Podcasts about national women

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Latest podcast episodes about national women

Smart Talk
Women entrepreneurs are facing challenges, here's how they can overcome them

Smart Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 22:37


Saturday kicks off National Women's Small Business Month. Women – specifically women of color – have powered the post-pandemic small business boom. Women entrepreneurs nearly doubled in number from 2019 to 2021, according to gusto. 32 percent of small businesses are owned by women and nearly one in five Black women are in the process of running or starting a business. According to Guidant Financial and the Small Business Trends Alliance, there have been more female small businesses owners in the past few years than at any other point in American history. But many women become entrepreneurs out of necessity to accommodate family needs and face obstacles that make it difficult for their business to survive and thrive. Careoheena Martinez, CEO of CAMEO, Adriana Eey-reece, Vice President of Partnerships at Accion Opportunity Fund, and Jennie Groff, Member of Business for a Fair Minimum Wage join us to provide some insight on the obstacles women entrepreneurs face and resources to help them succeed.Support WITF: https://www.witf.org/support/give-now/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Needs No Introduction
Migrant workers and 'the pandemic paradox': The unseen hands that truly keep us afloat

Needs No Introduction

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 61:32


In the second episode of the Courage My Friends podcast, Series III, Jhoey Dulaca (caregiver and organizer with the Migrant Workers' Alliance for Change), Ethel Tungohan (Canada Research Chair in Canadian Migration Policy, Impacts and Activism) and Chris Ramsaroop (activist and organizer with Justicia for Migrant Workers) discuss temporary foreign workers in Canada, the multiple and barriers they face and the struggle for recognition, rights and belonging.  Speaking to the situation facing foreign migrant workers, Dulaca says, “In the beginning it was a dream. It's not what happens in reality. The promise of Canada is when you get in, you are allowed to apply for permanent residence. That's the selling point, why I came here… They allow you to come here, but they won't allow you to have permanent status. And with permanent status, you are exercising your rights.”  Dulaca continued: “A lot of these people are tied to their employers. When I was working as a caregiver, I was tied to my employer and I couldn't do anything. If I was being abused, I couldn't just go and  look for [other] work. Just like the farm workers, they're tied to their employers and the system is made for them to shut up. First and foremost migrants come here to support their family. ..That's what makes it hard for workers to stand up for their rights.”  As Tungohan says, the situation facing these workers is structured into the system itself: “The thing about Canada that I find very perplexing is that it's always been constructed as a liberal immigrant receiving state. And  to a certain extent that's true, but only for certain groups of people. So the easiest way to think about Canadian immigration policies is that there's citizen-track immigration and non-citizen- track immigration. And I would argue that temporary labor migrants tend to fall [in] the latter group.” On speaking to the need for organized resistance, Ramsaroop says: “It's about the role of power and asymmetrical power imbalances..There are no industry specific regulations. And coupled with this constant threat of deportation and permanent loss of work, this is why workers are .. working at heights without protections, being sprayed with pesticides and chemicals, working at a peace-rate system which has numerous and multiple forms of injuries on their bodies.So it is critically important to see this as structural violence .. This is an entire system that's been built to meet the needs of the employers, not thinking about the needs of workers. And this is why trying to build power across the industry and across all forms of temporary work is necessary and essential to change the power imbalance that exists.” About today's guests:  Ethel Tungohan is the Canada Research Chair in Canadian Migration Policy, Impacts and Activism, and associate professor of Politics and Social Science at York University. She has also been appointed as a Broadbent Institute fellow. Previously, she was the Grant Notley Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alberta's Department of Political Science.  Her research looks at migrant labor, specifically assessing migrant activism. Her forthcoming book, “From the Politics of Everyday Resistance to the Politics from Below,” won the 2014 National Women's Studies Association First Book Prize. Her work has been published in academic journals such as the International Feminist Journal of Politics, Politics, Groups, and Identities, and Canadian Ethnic Studies. She is also one of the editors of “Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility,” which was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2012. Dr. Tungohan specializes in socially engaged research and is actively involved in grassroots migrant organizations such as Gabriela-Ontario and Migrante-Canada. Joelyn Dulaca is a careworker organizer with Migrant Workers Alliance for a Change which is a coalition of migrant  careworkers, healthcare workers, farmworkers and international students.  A former careworker herself, who had to work away from her children to chase the Canadian dream; she had experienced the struggles of working as a live-in caregiver and is now dedicated to organize caregivers to fight for better immigration, labour laws and permanent status for all. Chris Ramsaroop is an organizer with Justicia for Migrant Workers, a grassroots activist collective that has been organizing with migrant workers for nearly 20 years and whose work is based on building long term trust and relationships with migrant workers and includes: engaging in direct actions, working with workers to resist at work, launching precedent setting legal cases, and organizing numerous collective actions.  Chris is an instructor in the Caribbean Studies Program at the University of Toronto and a clinic instructor at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. Ramsaroop is working to complete his PhD at OISE/University of Toronto. Chris is also currently assistant professor at New College, University of Toronto, Community Engaged Learning. Transcript of this episode can be accessed at georgebrown.ca/TommyDouglasInstitute.  Image: Ethel Tungohan, Jhoey Dulaca, Chris Ramsaroop / Used with Permission Music: Ang Kahora. Lynne, Bjorn. Rights Purchased Intro Voices: Ashley Booth (Podcast Announcer); Bob Luker (voice of Tommy Douglas); Kenneth Okoro, Liz Campos Rico, Tsz Wing Chau (Street Voices)  Courage My Friends Podcast Organizing Committee: Chandra Budhu, Ashley Booth, Resh Budhu.  Produced by: Resh Budhu, Tommy Douglas Institute and Breanne Doyle, rabble.ca Host: Resh Budhu

The Full Pint Podcast
Interview - Amy Crook - Firestone Walker

The Full Pint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 61:26


This week, we are joined by Amy Crook, Quality Manager at Firestone Walker Brewing. We discuss many topics including: - Meeting Amy this summer at the annual Anniversary Ale blending session. - What does Amy do at Firestone Walker? - The road leading to her role at Firestone Walker. - Amy's education. - Wine country fostering quality careers. - What a typical work week looks like? - How Firestone's growth has impacted her responsibilities. - The journey beer takes from tank to shelf and how it relates to quality. - Date codes in relation to brewery and customer expectation. - The most challenging beer to manage from a quality perspective. - How packaging tech has changed over the years. - The challenges of using adjuncts. And tons more! This episode was sponsored by Eppig Brewing in San Diego. Makers of award winning lagers and ales - Eppig's Oktoberfest Celebrations are coming up soon. Follow them on instagram [here] to learn more. This episode was also sponsored by The Bruery. It's that time of year, enrollment has begun for The Bruery 2023 Reserve Society. Visit https://thebruery.com to learn about the two versions of The Reserve Society you can join while spaces are available! Please check out these resources if you are a member of the craft beer industry and need help. National Women's Law Center - https://nwlc.org/ Department of Fair Employment and Housing - https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/ Project When - https://projectwhen.org/resources/how-to-report-workplace-harassment-incidents/

Buffalo, What’s Next?
Buffalo, What's Next?: Equal Pay for Women, Health Equity

Buffalo, What’s Next?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 60:03


Today is Black Women's National Equal Pay Day and Jasmine Tucker, research director at the National Women's Law Center will share some numbers with Dave Debo, on why such a day is necessary, the extent of the disparities, and what can be done about it. Then Jay Moran has a discussion with Stan Hudson of CAI Global and Ebony White from the Buffalo Health Equity Center

Sports Medicine Weekly
The Evaluation and Management of Concussions

Sports Medicine Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:09


Dr. Brian Cole is joined by Dr. Elizabeth Pieroth, the Director of the Concussion Program at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, to talk about the evaluation and management of concussions. Dr. Pieroth is a Board Certified Clinical Neuropsychologist and is the Head Injury/Concussion specialist for the Chicago Bears, Blackhawks, White Sox, Fire, and the National Women's Soccer League, as well as numerous colleges and high schools across the State of Illinois. Dr. Pieroth is the Co-Director of the NFL Neuropsychology Consulting Program. She is also on the Board of Directors of the Brain Injury Association of Illinois and is a member of the USA Football Heads Up Advisory Committee, the NFL Head, Neck and Spine Committee, the US Soccer Concussion Task Force and the Amateur Hockey Association of Illinois Safety Committee.

Life Is The Future
Breaking Teenage Stereotypes - S5 E2

Life Is The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 16:04


Stereotypes: generalizations based on a group in which a person belongs. (Ex: race, age, gender, income, neighborhood, etc.) This week's 8th grade hosts, Saif and Julius partner up to interview classmates Aidan, Gareth, and Tytus. The five teens take on the topic of stereotypes in middle school and in life. This is always a recurring conversation year-to-year, and for good reason. They bring up age, race, and gender norms, talking through peer pressure, drug use, older generations, and perceptions vs. reality of people with mental-emotional issues like ADHD and depression. RESOURCES: Gender Stereotypes from Teaching Tolerance Racial Stereotypes from Simply Psychology Breaking Stereotypes from National Women's Law Center How Middle School Kids Reject Stereotypes from MiddleWeb Talking About Race & Stereotypes in School from Edutopia Tune in next week as our other two hosts, Ava and Dinora, take over with a new topic and a new set of guests. Make sure to subscribe to keep up to date on our podcast episodes throughout the school year. Teaching insight, blog posts, and more from the Health Education classroom: LifeIsTheFuture.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifeisthefuture/support

MASTER COACH ONLINE
Master Coach Online Speaks with Lauren Barnes

MASTER COACH ONLINE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 51:37


Today, we speak with Lauren Barnes, Professional Player for OL Reign the in National Women's Soccer League. Barnes has been an essential part of OL Reign's backline since its inaugural season in 2013. She's represented Youth National teams, and played four years for UCLA. Check it out and let me know what you think! Give Lauren a follow on Instagram @luuuuluuu Enjoy the Pod. Take learning with you --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

LIVE! From City Lights
Defending Choice: Roe vs. Wade and the Battle to Preserve Women's Reproductive Rights

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 90:44


City Lights in conjunction with Mother Jones (https://www.motherjones.com) present "Defending Choice: Roe vs. Wade and the Battle to Preserve Women's Reproductive Rights." This event was originally broadcast via Zoom, hosted by Peter Maravelis, and moderated by Becca Andrews of Mother Jones Magazine with Jenny Brown, Dr. Katherine Brown, Joshua Prager, and Mary Ziegler. You can purchase copies of the panelists' books directly from City Lights here: "Dollars for Life: The Anti-Abortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment" - by Mary Ziegler: https://citylights.com/dollars-for-life-anti-abortion-movemen/ "Without Apology: The Abortion Struggle Now" - by Jenny Brown: https://citylights.com/praxis/without-apology-abortion-struggle-now/ "The Family Roe: An American Story" - by Joshua Prager: https://citylights.com/north-america/family-roe-amer-story/ Becca Andrews is a reporter at Mother Jones. A Southerner, she most often writes about the Southeast, gender, and culture. Before joining Mother Jones as an editorial fellow, she wrote for newspapers in Tennessee. Her work has also appeared in Slate, The New Republic, Wired, and Jezebel, among others. Her first book, "No Choice," on the dwindling access to abortion in the United States, is due out in October 2022 from Hachette's Public Affairs imprint. Jenny Brown was a leader in the fight to get the morning-after pill over the counter in the US and a plaintiff in the winning lawsuit. She is co-author of the Redstockings book "Women's Liberation and National Health Care: Confronting the Myth of America." While editor at Labor Notes magazine, she coauthored "How to Jump-Start Your Union: Lessons from the Chicago Teachers." She writes, teaches, and organizes with the feminist group National Women's Liberation and is the author of "Birth Strike: The Hidden Fight over Women's Work." Verso Books published her book "WITHOUT APOLOGY: The Abortion Struggle Now." Dr. Katherine Brown is a general obstetrician-gynecologist and is fellowship-trained in family planning at UCSF. She provides full-scope reproductive healthcare. She is a passionate advocate for reproductive health, choice, and justice. Her research focuses on exploring and improving the reproductive health experiences of Black women. Joshua Prager, a former senior writer for The Wall Street Journal, has written about historical secrets—revealing all from the hidden scheme that led to baseball's most famous moment (Bobby Thomson's “Shot Heard Round the World”) to the only-ever anonymous recipient of a Pulitzer Prize (a photographer he tracked down in Iran). His work, described by George Will as “exemplary journalistic sleuthing,” has shed new light on our cultural touchstones. So does his new book, "The Family Roe," illuminating unknown stories and people behind Roe v. Wade, and enabling the public, for the first time, to see the abortion debate in America in its full social and personal context. The book was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Mary Ziegler is the Stearns Weaver Miller Professor at Florida State University College of Law. She specializes in the legal history of reproduction, the family, sexuality, and the Constitution. In the spring of 2022, she is visiting at Harvard Law School. Her most recent book, "Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, Roe v. Wade to the Present," was published by Cambridge University Press in 2020, and received positive reviews in outlets from the Washington Post to the Christian Science Monitor. Her new book, "Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment," was published by Yale University Press in June of 2022. She also has a forthcoming book with "Routledge, Reproduction and the Constitution." Her next project, What Roe Means: A History, will be published by Yale in 2023. This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
National Women's Enterprise Day Launched

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 5:15


Research has shown that Irish women's belief in their ability to run a successful business is continuing to grow as this year's National Women's Enterprise Day (NWED) was launched today. The initiative of the Local Enterprise Offices, now in its 16th year, will take place on the 13th of October with the aim of encouraging female entrepreneurship and supporting women in business across the country. The research, part of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) for 2021, showed that 49% of women surveyed believed they had the necessary skills and knowledge to start a business. This was up from 39% in 2018. The report also highlighted that Ireland has the third highest rate for early-stage women entrepreneurs across European countries, with over 1,400 women starting a new business in Ireland every month. Early-stage women entrepreneurs in Ireland are mainly focused on the customer services sector with 64% of those surveyed working in that area. The report showed significant growth in export customers for these businesses, with 26% of customers of these early-stage startups based abroad, up from 15% in 2019 highlighting how they have diversified their markets during Covid. The theme of this year's National Women's Enterprise Day is “Our Future, Our Way” which will be reflected in the 16 physical events taking place across the country, supported by Enterprise Ireland and the Local Authorities. These events will feature a mix of well-known Irish entrepreneurs and business people such as Suzanne Jackson, founder of the SoSu Cosmetics brand, successful jockey Nina Carberry, International referee Michelle O'Neill, award-winning jewellery designer Chupi Sweetman, Interior design specialist and Home of the Year judge Suzie McAdam and broadcaster and entrepreneur Aine Kerr. Breege Cosgrave, Chair of National Women's Enterprise Day 2022, said; “National Women's Enterprise Day has become a flagship event for women entrepreneurs and businesswomen every year. While the past two years saw successful online celebrations, it really is special to be back with sixteen in-person events across the country, and some amazing speakers and inspirational businesswomen. If you have that itch to start a business, or maybe you are already running a business, then this is the event for you. It can help you grow your network, find out what supports are available and learn from those who have gone before. No matter where you are in the country there is an event on your doorstep so get registered and be a part of Ireland's biggest celebration of women in business!” Carol Gibbons, Divisional Manager, Regions and Local Enterprise with Enterprise Ireland said; “Enterprise Ireland is delighted to support National Women's Enterprise Day, particularly as we are seeing in-person events return this year. As evidenced by the recent GEM report confidence about entrepreneurship among women is growing with nearly half of all women surveyed saying they had the skills and knowledge to start a business. Events like National Women's Enterprise Day are important in supporting this positive improvement, providing women entrepreneurs and those considering starting a business with insights from leading business women and introducing them to a network of entrepreneurs who are blazing a trail in the Irish market and overseas.” Ms Helena Cunningham, Deputy Chief Executive & Director of Finance and Economic Development, Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council on behalf of the local government sector said: “It's so important that we promote and support entrepreneurship for women, whom we know face particular barriers. Thankfully, more and more women are overcoming those barriers to great success. National Women's Enterprise Day is all about celebrating that, empowering and inspiring women and making sure they know that starting or growing a small business is a real option for them and that their Local Enterprise Office is there to help along with way.” National Women's Enterprise Day...

IIEA Talks
The State of the European Union 2022

IIEA Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 46:45


In her third State of the Union Address on 14 September 2022, President von der Leyen will set out the EU's response to the political, economic, social and energy-related consequences of Russia's invasion of Ukraine and set out the Union's policy priorities for the coming year. To mark this speech, the European Commission Representation in Ireland, the European Parliament Liaison Office in Ireland and the IIEA hosts a live-stream of the address, followed by a hybrid panel discussion with EU experts analysing President von der Leyen's address. About the Speakers: Senator Alice-Mary Higgins is an independent senator in Seanad Éireann where she leads the Civil Engagement Group and serves on the Committees for Environment and Climate Action, Finance and Public Expenditure and Reform, and on Disability Matters. She was policy coordinator at the National Women's Council of Ireland, member of the Executive of the European Women's Lobby in Brussels, and worked for the Older and Bolder alliance, Trócaire and Comhlámh NGOs on homecare, climate change, peace-building, and anti-racism issues. Brigid Laffan is Emerita Professor of political science, focusing on European integration. She has recently concluding her mandate as Director of the Robert Schuman Centre at the European University Institute (EUI). Before this, she was Professor of European Politics, Vice-President of UCD and Principal of the College of Human Sciences from 2004-2011. Professor John O'Brennan is Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration and Director of the Maynooth Centre for European and Eurasian Studies at Maynooth University. He is an internationally recognised expert on EU Enlargement policy, post-accession processes, ­­­­­­and the EU in the Western Balkans. David O'Sullivan is the IIEA Director General and Chair of the European Policy Centre's (EPC) Governing Board. He is also a former Secretary-General (2000-2005) and Director-General of DG Trade (2005-2010) of the European Commission. In a distinguished public service career over 30 years, he most recently served as the Ambassador of the EU to the United States (2014-2019). Before this, he was Chief Operating Officer in the European External Action Service (EEAS) and was responsible for establishing the EU's diplomatic service. Since his retirement from the public sector, he currently serves as a Senior Counsellor with Steptoe & Johnson LLP. The discussion was moderated by Dearbhail McDonald, journalist, author, and broadcaster.

The Full Pint Podcast
Interview - Clayton LeBlanc of Eppig Brewing

The Full Pint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 57:30


This week, we are joined by Co-Owner/Brewer of Eppig Brewing out of San Diego, CA, Clayton LeBlanc. We discuss many things including: - Danny's introduction to Eppig Brewing five years ago. - The infamous Brewery Igniter program. - Clayton's journey leading to Eppig. - Eppig making their name by brewing really good lagers in an IPA town. - Interesting history behind Eppig. - Was the lager stigma in San Diego created by Stone Brewing? - Moving out of the 'Igniter. - Festbier/Oktoberfest - Creating drinking destinations - Being spooked by industry changes in San Diego? - Hey, they make hoppy ale too! - 6th Anniversary coming up! And much more! Follow all the latest on Eppig Brewing by visiting and following their Instagram account @eppigbrewing Please check out these resources if you are a member of the craft beer industry and need help. National Women's Law Center - https://nwlc.org/ Department of Fair Employment and Housing - https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/ Project When - https://projectwhen.org/resources/how-to-report-workplace-harassment-incidents/

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast
The Hidden Cost of Blazing Your Own Trail (with USWNT legend Briana Scurry)

Richmond Til We Die: A Ted Lasso Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 36:48


Welcome back to the Crown & Anchor, Greyhounds! In this episode Christian and Brett have a conversation with soccer icon Briana Scurry. Briana is best-known for her accomplishments as the starting goalkeeper for the United States Women's National Team, where she helped the squad win a World Cup and two Olympic gold medals.Briana is currently an assistant coach for the Washington Spirit of the National Women's Soccer League and recently released a memoir titled MY GREATEST SAVE. In the book, she chronicles her journey from a gifted athletic kid growing up in Minneapolis to her triumph as a legendary goalkeeper. She also details her experience as a gay African-American woman making strides and spearheading change in a sport that was at the time predominately-white, predominately-suburban sport.In our conversation with Briana, we discussed her story and got into many of the themes of the book, including perseverance, mental health, and, ultimately – hope (be advised that there is some discussion of suicidal ideation in this episode). We also chatted about some of the similarities between her high school soccer coach and Ted Lasso. And Briana revealed which of her soccer-playing friends she'd most like to see make a cameo appearance on the show!Pick up Briana's incredible book (or download the audiobook), MY GREATEST SAVE, wherever you buy such things. We can't recommend it highly enough.Full show notes can be found on our website: https://www.tedlassopod.com/briana-scurry-my-greatest-save-ted-lassoRichmond Til We Die is an episode-by-episode conversation about the Apple TV+ show Ted Lasso, where we explore the characters, their relationships to each other, and how they're able to make us laugh until we can hardly breathe one moment and then feel with the deepest parts of our hearts the next. When you're here, you're a Greyhound!

For Real
Women in Sports

For Real

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 44:12


This week Kim and Alice go down a rabbit hole talking about A League of Their Own and talk nonfiction about women in sports. Follow For Real using RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. For more nonfiction recommendations, sign up for our True Story newsletter, edited by Kendra Winchester and Kim Ukura. This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Nonfiction in the News Barbara Ehrenreich, author who challenged American Dream myths, dies at 81 [Washington Post] Recommending Books Based on the Weirdest Facts They Taught Me [Book Riot] New Nonfiction Thinking 101: How to Reason Better to Live Better by Woo-Kyoung Ahn Off with Her Head: Three Thousand Years of Demonizing Women in Power by Eleanor Herman The Godmother: Murder, Vengeance, and the Bloody Struggle of Mafia Women by Barbie Latza Nadeau Africa Is Not a Country: Notes on a Bright Continent by Dipo Faloyin The Chaos Machine: The Inside Story of How Social Media Rewired Our Minds and Our World by Max Fisher Year of the Tiger: An Activist's Life by Alice Wong Women in Sports Hail Mary: The Rise and Fall of the National Women's Football League by Frankie de la Cretaz and Lyndsey D'Arcangelo Dust Bowl Girls: The Inspiring Story of the Team That Barnstormed Its Way to Basketball Glory by Lydia Reeder Baseball's Leading Lady: Effa Manley and the Rise and Fall of the Negro Leagues by Andrea Williams Curveball: The Remarkable Story of Toni Stone the First Woman to Play Professional Baseball in the Negro League by Martha Ackmann Reading Now Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg
9/12/22 We are the Troopers

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 45:05


Stephen Guinan, author of "We are the Troopers: The Women of the Winningest Team in Pro Football History." The team in question, the Toledo Troopers, utterly dominated the National Women's Football League in the 1970s.

MASTER COACH ONLINE
Master Coach Online Speaks to Sam Laity

MASTER COACH ONLINE

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 53:29


Today, we speak with Sam Laity, the Assistant Coach for OL Reign the in National Women's Soccer League. This is Sam's second time he's been with us on the Master Coach Online podcast. This podcast is slightly different, it addresses some of the lessons Sam has learnt throughout his ten years coaching in the NWSL. Check it out and let me know what you think! Give Sam a follow on Twitter @SamLaity7 Enjoy the Pod. Take learning with you --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Good Seats Still Available
276: The Toledo Troopers - With Steve Guinan

Good Seats Still Available

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 73:53


​Author/team biographer Steve Guinan (We Are the Troopers: The Women of the Winningest Team in Pro Football History) helps us celebrate the return of football this week - with a look back at ​​the unheralded story of the most dominant women's team of the 1970s -the Toledo Troopers. Winners of seven consecutive championships across two different leagues - Sid Friedman's barnstorming Women's Professional Football League (1971-72), and the pioneering true-pro successor National Women's Football League (1974-77) - the Troopers compiled an astounding 58-4-1 record over its nine years of life, including six seasons of undefeated play. Led by the league's most recognizable star Linda Jefferson and overseen by its hard-charging owner/head coach Bill Stout - the Troopers' roster was an unlikely assemblage of housewives, factory workers, hairdressers, former nuns, high school teachers, bartenders, mail carriers, pilots, and would-be drill sergeants - whose combined spirit, tenacity and simple "love for the game" helped create what even the hallowed Pro Football Hall of Fame officially recognizes as the “winningest team in professional football history.”

Jenn & Bill Daily
Beat the Bee | Lady Cops

Jenn & Bill Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 3:34


It is National Women in Law Enforcement Day so Bill's got trivia on TV Lady Cops. Lisa from Downingtown competes for 4 tickets to see TSO at the Wells Fargo Center.

The A&P Professor
Teaching Human Reproduction | A Chat with Margaret Reece | TAPP 122

The A&P Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 52:25


Veteran A&P educator and reproduction researcher Dr. Margaret Reece joins host Kevin Patton to talk about challenges of teaching human reproduction and development. Reece also briefly discusses her online resources (MedicalScienceNavigator.com) and her experiences in helping overwhelmed A&P students succeed in their studies. 00:00 | Introduction 00:43 | Reproductive Biology 08:13 | Sponsored by AAA 08:58 | Ultrasound & Reproductive Biology 20:25 | Sponsored by HAPI 21:13 | Basic Science 35:27 | Sponsored by HAPS 36:33 | Medical Science Navigator 50:19 | Staying Connected   ★ If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-122.html

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Pro soccer player Annika Schmidt on trusting in God's plan after a serious knee injury

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 42:40 Very Popular


Annika Schmidt is a professional soccer player with the Houston Dash in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL). In college, she was a three-year starter at Butler University and selected to the All-Big East First-Team three consecutive years. In 2020, she signed to play soccer overseas in Sweden with Goteborg FC and then in January 2021, she signed with the Houston Dash and the NWSL. In May 2022, she tore her ACL and meniscus while training for the upcoming season and missed the entire year. Today on the podcast, we talk to Annika about her soccer career, her faith in Jesus, the knee injury she suffered in May 2022 and how she's trusting God to guide her in he midst of this setback. Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here. 

The Full Pint Podcast
September Show - Andy Returns

The Full Pint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 56:22


We are back in the studio with our president, Andy. We chop it up and talk beery things such as: - A look back at Mikkeller in the United States. - When Mikkeller hit the scene in 2007/2008. - What made them unique at the time. - Paling up with Stone and AleSmith. - Importing high end beer via Shelton. - Danish tickers - High end bars Internationally and in the US. - Chumming back up with AleSmith. - Making a play for US production. - Mikkeller SD and the Viking Club - Mikkeller bars shuttering in California. - Workplace issues. - RIP Mikkeller SD. - Mikkeller's clout currently? - Latest chapter on Modern Times - Predicting the synergy of dual brands. - Early Festbier enjoyment. And much more! This episode was sponsored by Eppig Brewing in San Diego. Makers of award winning lagers and ales - Eppig's Oktoberfest Celebrations are coming up soon. Follow them on instagram [here] to learn more. Please check out these resources if you are a member of the craft beer industry and need help. National Women's Law Center - https://nwlc.org/ Department of Fair Employment and Housing - https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/ Project When - https://projectwhen.org/resources/how-to-report-workplace-harassment-incidents/

PBS NewsHour - Segments
College students return to campus amid uncertainty over access to reproductive care

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 9:42


As the fall semester begins at colleges and universities across the country, students, parents and higher education health officials are grappling with how to navigate new restrictions after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bayliss Fiddiman of the National Women's Law Center about how the post-Roe landscape impacts students and their choices as they go back to school. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
College students return to campus amid uncertainty over access to reproductive care

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 9:42


As the fall semester begins at colleges and universities across the country, students, parents and higher education health officials are grappling with how to navigate new restrictions after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bayliss Fiddiman of the National Women's Law Center about how the post-Roe landscape impacts students and their choices as they go back to school. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
College students return to campus amid uncertainty over access to reproductive care

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 9:42


As the fall semester begins at colleges and universities across the country, students, parents and higher education health officials are grappling with how to navigate new restrictions after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bayliss Fiddiman of the National Women's Law Center about how the post-Roe landscape impacts students and their choices as they go back to school. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court
College students return to campus amid uncertainty over access to reproductive care

PBS NewsHour - Supreme Court

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 9:42


As the fall semester begins at colleges and universities across the country, students, parents and higher education health officials are grappling with how to navigate new restrictions after the overturn of Roe v. Wade. Amna Nawaz spoke with Bayliss Fiddiman of the National Women's Law Center about how the post-Roe landscape impacts students and their choices as they go back to school. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

National Women's Fitness Academy Podcast
Learn Everything You Need to Know About Elin Granstrand

National Women's Fitness Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 25:24


We're excited to announce Elin Granstrand as our newest Co-host for the National Women's Fitness Academy's Podcast.Elin will be joining alongside Sig and Lauren to bring you all more valuable episodes about nutrition, body image and health. Get to know Elin by listening to today's podcast, we know you'll enjoy it!Enjoy this informative episode!Please leave us a review to let us know what you think of the podcast.Elin's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/elingranstrand/Sigi's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sigfisher/Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/womensfitnessacademy_aus/Watch our episodes on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6sMl76TpWV9sE5kchn6EgQ

Hunting Camp Downunder Podcast
Olympian Aislin Jones

Hunting Camp Downunder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 71:24


Australia's Youngest ever female shotgun Olympian, Aislin has tried to weave the sport into the field and the importance of both to the hunting community….  Its different story but I hope you enjoy it … Rob   Bio Aislin Jones developed an interest in shooting while following her father David Jones, around the Bairnsdale Field and Game clay target range from an early age. She started shooting in 2012 and switched from simulated field to skeet later that year. Jones competed in her first Australian Clay Target Association (ACTA) national championships at the age of 13, held at Wagga Wagga in 2013. The following year she won six medals at the ACTA national championships at Wagga Wagga and the National Women's Champion of Champions in the mixed 12 gauge/20 gauge event with a score of 99/100. In late 2014 she switched from American Skeet to ISSF skeet in order to achieve her Olympic and Commonwealth Games aspirations. At her first competitive ISSF skeet shoot in October 2014, she won the Victorian Ladies' Championship at Werribee Clay Target Club. In 2015 she competed in her first international competition, finishing 23rd in the junior world championships and 6th in the ISSF junior cup. In early 2016 she became the youngest winner of the Australian National Skeet Championship at the age of 15. Aislin Jones represented Australia in Women's Skeet at the Rio Olympic Games in 2016, finishing in 17th place. She was the second youngest Australian athlete, and the youngest of the 390 shooting athletes from around the world. At 16 years of age, she was also the youngest Australian shooter ever to compete at any Olympic Games In October 2017 she broke the Oceania Women's Skeet, junior and senior record and in January 2018, at the Australian Nationals in Echuca she won the Commonwealth championship, Australian Championship and High Gun. In March 2018 she won her first ISSF gold medal at the Junior World Cup in Sydney. She has been named in the Australian shooting team for the 2018 Commonwealth Games and finished 6th, after finishing second in the qualifying round.

The 323 with Reid Murphy
Emily Caron/Reiding Rainbow

The 323 with Reid Murphy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 62:38


Sportico reporter Emily Caron joins to discuss the legacy of Serena Williams, major broadcasting deals for the National Women's Soccer League, and the importance of investing in the growth of women's sports. Plus, a "lost segment" with Zuhair Ali and Scott Ellia talking the Fernando Tatis Jr. suspension, the show's curse on the Washington Commanders, and Top 5 Necks!

Pulse
Women's Equality Day: Why Do We Lock Up So Many Women and Girls?

Pulse

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 47:10


Today is National Women's Equality Day. Women's Equality Day commemorates the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, granting women the right to vote. The amendment was first introduced in 1878. Though Women's Equality Day didn't come around until 1971, when the U.S. Congress designated August 26 as Women's Equality Day. Throughout the years women have diligently fought for equal rights, though enormous strides have been made, there are some areas where women are still incredibly disadvantaged. The criminal justice system being one of the areas with the worst outcomes for women and girls. Join us and Jenna Morey, Executive Director of ReMerge as we break this down.

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin
History Matters: Understanding Abortion Rights in the U.S. and What Comes Next

On The Issues With Michele Goodwin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 60:38


In this episode, we are live with the National Women's History Museum for an incredibly important episode addressing reproductive health rights and justice from a historical point of view.  In the wake of the overturn of Roe, we've seen horrific cases: a 10-year-old girl fleeing the state of Ohio to get to Indiana in order to terminate a pregnancy after rape; a Wisconsin woman bleeding for more than 10 days with an incomplete miscarriage before doctors could provide her the standard medical treatment; and so much more. The political situation that's led to these cases becoming commonplace has deep roots in America's history of slavery, reproductive restrictions, and controlling women's bodies. So, how did we get here?We're unpacking the historical events that led us to the Dobbs v. Jackson decision, and examining how the Supreme Court failed in its analysis and recounting of America's history around reproductive health, rights, and justice.Joining us for this special event are:Professor Mary Ziegler is a professor of law at the UC Davis School of Law, as well as one of the world's leading historians of the U.S. abortion debate. Ziegler is also the author of Abortion and the Law in America: A Legal History, as well as the recently released Dollars for Life: The Antiabortion Movement and the Fall of the Republican Establishment.   Professor Sarah Dubow is a professor of history at Williams College and author of the award-winning book, Ourselves Unborn: A History of the Fetus in Modern America.   Professor Deborah White is the board of governors professor of History and professor of Women and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She's also the author of Ar'n't I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South.  Rate and review “On the Issues with Michele Goodwin" to let us know what you think of the show! Let's show the power of independent feminist media. Check out this episode's landing page at MsMagazine.com for a full transcript, links to articles referenced in this episode, further reading and ways to take action.Tips, suggestions, pitches? Get in touch with us at ontheissues@msmagazine.com. Support the show

National Day Calendar
August 26, 2022 - National Women's Equality Day | National Dog Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 3:30


Welcome to August 26th, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate women's rights and man's best friend. On this day in 1920 the United States Congress passed the 19th Amendment to the Constitution granting women full and equal voting rights. While it may sound preposterous today, this amendment was 80 years in the making, if you take into account that the seeds of unrest were sown in the early 1800s. That's when Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, along with Martha Wright, Mary Ann McClintock and Jane Hunt set in motion plans for the first woman's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York after being denied access to the Anti-Slavery Convention in London. Today we celebrate National Women's Equality Day and the one hundred years of progress we have made since the 19th Amendment was passed. Over 15,000 years ago, early humans domesticated wolves and created a friendship that has stood the test of time. Since then dogs have proven to be loyal, friendly and hardworking to boot. No other canine represents these traits better than the film star Lassie. While this collie was first played by a pedigree female, she refused to swim in the river and was replaced by a male dog named Pal. Since then, all nine Lassies have been male and all of them descendants of Pal.  It turns out that male collies don't lose their coats as often as females and are therefore more suited to their movie closeups. On National Dog Day, celebrate your own furry friends who are awfully glad that you're in their pack.   I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Glenn Davis Soccer
08/23/22 Soccer Matters Hour 2

Glenn Davis Soccer

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 48:22


On the second hour on this show, Glenn Davis is joined by Sebastián Ferreira Paraguayan forward for the Houston Dynamo to talk on his experience in the MLS. After the interview, our soccer matters host is joined by Canadian professional soccer player who plays as a midfielder for National Women's Soccer League club Houston Dash, Sophie Schmidt. Glenn closes off the show with a re air of a Tyler Adams interview while he was at Leipzig under Ralph Rangnick in 2019. 

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
What's The Meaning Of “Raizado”? with Mónica Ramírez

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 57:52


There are more than 62 million Latine people living in the United States. Some are US-born, others are recent immigrants, and still more have had family members here for centuries—living on land that was once part of Mexico. This week, Mónica Ramírez returns to Getting Curious to discuss how the Latine community is “deeply rooted” in the US, what it looks like to protect the humanity and dignity of these 62 million people, and why advocates like Mónica aren't simply showing up at spaces of consequence to address systemic issues—they're creating spaces of consequence.CW: This episode discusses bodily harm and hateful rhetoric.Mónica Ramírez is an attorney, author, and activist fighting for the rights of farmworkers,  migrant women workers, and the Latine(x) community. She is the founder of Justice for Migrant  Women and co-founder of Alianza Nacional de Campesinas, The Latinx House, and Poderistas. Mónica has received numerous awards, including Harvard Kennedy School's first Gender Equity Changemaker Award, Feminist Majority's Global Women's Rights Award, the Smithsonian's 2018 Ingenuity Award and the Hispanic Heritage Award. She was named to Forbes Mexico's 100 Most Powerful Women's 2018 list and TIME Magazine included her in its 2021 TIME100 Next list. Mónica is also an inaugural member of the Ford Global Fellowship. She serves on the Board of Directors of the National Women's Law Center, Friends of the Latino Museum and she is a member of The Little Market's Activists Committee. Mónica lives in Ohio with her husband and son.  Follow Monica on Instagram @activistmonicaramirez and Twitter @MonicaRamirezOH. The Latinx House is on Instagram and Twitter @thelatinxhouse, and at www.thelatinxhouse.org. For more on Raizado, The Latinx House Festival, head to www.raizadofest.org.  For more resources mentioned in this episode, check out: Coalition of Immokalee WorkersUnited Farm WorkersFarm Labor Organizing Committee, AFL-CIONalleli Cobo - Goldman Environmental Prize Join the conversation, and find out what former guests are up to, by following us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN. Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook.Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Love listening to Getting Curious? Now, you can also watch Getting Curious—on Netflix! Head to netflix.com/gettingcurious to dive in.Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com. Getting Curious merch is available on PodSwag.com.

The ERP Advisor
The ERP Minute Episode 52 - August 23, 2022

The ERP Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 3:23 Transcription Available


SAP and Francisco Partners (FP) announced that FP has signed a definitive agreement with SAP America Inc. under which Francisco Partners will acquire SAP Litmos from SAP. OneStream ranked among the fastest-growing companies in the 2022 Inc. 5000 list from Inc. Magazine. This is the 7th consecutive year the company has been recognized on the list, which represents the most successful private companies with a proven track record of growth. UKG delivered strong financial results for the third quarter of Fiscal 2022, ending June 30, 2022. Total revenue was $925 million, with subscription revenues excluding float growing 15% year-over-year. In addition, more than 70% of new customers selected the UKG full suite of HR, payroll, and workforce management solutions. Highlights of the quarter include recognition by Google Cloud for driving diversity and inclusion in the field of DevOps, collaboration with Uber to help organizations deliver rewards and incentives to people, and a multi-year partnership with the National Women's Soccer League, while also maintaining a high number of customer acquisitions. Salesforce released Salesforce Easy, a new simplified experience for businesses of all sizes, built for flexibility and business growth. Salesforce Easy provides self-service purchasing options and a three-click setup, making it easier and less costly for users to grow with Salesforce as business needs evolve. FinancialForce announced the general availability of its Summer 2022 Release. The new release introduces FinancialForce's Services-as-a-Business (SaaB) approach with improved resource management, significant enhancements to out-of-the-box analytics capabilities utilizing CRM Analytics by Salesforce, integrated Financial Planning & Analysis solutions, end-to-end intelligent bank reconciliation capabilities, and improved user experience.https://www.erpadvisorsgroup.com866-499-8550LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/company/erp-advisors-groupTwitter:https://twitter.com/erpadvisorsgrpFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/erpadvisorsInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/erpadvisorsgroupPinterest:https://www.pinterest.com/erpadvisorsgroupMedium:https://medium.com/@erpadvisorsgroup

Express Yourself!
Women's Empowerment and Gender Equality

Express Yourself!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 57:51


“Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it possibly, without claiming it, she stands up for all women.” ? Maya Angelou Hannah, Ruhani, Keerthi, and Sharanya stand up for all women. Keerthi offers an insightful, yet humorous take on creating interesting characters for fiction writing, especially for the female gender. Hannah dives into the dangerous effects of the recent overturning of Roe. v. Wade which took away women's reproductive rights and jeopardizes female healthcare. Ruhani talks about the troubling truth - women only make up .5 percent of recorded history! That's not entirely surprising, considering history is written by the victors, and in this patriarchal society, men have been victors since the beginning of time. Her original poem focuses on this disparity. Sharanya provides a literary history lesson about women pioneers in literature and how they changed the writing world. Since Mesopotamia,, male scholars dominated the arena. Sharanya reads her original poem, “Unnoticed”. More than ever, it is NECESSARY for young people to make their voices heard against oppression and discrimination of women and girls. Here are ways you can join the fight for women's reproductive rights and empowerment: • Sign petitions against discriminatory and restrictive policies targeted towards women's health (especially now, since the Supreme Court members have repeatedly stated their conservative and religious bias against other forms of healthcare such as contraceptives). • Join abortion rallies and protests, or even start your own with permission. • Spread the word to your friends and family! Discussing these issues with close individuals and your peers can have a significant positive impact on the movement. • VOTE. VOTE. VOTE! Vote like your life and rights depend on it. They do. Support candidates who unequivocally support women and abortion rights! • Donate to organizations and abortion funds, such as Planned Parenthood, the ACLU, Center for Reproductive Rights, National Women's Health Network, and more! Stand up for Women! Get educated. Together the youth of America can take back the power of equality for all. Follow us: https://www.starstyleradio.com/expressyourselfteenradio • https://www.facebook.com/ExpressYourselfTeenRadio/ • https://www.facebook.com/BTSYAcharity/ • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/expressyourselfradio/

PALITICUS
NextGen Podcast - Mariana Brazão

PALITICUS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 40:59


Today's guest is Mariana Brazão. Mariana Brazão was born in Lisbon, Portugal, and moved to the United States with her parents when she was nine months old. Mariana is a 2019-2020 Fulbright U.S. Student Program Research Grant recipient to Brazil. She has curated the online exhibit Representation with a Hyphen: Latinas in the Fight for Women's Suffrage at the National Women's History Museum, and The Indigenous Benches of Brazil virtual exhibit at the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia, in collaboration with Coleção BEI. Mariana is now also a PALCUS Director.

The Full Pint Podcast
August Mailbag Show

The Full Pint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 44:03


Danny and Jonny sit down to answer beer related questions that you submitted across our social media channels. We hope you enjoy! - Update on our 15th Anniversary can collabs. - Home brewers opening up a brewery? - The next brewery to sell out? - Greatest threat to craft beer? - Stone Cold IPA? - Why lower ABV beer sell the way they do? And tons more! We'd like to thank our sponsor, Great Notion Brewing. Great Notion Brewing offers a variety of modern, cutting edge, culinary inspired beers: pastry stouts, hazy IPAs, smoothie sours. Every few weeks they have been adding states to their direct shipping list. Download their app on the app store, and check out with promocode FULLPINT10 for 10% off your next order. Please check out these resources if you are a member of the craft beer industry and need help. National Women's Law Center - https://nwlc.org/ Department of Fair Employment and Housing - https://www.dfeh.ca.gov/ Project When - https://projectwhen.org/resources/how-to-report-workplace-harassment-incidents/

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: August 12, 2022 - with Melissa Santos

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 49:19


On this week-in-review, Crystal is joined by Axios reporter Melissa Santos. They start off looking at the larger trends from this last week's primary, including why the predicted ‘red wave' didn't materialize. Next, they talk about Olgy Diaz's appointment to the Tacoma City council, discussing her impressive credentials and watershed status as the first Latina to serve on the Council. In Seattle City Council news, Crystal and Melissa look at the two recent abortion- and trans-related protections the council passed this week. For updates on public health, our hosts look at how Washington state is lifting most of its COVID emergency orders, where the state is at with its COVID response, and what our outlook is for MPV and its vaccine. After that, the two discuss the redistricting plans for the Seattle City Council, and different neighborhoods' responses to the proposed new district lines and close the show by looking at the state of behavioral health crisis response in our neighborhoods, discussing the county's plans for an emergency walk-in centers, the county's plans to improve its behavioral health response, and our lack of crisis response staff.  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Melissa Santos, at @MelissaSantos1. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Our blue legislature bucks GOP trend” by Melissa Santos from Axios: https://www.axios.com/local/seattle/2022/08/12/washington-state-blue-legislature-gop-trend    “Tacoma City Council selects its newest member. She's the first Latina to serve” by Liz Moomey from The News Tribune: https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article264330356.html?taid=62f470bf1a1c2c0001b63754&utm_campaign=trueanthem&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter    “Seattle passes protections for abortion and gender affirming care” by KUOW Staff from KUOW: https://kuow.org/stories/seattle-passes-protections-for-abortion-and-gender-affirming-care   “MPV cases doubling nearly every week in WA, as U.S. declares public health emergency” by Elise Takahama from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/monkeypox-cases-doubling-nearly-every-week-in-wa-as-us-set-to-declare-public-health-emergency/   "US will stretch monkeypox vaccine supply with smaller doses" by Matthew Perrone from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/us-will-stretch-monkeypox-vaccine-supply-with-smaller-doses/   Washington state says goodbye to most COVID emergency orders” by Melissa Santos from Axios: https://www.axios.com/local/seattle/2022/08/09/washington-end-most-covid-emergency-orders   "New map would redraw Seattle's City Council districts, with changes for Georgetown, Magnolia" by Daniel Beekman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/new-map-would-redraw-seattles-city-council-districts-with-changes-for-georgetown-magnolia/   “Racial Equity Advocates Like Seattle's Newly Proposed Political Boundaries. Magnolia Residents Do Not.” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/08/04/77339585/racial-equity-advocates-like-seattles-newly-proposed-political-boundaries-magnolia-residents-do-not   “County Plans Emergency Walk-In Centers for Behavioral Health Crises” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola: https://publicola.com/2022/08/11/county-plans-emergency-walk-in-centers-for-behavioral-health-crises/    "Local Leaders Announce New Coalition to Address Behavioral Health Crisis" by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/08/11/77680008/local-leaders-announce-new-coalition-to-address-behavioral-health-crisis   “Designated crisis responders, a ‘last resort' in mental health care, face overwhelming demand” by Esmy Jimenez from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/designated-crisis-responders-a-last-resort-in-mental-health-care-face-overwhelming-demand/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review because it helps a lot. Today, we are continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program today's cohost: Seattle Axios reporter, Melissa Santos. [00:01:00] Melissa Santos: Hello, thanks for having me. [00:01:01] Crystal Fincher: Hey, thanks for being back. We always enjoy having you. So there were a number of things that happened this week. I think we'll start off just talking about the elections real quick. We got more results this week. Things are looking more conclusive - a couple of late-straggling races have been decided, including one of the congressional - two, really of the congressional district races. It looks like in the 47th Legislative District race that Republican Bill Boyce will be facing Democratic candidate Senator - former Senator - Claudia Kauffman. And that in the 47th House seat, that Democrat Shukri Olow and Democrat Chris Stearns will both be getting through and Republicans will actually not be making it in that seat, despite that race including three different Republicans - one the pick of the GOP that raised over $200,000, Carmen Goers, who actually finished in last place. So a number of things got settled, but overall, as you look at these elections, what are your takeaways, Melissa? [00:02:16] Melissa Santos: On the legislative side, really things look mostly similar to what they looked like on primary night, in the sense that a lot of the races that Republicans had hoped to pick up, I think Democrats still look really strong in. And that's in a lot of those swing districts in the suburbs - in Island County, the Democrats have pretty strong performances in some House races that I think Republicans have been eyeing for a pickup in the 10th District. The 28th Legislative District looks pretty much like the incumbent Democrats are in really good shape there - that's around Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Lakewood, University Place. And I think that the Republicans not having someone in that 47th District open seat is maybe not what people would've predicted when talking about a red wave coming this year, and that Democrats have been saying - we're just trying to defend what we have, we're not really planning to add seats here. But they look like they're in a pretty good position to defend the seats. The only place where things look like it'll be rough for Democrats are seats up in the 47th - sorry, the 42nd Legislative District in Whatcom County, I think, have some disappointing results for Democrats when it comes to trying to get the former - the State Senate seat formerly held by Republican Doug Ericksen. That's gonna be a tough race where it looks like the State House Democratic Rep who's running for it might have a really tough race to fight in November. She wants to pick up that seat for the Democrats. But again, Democrats were trying to just defend mostly this year. So I think they look like they're in a pretty good position to do that. One thing that's a little bit interesting is a lot of the fringier types in the Republican legislative caucus in the House are actually not going to be returning to the legislature next year. And some of that's just because they ran for Congress in some cases, like Brad Klippert. [00:04:15] Crystal Fincher: And Vicki Kraft. [00:04:16] Melissa Santos: Yes, and Vicki Kraft. So I'm interested to see how that plays out. There are some races where legislative candidates who are being accused of being RINOs [Republicans In Name Only] actually have advanced through the primary. And I am wondering if some Republicans - are they more moderate or just hoping that they beat the more Trumpy Republicans essentially. So that's something I'm watching actually going forward is - while we certainly have situations across the nation where Trump-endorsed Republicans are getting through - we see this in the 3rd Congressional District race, here in our state, where Jaime Herrera Beutler who voted to impeach Trump will not be getting through to the general - that was finalized this week. But locally in legislative races, I'm not sure that the more far-right candidates will win out in all these races in November. So I'm watching that - how does our state picture, when it comes to the Republican party, compare to what we're seeing nationally. And it's always interesting to see how Washington does 'cause we're a little bit different sometimes as a state in how we vote versus the rest of the country. [00:05:25] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And that sets up an interesting dynamic for Republicans, I think, in that it is really helpful when - just from a campaign perspective - when everyone is consistent with the message that's being delivered for the party, what priorities are in terms of values. And so there have been - legislatively - some more moderate Republicans making it through. There are certainly some real extremists. And again, "moderate" is an interesting word for Republicans 'cause - when it is gonna come to some of these caucus votes, I think moderation is gonna effectively fly out of the window. Or being afraid to speak out on certain things that challenge some of the more extreme elements in the party, which essentially in my opinion, enables that element of the party. But with Joe Kent higher on the ticket and being so visible, being a frequent guest on Hannity, Trump-endorsed, and really vocal about a number of things like opposing aid to Ukraine, about wanting Jim Jordan - who is extremely problematic and has been accused of ignoring sexual assault allegations on his watch under his responsibility - wanting him to replace Kevin McCarthy as the leader of the party, certainly moving in a much more extreme direction. A number of those things are gonna be inconsistent, I think, with what some of the other Republicans, I think legislatively under JT Wilcox certainly, Republicans are gonna wanna be talking about. So there may be just a bit of a mismatched message there and it will be interesting to see how the party navigates that, but especially coming from a place where the extremism - you look at the primaries - certainly did not land. And some of, even the criticisms just legislatively, of Republicans who were on the message that they wanted to be on, did not turn out to be very effective at all - that presents a challenge for them in the general. [00:07:40] Melissa Santos: I think that was interesting in the Federal Way area. I think everyone, including Democrats, were saying - yeah, there's a lot of voters concerned about public safety there. I think everyone thought maybe the Democrats might be a little bit more vulnerable from attacks from Republicans in that area in South King County around Federal Way, with Republicans say - Hey, Democrats passed all these bills that hamstring police, so they can't keep you safe. I think everyone thought that line of argument might work better in some of those areas in South King County than it did. And so I'm wondering if Republicans will change their approach or not, or if they're just gonna stick with hammering Democrats on public safety. I think that maybe we'll see just more talk about economy and inflation and maybe a little less of the public safety attacks - possibly - based on those results. [00:08:29] Crystal Fincher: And they certainly hit hard on both of those. It is interesting to see - particularly - so you have Jamila Taylor, who is the incumbent representative there, there's another open House seat, and then Claire Wilson in the Senate seat. Jamila Taylor, who's the head of the Legislative Black Caucus, did play a leading role in passing a lot of, number of the police accountability reforms that police, a number of police unions, and people who are saying "Back the Blue" and these were problematic. She actually has a police officer running against her in that district. And also, the mayor of Federal Way, Jim Ferrell, is running for King County Prosecutor on a hard line, lock 'em up kind of message. They've been working overtime to blame legislators, primarily Jamila Taylor, for some of the crime that they've seen. And holding community meetings - really trying to ratchet up sentiment against Jamila Taylor - helping out both her challenger and Jim Ferrell was the plan. And again, that seemed to fall flat. Jamila Taylor finished with 54% in that race and the most votes out of any Democrat. You saw Democrats across the board, both Claire Wilson and Jamila Taylor, get 54% and 55% of the vote. In a primary, that is certainly where you would want to be and that's really a hard number to beat in the general. And then in the other open seat, you had two Democratic candidates combine for, I think, 55% of the vote. So it is - where they attempted to make that argument the hardest, it seemed to fall almost the flattest. And it goes to - we talked about this on the Post-Primary Recap a little bit - I think it goes to show that the conversation publicly - certainly the political conversation about public safety - I think is too flat and does not account for where the public actually is. I think people are absolutely concerned about crime and rightfully so - we have to attack gun violence, we have to attack property crime and violent crime. We have to do better than we're doing now. But I think people are recognizing that the things that we have been doing have not been successful. And we have been trying to lock people up and people see that there's a need for behavioral health interventions, for housing, for substance use treatment and that those things are absent. And that you can send a policeman to do that, but they don't have the tools to address that even if they were the appropriate responder. And there's a lot of people saying they aren't even the appropriate response for a number of these things. So I just think regular voters - regular people - just have a more nuanced and realistic view of what needs to happen. [00:11:42] Melissa Santos: I also think that message - we could talk about those races forever, probably - but I think that message might land especially flat in communities like South King County that are predominantly people of color in many of these communities. They want to address - well, okay, I should not group everyone together, let me back up here - but I think a lot of people see the effects of crime on their communities and their family members and want support, not just a crackdown. And I don't know if that - I don't know - I'm generalizing here and I shouldn't, but I think that maybe that - [00:12:09] Crystal Fincher: I think it's across the board. I feel like - we saw polling in Seattle where, even if you break it down by Seattle City Council district, whether it's North Seattle or West Seattle which are predominantly white areas, in addition to other areas with higher percentage of people of color - they're saying near universally - when given, asked the question - where would you allocate more of your tax dollars in the realm of public safety to make a difference? They start off by saying behavioral health treatment, substance use disorder treatment, treating root causes. And then "more officers" trails those things. So it's - and even before more officers, they're saying better training for officers so they do a better job of responding when they are called. So I just think that across the board, there's - Republicans have gotten far and have done a lot by talking about the problem. And I think what the primary showed is that you're gonna have to do a better job of articulating a logical and reasonable solution to the problem. 'Cause people have heard talk about the problem for a long time, this isn't new. They're ready for someone to do something about it and they want to hear something that sounds credible, with some evidence behind it, that'll make a difference. And I don't think Republicans articulated that at all. And I think Democrats are talking about things more in line with where voters are at. But certainly, we could talk about those election results forever, but we will move on to other news. Speaking of newly elected people, we have a new appointment of a person on the Tacoma City Council - Olgy Diaz was just unanimously appointed as the first Latina member of the Tacoma City Council last Tuesday night. She was one of 43 applicants to apply, ended up making the shortlist, and then was officially appointed on Tuesday night. What did you take away from this? You previously covered - based in Tacoma, covered Tacoma previously, worked at The News Tribune. What does Olgy bring to the Council? [00:14:41] Melissa Santos: Olgy is really experienced in politics, I want to say. For way back when - I think I started talking to Olgy years and years ago - she was, definitely in her role with leading One America, she's done a lot of policy work at the state level for a long time. She worked in the Legislature, so I talked to her in that capacity. And she brings a lot of experience to the table - I think more than a lot of people who apply for vacancies on city councils, for sure. But I honestly was also just - I was blown away to read - I didn't realize the Tacoma City Council has never had a Latina member before and that really blew my mind, given the diversity of Tacoma and given that that's a community where you have people who just weren't represented for such a long time. I worked in Tacoma for eight years at the paper and I didn't - I guess I didn't realize that was the case. So Olgy - separately - brings just a ton of experience. She leads the National Women's Political Caucus of Washington now as president and I talked to her for stories in that capacity, and she's always very knowledgeable and really thoughtful. But yeah, that's just - in terms of representation, she brings a lot to the Council that apparently it hasn't had - in terms of experience and lived experience as well. I didn't watch the whole appointment process every step of the way, but it seems like that is a very solid choice, given that you have someone coming in possibly that has way more, broader political knowledge than a lot of the sitting councilmembers in some cases. And that's not a knock on the sitting councilmembers, but you just have someone really, really versed in politics and policy in Washington State coming onto that city council. [00:16:26] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and an unusual amount of experience. I think, to your point, not a knock on anyone else. Olgy just has an unusual amount of experience on both the policy and political side. She's the Government Affairs Director for Forterra, she's president of the National Women's Political Caucus as you said, on the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition and Institute for a Democratic Future board. She's previously been on the city's Human Rights Commission. She just has so many, so much experience from within, working within the legislature and elsewhere. And if - full disclosure - Olgy Diaz is not just a friend, but also worked for Olgy as her consultant and love the woman. But just completely dynamic and if you know Olgy, you know she reps South Tacoma harder than anyone else just about that you've ever met. She deeply, deeply loves the city, particularly South Tacoma, and has been an advocate for the city in every role that she's had. So just really excited to see her appointed. In other local news - this week, Seattle, the Seattle City Council stood up and passed protections for abortion and gender affirming care. What did they do? [00:17:52] Melissa Santos: They passed something that makes it a misdemeanor for someone to interfere, intimidate, or try and threaten someone who is seeking an abortion and they also have some civil rights protections that they passed. Those are especially - you might not think that's necessarily an issue in Seattle all the time, but I think that - certainly the misdemeanors for trying to interfere for someone getting treatment or getting abortion care, I think that is something that could actually be used and called upon sometime in Seattle with certain individual cases. And I do think it's - not necessarily in a bad way - but a messaging bill on both of them - in a way saying - care is protected here. Even though in Washington State we do have some state law protections for abortion - better than in most states - I think it's partly about sending a message to people that your care will not be interfered with here. And maybe even a message to people in other states - that they can come - actually that is part of it - is that you can come to Seattle and get care and you will not, we will support you. And so that's part of why they're doing it - both on a practical level, but also sending a message that we will not tolerate people trying to dissuade, to discourage people who decided to get an abortion from getting the care that they are seeking. [00:19:18] Crystal Fincher: And I know Councilmember Tammy Morales has also said that she plans to introduce further legislation to prevent crisis pregnancy centers from misrepresenting the facts, misleading people - which has happened in other situations with pregnancy crisis centers, which sometimes bill themselves as abortion care providers. A person seeking an abortion finds them, goes, and unexpectedly is - in some situations - heavily pressured not to have an abortion. And there's been situations where they have been found to have been coerced into not having an abortion. And so that would just seek to make sure that everybody correctly represents themselves, and who they are, and what they are attempting to do. Lots of people do, to your point, look at Seattle and say - okay, but this - things were safe here anyway. I do think the first one - we see a lot of counter-protestors - of people making points in Seattle, going to Seattle to protest different things, because it has a reputation for being progressive, where progressive policy is. So it attacks people who really dislike those policies and moving in that direction. I think this is helpful for that. And it serves as model legislation. There are some very red areas here in the state. There are other localities - we may have neighboring states that - the right to abortion is coming to an end. And so having legislation like this that has passed in the region, that has passed nearby, that is in place, that survives legal challenges against them makes it easier for other localities to pass the same. And so I think that it is a very positive thing for Seattle to take the lead passing model legislation. Certainly aren't the first to pass, but having it in the region is very, very helpful. So glad to see that. Also this week - some challenging news. One - monkeypox, now referred to as MPV, cases have been doubling nearly every week in Washington and has been declared a public health emergency. Where do we stand here? [00:21:37] Melissa Santos: I think that right now, we have about 220 cases - and that's what I think I saw on the CDC website just earlier today. And last week, it was 70 fewer than that, at least - we have been seeing, especially early on, every week or so the cases were doubling in our state. And we remember how COVID started in a way - it was small at first and things just can really expand quickly. This isn't spread the same way COVID is - and I'm not saying it is - but we do definitely have a vaccine shortage here for this and that's a huge concern. I asked the State Department of Health - actually, I have not put this in the story yet, but I was like - how many people do you feel like you need to treat that are at high risk? And they said it's almost 80,000. And took me a long time to get that number, but I think we only have - we only are gonna have something like 20-something thousand vaccines doses coming in, maybe 25,000, through at least early September. So there's a lot of potential for this to spread before we get vaccines to treat the people who are most at risk. That's a big concern. And so I haven't checked in our state yet - this sort of decision that we can stretch these doses further by divvying them up and doing, making each dose into maybe five doses - that could really help here. So I need to check whether in our state we're going forward with that and if that meets the need or not. But we still need a second dose for everybody, even beyond that. So it looks like the math just doesn't work and we're still gonna be short. And in that time, how far will it spread? Because it's not just - it's not a sexually transmitted disease that only is going to spread among LGBT individuals - other people are getting it and will get it. So that is - and also that community needs as much support as they can get anyway, regardless. But this is not something that just affects someone else, for instance, if you're not a member of that community. It's something that can affect everybody, and it's - everyone's afraid of another situation like we had with COVID - could it spread before we get a handle on it? And I think it's still an unknown question right now. [00:23:57] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, big unknown question. And to your point, it was - the CDC just announced that the vaccine supply can be stretched by giving one-fifth of the normal dose, so stretched five times what we thought we previously had. But that was just announced, so our local plans for that are probably in progress and process and hopefully we'll hear more about that soon. But haven't yet as that information was just announced - I want to say yesterday, if not day before. With that, to your point, it is - some people are under the mistaken impression that this is a sexually transmitted infection. It is not. It can spread by just skin-to-skin contact. If two people are wearing shorts and at a concert, or have short-sleeve shirts and are rubbing against each other, it can be spread just by touching especially infected lesions, by surfaces if there's a high enough amount on a surface. It is pretty hardy - lasts a long time on a number of surfaces or clothes or different things like that. Certainly a lot of concern with kids going back into school, kids in daycare that we may see an increase particularly among children - just because they are around each other and touching each other and playing as they do and that is how this virus can spread. So certainly getting as many people, starting with the highest risk people, vaccinated is important. We are short - there are just no two ways about that and running behind. Testing capacity has also been a challenge. So hopefully with these emergency declarations that we've seen locally and nationally that we fast forward the response to that and get prepared pretty quickly, but we will say that. Also this week, most COVID emergency orders have been ended. What happened here? [00:26:08] Melissa Santos: Some of them are still getting phased out, but the governor just very recently announced in our state that he's going to be - he's ending 12 COVID emergency orders. And so I went - wait, how many are left then, 'cause I don't think we have that many. And the governor's office - there's only 10 - once these mostly healthcare, procedure-related orders are phased out, will only be 10 COVID emergency orders left. And honestly, some of those have even been scaled back from what they were. They're - one of the orders relates to practicing some safe distancing measures or certain precautions in schools - that's really a step back from having schools be completely closed, like we had at one point. So even those 10 aren't necessarily as stringent as the orders we were seeing earlier in the pandemic. What does that really signify? I think that the governor has said - because we have good treatment options available, it doesn't mean that COVID is no longer a threat, but we have better ways of dealing with it essentially. It's not like early in the pandemic when nobody was vaccinated. We have a fairly high vaccination rate in our state compared to some others. And we have some treatment options that are better. And at least right now - well, I say this - our hospitals aren't pushed completely beyond capacity. Although, however - this week Harborview actually is over capacity, so that's still a potential problem going forward. But we just have better ways of dealing with the virus than we did. It doesn't mean it's not a threat, it doesn't mean that people aren't still getting hospitalized and even dying - because they are. But we're moving to a different stage of this pandemic where we're just not going to have as many restrictions and we're going to approach the virus in a different way. [00:27:51] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Yeah, that pretty much covers it there. [00:27:56] Melissa Santos: The thing - I do think for public - I've asked the governor a couple times - what is your standard for lifting the underlying emergency order? 'Cause we still are in a state of emergency over COVID and that does give the governor, if something comes up, quick power to ban some activity or something. And if there's a public health risk, he could order, for instance, indoor mask wearing again if he wanted. He has not indicated he plans to, but it gives him a little more power. Republicans are still mad about that, but in effect, there aren't that many orders actually in place anymore. We're just not living under as many restrictions as we once were. [00:28:34] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. So the protections are going away - there are lots of people who are very concerned about this. This does not seem tethered to - earlier in the pandemic - in some situations when cases were spreading at a lower amount than they were in some areas then than they are today - they tied it to certain metrics and to hospital capacity and different things. So there seemed like there was an underlying data-based justification that would dictate what the appropriate health response was. This seems untethered from all of that. And I think a lot of people's criticisms of this are - the actions that are taken, or realistically the actions that are no longer being taken, the justification behind that seems to be driven by convenience or by a desire just to get back to normal or fatigue. And instead of what health precautions dictate would be wise. I think at the very minimum we would be a lot better off if - we were very late in, from the CDCs perspective, in acknowledging that this is an airborne virus. And so air quality, air purification, air turnover in indoor spaces is extremely important, especially given how helpful that is for wildfire air mitigation. We're having a higher, more low-quality air days than we have before. Focusing on indoor air purification - I wish there were more of a push for that, more awareness for that, more assistance for that. Because it just seems like - given this and monkeypox, which has evidence that it is spread also via airborne - [00:30:37] Melissa Santos: Or at least droplets in close - yeah, at least like close breathy, breathing-ey stuff. [00:30:44] Crystal Fincher: Yes - that air purification is important. And so I wish we would make a greater push because still - that's not really aggressively talked about by most of our public health entities. And there's just not an awareness because of that, by a lot of people who are not necessarily being, saying - no, I don't want to do that - but just don't understand the importance of that. And many businesses that could take steps, but just don't know that that's what they should be doing. Sometimes it's still here - well, we're sanitizing all of these surfaces, which is going to come in handy for monkeypox certainly, but is not really an effective mitigation for COVID when - hey, let's talk about air purification instead of you wiping down surfaces. Just interesting and this may ramp up again, depending on what happens with MPV infections and spread. So we'll see how that continues. [00:31:47] Melissa Santos: But this time we have a vaccine at least - there is a vaccine that exists. Remember the beginning of COVID - of course, everyone remembers - there was no vaccine. So this feels like - theoretically, we should be able to address it faster because we have a vaccine, but there's just a shortage nationwide of the vaccine. So that's, I think, an extra frustrating layer of the monkeypox problem - is that we have a tool, but we just don't have enough of it. In COVID, we just were all completely in the dark for months and months and months and months - and anyway. [00:32:17] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and unfortunately the effect on the ground of not having enough is the same as not having any. [00:32:23] Melissa Santos: Right. Yeah. [00:32:24] Crystal Fincher: And so people are left with greater exposure to the virus and to spreading the virus than there would be otherwise, because we don't have the adequate supply of it. Which they say they're working on, but of course those things - unless you are prepared beforehand and making an effort to be prepared beforehand, it takes a while to get that ramped up. I think they're saying the earliest we could anticipate additional supply would be in the September timeframe, and oftentimes that's when it starts to trickle. And so it could be October before we see a meaningful amount of additional supply or longer. Just stay on top of information, be aware out there, and we will see. Very important thing happening within the City of Seattle - is Seattle City Council district redistricting, and what's happening. There have been some good articles written recently - both in The Seattle Times, especially in The Stranger by Hannah Krieg - about racial equity advocates actually being happy about the newly proposed political boundaries for council districts. But some residents of Magnolia, the expensive and exclusive Magnolia community, who have been known to advocate against any type of growth, or development, or any change to their community, other people getting greater access to their community and the political power that comes with who they've been and their ability to have an outsized voice, realistically, in local politics. They're not that happy. What's happening here? [00:34:16] Melissa Santos: The proposal that at least is moving forward at this point would split Magnolia, right? So this is something that communities of color have argued as being - Hey, in other areas, our communities are split and that dilutes our voice. And now it's interesting that Magnolia, which is not historically an area where - that has been predominantly people of color - every district in Seattle is changing - safe to say that it's been a whiter area. They're saying - Hey, wait, whoa, whoa, whoa - wait, we're gonna get split, that's gonna dilute our voice. So it's an interesting dynamic there. And what's also interesting - and it makes sense because the same organizations have been working on city redistricting and state redistricting, to some degree - we're seeing this movement to really unite and ensure communities in South Seattle are not divided. So in this - this was something that they really were trying to do with congressional districts - is make sure that South Seattle communities of color have a coalition and aren't split. And especially having the - well, let's see, and at least in state redistricting - making sure the International District is connected in some way to other parts of South Seattle and Beacon Hill. That was a priority in one of the congressional district redistricting for some of these groups that are now working on Seattle redistricting. One of the things that it would do is put South Park and Georgetown in the same district, which is interesting because I think those two communities work together on a lot of issues that affect the Duwamish and affect - again, a lot of people of color that live in those districts - there are issues that really would affect both of them. And so putting them in the same district, I could see why that would make sense. And you also have - I want to make sure I have this right, but I think - making sure Beacon Hill and it is connected to South Seattle as well. I'm gonna check here - is it also the International District here we're talking as well? Oh, Yesler Terrace - that's right. [00:36:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, so CID and Yesler Terrace will be in District 2 - kept them both in District 2 - that those were some really, really important considerations. And large percentages of those communities have talked about how important that is. You just talked about Georgetown and South Park being in that district. Looking at Lake City, Northgate, and Broadview in District 5. Also keeping growing renter populations together in South Lake Union and Downtown together there has been making a difference. Both communities of color and, as we talk in the larger redistricting conversation, communities of interest - and now with more than half of the City being renters - renters have been largely overlooked in terms of redistricting and City policy until now. And really what a number of these organizations are saying is - we've been overlooked, we have not been absent, but we've been ignored in this and communities and voices from places like Magnolia have been overrepresented and have been catered to this time. And there's a saying - when you're used to privilege, equity looks like oppression. And so Magnolia is saying - we're losing our voice - and kind of collectively, interests from the rest of the City are saying - no, what you're doing is losing the ability to speak over our voices. But now that we're all at the table and all have a voice, it's time for us to also be recognized as valid and important and worthy of preservation and continuity and representation and not have it broken up in favor of predominantly wealthy homeowners who are saying - well, we're a historically important community. Well, are you historically important and the change that the rest of the City has seen hasn't come to your district because you have fought so vehemently against it. And then turn around and say - and that's why you should cater to us and keep us together because we continue to fight against any kind of change. And realistically saying - hey, other districts have changed and boundaries need to change in those other areas to accommodate that. And so this does - certainly not all that advocates have asked for, but some meaningful progress and some promising boundaries, I think, for a lot of people in the City, for a lot of people who are not wealthy, for people who are renters no matter what the income is - because of the challenges that just the rental population is facing. And to your point, neighborhoods who have worked together and who share interests, who now have the opportunity to have that represented politically within the City? I think that's very helpful and I definitely hope people stay engaged. In this redistricting process. And as the voices from some of those communities who have had greater access to an ability to participate in these redistricting and City processes, and who've had the inside track and who have been listened to to a greater degree than others, that you add your voice to the conversation to make sure that it isn't drowned out by anyone else. Looking at a recent announcement - and kind of announcement is a better word than a new policy or a plan - because it is just announced and announced the intention to take action, but we have yet to see. There was a press conference yesterday about emergency walk-in centers for behavioral health cases, addressing our regional behavioral health crisis here. What was announced and what is the deal? [00:40:32] Melissa Santos: What exactly is going to happen remains a little bit unclear to me exactly, but basically King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a plan to just expand services for people who are experiencing a behavioral health crisis. And it's going to be part of his 2023 budget proposal, which isn't coming out 'til next month. So the idea is having more short- and long-term treatment - so more walk-in treatment that's available and more places to send people who have acute mental health needs. He was talking about how the County's lost a third of its residential behavioral healthcare beds - Erica Barnett at PubliCola reported on this pretty extensively - and there's just a concern there just won't be enough. I was surprised by the stat that there's only one crisis stabilization unit in the County that's 16 beds - that's not very much, especially when we know people suffer mental health crises more frequently than that small number of beds might indicate. So what's interesting is we want to put more money in somewhere so people aren't getting treated in jails, that they have a better place to go, but we're not quite - we don't know exactly the scope of this, or how much money exactly we're talking about to put toward more beds. I guess there's some plans to do so - is what I got from the executive. [00:42:06] Crystal Fincher: Certainly from a regional perspective, we saw representation from the mayor's office for the City of Seattle, county executive certainly, county council, regional leaders in behavioral health treatment and homelessness - all saying that - Hey, we intend to take action to address this. Like you said, Dow said that he will be speaking more substantively to this in terms of details with his budget announcement and what he plans to do with that. Universal acknowledgement that this is a crisis, that they lack funding and resources in this area, and say that they intend to do better with a focus, like you said, on walk-in treatment and the ability to provide that. But we just don't know the details yet. We'll be excited to see that. And you covered this week, just the tall task ahead of them, because we've spoken about before and lots of people have talked about even in this press conference, a problem that we almost require that people - the only access that people can get to treatment sometimes is if they've been arrested, which is just a wildly inefficient way to address this, especially when it plays a role in creating some of the problems with crime and other things. But even with the newly rolled-out intervention system with an attempt to - if someone who previously would've called 911 now can call a dedicated kind of other crisis line to try and get an alternative response - but even that is severely underfunded. What's happening with that? [00:44:00] Melissa Santos: So with 988 - this is the three-digit number people can call when they have a mental health crisis and they'll be connected to a counselor who can help talk them through it. The idea is ultimately for that system to also be able to send trained crisis responders - largely instead of police in many, many cases - meet people in-person, not just talk to them on the phone. But we just don't have enough of these mobile crisis response teams. There's money in the state budget to add more over the next couple of years, especially in rural areas that just don't have the coverage right now. They just don't have enough teams to be able to get to people when they need it. That's something they want to expand so there's more of a response than - that isn't a police officer showing up at your door. So that's the ultimate vision for this new line you call - 988 - but it's not fully implemented right now. You still will get some support. And if you call, I'm not trying to say people should not call the line, but they don't necessarily have all the resources they want to be able to efficiently deploy people - I shouldn't say deploy, it sounds very military - but deploy civilian trained helpers to people who are experiencing a crisis. So that's where they want it to go and The Seattle Times had an article just about how some of those designated crisis responders right now are just stretched so thin and that's just not gonna change immediately, even with some new state money coming in to add more people to do those sorts of things. And designated crisis responders have other duties - they deal with actually to getting people to treatment - some involuntarily in certain cases. Again, it's different than a police response and right now there's just not enough of those folks. [00:45:55] Crystal Fincher: Which jeopardizes the willingness of people to continue to call. Certainly the possibility that a police response can ultimately happen from someone who was requesting a behavioral health or another type of intervention response. And that is still a possibility which some people find challenging or - hey, they expected to avoid that or have something different if they call this and that might not always be the case. But it's certainly a challenge and I think one of the things that was talked about yesterday, which kind of wraps this under a whole umbrella, is there needs to be a lot more done in terms of infrastructure and capacity from - with there being someone to call, someone appropriate to call for whatever the challenge is, an appropriate response. If that is a behavioral health trained person, a crisis intervener, someone like that - and places to take people. Someone does respond and then can connect that person to services that exist. We have problems in a number of areas saying - yeah, we offered services or services are available and they aren't, or they aren't appropriate for the crisis that's there. They don't meet the needs of the person and their situation. So certainly a lot to build out. I think it is a positive step that we're hearing acknowledgement of this and a unified plan to take action, but still need to see what actually results 'cause sometimes we hear big fanfare to start and don't get much substantive on the back end. Certainly I hope with a number of the people involved in this that we do get some substantive progress and I hope to see that, I would expect to see that - but I'm looking forward to it. With that, I think that wraps up this show today. Thank you so much for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, August 12th, 2022. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler, assistant producer is Shannon Cheng with assistance from Bryce Cannatelli - we have an incredible team here at Hacks & Wonks - just want to continue to say that it is not just me, it is completely our team and not possible without this full team. Our wonderful co-host today is Seattle Axios reporter Melissa Santos. You can find Melissa on Twitter @MelissaSantos1. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on the new Twitter account @HacksWonks, you can find me on Twitter @finchfrii (spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I). Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show deliver to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show and Election 2022 resources at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the podcast episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Our Missouri
Summer Series 2022: Marjorie Paxson (NWMC, Part 4)

Our Missouri

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 23:59


This episode features excerpts from an oral history conversation between Marjorie “Marj” Paxson and Jean Gaddy Wilson recorded in 2007 for the National Women and Media Collection's 20th Anniversary. Wilson talks with Paxson about her career in media, her role in the establishment of the National Women and Media Collection (NWMC), and her views on the state of journalism for women at the turn of the 21st Century. About the Guests: MARJORIE “MARJ” PAXSON Marjorie “Marj” Bowers Paxson was born on August 13, 1923, in Houston, Texas. She attended Rice University in Houston for two years, where she worked on the student newspaper, the Thresher. In 1942 Paxson transferred to the University of Missouri and graduated in 1944. While at the University of Missouri, she worked on the Columbia Missourian. Over the course of her journalistic career, she held various reporting, editorial, and publishing positions at the United Press, Associated Press, Houston Post, Houston Chronicle, Miami Herald, St. Petersburg Times, Philadelphia Bulletin, Idaho Statesman, Chambersburg Public Opinion, and Muskogee Phoenix. Paxson was also named editor of Xilonen, an eight-page daily newspaper published for the United Nations World Conference for International Women's Year held in Mexico City in 1975. She retired in 1986 and continued writing a column for the Muskogee Phoenix until 2004. In 1987, Paxson donated $50,000 and her personal papers to help establish the National Women and Media Collection at the Western Historical Manuscript Collection (now administered by the State Historical Society of Missouri). Marjorie “Marj” Paxson died on June 17, 2017. JEAN GADDY WILSON Jean Gaddy Wilson is a professional consultant who has spoken on five continents and who spent fourteen years as a Professor of Journalism at the University of Missouri. She is a co-author, along with Brian S. Brooks and James L. Pinson, of the journalism textbook Working With Words: A Handbook for Media Writers and Editors. She is the founder of New Directions for News, an innovation think tank, at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, and her work led to the founding of the Journalism and Women Symposium (JAWS) and the International Women's Media Foundation. She co-founded the National Women and Media Collection (NWMC) with Gannett publisher Marj Paxson and the Western Historical Manuscript Collection (now administered by the State Historical Society of Missouri).

Tough Girl Podcast
Nirjala Tamrakar Wright - aka "Mountain Queen” - The Mountain Biking National Champion of Nepal from 2001 to 2012!

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 37:29


Nirjala, the "Mountain Queen," was born in Kumari Pati in Kathmandu, Nepal. Nirjala is one of two children, with a younger brother who is a keen road biker. Nirjala started out in her late teens as a professional model. For this career, she was required to keep fit, and it was through going to the gym that she got into first bodybuilding and then cycling. In 2001, some friends suggested she try her luck in a mountain bike race, The Himalayan Mountain Bike Race Series, and she won the National Women's Category. This proved to be her inspiration to leave modelling and pursue a professional career as a cyclist for the Nepal National Team. Nirjala's rise to fame and to working as a professional athlete for the Nepal National Team was beset by the difficulty that arose from the patriarchy-based society in which she grew up. Although she competed at a national and international level and at a higher level than the majority of Nepalese male riders, she was marginalized by her own national cycling association, which found sponsors and endorsements for her male counterparts. Despite this, she continued and found her own sponsors (like Qoroz Professional Titanium Bikes). Nirjala's Notable Achievements: First Nepalese Woman to cycle 22 days from Lhasa (Tibet) to Everest Base Camp (North) to Kathmandu (Nepal) First female to Win (2 times) the Highest Altitude, Endurance race in the World, "The Yak Attack" First Nepalese Female to win a cycle race in the UK First Nepalese Cycle Athlete to compete in a UCI World Cup Finals First Nepalese Cycle Athlete to compete in South Asian Games First Nepalese Woman to complete a cycle race of the Annapurna Circuit Recipient of the - "Tamrakar Award Fund" - Ugrachandi Award (Nepal) Participated in the mountain biking competition at the 16th Asian Games in China in November 2010 She is now a keynote speaker and role model for young women in Nepal and all over the world who have grown up in oppressive societies but dream of being recognized for their sports and achievements. The British writer Jane Nobel Knight wrote a book titled "The Inspiring Journeys of Pilgrim Mothers" and included a chapter on Nirjala's struggle and eventual success in her field. Nirjala is now married to her British husband, Daniel Wright, and has a son, Percy, and a daughter, Aurora. She is also a respected Mandala Artist (3-time Nepal National, Street Mandala Winner) and holds a Masters in Business Studies (MBS). Nirjala recently completed her 10km swim race on 9th July in 5 hours, organized by MediaCity UK Swim Challenge. New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Subscribe so you don't miss out.    You can support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Learn more by visiting www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast . Thank you.     Show notes Who is Nirjala Her passion for sports and fitness Wanting to do more challenging things in her life Her life in Nepal Being sent to a very academic school Her role as a girl in her household Her destiny in life  Trying to make her parents happy Doing all the household chores from a young age Her teenage years and realising that she wanted more from life Getting into physical exercise, starting with yoga and then onto cycling Winning her first mountain bike race Meeting like minded people who enjoyed mountain biking How winning the race changed her life Not having the proper gear  Feeling like somebody Not knowing what she needed to do to get to number 1 in the sport The next step in her journey  Taking part in all the mountain biking races, while studying and working Wanting to know how she compared to other athletes around the world Wanting to compete with the best mountain biking athletes in the world Getting the opportunity to race for 10 days in Northern India in 2009 Starting to win the international races The challenges she's faced, from getting gear to finding sponsorship Racing for no prize money  Funding her life and the financial struggle Racing in the World Cup in France The struggle of having to do everything by herself Facing a very technical route Having children and getting back on to the bike again Moving to the UK  Dealing with the cold lake water Signing up for her first triathlon  Dealing with pre race anxiety The women who have inspired Nirjala If you can dream big you can make it possible Connect with Nirjala on Facebook   Social Media   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NirjalaTamrakar   

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, August 2nd, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 15:28


This is Garrison Hardie with your CrossPolitic Daily News Brief for Tuesday, August 2nd, 2022. Today, we’ll talk about polling for the democratic party not looking so good… Oregon, considering a gun control measure that would be the strictest in the nation… Germany is planning for an energy crisis… and more… but first! FLF Magazine: We are on a mission to make magazines great again. So, subscribe to our Fight Laugh Feast magazine. This is a quarterly mini-book like experience, packed full of a variety of authors that includes theologically-driven cultural commentary, a Psalm of the quarter, recipes for feasting, laughter sprinkled throughout the glossy pages, and more. Sign your church up, sign your grumpy uncle up, and while you are at it…sign up the Pope, Elon Musks, and Russel Moore. Disclaimer: This magazine will guarantee various responses and CrossPolitic is not held liable for any of them. Reading the whole magazine may cause theological maturation, possibly encourage your kids to take the Lord’s Supper with you, and will likely cause you to randomly chuckle in joy at God’s wondrous world. Sign up today! Four issues and $60 per year, that is it. Go to fightlaughfeast.com right now to sign up!. https://www.dailywire.com/news/wild-new-poll-shows-virtual-tie-between-parties-as-gop-surges-among-hispanics New Poll Shows Virtual Tie Between Parties As GOP Surges Among Hispanics To the absolute despair of the Democratic Party, a new poll finds that the surge of support among Hispanics for the Republican Party has grown so strong that a virtual tie exists between support for the Democratic Party and the Republican Party. Evidence has been building for the seismic shift among Hispanics for months. In May, a nationwide poll by Quinnipiac showed President Biden’s approval rating among Hispanics at 26% as opposed to the 2020 presidential election, when he secured two-thirds of the Hispanic vote. “Biden is less popular among Hispanics than any other demographic, including age and gender,” Fox News noted of the poll’s results. A paltry 27% of Hispanics approved of Biden’s economic policies, a percentage even lower than the 32% of Americans nationwide. Hispanics ranked inflation as the most pressing issue concerning them. In March, Axios reported that their poll showed inflation had replaced COVID as the major source of concern among Hispanics. “Getting prices under control is very clearly the number one priority for the majority of Hispanics and Latinos, and it underscores the challenges Biden is facing now,” Ipsos pollster Chris Jackson acknowledged. “There’s not really a single issue that’s super-dominant, but we’re seeing a shift from a focus on COVID and COVID-related issues much more to inflation, cost pressures, supply chain breakdowns.” For the Republicans to come anywhere near parity with Democrats is a stunning turn in the recent political fabric of the United States. In 2016, Republican nominee Donald Trump won 29% of the Hispanic vote while Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton won 65% of the Hispanic vote; in 2012, Republican nominee Mitt Romney won 27% of the vote while Barack Obama won 71% of the vote. In 2008, 67% of Hispanics voted for Barack Obama and Joe Biden; only 31% voted for Republicans John McCain and Sarah Palin. According to Latino USA, in 2004 the Republican nominee, George W. Bush, reached the highwater mark for his party since 1980, garnering 40% of the vote, but even then his opponent John Kerry secured 58% of the vote. The Republican presidential candidate received 35% of the Hispanic vote in 2000, 21% in 1996, 25% in 1992, 30% in 1988, 37% in 1984, and 35% in 1980. https://thepostmillennial.com/biden-made-false-claims-that-inflation-reduction-act-will-only-raise-taxes-on-those-making-400-000-report?utm_campaign=64487 Biden made false claims that Inflation Reduction Act will only raise taxes on those making $400,000+: report President Biden has claimed that the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 will not raise taxes on individuals making less than $400,000 per year, but according to data released by Republicans on the Senate Finance Committee, the President's claims are false and misleading, Daily Wire reports. "The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 will lower health care costs for millions of Americans. And, for the first time in a long time, make the largest corporations pay their fair share without any new taxes on people making under $400,000 a year," Biden claimed in a tweet on Sunday. Data conducted by the nonpartisan Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) shows that taxes will increase for everyone except those making between $10,000 and $30,000 per year, Daily Wire reports. According to the JCT data reported by the outlet, "those making under $10,000 will see a .3% increase in their federal taxes; those making between $30,000 and $75,000 will see a .1% increase; those making between $75,000 and $100,000 a .2% increase; those making between $100,000 and $500,000 a .3% increase; those making between $500,000 and $1,000,000 a .5% increase; and those making over $1,000,000 a year will see a .6% increase." After analyzing the new bill, Penn Wharton researchers released a study that found that the Inflation Reduction Act will cause inflation to increase until at least 2024, and GDP won't see an increase until 2050. Republican Senator John Cornyn (Texas) slammed President Biden's tweet on Sunday and says it puts hardworking taxpayers under an even tighter microscope. "It will subsidize the wealthy at the expense of working families, raise taxes on workers making as little as $10K a year, and unleash an army of IRS agents on taxpayers," Cornyn wrote. "Oh, and it won't reduce inflation anytime soon." https://www.theepochtimes.com/oregonians-to-vote-on-nations-strictest-gun-control-measure_4633649.html?utm_source=partner&utm_campaign=BonginoReport Oregonians to Vote on Gun Control Measure Opponent Calls ‘Strictest’ in the Nation Oregonians will soon vote on a ballot measure that opponents say could virtually end the legal sale of firearms in the state, making it one of the “strictest gun-control measures ever proposed in the nation,” according to Leonard Williamson, an explanatory committee member who opposes the measure. If voters approve Measure 114, the “Changes to Gun Ownership and Purchase Requirements Initiative,” a permit would be required to obtain any firearm, magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds would be outlawed, some commonly used pump shotguns would be banned because they can exceed the 10 round limit, and State Police would be required to maintain a searchable public database of all permit applications. Arguments on both sides of the issue began in earnest on July 26 as a five-person committee— comprising two members who helped to draft and promote the citizen-driven ballot measure, another who supports it, and two who oppose it—met to write the 500-word Explanatory Statement that will appear in the voters’ guide this fall. The committee got off to a contentious start as the only statement considered had been provided by proponents. Those opposing the measure called their language “misleading.” The measure would enact a law requiring a permit issued by a local law enforcement agency to purchase any firearm. Applicants would have to pay a fee, be fingerprinted, complete safety training, and pass a criminal background check. In addition, the applicant must complete a hands-on demonstration of basic firearms handling to qualify. “In order to obtain the permit, an applicant would have to show up with a firearm to demonstrate the ability to load, fire, unload, and store the firearm,” Williamson, an Oregon trial attorney specializing in firearms law, told The Epoch Times. “But you can’t get a firearm without the permit. And under Oregon’s highly restrictive gun storage laws, no one can legally loan a firearm to another. That creates an impassable barrier.” Opponents claim that the permit and training programs also create an unfunded mandate with no enforcement measures. The measure does not estimate the cost or analyze its impact on small local police departments. The Oregon State Sheriff’s Association has estimated that even if a person could somehow complete the required training, the permitting process could cost sheriffs almost $40 million annually. But nothing in the measure provides any funding, and the fees included would not come close to cover