Mesoamerica. Dr. Anderson first appeared on our show in episode 11 to talk about pseudoscience in archaeology, and we are excited to have him back on the show to discuss with us the real perpetrators of Central American megalithic structures and ceremonial centers. Dr. Anderson enlightens us about theories surrounding the emergence of complex civilization in Central America and then we delve into the Olmec and other Preclassic civilizations. We then get our minds blown about the size/scope of the El Tigre Pyramid and discuss some other Late Preclassic Maya sites. Dr. Anderson then teaches us about all things Maya. Literature Recommendations Olmec Archaeology and Early Mesoamerica by Christopher Pool The First Maya Civilization: Ritual and Power Before the Classic Period by Francisco Estrada-Belli Discovering the Olmecs: An Unconventional History by David C. Grove Contact for Guest Dr. Anderson's Twitter: @DSAArchaeology Dr. Anderson's Instagram: @DSAArchaeology Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Ruins on APN: https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/ruins Store: https://www.redbubble.com/people/alifeinruins/shop ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

TechTimeRadio
Bitcoin now is the legal tender in a Central American Country. Amazon pays for college for its workers, and Facebook is in the wearable space. Then, we have "Bad Big Brother", Gadgets and Gear" and listeners phone calls. Air Date: 9/11-9/17

TechTimeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 112:41


This week on the show, El Salvador makes Bitcoin its legal tender; we cover what happened on day one of this change. Next, Facebook to release its wearable tech in partnership with Ray-Ban called "Stories." Then, Amazon to pay full college tuition for workers; what is the fine print. Following that, we have our [Gadgets and Gear] segment with TechTime's producers, Gwen Way. Next, we have the phones lines open for our third segment as we will take callers Technology questions on the air. Finally, we have "Mike's Mesmerizing Moment" brought to us by StoriCoffee® along with our NFT and Whiskey Tastings, all of this on the first hour of the show."Welcome to TechTime with Nathan Mumm, the show that makes you go "Hummmm" technology news of the week for September 11th - 17th, 2021. The technology show for the everyday common person, that will impact your future with insightful segments, weeks ahead of the mainstream media."Episode 64: Hour 1--- [Loaded Question Of The Day]: Starts at 9:57--- [Top Stories in 5 Minutes]: Starts at 11:06El Salvador makes Bitcoin its legal tender -  https://tinyurl.com/2wdrm7r4 Hey Facebook, take a photo: Facebook wades into a privacy minefield as it focuses more on wearables -  https://tinyurl.com/ppm2daf4 Amazon will pay full college tuition for some warehouse workers -  https://tinyurl.com/ywmu6fnz--- [Gadgets and Gear]: Starts at 23:00Gwen Way brings us a unique book for children that is influenced by coding basics. --- [Call In]: Question for Mike and Nathan: Starts at 37:50Question: Kimberly asks about Technical College Advice for students returning to school.Question: Anthony asks what happens if your Windows 10 Drive fills up and is not able to boot.Question: Lisa ask why helpdesk or support calls always ask you to reboot.--- [Mike's Mesmerizing Moment brought to us by StoriCoffee®]: Starts at 50:51--- [Pick of the Day]: Starts at 52:35 Old Camp American Blended Whiskey | 80 Proof | $19.00Nathan: Thumbs Up | Mike: Thumbs Down Episode 64: Hour 2 - Starts at 1:02:16 On the Second Hour, we have our [Letters] segment. We have a loyal "Tech-Timer," a dedicated listener joining us on the air in the studio. Why do you ask? This listener has mapped out all our likes and dislikes over the past year of whiskey tastings, and he believes he has the perfect whiskey for Mike and Myself after listening to all our reviews. Is he correct, or is his data a bit skewed? We will find out live if he has broken the code to our whiskey palate. Our feature is focused on [Bad Big Brother] as we look at people and agencies collecting data without our permission. --- [Love Shack Question]: Starts at 1:05:49--- [Letters]: Starts at 1:09:06Mike and Nathan read this week's emails on scams, phishing attempts, and scammers.--- [Pick of the Day]: Starts at 1:21:37We have a loyal "Tech-Timer," a dedicated listener joining us on the air in the studio and he believes he has the perfect whiskey for Mike and Nathan after listening to our reviews. Is he correct, or is his data a bit skewed? We will find out live if he has broken the code to our whiskey palate.--- [Bad Big Brother]: Starts at 1:41:23"Revealed: LAPD officers told to collect social media data on every civilian they stop, per an internal police chief memo.--- [Call In]: Question for Mike and Nathan Starts at 1:47:35 Question: What Can I do if my windows 10 keeps asking me to update my pc but never does it.

UNEWS, Top stories for U.S. Latinos in English
Friday, September 10th, 2021

UNEWS, Top stories for U.S. Latinos in English

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 30:51


Final preparations are underway to mark 20 years since the September 11th terror attacks that changed the nation; Pres. Biden ordered sweeping new federal vaccine requirements for as many as 100 million Americans; Mexican authorities continue to violently crackdown on Central American and Haitian migrants trying to reach the US/Mexico border seeking asylum; and today is the last episode of Unews the broadcast and podcast, stay tuned for an exciting announcement. Thank you for following!

The Bull & The Bear
Bitcoin to $1M by 2025? Little-Known Indicator Predicts Crypto Price

The Bull & The Bear

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 8:48


Green Zone Fortunes co-editor Charles Sizemore and I had a https://moneyandmarkets.com/el-salvador-bitcoin-experiment-future-of-crypto (robust conversation) about El Salvador bringing bitcoin in as a legal tender this week. The Central American nation became the first country to adopt the cryptocurrency as an accepted form of payment for goods and services. I asked Charles what he thought this would do to the price of bitcoin. (It was around $53,000 the day before El Salvador made bitcoin legal tender.) Neither of us expected a 17% sell-off. Smart https://moneyandmarkets.com/5-steps-investing-for-beginners/ (investors) are always trying to figure out the future price movement of their investments. For stocks, there are a lot of technical indicators that can give you a glimpse, but nothing is ever certain. In the world of cryptocurrency, it's an even bigger animal because crypto is decentralized, and its price is based on supply and demand as well as the cost to mine. Plus, it's very volatile. (I'll get to that in a minute). But one technical indicator has shown some accuracy in predicting the future price movement of bitcoin. In this episode of The Bull & The Bear, I'll tell you about this cryptocurrency price model, how it works, and what it tells me about the future price of the world's most popular digital currency. Be sure to also subscribe to our https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt9RDMMAOPBAIWODmDGactQ?sub_confirmation=1 (YouTube channel) for more videos like my weekly Marijuana Market Update. Have something you want us to talk about? Email thebullandthebear@moneyandmarkets.com and give us your thoughts. Check out https://moneyandmarkets.com/ (moneyandmarkets.com), and sign up for our free newsletters that deliver you the most important and unbiased financial news, commentary, and actionable advice. Also, follow us on: https://www.facebook.com/moneyandmarkets (Facebook) https://twitter.com/TheMoneyMarkets (Twitter) https://www.linkedin.com/company/money-and-markets (LinkedIn)

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics
‘Friendshoring' in the Caribbean [S4, E16]

Altamar - Navigating the High Seas of Global Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 30:52


Since the early 2000s, most US and European companies have cut significant costs by moving manufacturing operations to China and Southeast Asia. Because of COVID disrupted supply chains, growing tensions and trade disputes between China and Western nations, and backlash over China's dismal human rights records, companies are seeking diversity. As CEOs are rethinking their supply chain strategies and looking to new areas, the Caribbean and Central American regions are positioning themselves as attractive, close-to-the-US global manufacturers. Will this new practice be a fad or a long-term solution? Altamar hosts Peter Schechter and Muni Jensen are joined by Roberto Álvarez, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Dominican Republic, to explain this new concept of “nearshoring.” Altamar's ‘Téa's Take' by Téa Ivanovic discusses how governments must do more to prepare their young population for nearshoring.

Viewsroom
Viewsroom: Bitcoin, El Salvador and Roger Federer

Viewsroom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 17:12


As the Central American country adopts the cryptocurrency as a coin of the realm, Richard Beales and Gina Chon discuss the merits of stablecoins and the scramble by regulators to catch up with the market. Karen Kwok takes a slice at Roger Federer-backed running shoe outfit On. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Invest Like a Boss
191: Costa Rican Tourism Bonds with Richard Bexon

Invest Like a Boss

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 49:02


Johnny interviews Richard Bexon from Costa Rica Tourism Bonds to find out about this investment in the Central American country which not only allows you to earn a return on your money, but also provides accommodations and the chance at Costa Rican residency. Richard has lived in Costa Rica since 2004. He's the co-owner of Central America's largest luxury travel agency and has vast experience in real estate investments, both commercial and private. Sam hops on with Johnny before and after the interview to talk about this investment.   About Costa Rica Tourism Bonds:  It goes without saying that a company offering investments has a strong focus on financial returns, but it doesn't end there. Costa Rica Tourism Bonds places a high value on lifestyle, responsibility, and sustainability. This means we only work with properties that hold these values in equally high regard.    We started Costa Rica Tourism Bonds as we saw strong demand for an investment vehicle that both generated returns and provided a lifestyle benefit, whereby investors could enjoy the fruits of their investment by enjoying luxury vacations in the properties they invested in.  Where better to invest in than one of the most beautiful and biodiverse places on the planet, Costa Rica.   This is coupled with the eagerness of tourism properties in Costa Rica to diversify their investor base and share the benefits of investing in one of the world's most vibrant travel destinations with international bondholders.    It's a match made in heaven for investors that value a lifestyle investment that can be enjoyed by themselves and their family.   Richard has lived in Costa Rica since 2004. He's the co-owner of Central America's largest luxury travel agency and has vast experience in real estate investments, both commercial and private. Listen to ILAB 191 on iTunes here or subscribe on your favorite podcast app. Where we are: Johnny FD – Ukraine / IG @johnnyfdj Sam Marks – Barcelona/ IG @imsammarks Derek Spartz - Venice Beach / IG @DerekRadio Sponsor: IndeedReceive a free $75 sponsored job credit to boost your job post at Indeed.com/ILAB Support Invest Like a Boss: Join our Patreon Discussed: Costa Rica Tourism Bonds Like these investments? Try them with these special ILAB links: ArtofFX – Start with just a $10,000 account (reduced from $25,000) Fundrise – Start with only $1,000 into their REIT funds (non-accredited investors OK) Betterment – Get up to 1 year managed free Wealthfront – Get your first $15,000 managed free PeerStreet – Get a 1% yield bump on your first loan *Johnny and Sam use all of the above services personally. Time Stamps: 10:24 – How did you get into tourism and bonds? 12:08 – What are some of the reasons you like living in Costa Rica? 13:05 – How did the Tourism Bond Programme start? 16:23 – How do the projects work with the investments? 17:33 – What kind of returns can an investor expect? 19:52 – What is the minimum and at what point can someone get a week at one of the hotels? 20:40 – What is the process for obtaining residency? 23:53  – Can you give an example of what is available right now and what are the benefits? 25:04 – Are there any blackout dates and or additional taxes when you stay at a hotel you have invested in? 29:20 – Who can invest, and from what countries, and do you need to be an accredited investor? 30:16 – What are the benefits of having residency for someone who isn't looking to live in Costa Rica? 32:04 – How do you get paid from the investment? 36:01 – Sam and Johnny review If you enjoyed this episode, do us a favor and share it! Also if you haven't already, please take a minute to leave us a 5-star review on iTunes and claim your bonus here!  Copyright 2021. All rights reserved. Read our disclaimer here.