Podcasts about Agri

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  • 424PODCASTS
  • 1,328EPISODES
  • 29mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Agri

Show all podcasts related to agri

Latest podcast episodes about Agri

Green Sense Radio
Women leading the charge in Agtech

Green Sense Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 25:09


Over the last several years, billions of dollars have been poured into the Agri-food tech industry, yet only a small percentage of the money goes to women-owned companies. This week we spoke to Amy Wu, who is on a mission to get more women at the table and raise awareness about the lack of representation in funding in the Agri-food tech space. Amy is the Founder and Creator of From Farms to Incubators. This multimedia platform uses documentary, video, photography, and the written word to tell the stories of women leaders and innovators in Agtech.

Innovation Forum Podcast
Weekly podcast: Agri-sector entrepreneurs backed by Tesco and WWF

Innovation Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 29:58


This week: Representatives of the winning projects from WWF and Tesco's Innovation Connections programme for agricultural supply chain entrepreneurs, receiving up to £150,000 each, talk about their projects and how they will impact at scale. Talking with Ian Welsh are Casey Woodward, founder and CEO of AgriSound, Branston agronomy director David Nelson, Oliver Kynaston, carbon calculator manager at Farm Carbon Toolkit, Chirrup project lead Conrad Young, and Future by Insects chief executive Evelyn Peters. Plus: concerning new road development in the Amazon; indigenous rights impacts from land speculators; India's new carbon market for heavy emitting sectors, and UK retail chain Morrisons goes carbon neutral in its egg supply chain, in the news digest. Host: Ian Welsh

FACTUM-AUDIO
Factum - Agri, farmer Roger Dalrymple on sequestration

FACTUM-AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 23:16


RealAg Radio
RealAg Radio, August 3: Managing market uncertainty, fertilizer emissions target, and Alberta’s future in agri-processing

RealAg Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 54:59


Happy Wednesday, and hope you are enjoying the first week of August! Hard to believe that harvest and the beginning of another school year is right around the corner, yet here we are — thank you for making RealAgriculture and RealAg Radio a part of your day. We’ve got a great line-up for you today... Read More

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
RealAg Radio, August 3: Managing market uncertainty, fertilizer emissions target, and Alberta’s future in agri-processing

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 54:59


Happy Wednesday, and hope you are enjoying the first week of August! Hard to believe that harvest and the beginning of another school year is right around the corner, yet here we are — thank you for making RealAgriculture and RealAg Radio a part of your day. We’ve got a great line-up for you today... Read More

AHDB
353: Agri market outlook – livestock

AHDB

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:30


With food price inflation still on the rise, and persisting for longer in the UK than in Europe, margins will continue to be squeezed over the coming months.  In this episode, John Bates speaks to some of AHDB's market specialists and analysts to find out what impact this will have on the beef, lamb, pork and dairy sectors, as they discuss the latest Agri market outlook for livestock. Guests Sarah Baker, Senior Strategic Insight Manager Kim Heath, Senior Retail Insight Manager Patty Clayton, Lead Analyst (Dairy) Hannah Clarke, Senior Analyst (Red Meat) Agri market outlook AHDB's latest Agri market outlook looks in detail at the issues and shifting consumer behaviours. It's produced every six months and examines the factors that will affect farm businesses, helping levy payers plan and budget for what may lay ahead. Key findings for the livestock sectors: Beef  Beef production is expected to be up for 2022, bolstered by higher than anticipated cow throughput Overall beef consumption is forecast to drop by a moderate 4% in 2022, as the recovery in foodservice demand slows and retail sales start to suffer as consumers switch to cheaper proteins  Beef imports are forecast to grow as foodservice demand remains in growth Exports of beef are still forecast to increase, helped by higher domestic production and the tight supply situation facing the continent Lamb The 2022 lamb crop is forecast higher following growth in the breeding stock.  Total sheep meat production is expected to rebound from last year's low levels, returning to 2020 levels. A return to more normal trading patterns after two years of disruption led to an increase in the number of available lambs to kill, as we shift away from a pre-Brexit kill pattern Demand is expected to remain extremely sluggish in the retail and foodservice sector on the back of changing preferences and rising prices  Pork A contraction in the breeding herd is expected, leading to a 6% fall in UK pig meat production, strongly weighted towards the second half of 2022 UK demand is expected to weaken minimally as the year progresses, as pre-pandemic trends re-emerge along with wider increases in the cost-of-living Export markets remain challenging with Chinese demand slowing. Although exports had been increasing, higher GB pig prices and declining production may constrain future volume growth Imports are expected to grow in the second half of year as declines in demand are outweighed by declines in production Dairy GB milk production is forecast to finish the 2022/23 season between 1% and 3.8% lower year on year, depending on the severity of cash flow pressures  Input price volatility, uncertainties around milk prices and labour shortages will discourage most farms from pursuing yield growth Milk prices are high but are only just keeping pace with rising production cost China's oversupply may limit import demand for the remainder of the year, affecting global product pricing Low economic growth and food price inflation will weaken demand, potentially limiting further milk price increases Useful links Read the latest Agri market outlook Trade and policy: food, farming and agriculture Retail and consumer insight Improving shopper engagement with the meat aisle Nitrogen fertiliser adjustment calculator for cereals and oilseeds Cost benefit calculator for nitrogen fertiliser use on grassland Inflation hits value meat tiers, impacting struggling shoppers Subscribe to our sector newsletters for the latest prices, news and market information Get in touch If you have any comments about this podcast, would like to be a guest because you have something of interest to say to levy payers, or to suggest a topic for a future episode, please get in touch: foodandfarming@ahdb.org.uk We'd love to know what you think of our podcasts. If you'd like to give your feedback, please complete our short questionnaire, which will help us to improve the podcast on an ongoing basis, or email: foodandfarming@ahdb.org.uk.    This episode was produced and edited by Miriam Drewett, Marcomms Manager (Pork).

The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Mary Peluso, Director, Private Label Grocery, Sobeys

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 21:51


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet  Mary Peluso, Director, Private Label Grocery, SobeysThanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About MaryA highly motivated, energetic individual with an extensive background in buying, planning and omni merchandising. I have led successful teams in both the retail and wholesale markets. My diverse background has given me commodity experience in all industries including : health and beauty, grocery and hardlines.About UsDr. Sylvain Charlebois Dr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability. He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star. Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa. Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

Pa ceļam ar Klasiku
Beidzot visi kopā! Koncertuzvedums "Dziesma dejo. Deja skan" - sapnis, kas piepildījies

Pa ceļam ar Klasiku

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 21:50


4., 5. un 6. augustā Mežparka Lielajā estrādē notiks koncertuzvedums "Dziesma dejo. Deja skan", tāpēc "Klasika" uz sarunu aicinājusi idejas autoru, producentu Edžu Arumu, un arī divus mākslinieciskos vadītājus - diriģentu Mārtiņu Klišānu un horeogrāfu Agri Daņiļeviču.  *** Koncertuzvedumā vēl nebijušā formā savienosies divas tradīcijas - dziesma un deja, tajā kopā pulcēsies vairāk nekā 6000 dalībnieku no Latvijas un ārvalstīm. Dalībnieki demonstrēs gan labi pazīstamu repertuāru, gan speciāli šim notikumam veidotu jaunradi, kurai muzikālās daļas autors ir vairākkārtējs Grammy balvas nominants Uģis Prauliņš un horeogrāfs Agris Daņiļevičs.  Koncertuzveduma nosaukums "Dziesma dejo. Deja skan" ir arī formas apzīmējums, jo dejotāji dejos un dziedās un arī koristi dejos un dziedās. Repertuārā iekļauti labi zināmi koru un deju pasaules numuri, kā arī jaunrade, tādēļ komponists un muzikālās daļas vadītājs Uģis Prauliņš ir izveidojis vienotu skaņas dizainu visam koncertuzvedumam. Mežaparka Lielajā estrādē to izpildīs 14 mūziķu sastāvs, 53 kori un 105 deju kolektīvi no visas Latvijas, kā arī 10 ārzemju koru un deju kolektīvi. Tas paredz, ka arī koris pārvietosies vienā laukumā ar dejotājiem. Skatītāji šoreiz sēdēs atjaunotās Mežaparka Lielās estrādes korim paredzētās vietās un dalībnieki dejos laukumā, kur parasti atrodas skatītāju soli. Lai skatītājiem nodotu emocionālo vēstījumu, viss uzvedums būs dzīvajā izpildījumā. Režisoriskā vadlīnija ir šūpoles, kas šūpo latvieti strap pagātni un tagadni, zemi un debesīm, pļavām un mežu galotnēm, šo un to sauli, ziemu un vasaru, bērnību un vecumdienām, starp Latviju un svešumu - starp deju un dziesmu. Par latvieti, kas dzied un dejo - godos, skumjās, darot darbu, iemīlējies un ejot dabā. Koncertuzvedumā tiks izmantotas Ulda Žagatas, Aijas Baumanes, Ulda Šteina horeogrāfijas, skanēs Raimonda Paula, Mārtiņa Brauna, Emiļa Melngaiļa, Imanta Kalniņa, Jāzepa Vītola un vēl citu skaņražu darbi. Inta Pīrāga: No skatītāju viedokļa ir tā - ja dodamies uz Mežaparku un dzirdam, ka tur piedalīsies kori un dejotāji,visiem jau gatavs priekšstats, kā tur būs. Bet jūs esat parūpējušies par to, lai tur būtu pilnīgi kaut kas cits. Edžu, jūs esat šīs idejas autors: kas īsti sagaida skatītājus?  Edžus Arums: Skatītājus sagaida nepieredzēta lieta, kas ir ļoti ilgi gaidīta - ka dejotāji un dziedātāji kopā veido vienu priekšnesumu, vienu mākslu. Pie tam ļoti labu mākslu. Kustēsies arī dziedātāji - , mēs to skaļi saucam par dejošanu, bet tā ir tāda forša dejošana, vairāk kustību. Savukārt dejotāji arī dziedās, tikai viņiem būs jāskatās apkārt, lai tuvumā nav kāds koris ar mikrofoniem - tad dejotājiem būs jādzied klusāk. Agris Daņilevičs: Visa tapšanai nebija īpaši daudz laika, jo mēs, dejotāji, un arī koristi reāli varējām sanākt kopā tikai no 1. aprīļa - sākt mēģināt un saprast posta apmērus, bet tas viss ir vainagojies ar jau izdarīto darbu, ar skaidru un taustāmu vīziju. Un par to, ka šis pasākums notiks, tas būs kvalitatīvs un labs, vairs nav pilnīgi nekādu šaubu. Nupat biju pie gaismošanas lietām - ar "NA" puišiem sagaismosim riktīgi labi tieši tās intermēdijas, kurām mūziku rakstījis Uģis Prauliņš un kur dzirnieši izpaudīsies ar kaut ko patiešām jaunu, neredzētu arī mums. Protams, tas ir izaicinājums! Protams, pie tradicionālā repertuāra, kur ir skaisti tautas tērpi, būs baltās gaismās, lai redz tautastērpu rakstus un krāsas - tur mēs ar gaismām nejauksimies iekšā, bet intermēdijas būs tāds bišķi kosmisks pasākums. Dalībnieki - dejotāji un dziedātāji - atradīsies tur, kur parasti sēž skatītāji, savukārt skatītāji būs augšā, uz koru podestiem. Vai apzināti izvēlēts, ka tas viss notiks vēlu vakarā? Edžus Arums: Jā, apzināti, jo gaismu spēle ir vajadzīga. Gaismai ir ārkārtīgi liela nozīme režijā, idejas nodošanā tālāk, un neviens tos melnos prožektorus vēl nav izdomājis, lai gaismā varētu uztaisīt tumsu, tāpēc sagaidām vakara stundas un esam priecīgi. Dziedātājs, dejotājs, gaisma un mūzika - šīs četras dimensijas iet kopā. Mārtiņ, lai taptu šāds koncerts, nepieciešamas ļoti daudzas mēģinājumu stundas. Līdz ar to, ka šis ir tāds ārpuskārtas pasākums, Mārkā jūs trenējāt dziesmas? Jo tur jau mazliet sakarā ar Uģa Prauliņa intermēdijām kaut kas arī tajā ierastajā kārtībā pamainās. Mārtiņš Klišāns: Jā, laika ir bijis maz. Mūs ietekmējuši visādi apstākļi - ilgi gaidījām, un tikai šopavasar ar pilnu sparu varējām mesties cīņā, jo tomēr tas viss ir paralēli mūsu gatavošanās procesam lielajiem svētkiem, kas notiks nākamgad. Neskatoties uz to, šis ir brīvprātīgs pasākums un no koristu puses bija ļoti liela atsaucība un vēlme piedalīties, jo visi ir vienkārši nocietušies kaut ko darīt! Kas attiecas uz kora uzdevumiem, tie ir ļoti nopietni, jo tas ir pilnīgi kaut kas cits - te nav nekā no Dziesmu svētku repertuāra, izņemot dažas mūsu zelta fonda dziesmas, bet principā - bija vesels liels saraksts, kas bija jāapgūst. Dejotājiem solis ir ļoti raits, un dažās dziesmās tempi ir ļoti, ļoti, ļoti, ļoti žilbinoši... Jo tās asociācijas ar tautas deju man ir tādas jau izsenis un īstenībā ir gribējies lauzt šo audiobaudījumu - nevis kvalitāti, bet veidu, kā dejas notiek, un ir ļoti labi apzināties, ka šoreiz dejas notiks dzīvās mūzikas izpildījumā. Nebūs neviena ieraksta, un vairāk nekā tūkstoš dziedātāju lielajam korim būs liels uzdevums tikt galā tieši ar šīm žilbinoši ātrajām dejām. Bet, kas attiecas uz Uģa Prauliņa jaundarbiem, tur vairāk būs iesaistīts jauniešu koris "Balsis" ar Intu Teterovski. Tā būs kopēja sadarbība. Viņi būs tie, kas iznesīs intermēdijas. Drusku būs arī jāpakustas. Visu nestāstīšu, bet būs interesanti. Agris ir pieradis strādāt ar saviem dejotājiem, bet tagad droši vien horeogrāfiskā partitūra lielā mērā tiek projicēta arī uz daudzajiem koristiem, vai ne? Agris Daņiļevičs: Jā, koris ir dinamisks, koris nestāv vienā vietā - tas pārvietojas: reizēm koris ir kopā, reizēm tas ir kopā ar dejotājiem, reizēm atsevišķi, reizēm koris ir tuvplānā skatītājiem, tad tas ir druscītiņ tālāk, tā kā kora apskaņošana nebūs vienkārša. Arī dzirniešiem tas bija milzīgs izaicinājums, jo divarpus stadionu mērogs - tas nav vienkārši. Beidzot redzu sava ilggadējā darba augļus, jo vienmēr deju zālē, stadionos vai kādos citos laukumos vienmēr saviem dejotājiem esmu prasījis redzēt laukumu, redzēt savu vietu tur un redzēt, ko dara pārējie un kur atrodies tu pats. Tad nu šī ir tā reize, kur tas ārkārtīgi noder. Tā ir milzīga pieredze arī pašiem dejotājiem. Maziem, lieliem, visiem. Mārtiņ, ja koris kustēsies, vai dziedāšanas kvalitāti tas nebojās? Mārtiņš Klišāns: Ņemam vērā visus apstākļus un vajadzības, tāpēc būs balanss: ne vienmēr un visur tieši dziedot kustēsimies, jo mums ir iespēja dziedāt starp dejām, un ir dejas, kurās mums nav jādzied. Ir arī dažas integrētas lietas atsevišķās dejās, ko atkal neatklāšu. Bet principā esam gatavi. Protams, apskaņošanas ziņā tas ir liels izaicinājums, jo laukums ir ļoti liels, izkārtošanās perimetrs mums ir diezgan plašs, taču mūsdienu tehnoloģijas un apskaņošanas sistēmas ir tik tālu attīstījušās, ka ļauj mums diezgan brīvi rīkoties ar pārvietošanās iespējām un scenogrāfiem. Domāju, ka būs labi. Agri, raidījumā "Kultūras rondo" jūs atzināties, ka starp dejotājiem arī ir daudz labu dziedātāju un viņi nepakautrēsies arī padziedāt. Agris Daņiļevičs: Jā, es to sen jau esmu pamanījis, ka dejotāji tiešām ļoti grib dziedāt un lielai daļai dejotāju tas arī padodas. "Dzirnās" izmantojām mūsu ļoti labo dejotāju un arī Mārtiņa audzēkni Aleksandru Špicbergu, kura nupat pabeidza Kordiriģēšanas nodaļu, un dejotāji, iespējams, ir Aleksandras pirmais koris, jo tiešām viņa ar mums strādāja, mēs skaisti iemācījāmies dziesmas "Gaismas pils", "Saule. Pērkons. Daugava", "Piena ceļš", "Jāņuvakars". Visas dziesmas esam iemācījušies! Nezinu, vai visiem dejotājiem būs bijusi iespēja paaicināt palīgā kādu diriģentu, bet varbūt viņi tiešām tā arī darījuši, jo mēs mēģinājām rādīt piemēru, kā to vajadzētu. Piedalīšanās šajā pasākumā ir brīvprātīga, bet dalībnieku skaits, kas atsaucies, ir milzīgs. Vai tiesa, ka tie varētu būt pieci seši tūkstoši? Edžus Arums: Sākotnēji bijām cerējuši uz lielāku skaitu, bet kovidķibele iegrieza amatiermākslas kolektīviem visā republikā - jūtam, ka kritums ir par trīsdesmit, četrdesmit procentiem, un tieši ar to saskaramies arī mēs. Taču viss notiek tā, kā tam jānotiek - seši tūkstoši ir tieši tas daudzums, ar kuru mēs ļoti labi operējam uz laukuma, kurus mēs varam brīvi apzināt. Dalībnieku nav ne par daudz, ne par maz, un varam realizēt savas mākslinieciskās idejas tieši tā, kā mēs to bijām iedomājušies sākumā. Tā ka Kāds šeit stāv klāt un visu koriģē - no apjoma viedokļa viss ir pareizi un labi. Šķiet neticami, ka uz laukuma pietiek vietas sešiem tūkstošiem dalībnieku... Mārtiņš Klišāns: Pirms gada mēs pavadījām vienu skaistu nakti Mežaparka estrādē, mūsu jaunajā Sidraba birzī. Atradāmies vieni paši augšā, skatītāju tribīnēs, tādās Dieva ložās, kā mēs smējāmies, un tā aina, kas paveras no turienes klātienē, ir neticama, tā ir ļoti iespaidīga. Laukums ir milzīgs... Ja skatītāju zonā nav solu, faktiski to pat grūti iztēloties - tur jābūt klāt, lai saprastu, ka mūsu sākotnējās idejas un ieceres scenogrāfijas ziņā bija pat jāmaina. Jo tas lauks ne tikai vizuāli, bet arī emocionāli ir neaptverams. Tā ka vietas pietiks visiem - gan cilvēkiem, gan idejām, gan emocijām, gan visai kopābūšanai. Vairāk un plašāk - ierakstā. *** Koncertuzveduma radošā komanda: Edžus Arums - idejas autors, producents Uģis Prauliņš - komponists, muzikālās daļas vadītājs Mārtiņš Klišāns - mākslinieciskais vadītājs, virsdiriģents Agris Daņiļevičs - mākslinieciskais vadītājs, horeogrāfs, virsvadītājs Ilze Jakubovska - režisore Aigars Ozoliņš - scenogrāfs Oskars Pauliņš - gaismu režisors Ints Teterovskis - virsdiriģents ar iniciatīvu Taiga Ludborža - virsvadītāja Ilze Mažāne - virsvadītāja Indra Ozoliņa - virsvadītāja Ilmārs Dreļs - virsvadītājs Diāna Gavare - virsvadītāja Baiba Ķestere - virsvadītāja Kaspars Brauns - virsvadītājs, mākslinieciskā vadītāja asistents.  

L'Empreinte
[REDIFFUSION] Christophe Aillet de La Boulangère : comment la boulangerie industrielle se réinvente-t-elle à l'ère du “zéro plastique” et “zéro packaging” ?

L'Empreinte

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 25:11


Dans l'Empreinte, nous essayons de comprendre, ensemble, comment les marques d'aujourd'hui s'engagent ou non, pour notre planète et pour notre société. Chaque semaine, Alice Vachet reçoit donc des start-upers, des PDG de grands groupes ou encore des directeurs de la RSE qui lui expliquent comment leur entreprise s'engage pour porter une révolution de l'impact sur notre planète, une empreinte. Dans ce nouvel épisode de L'Empreinte, Alice Vachet reçoit Christophe Aillet, le directeur général de La Boulangère. La marque La Boulangère Bio, entreprise implantée au cœur de la Vendée, fête ses 20 ans et associe ses convictions fortes autour du bio et de l'équitable avec la performance industrielle. Depuis 2018, La Boulangère Bio propose des pains et viennoiseries bio avec de la farine de blé et des œufs issus du commerce équitable français, labellisés Agri-Éthique France. Au-delà du bio, c'est aussi sur le packaging que la marque s'engage en proposant des emballages papier pour des produits. Concrètement, ça change quoi un emballage papier ? Et comment la marque réduit-elle son empreinte écologique ? Toutes les réponses dans ce nouvel épisode.  En savoir plus Inscrivez-vous à la newsletter de L'Empreinte pour suivre toute l'actualité RSE en cliquant ici. Avec notre partenaire Cyberghost, profiter d'une réduction de 84 % soit 1,94 €/mois et de 4 mois offerts pour votre VPN. Garantie 45 jours satisfait ou remboursé. Pour bénéficier de cette offre exclusive, rendez-vous sur le lien suivant : https://cyberghostvpn.com/LEMPREINTE Détail de la procédure d'activation sur ce lien Si vous souhaitez écouter les épisodes sans interruption, rendez-vous sur la chaîne Bababam+ d'Apple Podcasts : https://apple.co/3NQHV3I Abonnement L'Empreinte : https://apple.co/3Q3svuN

FACTUM-AUDIO
Factum - Agri, A tale from America on Carbon Credits

FACTUM-AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 24:21


The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Jim Delsnyder, COO, Zoglo's

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 16:16


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet Jim Delsnyder, Chief Operating Officer, Zoglo'sThanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About JimJim has been a leader in the Food and Beverage industry for more than 20 years. He was the former president of Eska Water Inc for 9 years and has worked at many other reputable companies such as Nestle Waters and Quaker Oats. About UsDr. Sylvain Charlebois Dr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability. He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star. Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa. Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

Roy Green Show
Dir. Agri-Foods Analytics Lab, Sylvain Charlebois, light at the end of the food inflation tunnel?

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 16:50


The Food Professor
Live from the Montreal SIAL Food Innovation Show: Meet Sylvain Roux, CEO, and Philippe Begin, VP, Dauphinais

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 16:16


Welcome to another special SIAL bonus episodes of The Food Professor podcast!Sylvain and I were thrilled to be the official podcast of the SIAL food innovation trade show held in Montreal in April. We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers from many facets of the food industry.   These are their stories.In this episode:  Meet  Sylvain Roux, CEO, and Philippe Begin, Vice President, Dauphinais Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor.  Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews from our podcast studio on the trade show floor in Montreal at SIAL, and stay tuned for our regular full length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.   About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

Tasmanian Country Hour
Smaller Tasmanian agri tourism businesses helping carbon capture

Tasmanian Country Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 12:48


Two small agri tourism businesses in north Tasmania are taking care of the environment with the help of visitors to their farms

Clare FM - Podcasts
Clare Farm Family Chair Warns One Agri Death Is 'One Too Many'

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 5:40


Clare IFA's Farm Family Committee Chair insists one farm death is one death too many. Geraldine O'Connell, Clare IFA's Farm Family Committee Chair is urging farmers to make small changes that could save lives this Farm Safety Week.

Clare FM - Podcasts
Chief Fire Officer Warns People Will Pay For Callouts If Burning Agri Waste During Heat Warning

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 3:19


Clare County Fire and Rescue Service is warning farmers not to burn agricultural waste while the temperature advisory warning is in place. Chief of Clare Fire and Rescue Service Adrian Kelly says while they normally make allowances for callouts to controlled burnings, that any call during this hot spell will be charged for.

Sizigedlile
Vuka Uzitjathe

Sizigedlile

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 25:04


Topic : Farming  Project, Agri-business planting onions, spinach etc. and sell the product to the community   Guest: Mfundo Emmanuel Mahlangu – Young black farmer

The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Rob Sengotta and Landon Kroeker, Von Slick's Finishing Touch

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 16:04


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Rob Sengotta and Landon Kroeker, Von Slick's Finishing TouchThanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About Rob Sengotta and Landon KroekerThe Man Behind the Flavour: RobMy 25 year culinary career has been an experience filled with adventure and growth. From world travel to building amazing relationships and pushing myself out of my comfort zone to continue to master my craft.I've had the privilege of cooking on private yachts, fine dining trains, even at a Helicopter ski resort.  Working with some of the best chefs in Europe and Canada along the way.From Michelin star restaurants in England and France, to spending time as a private chef in Whistler and Vancouver and finally owning my own fine dining restaurant for 10 years in British Columbia's beautiful Shuswap region.Using compound butters in fine dining is a common occurrence to bring bold flavour to your dish, as well as create dish consistency. Yet it can be difficult to find the product on the retail level.From a home cook to professional chef, Von Slick's has the ability to deliver a new level of restaurant quality flavour to any of your home-cooked meals. About UsDr. Sylvain Charlebois Dr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability. He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star. Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa. Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

SAfm Market Update with Moneyweb
Agri group Senwes reports 30.9% increase in profit

SAfm Market Update with Moneyweb

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 7:02


Francois Strydom – CEO, Senwes

The Irish Tech News Podcast
Helping Agri-related businesses to stay profitable while choosing sustainable choices with Brijesh Thoppil

The Irish Tech News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 18:35


On this podcast, Diana Paiva is joined by Brijesh Thoppil, Director of Strategic Partnerships at EOS Data Analytics. He talks about EOS Data Analytics, a global provider of Al-powered satellite imagery analytics and the climate issues that data analytics is more focused to improve and help. Brijesh Thoppil also explained about lucrative agro-partnership in his company and helping agri-related businesses to be more sustainable while staying profitable. About Brijesh Brijesh Thoppil is the Director of Strategic Partnerships at EOS Data Analytics, a global provider of AI-powered satellite imagery analytics that helps businesses get fast and actionable data and preserve the planet. He is primarily responsible for the management, growth, and development of the company's strategic partnerships, both existing and new. Brijesh holds a Bachelor of Technology in Mechanical Engineering from Anna University (Chennai). He has over 11 years of experience in various roles, including business development, implementation of technical projects, and management. Currently, Brijesh is responsible for strengthening the company's approach to partnership development by developing and implementing a partnership strategy to expand EOSDA products across targeted verticals; coordinating partners' training and communicating to partners EOSDA solutions' updates and collaborating with EOSDA Sales, Marketing, Product, and Technology teams to deliver partners' feedback. He is also responsible for assisting in product development to ensure the EOSDA offerings are aligned with the products adoption strategy and tracking the progress of the partnership goals achievement. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brijesh-thoppil/ About Diana Paiva About Diana Paiva Diana is currently interning with Irish Tech News. She graduated from Birkbeck University, with a degree in modern languages and she is currently doing a master's in Journalism at the University of Roehampton. She has an interest in technology, fashion, and the environment. Starting her master's in journalism made her realise that she has a passion to report and write people's stories. After graduation, her main priority is to find a job in communications or public relations. Diana Paiva is active on social media platforms, including Twitter, and LinkedIn.

The Food Professor
Live from the Montreal SIAL Food Innovation Show: Meet Gurth M. Pretty, SIAL Cheese Ambassador, Lakeview Cheese Galore

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 18:30


Welcome to another special SIAL bonus episodes of The Food Professor podcast!Sylvain and I were thrilled to be the official podcast of the SIAL food innovation trade show held in Montreal in April. We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers from many facets of the food industry.   These are their stories.In this episode:  Meet Gurth M. Pretty, SIAL Cheese Ambassador, Lakeview Cheese Galore Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor.  Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews from our podcast studio on the trade show floor in Montreal at SIAL, and stay tuned for our regular full length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About Gurth:I am a bilingual, passionate and knowledgeable cheese and sales professional, specializing in both Canadian and international cheese. My experiences include retail merchandising, sales analyses and review, category management, distribution, marketing, brand strategy, corporate training, co-ordinating special events, media spokesman, sales strategies, participating as a judge at international cheese competitions, recipe development, food costing, catering, vendor negotiation and problem solving.Gurth's Bookhttps://amzn.to/3NpDLPOGurth's Cheese Storehttps://lakeviewcheesegalore.ca/  About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

Future Hacker
#86 - Agro Farming Technology (Yazen Al Kodmani)

Future Hacker

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 23:15


A conversation about growing sustainable, organic farming in the middle of the desert, about BioFarm, the advancements in Agri business in the UAE (agri tourism opportunities), greenhouses & shade houses, the Future of Agriculture and all the challenges and opportunities out there, and how the future of family farming looks like. Yazen Al Kodmani is a seasoned organic farm manager who has developed and overseen a proven hybridization of large-scale organic farming, agritourism and retail in the UAE. With over a decade of experience, he has transformed over 25 hectares of arid land into a profitable wholesale and direct-to-consumer farm and tourist destination. He has also established 3Y Agtech, an agritech consulting firm to address the regional food security challenges which brings together the expertise of experienced consultants, developers and farmers.

The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Manisha (Mistry) Nagar, Private Brands Product Development Manager - Health & Wellness, Consumables, Baby & Pet, Walmart

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 14:44


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet Manisha (Mistry) Nagar, Private Brands Product Development Manager - Health & Wellness, Consumables, Baby & Pet, Walmart  Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.   About Manisha:A quick learner with 15+ years of Product Development experience from both manufacturing and retail. Accustomed to multi-tasking in a fast-paced, and ever-changing environment.Strong leadership abilities with the ability to communicate, influence and negotiate at all levels. Excellent relationship builder. Always looking for opportunities to improve personally and professionally. Direct New Product Development & Continuous Improvement Ability to manage priorities, multitask and handle complex situations under pressure. Proven ability to prioritize and use time efficiently and effectively.  Problem Solver Analytical Skills Leadership & coaching abilities About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel! 

Innovation Forum Podcast
Five agri-sector innovation projects backed by Tesco and WWF

Innovation Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 26:02


Innovation Connections from Tesco and WWF is a new accelerator programme that has paired pioneering start-ups with Tesco suppliers to fast-track innovation in the supply chain. In May, a group of finalists pitched head-to-head in front of a panel of experts from Tesco and WWF, with five exciting projects each awarded funding of up to £150,000. Innovation Connections is part of a long-term partnership between Tesco and WWF that aims to halve the environmental impact of the average shopping basket. In this podcast, Innovation Forum's Ian Welsh speaks with representatives from the five projects. Casey Woodward, founder and CEO of AgriSound David Nelson, agronomy director at Branston Oliver Kynaston, carbon calculator manager at Farm Carbon Toolkit Conrad Young, project lead at Chirrup Evelyn Peters, chief executive at Future by Insects. For more detail on the Innovation Connections programme and the winning projects click here.

The Food Professor
Live from the Montreal SIAL Food Innovation Show: Meet Natasha Vandenhurk, CEO at Three Farmers Foods

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 18:40


Welcome to another special SIAL bonus episodes of The Food Professor podcast!Sylvain and I were thrilled to be the official podcast of the SIAL food innovation trade show held in Montreal in April. We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers from many facets of the food industry.   These are their stories.In this episode: Natasha Vandenhurk, CEO at Three Farmers Foods Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor.  Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews from our podcast studio on the trade show floor in Montreal at SIAL, and stay tuned for our regular full length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About Natasha:Natasha Vandenhurk is CEO and one of the initial founders at Three Farmers Foods. She studied Economics at the University of Saskatchewan before partnering with three farmers from Southeast Saskatchewan to realize a dream of taking healthy wholesome foods to the marketplace.Being CEO of a growing, natural foods brand has set Natasha on a journey of continuous learning and leadership. Her passion, dedication and tenacity has grown Three Farmers Foods from a young start up to a thriving international brand. As Three Farmers Foods continues to evolve into an established Consumer Packaged Goods brand, Natasha is adamant about building high performing teams throughout the organization that are dedicated to excellence, accountability and continual learning in this dynamically changing industry. About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!

WEDA CONNECT
Get To Know Fleming Agri Products

WEDA CONNECT

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 15:20


In today's podcast, NAEDA Connect's Mike Kraemer visits with Alison Duncan and Gareth Walker from Fleming Agri Products, who discuss what makes Fleming Agri Products a leader in its field and their desire to expand distribution and retail sales in North America.

The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Mike Primucci, Mimi Foods

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 18:29


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet Mike Primucci, Mimi FoodsURL Mentioned in the podcast: https://chefduo.ca/ Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.   About Mike:MiMi Foods 'Artistic Dough Products'Dedicated to developing and delivering premium quality products and exceptional customer service through operational excellence, innovative product development, client training and support, excellence in food safety, and doing it all with ARTISTIC PASSION. BRC and HACCP Certified.SPECIALITIES: Pizza dough manufacturing and related pizza products consisting of:Pizza Dough Balls, Par-baked Crusts, Sheeted Doughs, Flatbreads, Ciabatta's, Focaccia's, Pinsa Romana, Panuozzo Breads, Gluten Free Products (Cauliflower, Red Lentil, Broccoli, Black Bean, Beetroot, Quinoa and Keto). Products available in various shapes, sizes and flavours.WHAT SETS UP APART is our ability to custom formulate products. Our R&D team works closely with our customers to develop and produce proprietary formulations such as the 2012 Canadian Grocery Grand Prix Winner for Innovation for the Focaccia Toscana product.PROUD developer and supplier for the pizza dough used in the 'Guinness World Record' for most pizza's made in one hour, held by Bob Blumer of the 'Glutton for Punishment' TV show.Link to article on MiMi Foods- Canadian Business Executive:http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?EID=e5608c2e-0380-481d-8180-e0fe91c03a77FOLLOW US ON TWITTER & INSTAGRAM ~ @mimifoodsLEARN MORE about MiMi Foods at www.mimifoods.caAbout UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel! 

RTÉ - CountryWide Podcast
The Agri Economy

RTÉ - CountryWide Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 12:24


Economists Jim Power and Emma Dillon discuss the state of play of the Irish Agri Economy and outline just what we can expect from the economy this year.

Hagmann Report
Agri-cide & Genocide Now Underway | Steve Quayle Joins Doug Hagmann | The Hagmann Report (FULL SHOW) 6/16/2022

Hagmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 90:01 Very Popular


For show notes, links and complete description, visit www.HagmannReport.com/videosThe Hagmann Report is brought to you by EMP Shield - www.EMPshield.com/hagmannUse Promo Code HAGMANN for $50 OFF!IMPORTANT LINKS:DONATE: (www.HagmannReport.com/fundraiser)HAGMANN COFFEE: (www.HagmannStore.com)The Hagmann Report provides news and information based on a combination of exclusive investigative work, proprietary sources, contacts, qualified guests, open-source material. The Hagmann Report will never be encumbered by political correctness or held hostage to an agenda of revisionist history.Join Doug Hagmann, host of the Hagmann Report, Weekdays @ 7 PM ET.ON THE GO? SUBSCRIBE TO HAGMANN'S PODCASTiTunes: (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/hagmann-report/id631558915?uo=4)Spotify: (https://open.spotify.com/show/376mkckQHCPYTJssQN794g)iHeart: (https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-hagmann-report-30926499/)Spreaker: (https://www.spreaker.com/show/hagmann-report)Email: studio@hagmannreport.comFOLLOW HAGMANN AT:Parler: (www.parler.com/profile/DouglasHagmann)Gab: @DougHagmannTwitter: Twitter is garbage

Ideas Untrapped
UNDERSTANDING INNOVATION

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:39


Innovation is the key ingredient to human material prosperity and an essential factor in economic development. But the importance of innovation is often misunderstood because of the common belief that poorer nations need not invent anything new and can always copy existing technologies from the richer nations - hence innovation policies are often missing from the development agenda of most developing countries. My guest today is social scientist and innovation policy expert Dan Breznitz - and he has made many significant contributions to changing the conversation and policy around innovation. We talked about the distinctions between innovation and invention, why the Silicon Valley model of innovation does not fit all contexts, and how innovation policies can be set in the long term.TRANSCRIPTTobi;Where I will start, basically, is innovation as the engine of economic growth is a view that has been pretty much validated through economic history. But when we think of innovation, we still think of new things, invention, which is kinda like a distinction you made in the book. So briefly, just tell me what is the difference between innovation and inventing new things, which most people understand innovation to be.Dan;So there's a big difference between innovation (and that's what we should care about) and invention. We should also care about it but it does not necessarily lead to economic growth, especially not where it happens. So if you and I would go back to my lab or your lab in the university, or just a lab in the back room, and we come up with a new idea for a new product or service. Even if we move it to a level of a prototype or have a patent on it, that's great, that's invention but that's not innovation.Innovation is taking ideas and actualizing them in the real world. So taking the idea that we develop and actually make it into a product (if we talk about economic innovation) or service and sell it to people. It can be novel ideas, but it's across all the arrays of activities from coming up with novel ideas, to improving them, to recombining them with others, to innovation in their production, to even innovation in their assembly and after-sale. And innovation is important and creates welfare, not in the moment of invention but because it's continuous. So let me give you two examples that are very prominent because of Covid.The one which is the most simple, since I know you love new cars, right, Tobi, and you ordered at least three in the last year, right. And you can't get even one of them. And the reason you can get one of them is not because people cannot produce cars, but because there are not enough semiconductors. And the reason there are not enough semiconductors in the world is Silicon Valley, which is called Silicon Valley because it was in semiconductors [but now] no longer knows how to innovate in the production of semiconductors. There are actually only very few companies. two be exact, and they both come from Taiwan, that knows how to create semiconductors, and how to actually innovate in their production.But a much better example is COVID itself. I mean, it's great that we came up with new vaccines. But that was not enough, right, with the molecule. We had to innovate in their production, we had to innovate in material science creating a new glass vial, so we can move them around. We have to innovate in their distribution. But it's now very, very clear that that's not enough. True welfare for humanity and the ability to live with Corona would happen when we innovate to a level, which is now very clear, of producing billions of units of said vaccines and distributing them to every human on earth. Okay. That will probably allow us to put Corona behind us.So it's not the moment of invention. I mean, the moment of invention is great. But innovation is the actualization of ideas all across the [value chain], if you want to call it the supply or the production, network, and stages, in order to constantly come up with better and improved products and services, and its impact, real impact start to happen when either all or most people on earth actually have access to it. And that happens because it's continuous.So you and I talk on Zoom, which is a very old invention, right? Telemedia. However, you and I can talk - you're in Nigeria, I'm in Toronto - and not even think about the cost of this because hundreds of millions... not because somebody invented it, but because after somebody invented it, hundreds of millions of engineering hours, if not days, went into improvement in fiber optics, improvement in software algorithm, improvement in memory, improvement in CPU and speed to the level that now you and I can do zoom as if this is costless. And that's the real impact of innovation.Tobi;There's so much to unpack in that answer. But now today, like you said in the introduction, when people talk about innovation what usually comes to mind is Silicon Valley, and that's the model that you've critiqued quite a lot, rightfully so, in my opinion on many points, but just give me a brief. What are the limitations of the Silicon Valley model of innovation today and why is it an inappropriate example of what innovation should be?Dan;So let's understand what has changed in the world. And what has changed in the world in the last 20 to 30 years is before, when somebody came up with an invention and a novel innovation, it was then produced, it was transformed into industries, in production around that area. So let's think about HP, or Apple computers, as it was known there.It used to be that when they came up with new products, they will produce that product very close to their headquarters. So Apple and HP employed 1000s, if not 10s of 1000s of engineers around Silicon Valley or in places like Colorado, around it. And those people will have great jobs in what you and I will now call advanced manufacturing, and all boats will be right. What we now have is a global system of fragmented production.So let's talk about semiconductors. Okay. In semiconductors, now, we look at Tel Aviv, Silicon Valley, Taipei, Shinshu Park, Taiwan, Seoul, Korea, Shenzhen, in China, all of those places have unbelievably successful semiconductors industries. And if you look at those places, you'll also see that many of the same companies work in all of those places. So you think great, but then if you look at what the companies in those places do, it's completely different.So in Silicon Valley and Tel Aviv, it's the first stage, we think about new ideas to put on silicon. In Taiwan, as you now know because you can get your car, it's the only place where they can take those ideas and actually make them into silicon. And Seoul, in Korea, Samsung and LG control very critical niches. So for every smartphone that you buy, the second-highest profits go to Samsung and LG because of memory and the controller of the screen, the touch screen. And in Shenzhen, it's the only place where we can work with different materials, constantly changing components [that] actually produce a product that works, for example, this iPhone and all the rest and sell it.So all those places are extremely innovative, but they do different activities. And in order to succeed in each one of them, you need therefore different innovational capacities, but also different finance, different institutional system, different education system. And there are real, for two reasons, those options of where you work. One is because once you develop those capabilities and systems, you can excel in one or two of those stages but not in others. And the second is because they also define who is enjoying the fruits of the success, who is being employed, and how we're being compensated for that employment.[What] happened in Silicon Valley and in Tel Aviv is that when move, we move to fragmented production, and we have a new model of venture capital. We moved [away] from actually having an industry which is really about innovation. So if you want to be completely cynical about it, the industry is about creating companies for cheap and selling them for a financial exit within five to seven years for the highest bidders, preferably 1000s of percent, right? It's not really for most of those people about changing the world. And in this system, the only people you employ are the engineers of the top universities (so not the people we should really care about or worry about). They are getting wages that are at the top wages of the US and Silicon Valley, or Tel Aviv, it's the same wages. So they're on their way to becoming a millionaire and they're getting stock options, right, basically lottery tickets to become billionaires.But who are the people that enjoy this system, it's only the GEEK ELITE, their financiers, maybe a few celebrity chefs and that's it. No one else is really employed in that level. And as soon as they finish with their work, all the rest of innovation goes somewhere else to be done. So what happened in both Tel Aviv and Silicon Valley is suddenly from a system that created a lot of good employment and jobs for everybody in that society, you're employing only the top 15 percent who are already basically extremely well off, the rest of it 85% are on a treadmill to nowhere.We all heard about what happened in San Francisco and Silicon Valley. But let's talk about Israel. Israel moved from being the second most equal society in western democracies in the 70s when it started that process, to now moving into a position where one of every five families in Israel is under the poverty line, which means they don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. And that's the fruit of a success they enjoy from this tremendous, maybe the most amazing innovation miracle in the second half of the 20th century. 20% of Israelis, including children, don't have enough money to buy food at the end of the month. So I wonder why people, even if they can imitate Silicon Valley, why do we think this is a good model for our community?Tobi;Now, you touched on something that I want to sort of press on, which is the finance of innovation and how it has come to be dominated today by venture capital finance model. Now, we all know how even Silicon Valley itself got started with a lot of public funding, either in Defense Research, which created lots of companies from IBM, Oracle, even Microsoft… how DARPA funded Google initially. So my question then would be why did the public, in this case, governments (whether at the city level or at the federal level) stop funding [research]? How did venture capital come to dominate the finance of innovation, and public financing just kept dwindling and dwindling, is it because we stopped believing in innovation as a source of growth, and policy sort of shifted to things like redistribution and things like that?Dan;So I will say that it really depends. There are some countries, multiple countries that still have a lot of public support for innovation. Canada, for example, is one. However, the problem with some of them is that they don't know how to transport that investment in basic invention into real innovation. And then all that great wealth, intellectual wealth, if you will, and all those inventions are then being taken away, and becomes great innovation somewhere else with what you say private money. So I wouldn't be as harsh on that. What I think has happened is that we have developed together with what people will call the neoliberal worldview. A firm belief with Silicon Valley is the only model. And then a very thin understanding of how Silicon Valley really works. And that's a belief that actually helps a lot of government if they so wish because then they don't have to be responsible and the only thing we need to do is to allow venture capital, whatever that is to come into the play, instead of actually looking cases of success, real success, from China, to Taiwan, to Korea to Finland, to actually all the Nordic countries.Whereas a significant role for public money and very interesting division of labor between public funding, public money and what it's trying to do, and where and how, and I think that's the most important thing, how private money and private investment in innovation are done, regulated, and most importantly institutionalized. And the way to think about it remember those stages we talked about?Tobi;Yes.Dan;Each one of them necessitates a completely different financial system in order to excel in it, right. If your aim is to supposedly create a new Alphabet, Google, or Facebook, you need maybe a system that resembles venture capitalist [...]. I have to say venture capital work only in ICT in biotech so far. So if you are in any other industry, maybe you should look for other ways of financing it. But if you're, for example, in the business of Taiwan where in order to excel as TSMC, you need to build new fabrication facilities, basically, factories at the tune of several billions, if not 10 or above billions a year, Venture Capital, Private Equity and even the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ are just not the way you can find this type of behavior.There is no venture capital on earth that would allow you to spend hundreds of millions or billions every year on basically capital equipment. You need to figure out the different financial systems that allow you to do that and judge you. The metrics of your success are different than the metrics of the success that your VCs and NASDAQ uses. From return on assets, to a margin of profitability, all those things need to be changed for you and your financiers to actually be able to make money.Tobi;So not to defend Silicon Valley, I'm not in any position to do that. But I'm just thinking from the perspective of say an African startup founder, for example. And we are talking about the proliferation of this model. So my question is, don't you think this model, the Silicon Valley model, venture financing startup as an approach to innovation spread the way it did because it is permissionless? So for example, I can start a startup right here in my room, in Lagos, Nigeria, whereas the current political economy might not let me be able to build a factory, because then I'll have to go through all kinds of regulatory red tape, I have to know someone at government ministries, I'll have to navigate a whole bunch of things. So an African found out my hear your argument and think, Well, the only way I have this opportunity to rise is because of the Silicon Valley model. So what would you say to them?Dan;So I will say that A, you're right. And, and I'm not against the Silicon Valley model. The two things that you have to take into the equation, and again, as a community leader is A, it's very, very hard to innovate with the Silicon Valley model, which is fine.  But the second, if you are successful, really successful, one of the results will be growing inequality if you really imitate it. So you might as well think about it in advance and figure out ways how to at least limit this inequality, or, you know, the growth much more positive and wide, instead of, you know, like Israel, who understand that they have a problem, but now for at least a decade now have programs after programs trying to diffuse the miracle with mixed success because they're already stuck in that model.So from a point of what you just said, yeah, all power to you. The question is, how can we then widen the, in Lagos, or in Nigeria.... the impact of your startups? One thing is what I call in the book, play [...] is, you say, Yeah, that's a model, that's a financial system and it works. And that's one problem. Once you put venture capital into your firm, Tobi, you will need to supply them with a financial exit, right? That's how they make their money. But what I want as the mayor of Lagos is for your company to grow as big as possible, preferably in Lagos.So we need to then figure out how to do two things. A, how to allow you to grow as big as possible in Lagos for as long as possible before a financial exit. Because then two things happen, A, if you're big enough and successful enough in life your venture capitalist wouldn't want to move, they would like you to be in Lagos. Not only that, then is the biggest you are and the most successful you are the chances are that your financial exit will be an IPO, which means that you will stay as an independent company. And then when we do an IPO, should you go to a NASDAQ IPO or should you go to a local IPO or should you go to an [...] IPO there are several options, right? Each one of them has consequences on your growth. The second if you grow big enough and successful enough, even if the financial exit is somebody is buying you, Tobi, because you by then have already 300, 400 employees in Lagos and you have customers all over Africa, the foreign company that will buy you will probably keep you maybe even grow you to become their main division in Nigeria.So it's not that the only thing that Lagos will get is you, your co-founders and some of your employees becoming millionaires and then the employment disappearing. But not only you as some of your employees grow and become bigger and employ more people. And as we do that, we also need to think about what will be the financial incentives I'll have you if you're big enough, so you can employ people who are not just r&d engineers. So I would call it, you know, playful delay. So the Nigerian startups or any African startups that now happen, grow as big as they can, for as long as they can before they're being bought by someone else.Tobi;So now, if I am the governor of Lagos, the Mayor of Lagos and I'm trying... So my first question before I get that would be, are there geographic? So I'm thinking along the lines of things like new trade theory, economic geography, and specializations. So are there geographic determinants of innovation? Or can innovation be deliberately nurtured and directed in any location? So I had a conversation recently about the supply chain, which you also touched on on semiconductors. And it took the pandemic for me to know that probably two-thirds of the global supply of hand gloves come from Malaysia. But I didn't think, unless you tell me I'm wrong, that Malaysia did set out to become the global supplier of hand gloves. So are some of these innovative niches and economic dominance based on innovation, are they serendipitous or can they be deliberately nurtured in a particular location?Dan;So let's talk reality. Okay.Tobi;Yeah.Dan;And I'm going to use Israel and Taiwan as an example, just because both of them are famous enough that people at least heard about them. So both of them started at the same time, okay. And since I interviewed the people who were responsible, if I tell you that they really knew how the end outcome would look, I'll be lying, and they would be lying as well. But they made particular choices that really define their success. So Israel, even before Silicon Valley became famous and all the rest says, Look, we have no natural resources, we don't have a lot of money, what we have is brains. And we actually have no clue in what industrial sector those brains will transform things into to growth. So we are going to create an innovation policy, which is a horizontal technology policy. Back then just so you understand how limited knowledge was, they called it science-based industries because the term high tech was not yet created. And they said, in order to do that, we will focus all our attention on coming up with new ideas and making them into products. Okay, and we'll derisk will help private [companies] and private companies need to do that. And we will create policy, after policy, after policy to make it happen.And then those companies started to be created. Then very early on like a year after the NASDAQ was established, there was already an Israeli IPO on NASDAQ. So the state co-evolved its policies to slowly but surely worked down this model. So it's not a surprise that Israel ended up basically as an engine of startups. It's not a surprise because it was horizontal. So it was whatever was successful in the market, it followed very closely in the footsteps of the US in new industries, first hardware, and then software. But the Israelis had no clue that this is what was going to happen. They also invested a lot in Agri-tech companies and in geothermal energy and then all the rest. Okay. But their model of how do we know that we are successful is, we will have a lot of new companies with new products that are exportable and we'll build the financial system to allow that to happen. Taiwan was almost the opposite.Taiwan says for both political reasons other is we do not want to have very big corporations like Japan and Korea, which is a model we see to our left. And because we are isolated, we can take that risk. We also don't think that we can be successful completely imitating Silicon Valley. So where we can be successful is in new industries working with the US. It's not just Silicon Valley back then, it's the US as a whole. So we will put bets on this new industry called semiconductors. But unlike Japan or Korea, we will not put bets on a specific niche. But we will create two capabilities that will allow Taiwan to excel in what we want to excel, which is basically the sub-suppliers for American companies, maybe Japanese. Remember, there was nothing else in the world back then. So they spent resources on innovation in the production of semiconductors. So all those companies that we talk about TSMC, UMC, Taiwan Mask Company, all of them came from a public research institution, which created projects that basically took the technology from abroad, brought it to Taiwan, created the company that then allow the ability to, you know, produce semiconductors in Taiwan, that was one.And the second, [is] a huge amount of attention to design. So you want to do something with silicon, you need to do two things. Actually produce the silicon but also design what it is that this chip does. And again, through the same public research institute that was diffused. But the aim was not an industry like Silicon Valley that comes up with new ideas, but the aim was you need much more simple semiconductors, for example, in toys. So we will figure out where there are niches where you already have a need for semiconductors and we'll make those semiconductors more reliable and cheaper. We're not going to invent new ones.And we will be able to do that because we just created those factories so we can do those two things and be these great sub-suppliers for very big multinationals. So without even understanding how the global system is getting fragmented, they opted for one industry and in one part of that industry. When they created TSMC they didn't know that they were going to completely change the global semiconductor industry. But they had a very specific strategy of thinking, what would success look like to Taiwan? So the ability to do over design and supply for big American, European and Japanese companies, the ability to innovate in the production, and the ability to innovate in second-generation innovation and semiconductors and multiple companies that will grow big but most of them are SMEs, and that was the vision. And then as industry changed, right, they co-evolved.In both places, there was nothing, really nothing before the government started. So in Israel, there were 860 Something people with any kind of academic education doing any kind of r&d in the whole business sector. So probably less than in one lecture hall in your university. And in Taiwan, not only that the private industry did not want to do semiconductors but even after a few very successful spinoffs from ITRI, (that public research institute I'm talking about) when they wanted to spin off TSMC (maybe one of the world's most successful companies), private investors in Taiwan refuse to participate, and it ended up in a small Dutch company called Philips [which] became the biggest investors in TSMC. So again, did they know how they were going to change the global industry? No. But did they have a very specific vision of what is success and what would it do to Taiwan and Israel? Yes.Tobi;Excellent. That brings me to my next question, which is kind of broad. Like I mentioned earlier, if I was the governor of Lagos, or the mayor of a city, or even maybe the President, and I want to design innovation policy, I really want to exploit innovation for real inclusive, widespread, broad-based growth that tries to avoid some of these problems that you have mentioned, both in the book and even in our conversation on Israel, Silicon Valley and all that. What should I do? What should I be funding? What complimentary public institutions do I need? And how should innovation policies be designed generally?Dan;So I think you're missing the most important step. The most important step is what, as I just said, Israel and Taiwan have done, maybe even unknowingly. What I will tell you as the governor of Lagos is that, Okay, let's assume you're successful as a first step. 15 years from now, what does Lagos look like? What kind of companies do you have? What kind of people do they employ, what kind of things do they sell to the global system and what kind of things do they buy from the global system? Okay, now that we have this vision, let's do reverse engineering, and figure out how we get into that vision knowing that we, I mean, the world is constantly changing, we might have to, you know, change course, but we have a vision of what success is. And that vision is not the one that too many cases are now [that] when they talk about innovation, they talk, oh, I want to go to VCs and I did a lot of patents. No.What does your society look like? Once you do that, A) we can reverse engineer and figure out exactly what financial system you need, how you develop it, what changes you need for your education system, how you also tie yourself into those global networks so you get the outputs you need, which are not just physical outputs but the constant knowledge and ideas, and how do you move it back? And as you do that, you also need to look at several things: what are your current strengths and limitations? what you can build upon? And what are gaps that you have that [you think] is reasonable for you to assume you can fix? And then we can start to be much more targeted. Not necessarily in industries, but the way I think about it is in capabilities, where do you want to operate in those four stages? And then we can maybe talk about industries, maybe just talk about core activities of what you need in order to excel in that and build all those institutions and programs. But without that vision, you're basically going into a very rough ocean with no map and the no goal. So the only thing that will happen is, at best, you'll be drowned.Tobi;That's powerful and poignant. Final question, Dan. And this is a bit of a tradition on show. What's the one idea, it may be from your work, it may be something you admire, it may be something that is probably even old and the world has forgotten about, what's the one idea that you would like to see spread everywhere, you'd like to see people discuss more, you'd like to see people think about a lot more? What's that idea?Dan;That idea is that: believe in human agency, or believe in the ability of humans to do things and to make things better. Right? So if you think about what makes us human, it's really to innovate is to take ideas and make them part of the world. Right? That's what we do. And for too long, everybody has been taught that there's only one way to success. And I think that that's the main problem of modern economics and modern social science. We look too much at structure, and not enough at the human agency. And we need to believe in the ability of societies, humans working together, figuring out new ways to make our communities better. But in order to do it, they have to understand how the world works and how they work. And doing that I think we now have more options than ever before to make communities both richer and more inclusive. But it has to come from the communities itself. Lagos and a lot of places in Africa need to dream their own dreams and stop dreaming the European or American dreams. The other successful countries that have done that manage at least to tailor the American dream and make it into their, I don't know, flavour [of] dreams - from Japan and Korea to Taiwan, Israel, Finland, all of those places that have moved from being poor to successful after World War Two.Tobi;Terrific. Thank you so much, Dan, for doing this with me. It's been educating, it's been enjoyable. Thank you so much.Dan;You are very, very welcome. I hope that one of those days, maybe after, we will finally innovate our way out of COVID...Tobi;YeahDan;Then I can meet face to face.Tobi;Yeah, I would I would love nothing more. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

The Food Professor
Live from the Montreal SIAL Food Innovation Show: Shawn Leggett, President/Founder at GroundUP Eco-Ventures

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 17:57


Welcome to another special SIAL bonus episodes of The Food Professor podcast!Sylvain and I were thrilled to be the official podcast of the SIAL food innovation trade show held in Montreal in April; for many, the first in-person event since the COVID era began two years ago.We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers from many facets of the food industry.   These are their stories.In this episode: Shawn Leggett, President/Founder at GroundUP Eco-VenturesGold Winner in SIAL's Innovation  Awards Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor.  Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews from our podcast studio on the trade show floor in Montreal at SIAL, and stay tuned for our regular full length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.  About Shawn:Senior executive skilled at maximizing financial performance and motivating others to achieve peak performance. Listed accomplishments reflect an ability to grow business and manage it with exceptional results in the energy sector in terms of innovation, securing first adopters, safety, cost, quality, schedule and customer satisfaction.People change careers throughout their lifetime, each job an opportunity to highlight a specific set of qualities or aptitudes. The same can be said of raw ingredients, but maybe the voices saying it aren't loud enough yet. So hear us when we say that coffee beans make brownies better & barley makes baked goods great for you. If you want more from your food, waste not.GroundUp eco-ventures is a unique company based on the concept of circular economies. Using clean technology we are focused on creating value from upcycling the waste streams of both the coffee & craft brewery industries. Our goal is to create value through eliminating waste & while we love to nerd out on the process, we couldn't be happier with the results as well.We started planning GroundUp in early 2018, but the world had other plans for all of us. They say that good things come to those who wait & we are now delighted to bring our delicious, nutritious products to you. For us, ‘eating up' means eating something that tastes great, is good for you & is environmentally responsible. It's a win win win. GroundUp is Canadian owned & based in Okotoks, Alberta. About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!   

The Farmers Weekly Podcast
Fertiliser plant closure, agri-innovation funding, farm robots (again), sugar beet price talks, farmland market, and how to host the Cereals event

The Farmers Weekly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 45:08


In this episode, we investigate the impact on fertiliser prices as a major manufacturer confirms plans to close one of its UK sites.Government minister Jo Churchill promises lots of new money for agri-innovation – but will it make a difference to farmers?Could we be about to see a big price increase for sugar beet growers? And with ag-inflation soaring, will it be linked to rising input costs?On the markets, land sales get busier and prices increase.And we find out what it's like being the host farmer for the Cereals event.This episode of the Farmers Weekly Podcast is co-hosted by Johann Tasker and Surrey farmer Hugh Broom – including on location at Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

The Food Professor
Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards Finalist Bonus episode: Meet Scott Spencer, Chief Operating Officer at Island Abbey Food Science Ltd.

The Food Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 15:52


Welcome to a special bonus episode celebrating the 29th ANNUAL CANADIAN GRAND PRIX NEW PRODUCT AWARDSSylvain and I are thrilled to be a sponsor of these prestigious awards for the third year in a row and have the chance to hand out the hardware on the stage to the winners in person for the first time!We had the opportunity to meet and get to know many fantastic food innovators and entrepreneurs, creators and makers - from consumer brands to private retail labels.   These are their stories.In this episode, meet Scott Spencer,  Chief Operating Officer at Island Abbey Food Science Ltd. Thanks for joining us on this special bonus episode of The Food Professor. Stay tuned for plenty of great interviews of the finalists from the Retail Council of Canada's Canadian Grand Prix New Product Awards. And stay tuned for our regular full-length episodes available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google - wherever you enjoy your podcasts today.   About ScottAs the President and Chief Operations Officer of Island Abbey Foods, Scott is responsible for all company functions including the Supply Chain from Procurement through Production, Packaging and Distribution as well as Sales and Marketing for Honibe® Canada. In addition, his duties include organizational design, strategic and financial planning and S&OP. Scott also serves as the primary liaison with the community and local government agencies. Prior to joining IAF, Scott held the position of VP, Engineering and Continuous Improvement at The Nature's Bounty Company, the United States #1 provider of vitamins and supplements. In that role he was responsible for Engineering, Maintenance, Environmental Health and Safety, Project Management and the company's TPM based Continuous Improvement Program. Prior to joining TNBC, he was the Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) Early Management Pillar Leader for C&S Wholesale Grocers. In that capacity, he implemented TPM based Engineering tools in the design, construction and operation of fully automated mixed selection warehousing and distribution systems. In his previous role as Director of Engineering at Snyder's-Lance, Scott was responsible for the Engineering and Maintenance functions over 13 manufacturing sites focused on project execution, equipment and infrastructure reliability and organizational development through the implementation of TPM tools. Scott also spent eight years at General Mills, holding multiple roles in Operations, Maintenance and Engineering. He began his career as a Nuclear Power Officer in the US Navy, successfully conducting two West Pack tours in the Arabian gulf onboard the USS CALIFORNIA (CGN 36) and defueled and decommissioned her two 250 MW nuclear reactors when the ship was retired. Scott earned a B.S. and M.S in Chemical Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Scott lives on Prince Edward Island, with his wife, Kimberly and rescue pit bull Missy.About UsDr. Sylvain CharleboisDr. Sylvain Charlebois is a Professor in food distribution and policy in the Faculties of Management and Agriculture at Dalhousie University in Halifax. He is also the Senior Director of the Agri-food Analytics Lab, also located at Dalhousie University. Before joining Dalhousie, he was affiliated with the University of Guelph's Arrell Food Institute, which he co-founded. Known as “The Food Professor”, his current research interest lies in the broad area of food distribution, security and safety. Google Scholar ranks him as one of the world's most cited scholars in food supply chain management, food value chains and traceability.He has authored five books on global food systems, his most recent one published in 2017 by Wiley-Blackwell entitled “Food Safety, Risk Intelligence and Benchmarking”. He has also published over 500 peer-reviewed journal articles in several academic publications. Furthermore, his research has been featured in several newspapers and media groups, including The Lancet, The Economist, the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, BBC, NBC, ABC, Fox News, Foreign Affairs, the Globe & Mail, the National Post and the Toronto Star.Dr. Charlebois sits on a few company boards, and supports many organizations as a special advisor, including some publicly traded companies. Charlebois is also a member of the Scientific Council of the Business Scientific Institute, based in Luxemburg. Dr. Charlebois is a member of the Global Food Traceability Centre's Advisory Board based in Washington DC, and a member of the National Scientific Committee of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) in Ottawa.Michael LeBlanc  is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice.   He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience, and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career.  Michael is the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts including Canada's top retail industry podcast,       The Voice of Retail, plus  Global E-Commerce Tech Talks  ,      The Food Professor  with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois and now in its second season, Conversations with CommerceNext!  You can learn more about Michael   here  or on     LinkedIn. Be sure and check out Michael's latest adventure for fun and influencer riches - Last Request Barbecue,  his YouTube BBQ cooking channel!