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Haymarket Books Live
Learning As Rebellion: Resisting Right-Wing Attacks on Higher Ed Across the Americas

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 85:56


Join Haymarket Books, and NACLA for a discussion of how to resist the conservative attacks on higher education From Brazil to Puerto Rico to the United States, conservative politicians have set their sights on schools as key ideological battlegrounds. And when vulnerable students and scholars are targeted for their identities and/or politics, universities often fail to protect them for fear of alienating donors or powerful political allies. What can we do to fight back and protect one another? As right-wing forces work to dismantle accessible education and limit academic freedom in countries across the Americas, join us for a virtual roundtable inspired by Lorgia García Peña's recent book, Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color. In conversation with García Peña, scholar-activists Luciana Brito and Geo Maher, with moderation by Marisol LeBrón, will discuss the recent wave of attacks on education across the Americas and envision how to build liberatory spaces of learning and transformation. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Luciana Brito is a historian and professor at the Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia-Brasil, specializing in the history of slavery and abolition in Brazil and the United States. She is member of the Executive committee of ASWAD (Association for the Worldwide Diaspora), is columnist of Nexo Jornal and has been publishing a lot of academic and non-academic articles about race, gender, class and inequality in the Americas. She is the author of the book Fears of Africa: Security, Legislation and African Population in 19th Century Bahia. Instagram: @lucianabritohistoria Marisol LeBrón is associate professor in Feminist Studies and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is author of Against Muerto Rico: Lessons from the Verano Boricua/Contra Muerto Rico: Lecciones del Verano Boricua (Editora Educación Emergente, 2021) and Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in Puerto Rico (University of California Press, 2019) and co-editor of Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm (Haymarket Books, 2019). Geo Maher is a Philadelphia-based writer and organizer, and Visiting Associate Professor of Global Political Thought at Vassar College. He has taught previously at Drexel University, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas, and has held visiting positions at the College of William and Mary's Decolonizing Humanities Project, NYU's Hemispheric Institute, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He his co-editor of the Duke University Press series Radical Américas and author of five books: We Created Chávez (Duke, 2013), Building the Commune (Verso, 2016), Decolonizing Dialectics (Duke, 2017), A World Without Police (Verso, 2021), and Anticolonial Eruptions (University of California, 2022). Lorgia García Peña is the author of Community as Rebellion: A Syllabus for Surviving Academia as a Woman of Color and is a first generation Latinx Studies scholar. Dr. García Peña is the Mellon Associate Professor of Race, Colonialism and Diaspora Studies at Tufts University and a Casey Foundation 2021 Freedom Scholar. She studies global Blackness, colonialism, migration and diaspora with a special focus on Black Latinidad. Dr. García Peña is the co-founder of Freedom University Georgia and of Archives of Justice (Milan-Boston). Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/gJ2EnOVFAxk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Found Cause
Ep.145 The TRUE History of the Eastern Church - What Catholics DON'T Want You to Know

The Found Cause

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 55:23


This episode, Sebastian takes you on a crash-course of Eastern Christianity - truly obscure and little-known stories about the faithfulness of God's church in the Far East. Roman Catholics have manipulated history ever since they battled Eastern Orthodox (and eventually Protestants) - they have long labelled Eastern Christians 'heretics' and discounted the expansion of the Gospel far beyond the reach of the Vatican. However, we show that this view of history is unbalanced, biased, and makes God's story throughout the world seem unduly Western, sudden, and modern. Sources below:   Frykenberg, R. (2008). Christianity in India: From Beginnings to the Present. Oxford History of the Christian Church. Oxford University Press.   Godwin, T. (2018). Persian Christians at the Chinese Court: The Xi'an Stele and the Early Medieval Church of the East. Bloomsbury Publishing PLC.   Herman, G. (2016) Persian Martyr Acts under King Yazdgird I. Persian Martyr Acts in Syriac: Texts and Translation, 5. Gorgias Press.   Jenkins, P. (2008) The Lost History of Christianity: The Thousand Year Gold Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia–and How It Died. Harper Collins Publishers.   Kozah, M., et al (eds.). (2014). The Syriac Writers of Qatar in the Seventh Century. Gorgias Eastern Christian Studies, vol 38. Gorgias Press.   Kozah, M., et al (eds.). (2015). An Anthology of Syriac Writers from Qatar in the Seventh Century. Gorgias Eastern Christian Studies, vol 39. Gorgias Press   McClean, N., Kiraz, G. (ed.). (1899). An Eastern Embassy to Europe in the Years 1287-8. Analecta Gorgiana, 957. Gorgias Press.   Mingana, A., Kiraz, G. (ed.). (1925) The Early Spread of Christianity in Central Asia: A New Document. Analecta Gorgiana, 640. Gorgias Press.   Mingana, A. (1928). Timothy's Apology for Christianity. Christian Documents in Syriac, Arabic, and Garshuni, vol 2. Cambridge Heffer & Sons Limited. Tertullian.org   Palmer, M. (2001). The Jesus Sutras: Rediscovering the Lost Scrolls of Taoist Christianity. Ballantine Publishing Group.   Rossabi, M. (2010). Voyager from Xanadu: Rabban Bar Sauma and the First Journey from China to the West. University of California Press.   Soro, B. (2007) The Church of the East: Apostolic and Orthodox. Adiabene Publications.   Tang, L., Winkler, D. (eds.). (2013). From the Oxus River to the Chinse Shores: Studies on East Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. University of Salzburg, vol 5.

Outside/In
The olive and the pine

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 52:01 Very Popular


Planting a tree often becomes almost a shorthand for doing a good deed. But such an act is not always neutral. In some places, certain trees can become windows into history, tools of erasure, or symbols of resistance.This episode originally aired in October of 2020. Featuring: Liat Berdugo, Irus Braverman, Jonathan Kuttab, Noga Kadman, Iyad Hadad, Raja Shehadeh, Rabbi Arik Ascherman, Miri Maoz-Ovadia, and Nidal Waleed Rabie and his granddaughter Samera. SUPPORTOutside/In is made possible with listener support. Click here to become a sustaining member of Outside/In. Subscribe to our FREE newsletter.Follow Outside/In on Instagram or Twitter, or join our private discussion group on Facebook LINKS & BIBLIOGRAPHYBerdugo, Liat. “A Situation: A Tree in Palestine.”Places Journal. January 2020. Braverman, Irus. Planted Flags: Trees, Land, and Law in Israel Palestine. Cambridge University Press: 2009.Kadman, Noga. Erased from Space and Consciousness: Israel and the Depopulated Palestinian Villages of 1948. Indiana University Press: 2015.Long, Joanna. “(En)planting Israel: Jewish national fund forestry and the naturalisation of Zionism.” University of British Columbia: 2005.”Our History.” Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael Jewish National Fund. Accessed 8 October 2020.Pappe, Ilan. The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine. One World Oxford: 2006.Shehadeh, Raja. Palestinian Walks: Forays into a Vanishing Landscape. Scribner: 2007.Tal, Alon. Pollution in a Promised Land: An Environmental History of Israel. University of California Press: 2002. CREDITSHost: Nate HegyiReported and produced by: Justine ParadisMixer: Justine ParadisEditing by Taylor Quimby, Sam Evans-Brown, and Erika JanikRebecca Lavoie is our Executive ProducerMusic for this episode by Blue Dot Sessions. Our theme music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.Special thanks to Yehoshua Shkedy, Amit Gilutz, Eliana Passentin, and Vered Ben Saadon. Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio

OBS
Guden som gick upp i rök – Robespierre och Det Högsta Väsendet

OBS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:31


Med franska revolutionen skulle förnuftet ta religionens plats. Men för en kort tid fanns faktiskt en officiell kult, skapad av Robespierre själv. Gabriella Håkansson berättar den märkliga historien. ESSÄ: Detta är en text där skribenten reflekterar över ett ämne eller ett verk. Åsikter som uttrycks är skribentens egna. Essän sändes första gången 2019.Klockan fem på morgonen den tjugonde dagen i månaden Prairal, år två i den franska revolutionskalendern, väcktes medborgarna i Paris av smattrande trumvirvlar. Det var dags att stiga upp. En stor dag väntade.Med mycket kort förvarning hade nationalkonventet meddelat att en ny religion skulle instiftas, skräddarsydd av revolutionsledaren Maximilien de Robespierre, för att passa den unga republikens behov. Dagen till ära hade Robespierre bestämt att man skulle hålla en stor nationell fest. Alla skulle vara med, stadsbor liksom bönder, och en minutiös festmanual hade skickats ut. Instruktionerna var tydliga. Samtliga medborgare skulle pryda sina hus med frihetens röd-vit-blåa färger och hänga ut vimplar. Därefter skulle de klä sig i samma färger. Kvinnorna skulle bära blomkorgar, flickorna rosenbuketter. Alla pojkar och män skulle hålla en ekkvist i handen, och från vart och en av Paris fyrtioåtta distrikt skulle man välja ut femtio personer som skulle representera stadsdelen. Klockan åtta prick avfyrades en skottsalva från Pont Neuf. Det var signalen för att processionerna kunde börja tåga mot stadskärnan.Förnuftet var ett medel för dygd, inte ett mål i sig, menade han ilsket och ateism var en styggelse.Själva festen för den nya religionen inleddes i Nationalparken, där alla fyrtioåtta korteger strålade samman i ett jättetåg om flera tusen personer. Utanför nationalkonventet hade man rest en fem meter hög allegorisk staty som föreställde Den förfärliga Ateismen. Robespierre höll ett tal och sedan väntade en överraskning. Med en fackla kallad Sanningens flamma antände han den stora statyn, som visade sig vara gjord av papier maché. Det blev en ohygglig brasa. När flammorna falnat uppenbarade sig en annan staty inuti Den Förfärliga Ateismen det var en mindre figur, vit och glänsande, som föreställde Visdomen. Robespierre talade åter och sade: Den evigt lyckliga dagen är kommen när det franska folket har vigt sig åt dyrkan till Det Högsta Väsendet. Enligt instruktionerna var det nu dags att applådera och ge uttryck för sin lycka. Militärorkestern satte igång att spela musik av Francois-Joseph Gossec, och operakören stämde upp i en specialkomponerad en hymn till den nya guden. Symboliskt hade man nu gjort upp med den impopulära statsateismen som under revolutionens första år ersatt katolicismen. Det var dags för den stora glädjemarschen. Men vad var egentligen Det Högst Väsendet för något och vad innebar den nya kulten?Den frihetsklädda folkmassan tågade nervöst längs festens långa paradagata som löpte förbi den raserade Bastiljen, över Seine och fram till det artificiella berg som designats av Jacques-Louis David och rests på Champ de la Reunion. Nervositeten ersattes av lättnad när man passerade Place de la Revolution och upptäckte att den fruktade giljotinen hade försvunnit. Kanske betydde det att Konventet skulle utlysa en amnesti för alla folkfiender som satt inspärrade i väntan på avrättning? Längs vägen hade man hängt upp banderoller med revolutionsslogans: Att ära Gud och döda kungar är samma sak. Det var Robespierres som författat dem. Han hade tidigt tagit avstånd från den första kulten som revolutionen pådyvlat folket och som gick ut på att man skulle dyrka förnuftet. Förnuftet var ett medel för dygd, inte ett mål i sig, menade han ilsket och ateism var en styggelse. Men nu var ordningen återställd.Robespierre talade till folket och förklarade vem Det Högsta Väsendet var. Av allt att döma hade han hade samma funktion och egenskaper som den gamla kristna guden, vilket var en enorm lättnad för den troende allmogen och medelklassen som hade förlorat rätten att praktisera sin kristendom. Visserligen ingick religionsfrihet i Deklarationen om människans och -medborgarnas rättigheter som man antagit 1789, men den hade inte efterföljts. Kyrkorna hade totalförstörts, och prästerna, ja, dem hade man slagit ihjäl.Nu skulle alla vandaliserade helgedomar repareras och bli Det Högsta Väsendets Tempel. Och bäst av allt Robespierre hade under ett av sina många festtal pratat om själen. Detta var stort. Under statsateismens mörka dagar hade man i materialistisk upplysningsanda dödförklarat själen. Endast kroppen fanns, sa man, men med den nya religionen hade fransmännen fått tillbaka några av sina gamla trosföreställningar. Festen till Det Högsta Väsendet blev revolutionens mest lyckade. När historikerna på 1980-talet började forska i ämnet fann man att det strömmat in gratulationer. Det formella revolutionslingot som vanligen användes var ersatt med genuina tacksamhetsbetygelser. Framgången berodde inte bara på att det fanns ett behov av en ny tro, utan också på att festen firades nationellt och inte bara i huvudstaden. Det var dessutom den första tillställning där folket själva fick delta aktivt i firandet.den fruktade giljotinen hade inte alls försvunnit [...] Dagarna efter festen slog man rekord i avrättning. 98 folkfiender halshöggs på två dygn.Inspirerade av författaren Jean-Jacques Rousseaus kritik av konstarterna och teatern som han menade gjorde människor förställda och onaturliga så hade revolutionsledarna tidigt tagit avstånd från folkliga fester. Istället framhöll man paraden och marschen, där folket deltog passivt och representerade sig själva utan förställning. I Robespierres manual gjordes medborgarna istället till en del av ceremonierna. Nya texter skrevs till gamla folksånger så alla kunde sjunga med, och efteråt påbjöds det gatufester i varje stadsdel, där de som ville kunde läsa upp hymner till Det Högsta Väsendet. Det var uppenbart att det franska folket älskade Robespierres tilltag och just därför var det som hände sedan helt obegripligt.Dagen efter festen stormade Robespierre ut från Konventet mitt i en debatt och försvann från offentligheten i en hel månad. Orsaken är höljd i dunkel. Kanske lyckades ateistfalangen sätta stopp för den nya kulten, eller så var Robespierre utbränd efter att ha jobbat dygnet runt med festen i trettio dagar. Några instruktioner om hur den nya religionen skulle installeras dök aldrig upp. Och den fruktade giljotinen hade inte alls försvunnit, den hade bara flyttats eftersom de massiva mängder blod som samlades under den hotade att förgifta grundvattnet. Dagarna efter festen slog man rekord i avrättning. 98 folkfiender halshöggs på två dygn. När Robespierre efter en månad kom tillbaka till konventet höll han sitt berömda Åttonde Thermidor-tal, där han vädjar till regeringen att agera mot den konspiration som iscensatts mot honom. Dagen därpå, den 9 Thermidor, arresteras han, och ett dygn senare faller han själv offer för dödsmaskinens bila. Robespierres epok är över, och med det också hoppet om en ny religion.Att uppsåtet med festen till Det Högsta Väsendet var att ge den unga republiken en ny moral råder det inget tvivel om. Men tidpunkten lockar också till en annan tolkning. Idén om den nya guden uppstod bara två dagar efter att Robespierres äldsta revolutionsvänner, paret Camille och Lucile Desmoulins, och Georges Danton, hade anklagats för konspiration och avrättats. Trots att de hade blivit bittra fiender på slutet måste tanken på att aldrig mer få träffa sina vänner ha varit outhärdlig. Robespierre var svårt sjuk, omgiven av fiender och hatad av många. Kanske kände han på sig att slutet närmade sig även för honom och kanske gav helt enkelt tanken på själens odödlighet den tröst han behövde för att orka vidare och gå sitt grymma öde till mötes.Gabriella Håkansson, författare och kritiker LitteraturJonathan Smyth: Robespierre and the Festival of the Supreme Being, Manchester University Press, 2016Ruth Scurr: Fatal purity. Robespierre and the French Revolution. Metropolitan Books, 2006Slavoj iek: Virtue and Terror. Robespierres speeches. Verso, 2007Jonas Barish: The Anti-theatrical Prejudice. The University of California Press, 1981.Hilary Mantel: Frihet, Jämlikhet, Broderskap. Översättare: Marianne Mattsson samt Jens Ahlberg. Weyler förlag (En romantrilogi om den starka vänskapen mellan revolutionsledarna Robespierre, Desmoulins och Danton).

New Books in Latin American Studies
Joshua Savala, "Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 65:12


The War of the Pacific (1879–1883) looms large in the history of Peru and Chile. Upending the prevailing historiographical focus on the history of conflict, Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World (U California Press, 2022) explores points of connection shared between Peruvians and Chileans despite war. Through careful archival work, historian Joshua Savala highlights the overlooked cooperative relationships of workers across borders, including maritime port workers, doctors, and the police. These groups, in both countries, were intimately tied together through different forms of labor: they worked the ships and ports, studied and treated disease transmission in the face of a cholera outbreak, and conducted surveillance over port and maritime activities because of perceived threats like transnational crime and labor organizing. By following the movement of people, diseases, and ideas, Savala reconstructs the circulation that created a South American Pacific world. The resulting story is one in which communities, classes, and states formed transnationally through varied, if uneven, forms of cooperation. Joshua Savala is Assistant Professor of History at Rollins College. After finishing his undergraduate degree at the University of California, Davis in 2007, Savala worked as a union organizer with AFSCME Local 3299 in San Diego, California for two years. In 2012 he completed an MA in History at Tufts University and then went on to Cornell for his doctorate. Savala's research interests are in labor and working-class history, social movements, oceans, history of medicine, and the state. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

New Books in History
Joshua Savala, "Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 65:12


The War of the Pacific (1879–1883) looms large in the history of Peru and Chile. Upending the prevailing historiographical focus on the history of conflict, Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World (U California Press, 2022) explores points of connection shared between Peruvians and Chileans despite war. Through careful archival work, historian Joshua Savala highlights the overlooked cooperative relationships of workers across borders, including maritime port workers, doctors, and the police. These groups, in both countries, were intimately tied together through different forms of labor: they worked the ships and ports, studied and treated disease transmission in the face of a cholera outbreak, and conducted surveillance over port and maritime activities because of perceived threats like transnational crime and labor organizing. By following the movement of people, diseases, and ideas, Savala reconstructs the circulation that created a South American Pacific world. The resulting story is one in which communities, classes, and states formed transnationally through varied, if uneven, forms of cooperation. Joshua Savala is Assistant Professor of History at Rollins College. After finishing his undergraduate degree at the University of California, Davis in 2007, Savala worked as a union organizer with AFSCME Local 3299 in San Diego, California for two years. In 2012 he completed an MA in History at Tufts University and then went on to Cornell for his doctorate. Savala's research interests are in labor and working-class history, social movements, oceans, history of medicine, and the state. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Joshua Savala, "Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 65:12


The War of the Pacific (1879–1883) looms large in the history of Peru and Chile. Upending the prevailing historiographical focus on the history of conflict, Beyond Patriotic Phobias: Connections, Cooperation, and Solidarity in the Peruvian-Chilean Pacific World (U California Press, 2022) explores points of connection shared between Peruvians and Chileans despite war. Through careful archival work, historian Joshua Savala highlights the overlooked cooperative relationships of workers across borders, including maritime port workers, doctors, and the police. These groups, in both countries, were intimately tied together through different forms of labor: they worked the ships and ports, studied and treated disease transmission in the face of a cholera outbreak, and conducted surveillance over port and maritime activities because of perceived threats like transnational crime and labor organizing. By following the movement of people, diseases, and ideas, Savala reconstructs the circulation that created a South American Pacific world. The resulting story is one in which communities, classes, and states formed transnationally through varied, if uneven, forms of cooperation. Joshua Savala is Assistant Professor of History at Rollins College. After finishing his undergraduate degree at the University of California, Davis in 2007, Savala worked as a union organizer with AFSCME Local 3299 in San Diego, California for two years. In 2012 he completed an MA in History at Tufts University and then went on to Cornell for his doctorate. Savala's research interests are in labor and working-class history, social movements, oceans, history of medicine, and the state. Luka Haeberle is an enthusiastic student of Latin American and economic history. His main areas of interest are political economy, labor history and political theory. You can find him on Twitter: @ChepoteLuka Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Food
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/food

New Books in Public Policy
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Public Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/public-policy

The Chinese History Podcast
Professor Maura Dykstra on Her New Book ”Uncertainty in the Empire of Routine: The Administrative Revolution of the Eighteenth-Century Qing State” (Governing China, Part 2)

The Chinese History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:38


Professor Maura Dykstra of Caltech joins us today to talk about her new book titled Uncertainty in the Empire of Routine: The Administrative Revolution of the Eighteenth-Century Qing State. According to the publisher, the book "investigates the administrative revolution of China's eighteenth-century Qing state. It begins in the mid-seventeenth century with what seemed, at the time, to be straightforward policies to clean up the bureaucracy: a regulation about deadlines here, a requirement about reporting standards there. Over the course of a hundred years, the central court continued to demand more information from the provinces about local administrative activities. By the middle of the eighteenth century, unprecedented amounts of data about local offices throughout the empire existed. The result of this information coup was a growing discourse of crisis and decline. Gathering data to ensure that officials were doing their jobs properly, it turned out, repeatedly exposed new issues requiring new forms of scrutiny. Slowly but surely, the thicket of imperial routines and standards binding together local offices, provincial superiors, and central ministries shifted the very epistemological foundations of the state. A vicious cycle arose whereby reporting protocols implemented to solve problems uncovered more problems, necessitating the collection of more information. At the very moment that the Qing knew more about itself than ever before, the central court became certain that it had entered an age of decline." Contributors Maura Dykstra Professor Maura Dykstra is an Assistant Professor of History at Caltech. As a historian of Late Imperial China, her research interests are on bureaucratic, economic, and legal institutions of empire and their implications for political and social interactions in quotidian contexts. Professor Dykstra received her PhD from UCLA and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard's Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. In addition, she has held numerous residential fellowships and visiting positions in Europe and Asia. Starting in Fall of 2023, Professor Dykstra will begin a new position as Assistant Professor of Chinese History at Yale University. Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode No. 15 Release date: September 20, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles, CA Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Professor Dykstra Images Cover Image: Cover of Professor Dykstra's book, which can be purchased directly from the publisher or from Amazon. A 1771 prisoner's register from Ba County. Fig. 6 in the book with the following description: "Draft of a 1771 prisoner register produced by the Ba County magistrate." It is document 清 006-01-03710 in the Sichuan Provincial Archives' Ba County collection. Photo provided by Professor Dykstra.   References Bartlett, Beatrice S. Monarchs and Ministers: The Grand Council in Mid-Ch'ing China,1723–1820. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991.   Fitzgerald, Devin T. "The Ming Open Archive and the Global Reading of Early Modern China." Ph. D. diss. Harvard University, 2020.   Hucker, Charles O. The Censorial System of Ming China. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1966.   Kuhn, Philip A. Origins of the Modern Chinese State. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2003.   Mokros, Emily.  The Peking gazette in late imperial China: state news and political authority in late imperial China. University of Washington Press, 2020.   Wu, Silas H. L. Communication and Imperial Control in China: The Evolution of the Palace Memorial System 1693–1735. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1970.   ———. “Transmission of Ming Memorials and the Evolution of the Transmission Network, 1368-1627.” T'oung Pao 54, no. 4–5 (January 1968): 275–87.   Will, Pierre-Étienne. Official Handbooks and Anthologies for Officials in Imperial China: A Descriptive and Critical Bibliography. Brill, 2020.   Zhang, Ting. Circulating the Code: print media and legal knowledge in Qing China. University of Washington Press, 2020.

New Books in Sociology
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Anthropology
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books In Public Health
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books In Public Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Economics
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

New Books in the American South
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in American Studies
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Kenneth H. Kolb, "Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:50


Retail Inequality: Reframing the Food Desert Debate (U California Press, 2021) examines the failure of recent efforts to improve Americans' diets by increasing access to healthy food. Based on exhaustive research, this book by Kenneth H. Kolb documents the struggles of two Black neighborhoods in Greenville, South Carolina. For decades, outsiders ignored residents' complaints about the unsavory retail options on their side of town—until the well-intentioned but flawed "food desert" concept took hold in popular discourse. Soon after, new allies arrived to help, believing that grocery stores and healthier options were the key to better health. These efforts, however, did not change neighborhood residents' food consumption practices. Retail Inequality explains why and also outlines the history of deindustrialization, urban public policy, and racism that are the cause of unequal access to food today. Kolb identifies retail inequality as the crucial concept to understanding today's debates over gentrification and community development. As this book makes clear, the battle over food deserts was never about food—it was about equality. Stephen Pimpare is director of the Public Service & Nonprofit Leadership program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Jewish Studies
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30 Very Popular


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Flow
How Did Natives Survive the Colonial Era?

Flow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 14:07


In this episode I demonstrate how natives navigated life in the Republicas de Indios (Indian Republics) of New Spain. #colonialhistory #indigenous #chicano References Borah, Woodrow. 2018. Justice by Insurance: The General Indian Court of Colonial Mexico and the Legal Aides of the Half-Real. N.p.: University of California Press. Jiménez Gómez, Juan R. 2008. La república de indios en Querétaro, 1550-1820: gobierno, elecciones y bienes de comunidad. N.p.: Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro. Masters, Adrian. 2021. “THE TWO, THE ONE, THE MANY, THE NONE: Rethinking the Republics of Spaniards and Indians in the Sixteenth-Century Spanish Indies.” The Americas 78, no. 1 (January): 3-36. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/americas/article/two-the-one-the-many-the-none-rethinking-the-republics-of-spaniards-and-indians-in-the-sixteenthcentury-spanish-indies/834427C28A38B1F5A679DAB669501F5E Zurita, Alonso d. 1994. Life and Labor in Ancient Mexico: The Brief and Summary Relation of the Lords of New Spain. Translated by Benjamin Keen. N.p.: University of Oklahoma Press.

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 19

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 32:28


Episode 107:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6-8]2. From Reform to War, 1906-1917[Part 9-12]3. From February to October 1917[Part 13 - 17]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 18]5. War CommunismMobilising Industry[Part 19 - This Week]5. War CommunismThe Food Dictatorship - 0:27War Communism in Crisis - 18:32[Part 20 - 21?]5. War Communism[Part 22 - 24?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 25 - 28?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 29?]ConclusionFootnotes:16) 0:36The following is based on Lars T. Lih, Bread and Authority in Russia, 1914–1921 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990); V. V. Kabanov, Krest'ianskoe khoziaistvo v usloviiakh ‘Voennogo Kommunizma' (Moscow: Nauka, 1988).17) 8:36S. V. Iarov, Krest'ianin kak politik. Krest'ianstvo Severo-Zapada Rossii v 1918–1919gg. Politicheskoe myshlenie i massovyi protest (St Petersburg: RAN, 1999), 25.18) 9:23Iarov, Krest'ianin kak politik, 23.19) 12:17Kabanov, Krest'ianskoe khoziaistvo, 181.20) 20:25Mary McAuley, Bread and Justice: State and Society in Petrograd, 1917–1922 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991).21) 20:58Il'iukhov, Zhizn', 186.22) 21:28V. I. Lenin, ‘Declaration of the Rights of the Working and Exploited People', .23) 24:46Il'iukhov, Zhizn', 47.24) 25:25Steven G. Marks, ‘The Russian Experience of Money, 1914–1924', in Frame et al. (eds), Russian Culture in War and Revolution, 121–50 (136).25) 27:59G. E. Kornilov, ‘Formirovanie sistemy prodovol'stvennoi bezopasnosti naseleniia Rossii v pervoi polovine XX veka', Rossiiskaia istoriia, 3 (2011), 91–101 (95).26) 28:41L. Futorianskii and V. Labuzov, Is istorii Orenburgskogo kraia v period vosstanovleniia, 1921–27gg. (Orenburg: Orenburgskii gos. universitet, 1998), 16.27) 29:09H. H. Fisher, The Famine in Soviet Russia, 1919–23 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1927), 292–3.

New Books in History
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Religion
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books Network
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Ancient History
Sara Ronis, "Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia" (U California Press, 2022)

New Books in Ancient History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 64:30


The Babylonian Talmud is full of stories of demonic encounters, and it also includes many laws that attempt to regulate such encounters. In Demons in the Details: Demonic Discourse and Rabbinic Culture in Late Antique Babylonia (University of California Press, 2022), Sara Ronis takes the reader on a journey across the rabbinic canon, exploring how late antique rabbis imagined, feared, and controlled demons. Ronis contextualizes the Talmud's thought within the rich cultural matrix of Sasanian Babylonia, placing rabbinic thinking in conversation with Sumerian, Akkadian, Ugaritic, Syriac Christian, Zoroastrian, and Second Temple Jewish texts about demons to delve into the interactive communal context in which the rabbis created boundaries between the human and the supernatural, and between themselves and other religious communities. Demons in the Details explores the wide range of ways that the rabbis participated in broader discussions about beliefs and practices with their neighbors, out of which they created a profoundly Jewish demonology. Sara Ronis is Associate Professor of Theology at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

City Road Podcast
69. Visions of Nature

City Road Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 31:30


Dallas talks with Jarrod Hore about Visions of Nature, which revives the work of late nineteenth-century landscape photographers who shaped the environmental attitudes of settlers in the colonies of the Tasman World and in California. Despite having little association with one another, these photographers developed remarkably similar visions of nature. They rode a wave of interest in wilderness imagery and made pictures that were hung in settler drawing rooms, perused in albums, projected in theaters, and re-created on vacations. In both the American West and the Tasman World, landscape photography fed into settler belonging and produced new ways of thinking about territory and history. During this key period of settler revolution, a generation of photographers came to associate “nature” with remoteness, antiquity, and emptiness, a perspective that disguised the realities of Indigenous presence and reinforced colonial fantasies of environmental abundance. This book lifts the work of these photographers out of their provincial contexts and repositions it within a new comparative frame. Author Jarrod Hore is an environmental historian of settler colonial landscapes, nature writing, and geology, and is currently postdoctoral fellow with the New Earth Histories Research Program, University of New South Wales, Sydney. His work on wilderness photography, early environmentalism, and the Romantic tradition in the antipodes has been published in Australian Historical Studies and History Australia. His first book, Visions of Nature: How Landscape Photography Shaped Settler Colonialism is published by University of California Press.

Quoi de Meuf
(Rediff) - Charge émotionnelle

Quoi de Meuf

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 38:43


« T'as pensé à prévenir la garderie pour ce soir ? Ensuite, c'est toi qui vas chercher les enfants ? Et le gâteau d'anniversaire pour la semaine prochaine, il est commandé ?…». Tant de questions qui soulèvent un seul et même problème: la charge mentale que subissent quotidiennement les femmes.Comment se définit cette charge ? Concerne-t-elle seulement le travail domestique ? Et surtout, comment s'en libérer une bonne fois pour toute ?C'est à ce vaste sujet qu'ont décidé de s'attaquer Clémentine et Julie. Tentative de réponses dans ce nouvel épisode.Références entendues dans l'épisode:La Ligue du LOL: Une trentaine de membres d'un groupe Facebook – la Ligue du LOL – sont accusés de s'être livrés à du cyberharcèlement depuis 2009, en particulier sur Twitter. En savoir plus ici. Quoi de Meuf en a d'ailleurs parlé dans un épisode spécial à écouter iciLa sociologue féministe matérialiste Christine Delphy qui a écrit l'article “L'ennemi principal” paru dans la revue “Partisan” en 1970. Son intervention sur France Culture est disponible ici.Le MLF, le Mouvement de Libération des Femmes, un mouvement féministe autonome et non-mixte qui revendique la libre disposition du corps des femmes, et remet en question la société patriarcale. Il a été créé en 1970.La dessinatrice Emma qui a publié des dessins sur Facebook, et sorti sa BD intitulée “La charge mentale”. Son intervention dans le podcast La Poudre produit par Nouvelles Ecoutes ici.La chercheuse québécoise Nicole Brais à l'Université de Laval qui a définit la charge mentaleLa journaliste Titiou Lecoq qui a écrit le livre « Libérées: Le combat féministe se gagne devant le panier de linge sale » publié aux éditions Fayard. Son intervention est à écouter iciL'article de Slate sur ce que les hommes pensent de la charge mentale à lire iciLa sociologue américaine Arlie Russel Hoschild qui a théorisé l'«emotional labor», autrement dit, la charge émotionnelle, dans « The Managed Heart », publié par The University of California Press en 1983La BD “La charge émotionnelle et autres trucs invisibles”, aux éditions Massot de la dessinatrice EmmaLe mythe de la « strong black women », c'est à dire, de “la femme noire forte”Le film “Sister Act” d'Emile Ardolino et le personnage joué par l'actrice Whoopi GodlbergLes propos d'Amari Gaiter, étudiante à l'université de Colombia sont à lire iciLe phénomène du “tone policing”, autrement dit, faire “attention au ton que l'on emploie”L'article écrit par Clémentine Gallot sur Slate concernant la charge sexuelle est à lire iciL'article du Huffington Post pour des conseils aux hommes qui ont une “toute petite charge mentale”Marie Kondo est une femme japonaise spécialisée dans le rangement et le développement personnel. Elle a publié un livre “La magie du rangement” en 2011 aux éditions Pocket. C'est un best seller. France Inter en parle ici. Elle a également une série sur Netflix intitulée “Tidying up with Marie Kondo”, en français, “L'art du rangement avec Marie Kondo”. La bande-annonce est disponible iciMonica Geller est un personnage de fiction interprété par Courtney Cox dans la série “Friends”L'article de Vice sur la série Netflix de Marie KondoLa newsletter du Washington Post, The Lily, sur Marie KondoLa série « Mad Men » de Matthew Weiner diffusée entre 2007 et 2015La BD de la dessinatrice américaine Lucy Knisley intitulée “Something new: Tales from a Makeshift Bride” publiée en mai 2016La dessinatrice suédoise Liv Stromquist et sa BD “Les sentiments du prince Charles” sortie en 2012 aux éditions RackhamLa série “Insecure” de Larry Wilmore qui traite de la charge émotionnelle des femmes noires à travers le personnage interprété par Issa Rae. Un article à ce sujet ici.Le film “Madame Doubtfire” sur le travestissement mais aussi sur le double-standard avec l'acteur Robin WilliamsLe livre “Merci, fallait pas - Le sexisme expliqué à ma belle-mère” de Laura Domenge aux éditions FirstLa BD intitulée “Va chercher: Comment un méchant chien m'a montré le chemin” de Nicole Georges aux éditions CambourakisPour poser une question à la team Quoi de meuf : hello@quoidemeuf.netQuoi de Meuf est une émission de Nouvelles Écoutes, animée par Clémentine Gallot et Julie Hamaïde. Réalisée par Aurore Meyer Mahieu, montée et mixée par Laurie Galligani, coordonnée par Laura Cuissard.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trying To Be Kind
Season 4, Episode 4: I Suggest Therapy

Trying To Be Kind

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 62:30


Dangerous Games: What the Moral Panic over Role-Playing Games Says about Play, Religion, and Imagined Worlds; Laycock, University of California Press, 2015. With special guest Joe DeSimone.

Science Salon
296. Stephen Bloom on Jane Elliott's Famous Experiment on Race and Brutality and What It Reveals About Today's Racial Divide

Science Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 123:10 Very Popular


This conversation explores the never-before-told true story of Jane Elliott and the “Blue-Eyes, Brown-Eyes Experiment” she made world-famous, using eye color to simulate racism. Shermer and Bloom discuss: Jane Elliott and how she came to conduct her famous experiment • reactions to it (in the classroom, locally, nationally, internationally) • whether the “experiment” was really more of a demonstration • public interest, from Johnny Carson to Oprah Winfrey • the questionable ethics of the experiment • what it reveals about tribalism, racism, obedience to authority, role playing, social proof • whether the experiment reveals hidden racist attitudes or creates them in children • Does it indicate bad apples or bad barrels? • race sensitivity training programs, then and now (and why they don't really work) • what drives moral progress • the future of journalism. Stephen Bloom is a professor of journalism at the University of Iowa. He is the author of Blue Eyes, Brown Eyes: A Cautionary Tale of Race and Brutality (University of California Press, 2021); The Audacity of Inez Burns: Dreams, Desire, Treachery & Ruin in the City of Gold (Regan Arts, 2018); Tears of Mermaids: The Secret Story of Pearls (St. Martin's Press, 2011); The Oxford Project [with photographer Peter Feldstein] (Welcome Books, 2010); Inside the Writer's Mind (Wiley, 2002); and Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America (Harcourt, 2000). He has worked for the Los Angeles Times, Dallas Morning News, San Jose Mercury News, Sacramento Bee, Latin America Daily Post, and Field News Service. He especially likes writing about every man/woman: the barista, bartender, baker, butcher, barber — or murderer-turned-prison employee.

Environmental Leadership Chronicles
CEQA Series: CEQA Reform to Advance Climate Action, ft. Ethan Elkind, UC Berkeley

Environmental Leadership Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 49:38


This episode is a feature in our CEQA Series featuring Ethan Elkind. Ethan is the Director of the Climate Program at the UC Berkeley School of Law, with a joint appointment at the UCLA School of Law. He researches and writes on law and policies that address climate change. He previously taught at the UCLA law school's Frank Wells Environmental Law Clinic and served as an environmental law research fellow. His book, Railtown, on the history of the modern Los Angeles Metro Rail system was published by University of California Press in January 2014.  He is also a co-host of the weekly call-in radio show “State of the Bay” on the San Francisco NPR affiliate KALW 91.7 FM, airing Monday nights at 6pm, and a frequent guest host on KALW's “Your Call” morning call-in show. He received his B.A. with honors from Brown University and graduated Order of the Coif from the UCLA School of Law.