Podcasts about Orientalism

Imitation or depiction of Eastern culture

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Best podcasts about Orientalism

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Latest podcast episodes about Orientalism

The NeoLiberal Round
Bonus Video: Caribbean Thought Lecture Series on Zoom: Introducing the Course Concepts Part 1

The NeoLiberal Round

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 124:36


This is the Bonus Video of Season 6, episode 3 available on Spotify and our YouTube channel. As stated in the primary episode in audio: this episode begins the Lecture Series at the Jamaica Theological Seminary on Caribbean Thought: Towards Developing a Caribbean Thought Academic Audio Journal. This is a video episode uploaded from the class Zoom Recording as I am teaching the course via an online face-to-face module while here in Philadelphia USA. This course focuses on and explores the diverse currents of Caribbean Thought, which have influenced the development of Caribbean societies from colonialism to independence and beyond. It traces the history of resistance and examines the quest for equality and the challenge of defining Caribbean identity within this post-colonial and neoliberal Globalized world not just within the geographic sense but also in terms of a diasporic sense. It challenges the students to develop and express their own critical thinking as a Caribbean people within a unique way that helps to realize further the hope of a free independent Caribbean that is bursting with hope and opportunity. But the course understands that it requires that students begin to critique and explore their own thinking in deeply esoteric and critical way that deconstructs history and philosophy. At the end they will create their own Caribbean thought leading to a Caribbean Academic Journal of Young academics and future scholars. The Course will make you estranged from self, but it is geared towards getting you out of your bubble and to consider issues that will make you uncomfortable. The WES explored ways that we can prepare students for the global world. That means moving from the local and turning to the global as we are global citizens. The course surveys the history and philosophy of the Caribbean, the ways in which the Caribbean has emerged as a society in the shadow of colonialism and emergence of neoliberal Globalization. It examines the central ideological currents of twentieth century political thought in the region and covers broad topics such as Colonialism, Nationalism, Pan-Africanism, Socialism, Marxism, Feminism, Democratic Socialism and Neo-Conservatism, Neoliberalism, Globalization and Deconstructivism, Critical Race Theory, Strategy and the Foundations of Knowledge and the Hegemony of Faith, Economic Inequality and Poverty.  Among the thinkers that will be considered throughout the course are Marcus Garvey, George Padmore, C.L.R. James, Franz Fanon, Homi Bhaba, Walter Rodney, Fidel Castro, Michael Manley, Edward Seaga, Bob Marley Kamau Brathwaite, Edouard Glissant and the Negritude movement generally, Homi Bhaba, Mike Davis, Nelson and Novella Keith, Stephanie Black and Jamaica KinCaid, Garrnett Roper, Rex Nettleford etc. Themes will be drawn from a selection of contemporary newspaper columnists, talk‐show hosts and the ideas behind the major international agencies and institutions, which have shaped post-independence policies. The selection of thinkers and social movements to be examined will vary with each semester. This is Part 1. 1. Introductions 2. (32) Privilege, Power, Position and the Need for Critical Thinking | LinkedIn 3. Caribbean thought, Ideology and Philosophy (Foundations of Knowledge) The Phaedo, Plato & Socrates 4. Orientalism and Occidentalism The class did not complete Part 1 of the Lesson Plan and will therefore continue with Lesson on Part 2. Rev. Renaldo McKenzie is Creator/Host of The Neoliberal Round Podcast, Adjunct Professor at Jamaica Theological Seminary and President of The Neoliberal Corporation. He is also author of Neoliberalism, Globalization, Income Inequality, Poverty and Resistance and is working on a new book: Neoliberal Globalization Reconsidered. Renaldo is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University and graduated from University of Pennsylvania.  www.anchor.fm/theneoliberal/www.theneoliberal.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theneoliberal/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theneoliberal/support

The NeoLiberal Round
Towards Developing A Caribbean Thought Academic Audio Journal: Caribbean Thought Lecture Series Part 1

The NeoLiberal Round

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 127:23


This episode begins the Lecture Series at the Jamaica Theological Seminary on Caribbean Thought: Towards Developing a Caribbean Thought Academic Audio Journal. This is a video episode uploaded from the class Zoom Recording as I am teaching the course via an online face-to-face module while here in Philadelphia USA. This course focuses on and explores the diverse currents of Caribbean Thought, which have influenced the development of Caribbean societies from colonialism to independence and beyond. It traces the history of resistance and examines the quest for equality and the challenge of defining Caribbean identity within this post-colonial and neoliberal Globalized world not just within the geographic sense but also in terms of a diasporic sense. It challenges the students to develop and express their own critical thinking as a Caribbean people within a unique way that helps to realize further the hope of a free independent Caribbean that is bursting with hope and opportunity. But the course understands that it requires that students begin to critique and explore their own thinking in deeply esoteric and critical way that deconstructs history and philosophy. At the end they will create their own Caribbean thought leading to a Caribbean Academic Journal of Young academics and future scholars. The Course will make you estranged from self, but it is geared towards getting you out of your bubble and to consider issues that will make you uncomfortable. The WES explored ways that we can prepare students for the global world. That means moving from the local and turning to the global as we are global citizens. The course surveys the history and philosophy of the Caribbean, the ways in which the Caribbean has emerged as a society in the shadow of colonialism and emergence of neoliberal Globalization. It examines the central ideological currents of twentieth century political thought in the region and covers broad topics such as Colonialism, Nationalism, Pan-Africanism, Socialism, Marxism, Feminism, Democratic Socialism and Neo-Conservatism, Neoliberalism, Globalization and Deconstructivism, Critical Race Theory, Strategy and the Foundations of Knowledge and the Hegemony of Faith, Economic Inequality and Poverty. Among the thinkers that will be considered throughout the course are Marcus Garvey, George Padmore, C.L.R. James, Franz Fanon, Homi Bhaba, Walter Rodney, Fidel Castro, Michael Manley, Edward Seaga, Bob Marley Kamau Brathwaite, Edouard Glissant and the Negritude movement generally, Homi Bhaba, Mike Davis, Nelson and Novella Keith, Stephanie Black and Jamaica KinCaid, Garrnett Roper, Rex Nettleford etc. Themes will be drawn from a selection of contemporary newspaper columnists, talk‐show hosts and the ideas behind the major international agencies and institutions, which have shaped post-independence policies. The selection of thinkers and social movements to be examined will vary with each semester. This is Part 1. 1. Introductions 2. (32) Privilege, Power, Position and the Need for Critical Thinking | LinkedIn 3. Caribbean thought, Ideology and Philosophy (Foundations of Knowledge) The Phaedo, Plato & Socrates 4. Orientalism and Occidentalism The class did not complete Part 1 of the Lesson Plan and will therefore continue with Lesson on Part 2. Rev. Renaldo McKenzie is Creator/Host of The Neoliberal Round Podcast, Adjunct Professor at Jamaica Theological Seminary and President of The Neoliberal Corporation. He is also author of Neoliberalism, Globalization, Income Inequality, Poverty and Resistance and is working on a new book: Neoliberal Globalization Reconsidered. Renaldo is a doctoral candidate at Georgetown University and graduated from University of Pennsylvania. www.anchor.fm/theneoliberal/www.theneoliberal.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theneoliberal/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theneoliberal/support

New Books in Literary Studies
The Fremen in "Dune"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 54:53


Despite being set in the distant future on a remote desert planet, the story of resource extraction, power, politics, ecology, and religion told in Frank Herbert's sci-fi series Dune bears distinct parallels to real-world history and events. One example of Herbert's real-life inspirations comes in the characters of the Fremen, who Herbert based on both the Bedouin in the Middle East and Native American peoples. How are nomadic Indigenous peoples incorporated into and represented in Herbert's fictional universe, and what can we learn about real people and their history from these fictionalized representations? In this episode, I'm joined by Dune expert Dr. Kara Kennedy to discuss the Fremen of Dune , the inspirations and intentions behind the novels, Orientalism and literary representations of Islam and the Middle East, and what science fiction can teach us about both history and the future. Dr. Kennedy's book Women's Agency in the Dune Universe: Tracing Women's Liberation through Science Fiction is available here. Dr. Kennedy writes articles about Dune aimed at a general audience on her blog here. Follow Dr. Kennedy on Twitter @drkarakennedy and @dunescholar Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Film
The Fremen in "Dune"

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 54:53


Despite being set in the distant future on a remote desert planet, the story of resource extraction, power, politics, ecology, and religion told in Frank Herbert's sci-fi series Dune bears distinct parallels to real-world history and events. One example of Herbert's real-life inspirations comes in the characters of the Fremen, who Herbert based on both the Bedouin in the Middle East and Native American peoples. How are nomadic Indigenous peoples incorporated into and represented in Herbert's fictional universe, and what can we learn about real people and their history from these fictionalized representations? In this episode, I'm joined by Dune expert Dr. Kara Kennedy to discuss the Fremen of Dune , the inspirations and intentions behind the novels, Orientalism and literary representations of Islam and the Middle East, and what science fiction can teach us about both history and the future. Dr. Kennedy's book Women's Agency in the Dune Universe: Tracing Women's Liberation through Science Fiction is available here. Dr. Kennedy writes articles about Dune aimed at a general audience on her blog here. Follow Dr. Kennedy on Twitter @drkarakennedy and @dunescholar Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books Network
The Fremen in "Dune"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 54:53


Despite being set in the distant future on a remote desert planet, the story of resource extraction, power, politics, ecology, and religion told in Frank Herbert's sci-fi series Dune bears distinct parallels to real-world history and events. One example of Herbert's real-life inspirations comes in the characters of the Fremen, who Herbert based on both the Bedouin in the Middle East and Native American peoples. How are nomadic Indigenous peoples incorporated into and represented in Herbert's fictional universe, and what can we learn about real people and their history from these fictionalized representations? In this episode, I'm joined by Dune expert Dr. Kara Kennedy to discuss the Fremen of Dune , the inspirations and intentions behind the novels, Orientalism and literary representations of Islam and the Middle East, and what science fiction can teach us about both history and the future. Dr. Kennedy's book Women's Agency in the Dune Universe: Tracing Women's Liberation through Science Fiction is available here. Dr. Kennedy writes articles about Dune aimed at a general audience on her blog here. Follow Dr. Kennedy on Twitter @drkarakennedy and @dunescholar Music in this episode: Desert City by Kevin MacLeod. License. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Edith Wharton: In Morocco

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 56:45


Edith Wharton ranks as one of the Gilded Age's most prolific and popular writers. In this episode, Professor Stacy Holden tells us about her research on Wharton's lesser known travelogue In Morocco, a revealing account of the author's travels to the French and Spanish colony. It tells us a great deal about American and European imperialism, and the Orientalism that pervaded her thinking.Essential Reading:Edith Wharton, In Morocco (1920).Hermione Lee, Edith Wharton (2007).Recommended Reading: Julie Olin-Ammentorp, Edith Wharton's Writings from the Great War (2004). Alan Price, The End of the Age of Innocence: Edith Wharton and the First World War (1996). Andrew Patrick, America's Forgotten Middle East Initiative: The King-Crane Commission of 1919 (2015). Andrew Priest, Designs on Empire (on the podcast in 2022). Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mohammed Hijab
Modern Trends- Orientalism - Perceptions of Islam

Mohammed Hijab

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 48:25 Very Popular


New Books in Chinese Studies
Jingjing Li, "Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:33


Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism by Jingjing Li (Bloomsbury, 2022) starts its investigation with a longstanding question in the comparative studies of phenomenology and Yogacara. While phenomenology and Yogacara Buddhism are both known for their investigations of consciousness, there exists a core tension between them: phenomenology affirms the existence of essence, whereas Yogacara Buddhism argues that everything is empty of essence (svabhava). How is constructive cultural exchange possible when traditions hold such contradictory views? Answering this question and positioning both philosophical traditions in their respective intellectual and linguistic contexts, Jingjing Li argues that what Edmund Husserl means by essence differs from what Chinese Yogacarins mean by svabhava, partly because Husserl problematises the substantialist understanding of essence in European philosophy. Furthermore, she reveals that Chinese Yogacara has developed an account of self-transformation, ethics and social ontology that renders it much more than simply a Buddhist version of Husserlian phenomenology. Detailing the process of finding a middle ground between the two traditions, this book demonstrates how both can thrive together in order to overcome Orientalism. Jessica Zu is an Assistant Professor in the School of Religion at USC Dornsife. She specializes in modern Chinese Yogācāra and Buddhist social philosophy. You can find her on Twitter @JessicaZu7 or email her at xzu@usc.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books in Religion
Jingjing Li, "Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:33


Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism by Jingjing Li (Bloomsbury, 2022) starts its investigation with a longstanding question in the comparative studies of phenomenology and Yogacara. While phenomenology and Yogacara Buddhism are both known for their investigations of consciousness, there exists a core tension between them: phenomenology affirms the existence of essence, whereas Yogacara Buddhism argues that everything is empty of essence (svabhava). How is constructive cultural exchange possible when traditions hold such contradictory views? Answering this question and positioning both philosophical traditions in their respective intellectual and linguistic contexts, Jingjing Li argues that what Edmund Husserl means by essence differs from what Chinese Yogacarins mean by svabhava, partly because Husserl problematises the substantialist understanding of essence in European philosophy. Furthermore, she reveals that Chinese Yogacara has developed an account of self-transformation, ethics and social ontology that renders it much more than simply a Buddhist version of Husserlian phenomenology. Detailing the process of finding a middle ground between the two traditions, this book demonstrates how both can thrive together in order to overcome Orientalism. Jessica Zu is an Assistant Professor in the School of Religion at USC Dornsife. She specializes in modern Chinese Yogācāra and Buddhist social philosophy. You can find her on Twitter @JessicaZu7 or email her at xzu@usc.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Buddhist Studies
Jingjing Li, "Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Buddhist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:33


Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism by Jingjing Li (Bloomsbury, 2022) starts its investigation with a longstanding question in the comparative studies of phenomenology and Yogacara. While phenomenology and Yogacara Buddhism are both known for their investigations of consciousness, there exists a core tension between them: phenomenology affirms the existence of essence, whereas Yogacara Buddhism argues that everything is empty of essence (svabhava). How is constructive cultural exchange possible when traditions hold such contradictory views? Answering this question and positioning both philosophical traditions in their respective intellectual and linguistic contexts, Jingjing Li argues that what Edmund Husserl means by essence differs from what Chinese Yogacarins mean by svabhava, partly because Husserl problematises the substantialist understanding of essence in European philosophy. Furthermore, she reveals that Chinese Yogacara has developed an account of self-transformation, ethics and social ontology that renders it much more than simply a Buddhist version of Husserlian phenomenology. Detailing the process of finding a middle ground between the two traditions, this book demonstrates how both can thrive together in order to overcome Orientalism. Jessica Zu is an Assistant Professor in the School of Religion at USC Dornsife. She specializes in modern Chinese Yogācāra and Buddhist social philosophy. You can find her on Twitter @JessicaZu7 or email her at xzu@usc.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/buddhist-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Jingjing Li, "Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:33


Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism by Jingjing Li (Bloomsbury, 2022) starts its investigation with a longstanding question in the comparative studies of phenomenology and Yogacara. While phenomenology and Yogacara Buddhism are both known for their investigations of consciousness, there exists a core tension between them: phenomenology affirms the existence of essence, whereas Yogacara Buddhism argues that everything is empty of essence (svabhava). How is constructive cultural exchange possible when traditions hold such contradictory views? Answering this question and positioning both philosophical traditions in their respective intellectual and linguistic contexts, Jingjing Li argues that what Edmund Husserl means by essence differs from what Chinese Yogacarins mean by svabhava, partly because Husserl problematises the substantialist understanding of essence in European philosophy. Furthermore, she reveals that Chinese Yogacara has developed an account of self-transformation, ethics and social ontology that renders it much more than simply a Buddhist version of Husserlian phenomenology. Detailing the process of finding a middle ground between the two traditions, this book demonstrates how both can thrive together in order to overcome Orientalism. Jessica Zu is an Assistant Professor in the School of Religion at USC Dornsife. She specializes in modern Chinese Yogācāra and Buddhist social philosophy. You can find her on Twitter @JessicaZu7 or email her at xzu@usc.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Jingjing Li, "Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 56:33


Comparing Husserl's Phenomenology and Chinese Yogacara in a Multicultural World: A Journey Beyond Orientalism by Jingjing Li (Bloomsbury, 2022) starts its investigation with a longstanding question in the comparative studies of phenomenology and Yogacara. While phenomenology and Yogacara Buddhism are both known for their investigations of consciousness, there exists a core tension between them: phenomenology affirms the existence of essence, whereas Yogacara Buddhism argues that everything is empty of essence (svabhava). How is constructive cultural exchange possible when traditions hold such contradictory views? Answering this question and positioning both philosophical traditions in their respective intellectual and linguistic contexts, Jingjing Li argues that what Edmund Husserl means by essence differs from what Chinese Yogacarins mean by svabhava, partly because Husserl problematises the substantialist understanding of essence in European philosophy. Furthermore, she reveals that Chinese Yogacara has developed an account of self-transformation, ethics and social ontology that renders it much more than simply a Buddhist version of Husserlian phenomenology. Detailing the process of finding a middle ground between the two traditions, this book demonstrates how both can thrive together in order to overcome Orientalism. Jessica Zu is an Assistant Professor in the School of Religion at USC Dornsife. She specializes in modern Chinese Yogācāra and Buddhist social philosophy. You can find her on Twitter @JessicaZu7 or email her at xzu@usc.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Episodes – Witch, Please
Book 7, Ep. 7 | Sentimentality

Episodes – Witch, Please

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 67:10


In the wise words of Lizzo, it's about damn time! Our latest episode is all about Sentimentality, an 18th century philosophical intervention that emerged in opposition to rationality. Hannah (whose recent book, A Sentimental Education, is all about this topic) guides the episode. We revisit our discussions on Orientalism, Animal Studies and Print Culture, before jumping into an overview of what Sentimentalism is all about— and how we might read Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows as a novel written in that literary tradition.If you like thinking about character development, intersectional feminism and the power (or lack thereof) of the written word, then this episode is for you! We also get a little meta and think through how books become sentimental for a reader. For example, how a series about friendship and the fight between good and evil inspires two lady scholars to make an entire podcast about it for a dedicated listenership of people 25 years after it was first published. Just as an example!!If you're a longtime listener of the show, please consider becoming a Patron this time of year! We're hoping to reach 1000 patrons by January 1st and we're really close. For just $2 USD/month you can help us pay our producer, our apprentice, ourselves, our website costs, etc. It is truly what makes producing this show possible. If you find yourself with a spare $24 this year, we'd be really grateful for your financial support. If becoming a paying subscriber isn't in the cards right now, please leave us a review instead! Reviews help more listeners find us and that's a huge help! We have aa lot planned for the New Year (including merch now available on our website ohwitchplease.ca), so be sure to follow us on Instagram or Twitter @ohwitchplease to stay connected.Special thanks to our Witch, Please team: Gaby Iori, Erik Magnus, Zoe Mix, and Hannah Rehak. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

New Books in Early Modern History
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Early Modern History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Japanese Studies
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in Japanese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/japanese-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in History
Ayelet Zohar, "The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia" (Brill, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 99:10


Ayelet Zohar's The Curious Case of the Camel in Modern Japan: (De)Colonialism, Orientalism, and Imagining Asia (Brill, 2022) traces the use of camels in the visual vocabulary of Japan's definition of itself in the world―especially vis-à-vis “Asia―from the Edo period to the present.” In other words, Zohar uses representations of camels as a lens to view the ways in which Japan has both attempted to leave or conquer Asia on the one hand and to find solidarity in a shared Oriental/Asian identity on the other.  The core of The Curious Case of the Camel is the last two centuries, beginning with the introduction of a pair of live camels in 1821. Zohar shows that camels quickly became objects of popular fascination, polyvalent symbols understood in different ways in different contexts, but that they took on a particularly political dimension in the context of modern Japanese imperialism. In the latter half of the nineteenth century, as Japan sought to define its position in the world vis-à-vis Asia on the one hand and “the West” on the other, camels became one part of a visual vocabulary of Orientalism. This function of the camel imaginary is in some ways unchanged today, even if the political valences of camel iconography is new and different. Nathan Hopson is an associate professor of Japanese language and history in the University of Bergen's Department of Foreign Languages. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Current Affairs
Why Our Wars Never End (w/ Chris Hedges)

Current Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:03


Chris Hedges, who appeared on this program a few months back after the publication of his book Our Class, returns to discuss his powerful new book The Greatest Evil is War, which shows the true face of war and exposes the propagandistic narratives that help to sustain and escalate wars. Hedges, a veteran war correspondent, shows us the people who actually do the fighting and the dying, from those maimed and traumatized for life to those who must collect the corpses from the battlefield. He shows how every war is presented by each side as a battle of the forces of light against the forces of darkness, and why the real story is almost always much more complicated. He shows how the darkest facts of war are kept from public view, and instead the population is presented with an image of war as something heroic and exciting. He shows how war memorials and the media get us to "admire the despicable beauty of weapons systems without seeing what they do to human bodies," and explains how those who benefit from continued conflict contribute to sustaining it. Hedges warns that history shows us that those who think they can keep wars from spiraling out of control are often deluding themselves, and policy-makers who think themselves rational have often led their countries into catastrophic and suicidally destructive conflicts. Hedges' TomDispatch piece about writing on war is here. Tomas Young's letter can be read here. Hedges refers to Johnny Got His Gun and the preface to Edward Said's Orientalism. Nathan's review of The Greatest Evil is War is here. The news story about the Congressional Progressive Caucus' letter is here. Apologies for the delayed release of this episode. CA staff are busy trying to finish up the new print issue, which will be out within days! Also Nathan still isn't quite over COVID.

Sports As A Weapon Podcast
38 | 2022 Qatar World Cup Part 1

Sports As A Weapon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 70:40


Miguel welcomed back Chuy from The Heatwave Podcast to talk about the 2022 Qatar World Cup (Recorded 11.4.22), which began earlier this morning on November 20, 2022.  The Heatwave Podcast is a podcast centered around the political environment of the State of Arizona from a revolutionary socialist perspective, made by the people, for the people! You can listen to Chuy and his comrades on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcast!   To start the podcast, Miguel and Chuy get into what they are looking forward to the most during the World Cup and what team they are most looking forward to watching (hint: El Tri). Additionally, Miguel and Chuy discuss the issues with Qatar as the host of the World Cup, such as the abuse Migrant Labors faced in building the stadiums for the World Cup.   Miguel and Chuy also discuss the entanglement between the FIFA World Cup (Mega Events), Capitalism-Imperialism and Neo-Colonialism, the collaboration of the West with Qatar hosting the World Cup, and the overt Orientalism in Western sports media coverage. To end the podcast, they make some World Cup predictions, Which Group they think is the "Group of Death," and if anything unusual will happen. Sports As A Weapon Music Feature: Too Close For Comfort - Burn Bright (feat. Joey Fleming) (Official Music Video)Links:Follow The Heatwave Podcast on Instagram @thwpod and follow MECHA de ASU on Twitter @mechadeasuWorld Cup 2022: What's behind the sustained condemnation of Qatar? (Middle East Eye)World Cup 2022: Migrant worker abuse shames whole world, not just Qatar (Middle East Eye)‘Racism': Qataris decry French cartoon of national football team (Aljazeera)Qatar: what the media isn't reporting (Morning Star) Qatar hosting the World Cup highlights Western double standards (MSNBC)World Cup deaths: How and why do inaccurate figures spread? (DW News) Miguel Garcia produced this episode. The Sports As A Weapon Podcast is part of the @Anticonquista Media Collective. Subscribe to the ANTICONQUISTA Patreon and follow ANTICONQUISTA on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Tik Tok!Also, listen/subscribe to the Sports As A Weapon Podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Deezer, or wherever you get your podcasts.Follow us on:Twitter: @sportsasaweaponFacebook: fb.com/sportsasaweaponpodcastInstagram: @sportsasaweaponpodcastTik Tok: @SportsAsAWeaponPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/sportsasaweaponpodcast (If you want)Visit our website: www.sportsasaweapon.com

Join Us in France Travel Podcast
The Life and Times of Jean-François Champollion, Episode 416

Join Us in France Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 58:39


Today Annie Sargent brings you a conversation with Elyse Rivin  about Jean-François Champollion the man who deciphered Egyptian hieroglyphics. We talked about the places he lived, the positions he held, and how he became obsessed with languages. The period of the late 1700s early 1800s was a fascinating time in French history and this episode will help you see why. We talk about the places you can visit if you want to learn about Champollion and his work, we talk about the circumstances of his upbringing just as the French Revolution was brewing. His older brother was also very interested in languages and young Champollion followed in his footsteps and showed great interest in exotic writing systems. Table of Contents [00:00:38] Today on the podcast [00:01:23] Podcast supporters [00:01:41] Annie's Cookbook: Join Us at the Table [00:03:27] Places related to Champollion [00:03:58] Museum of Writing [00:06:01] Museum in Vif [00:07:32] Early Childhood [00:10:14] Jean Francois Champollion and school [00:10:48] His older brother [00:12:35] Interest in Languages and writing systems [00:18:50] I am Egypt. Egypt is me. [00:19:16] The Egyptians wrote on everything [00:21:21] Champollion gets a copy of the Rosetta Stone [00:25:20] Reading the Rosetta Stone [00:31:03] Cracking open 3000 years of Egyptian history [00:32:06] Writing systems invented to bring Christianity to first peoples [00:35:51] Egyptomania in Europe [00:38:16] Orientalism in art [00:38:53] The definitive translation of the Rosetta Stone [00:39:58] Champollion assimilates Egyptian culture [00:42:52] Outro [00:45:28] Preparing a trip to France? [00:46:28] Self-guided tours [00:46:59] Christmas decorations in Paris in 2022 [00:51:57] Related episodes [00:52:42] Thanksgiving at Annie's house [00:55:51] Show notes [00:56:07] Next week on the podcast #France, #Champollion, #Hieroglyphics, #FrenchHistory Episode Page

Kvothekiller Chronicles
S2E5 - Orientalism for Women

Kvothekiller Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 102:39


This week, on KvKc: Patrick writes the boring D&D campaign section of the book, Denna writes the Bohemian Rhapsody of Kvotheworld, Kvothe does extremely cool and sick and awesome Blood Magic crimes, and your hosts announce our new line of Patrick Rothfuss themed lipsticks! The Kvothekillers are played by: Summer, of My Podcabbages - Did the show art and you can comission them! Sarah, of Pod of Greed and Never Believe It - Also did the show art but you cant comission them. Robyn, of Who Watches the Watch and Fred Says Fuck. Janos, of A Song of Babies and Puppies and Lynchpin. Daniel, from Academic Elitism. The Podcast on Twitter NB: This podcast is not suitable for consumption by fans of Mr Rothfuss

Conspirituality
128: The Trauma of Caste w/ Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Conspirituality

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 80:02


An ancient text at the root of the culture that gave birth to the yoga tradition says that if an outcaste person—a Dalit—dares to learn the holy language of Sanskrit, they must be tortured. Molten lead must be poured into their ears. Their tongue must be cut out. In the Ramayana, an Dalit who dared to practice yoga was murdered so that the sickly child of a priestly family might regain his health. In the Mahabharata, an Dalit boy is commanded to cut off his own thumb for the sin of being devoted to a guru above his station. The pious are told that these obscene retributions maintain the divine order. Indian wisdom traditions have globalized to the extent that its evangelists have laundered the spiritualization of caste-based violence, and hidden its history from erstwhile progressives. Many of those evangelists have either been caste privileged, or caste apologists. The yoga they constructed for export has become a form of soft power, serving Hindu nationalist objectives.   The Trauma of Caste: A Dalit Feminist Meditation on Survivorship, Healing, and Abolition by Thenmozhi Soundararajan puts this history under a microscope. It pulls back the curtain on the carceral impacts of terms like dharma and karma, and concepts like purity, pollution, and reincarnation. In terms of our work here at Conspirituality, Soundararajan's text cuts through the romantic Orientalism used by influencers, cult leaders, and nationalists to exploit emotional vulnerabilities. It also points to—and updates—a vision of spiritual practice first articulated by the Dalit leader B. R. Ambedkar, rooted in the ancient Buddhist call to compassion and equality. Show NotesThe Trauma of Caste by Thenmozhi SoundararajanThenmozhi Soundararajan: Transmedia Artist, Theorist & FuturistB. R. Ambedkar - Wikipedia -- -- --Support us on PatreonStay in touch with us on Twitter: @derekberes @julianmwalker @matthewremskiOriginal music by EarthRise SoundSystem

New Books in European Studies
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Critical Theory
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Islamic Studies
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books Network
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
On Edward Said's "Orientalism"

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:39


Beginning in the 17th century, European countries began colonizing countries east of Europe. They imposed their own ideas over local cultures and extracted free labor and resources. One way that European colonizers justified this exploitation was through an academic discipline called Orientalism. In 1978, Edward Said, a professor of literature at Columbia University, published a book of the same name, Orientalism. In his critique, he challenged Europeans' construction of the so-called “East,” laid bare the biases of Orientalist study, and transformed the course of humanities scholarship. Stathis Gourgouris is a professor of classics, English, and comparative literature at Columbia University. He is the author of books such as Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece and Does Literature Think?: Literature as Theory for an Antimythical Era. See more information on our website, WritLarge.fm. Follow us on Twitter @WritLargePod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Victor E History
British Christianity and Opium in the Formation of the Oriental Other

Victor E History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 20:47


In this episode Dr. Manamee Guha is joined by Drew Legere, a Junior at Fort Hays State University to discuss her research project on the tense relationship between the British and the Chinese leading up to the Opium Wars. As the British involved themselves in the opium trade, which brought British controlled Indian opium to China, both the opium merchants and Christian missionaries argued in support of the opium wars. Religious arguments were used by both groups to emphasize the importance of a British connection to China. For British opium merchants, demonizing the Chinese through their heathenism allowed the merchants to ignore the negative impact of the opium trade since the Chinese lack this vital British quality. Christian missionaries supported the opium wars to expand Christian influences on China, but later view the opium trade as a barrier to conversion which they viewed as a necessity for Chinese betterment. Suggested Reading: Berridge, Virginia and Edwards, Griffith. Opium and the People: Opiate Use in Nineteenth-century England. London and New York, NY: Allen Lane and St. Martin's Press, 1981 Derks, Hans. History of the Opium Problem the Assaulton the East, Ca. 1600 - 1950. Leiden: Brill, 2012 Mason, Mary Gertrude. Western Concepts of China and the Chinese,1840-1876. New York, NY,1939 Milligan, Barry. Pleasures and Pains: Opium and the Orient in Nineteenth-Century British Culture. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1995 Said, Edward. Orientalism, New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1979 Paquette, Jean “An Uncompromising Land; the London Missionary Society in China, 1807-1860,” PhD Diss., University of California, 1987.  

New Books Network
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Chinese Studies
Carles Prado-Fonts, "Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation" (Northwestern UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 60:05


Today I spoke with Carles Prado-Fonts on his recently published book Secondhand China: Spain, the East, and the Politics of Translation (Northwestern UP, 2022). This transcultural study of cultural production brings to light the ways Spanish literature imagined China by relying on English- and French-language sources. Carles Prado-Fonts examines how the simultaneous dependence on and obscuring of translation in these cross-cultural representations created the illusion of a homogeneous West. He argues that Orientalism became an instrument of hegemony not only between “the West and the rest” but also within the West itself, where Spanish writers used representations of China to connect themselves to Europe, hone a national voice, or forward ideas of political and cultural modernity. Uncovering an eclectic and surprising archive, Prado-Fonts draws on diverse cultural artifacts from popular literature, journalism, and early cinema to offer a rich account of how China was seen across the West between 1880 and 1930. Enrique Gaspar, Luis de Oteyza, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, and lesser-known authors writing in Spanish and Catalan put themselves in dialogue with Leo Tolstoy, John Dewey, W. Somerset Maugham, Bertrand Russell, Pearl Buck, and André Malraux, as well as stereotypical figures from popular culture like Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan. Throughout, Prado-Fonts exposes translation as a technology of cultural hegemony and China as an appealing object for representation. A timely contribution to our understanding of how we create and consume knowledge about the world, Secondhand China is essential reading for scholars and students of Orientalism, postcolonial studies, translation studies, comparative literature, and cultural studies. Dr. Suvi Rautio is an anthropologist of China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

The Final Straw Radio
Islam and Anarchism with Mohamed Abdou

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 121:22


Islam and Anarchism with Mohamed Abdou This week, Scott spoke with Mohamed Abdou, a North African-Egyptian Muslim anarchist activist-scholar who is currently a Visiting Scholar at Cornell University and an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the American University of Cairo. Mohamed is the author of the recent book, Islam and Anarchism: Relationships and Resonances published by Pluto Press in 2022. For nearly 2 hours, Scott and Mohamed speak about Mohamed's experience of the Tahrir Square uprising of 2011 and the western media coverage of it, current unrest in Iran, Orientalism, decolonial education, Islam, Settler Colonialism, anarchism and a lot more. You can follow Mohamed on Twitter at @minuetInGMinor or on facebook at @MohammadAbdou2020 Upcoming Stay tuned next week for a chat with the organizers of the 2022 Atlanta Radical Bookfair and another surprise topic. For patreon supporters, pretty soon we should be sharing early releases of conversations with Robert Graham about his 2015 book “We Don't Fear Anarchy, We Invoke It” and with Matthew Lyons on far right christian movements and other chats. More on how to support us at tfsr.wtf/support. Announcements And now a few brief announcements Asheville Survival Program Benefit For listeners in the Asheville area, you're invited to an outdoor Movie Night benefit for Asheville Survival Program halloweeny season double feature on Saturday October 8th at 6pm at the Static Age River Spot. There'll be food, music and merch. To find out more sbout the venue, you can contact Asheville Survival via their email or social media, found at linktr.ee/avlsurvival Atlanta Radical Bookfair If you're in the southeast of Turtle Island, consider visiting so-called Atlanta on Saturday, October 15th where from noon to 6pm you'll find the Atlanta Radical Bookfair at The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African-American Culture and History in Georgia. There'll be speakers and many tables, including us! Hurricane Ian Relief If you want to offer support to folks in Florida around Hurricane Ian, one place to start could be with Central Florida Mutual Aid. They have tons of ways to plug in remotely or on the ground for what is likely to be a long and arduous cleanup and repair effort. You can learn more about them at linktr.ee/CFLMutualAid Also, Firestorm books is collecting donations of emergency goods at their storefront in Asheville. Prisons in the Wake of Ian We've regrettably missed the opportunity to promote the phone zap campaigns to raise awareness of prisoners in the path of Hurricane Ian before the storm hit, but suggest that folk check out FightToxicPrisons.Wordpress.Com to learn more about efforts to press public officials to heed the calls to protect prisoners during storms like this rather than follow the path of inertia and cheapness that leads to unnecessary deaths of folks behind bars. #ShutDownADOC2022 There is currently a prison strike within the Alabama Department of Corrections known by the hashtag #ShutDown ADOC2022. Campaigners have organized a call-in campaign to demand an end to retaliation against Kinetic Justice (s/n Robert Earl Council) who has been assaulted by guards on September 29th and placed in solitary confinement as well as retaliation of any prisoners participating, Kinetic's release from solitary and the meeting of prisoners demands. Supporters are asking folks to call Warden William Streeter at (256) 233-4600 or Commissioner John Hamm at (334) 353-3883. You can find a recent interview with Kinetic at Unicorn Riot, as well as more on the prison strike at UnicornRiot.Ninja . … . .. Featured Tracks: Blues for Tahrir by Todd Marcus Blues Orchestra from Blues for Tahrir Kill Your Masters by The Muslims from Fuck These Fuckin' Fascists

The Fight Site Podcast Network
TENGRIDOME Bonus: Ranting About Russia

The Fight Site Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 75:17


Iggy has been plenty busy for the last couple weeks, so he hasn't been able to really catch any of the fight events that happened, but seeing as he like many others has been cursed with living in interesting times, he has a lot of stories to tell about some OTHER events, particularly in regards to Russia, which he left almost immediately after it invaded Ukraine. Tune in as Iggy briefly explains what the hell's been happening to him for the past seven months and some of the reasons why. He also offers a brief overview of Russian history, particularly in the realm of some of its regions — such as his birthplace, the Republic of Buryatia, and the centuries-old tradition of Russian imperialism and chauvinism that still informs Kremlin's decisions. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FightSitedotcom Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/fightsite If you wish to help us find Iggy a new home, please give these posts a read: https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fight-site-staff-member-needs-help-urgently https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fundraiser-update Support Iggy on Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/iggytfs

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
203: How to Tell Great Travel Stories and Turn Your Lived Experiences into Poetry or Prose with Zein El Amine

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 59:27


In the third and final installment of this interview, Zein El-Amine discusses what makes a great piece of writing for him, as a reader.  He then talks about his process for writing great stories, explains the difference between poetry and prose, and shares how he chooses the medium through which to tell his stories.  Zein then gives advice on how to turn your travel and life experiences into great stories.  Next, he reflects on the impact of teaching Ulysses in Ireland on his students.  Zein also reflects on the impact of teaching about Orientalism, anti-Arab racism, and the Palestinian struggle.  Then, he talks about winning the Megaphone Prize and having his latest collection of short stories published by Radix Media. Zein describes the 7-story collection and then reads from the title story “Is this how you eat a Watermelon?”.  He explains how to pre-order a copy of the book and where to attend the book launch events.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com

Sacred Footsteps - The Podcast
037 Islam in Western Academia | John Esposito

Sacred Footsteps - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 77:04


Zirrar talks to Professor of Islamic Studies at Georgetown, John Esposito. They talk about the study of Islam in Western academia and the identity crisis faced by some Muslims in the West post 9/11. They also discuss the approach academics and students of Islam should take moving on from Orientalism. 

Your Inner Child Is An Idiot
Episode 171 - Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

Your Inner Child Is An Idiot

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 83:48


“…and the Temple of Orientalism” didn't test as well in focus groups. Voicemail or Text YICIAI: (615) 576-0525 Find us at all the finest podcast places: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/yourinnerchildisanidiot Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/dj-phillips/your-inner-child-is-an-idiot Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/your-inner-child-is-an-idiot/id957660267 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4BHABEvxH02VSCkhvKX2HQ?si=NHxzzArHSxGnxFUvTEpbNQ Thank you to our Patrons for not betraying Shiva: Tyler Richardson, Shit on the Cartouche!, Larissa Maestro, Lindsay Alice Halik, Heather Tuggle, Jonathon Day, Damon's Australian Accent, Particle Man, Dan McIntyre, The Hands of Fate, Jackson Has An Unhealthy Obsession With Damon, The Elusive Fan Gromkin, Josh Frigo, Dramatically Placed Hot Dog, Travis Vance, Hizoner the Mayor, Beth Surmont, David Mort, The Supreme Ruler of This Podcast, Just Cuz, Scalfasaurus, Dr. Malcolm's Heaving Bosom, Captain Jean-Luc Picard, T. Smith, Karen Curd, Lindsey Nell, The Zesty, Jeremy Powlen, theKuehm, Jody Passanisi, M Moran, Jessica Hurtado, Jirah Cox, Manstrocity, Vincent Jorgensen, Kathleen Campagna, Toxoglossa, Dan McIntyre is the Worst, Amy Parman, Emily Bucago, Caroline Amberson, Jarrad Holbrook, Kristin Carter, Little Flick, Emeka Obika, Jason X, GoodCause, Justin Shea and Bill Haynes. Edited by: https://www.weeditpodcasts.com/

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
202: De-Exotifying The Arab World, Teaching The Most Dangerous Book, and Founding Left Turn Magazine with Zein El-Amine

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 93:33


Zein El-Amine starts off talking about the study abroad program he designed to take his students to Egypt for a range of immersive experiences, including meeting Egyptian author Nawal el Saadawi at her home.  He then talks about his deep personal connection with James Joyce's book “Ulysses”.  Matt and Zein discuss “Bloomsday” celebrations around the world, as well as the history of the U.S. government's censorship of Ulysses.  Zein then talks about the study abroad program he designed to take his students to Ireland to study Ulysses and celebrate Bloomsday in Dublin.  He shares the impact that his first trip to Ireland had on him and why he now feels like Dublin is his second home.  Matt and Zein discuss Ireland-Palestine solidarity and Zein shares how he first toured Belfast as part of a Palestinian delegation.  He then talks about the study abroad program he designed to take his students to Morocco and explains the importance of understanding “Orientalism” as a framework for de-exotifying the Arab World.  Zein then reflects on his experience being exiled, talks about his poetry collection “A Travel Guide for the Exiled”, and reads his poem “On Embassy Row”.  He then reflects on his activist trajectory in the U.S., getting kicked out of the International Socialist Organization, and founding Left Turn Magazine.  Matt and Zein reflect on why Left Turn attracted extraordinary political activists, the importance to connecting the local with the global, and the impact of Palestine solidarity work over the last 25 years.  Zein also talks about hosting the Shay Wah Nana Show and discusses his recent episode highlighting the Tanzanian government's violent evictions of the Maasai people from their ancestral lands.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVIALABLE AT: www.TheMaerickShow.com

The afikra Podcast
GILBERT ACHCAR | Anti-war Activism | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 49:04


Gilbert Achcar spoke about his work as an academic and his recent book, "The People Want."Gilbert Achcar is a Lebanese academic and writer. He is a Professor of Development Studies and International Relations at the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London. His research interests cover the Near East and North Africa, foreign policy of the United States, Globalization, Islam, and Islamic fundamentalism. He is also a Fellow at the International Institute for Research and Education. Achcar obtained degrees in philosophy and social sciences at the Lebanese University and was a member of the Revolutionary Communist Group. He took up residence in France in 1983, and completed his doctorate in social history and international relations at the University of Paris VIII, where, in 1991, he began teaching political science, sociology and international relations. In 2003 he took up a research position at the Marc Bloch Centre in Berlin, which he maintained until he assumed a professorship at SOAS. His works include The Arabs and the Holocaust, Marxism, Orientalism, Cosmopolitanism, The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising, and many more. Created & hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Uncertain Things
Don't Blame Israel on the Jews (w/ Walter Russell Mead)

Uncertain Things

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 89:58


Foreign policy expert Walter Russell Mead's new book — The Arc of a Covenant — kept Adaam up at night with its unique insight into the American-Israel relationship and its gripping historical anecdotes (Stalin! Truman! Roosevelt, oh my!). In this conversation, we investigate the culpability of “THE JEWS,” explore why gentiles catalyzed the creation a Jewish nation-state, discuss the ways anti-Semites keep accidentally helping Israel, and break down the specter of Orientalism that keeps haunting American foreign policy. Plus, we get into the Iran deal and some good old-fashioned geo-politics, by way of a Matt Yglesias tweet.Check out our ‘Inscrutable' newsletter for thoughts and rants. To support us and gain access to exclusive content, consider becoming a paid member of Uncertain on Substack. Follow @UncertainPod on your social media of choice.On the agenda:-Debunking the Israel myth [7:57-15:00]-Antisemitism: long-rooted and occasionally helpful [15:01-29:44]-Orientalism [29:45-36:16]-Shaping the world in America's image [36:17-49:58]-The Cold War, Stalin, and Truman (or The Randomness of History) [49:59-1:07:28]-The history of the craziest, most practical, idea [1:07:29-1:15:57]-Matt Yglesias, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and geopolitics today [1:15:58-1:26:49]-Liberal Democracy: Nothing's set in stone [1:26:50-1:29:47]Follow WRM at @WRMead.Uncertain Things is hosted and produced by Adaam James Levin-Areddy and Vanessa M. Quirk. For more doomsday rumination, subscribe to: uncertain.substack.com. Get full access to Uncertain Things at uncertain.substack.com/subscribe