Podcast appearances and mentions of Colin Powell

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65th U.S. Secretary of State and retired four-star general

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Colin Powell

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Latest podcast episodes about Colin Powell

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney
Building the mindset to reach your maximum potential with Ben Newman | Construct your life #372

Construct Your Life With Austin Linney

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 29:45


Ben Newman is a highly regarded Performance Coach, International Speaker and Best-Selling Author, whose clients include Fortune 500 companies around the world, business executives, sales organizations and professional athletes in the NFL, PGA, NBA, MLB, UFC and NCAA. Newman is the #1 Wall Street Journal and USA Today Bestselling author of UNCOMMON Leadership. Ben serves as a Mental Conditioning Coach for the 18-time National Champion Alabama Crimson Tide football team and has worked with players from the last 4 Super Bowl Champion teams. He was recently selected by Influencive.com as one of the TOP 10 Motivators in Sports and Real Leaders Magazine selected him as one of their 2019, 2020, and 2022 TOP 50 Speakers in the World. Through the adversities of Covid19, Ben's BNC Speakers and Coaching groups have had a tremendous impact on organizations finding alternative ways to drive growth. Newman's clients have included: Microsoft, United States Army, Anheuser-Busch InBev, Quicken Loans, Miami Dolphins, MARS Snackfoods, Kansas State Football, St. Louis Cardinals, North Dakota State Bison Football, Northwestern Mutual, AFA Singapore, Mass Financial Group, Wells Fargo Advisors, Great West Life Canada, Boston Medical Center, Boys & Girls Club of America, St. Croix, Missouri Tigers Basketball, New York Life, The University of Iowa and The Minnesota Vikings…as well as thousands of executives, entrepreneurs, athletes and sales teams from around the globe. Ben's authentic, powerful, and engaging storytelling has become internationally recognized and he has shared the stage with Jerry Rice, Ray Lewis, Tony Dungy, Colin Powell, Brian Tracy, Ken Blanchard, Jon Gordon, Dr. Jason Selk, Floyd Little, Aeneas Williams, Walt Jocketty and other leaders and legends in the world. Ben lives in his hometown of St. Louis, Missouri with the true measure of his success, his wife, Ami, and their children, J. Isaac and Kennedy Rose. Get in touch with Ben: https://www.bennewmancoaching.com/

Around The Empire
Ep 258 The Sword and Cross at Albright's Funeral feat Sam Husseini

Around The Empire

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 77:30


Hosts: Joanne Leon and Kelley Lane. Guest: Sam Husseini. We talk about his recent article, Albright's Funeral -- The Sword and the Cross Come Together and more. In a bonus question, we talk about the convergence of neoliberal and neoconservative actors in the foreign policy establishment and the Biden administration.  Sam Husseini is a Washington, DC metro based independent journalist who has been piercing through the establishment's falsifications for 25 years. His more recent work includes the possible lab origin of the pandemic (which he started writing about in its early days) and the Kings Bay Plowshares 7 trial. In the 1990s and 2000s he covered the Yugoslavia Wars, sanctions policy against Iraq and the Iraq war. He has rigorously questioned officials including Colin Powell, Mike Pence, Nancy Pelosi, Saudi Amb. Turki bin Faisal al-Saud and many others.  FOLLOW Sam on Twitter at @samhusseini and subscribe to his Substack.  Find his past writings at http://husseini.org/ and his artwork at https://bethatempty.org/. Around the Empire aroundtheempire.com is listener supported, independent media. SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW on Rokfin rokfin.com/aroundtheempire, Patreon patreon.com/aroundtheempire, Paypal paypal.me/aroundtheempirepod, YouTube youtube.com/aroundtheempire, Spotify, iTunes, iHeart, Google Podcasts FOLLOW @aroundtheempire and @joanneleon.  Join us on TELEGRAM https://t.me/AroundtheEmpire Find everything on http://aroundtheempire.com  and linktr.ee/aroundtheempire Reference Links: Albright's Funeral -- The Sword and the Cross Come Together Autopsy Of A Disaster: The U.S. Sanctions Policy On Iraq, Institute for Public Accuracy

Neil Rogers Show
Neil Rogers Show (October 14, 2002)

Neil Rogers Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 117:41


Neil is in town and fired up. Condoleezza song, Colin Powell song. POLL: President Bush's approval rating is about 63%, what do you like about him most?

Time To Shine Today
That Sucks, Now What? - Real World Solutions for Getting Through What Your Going Through - TTST Interview with Coach, Author and Speaker Scott Schilling

Time To Shine Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 39:58


Show Notes:Scott Schilling is the Executive Vice President of Strategic Partnerships for BeeKonnected, an online platform that combines the attributes on online dating software, with search engine capability, and social media visibility, connectivity, and branding, to create an intentional community of business professionals coming together to do purposeful business with quality and integrity.Scott is also a Media Host, Executive Coach, International Trainer / Speaker, and an Authentic Connector who brings a unique combination of 35+ years of life experience in coaching, sales, marketing and training to corporations, business owners, entrepreneurs and individuals.He has presented at over 2,500 live events sharing the stage with General Colin Powell, Suze Orman, Jack Canfield, Les Brown, former first lady Laura Bush and many more.As an Internationally accomplished and entertaining presenter, Scott has spoken to hundreds of thousands of attendees across a range of industries. Scott brings a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the airwaves, stages, board rooms, podiums and print.Scott is a highly sought-after Executive Coach and Business Expert because of the results he produces. His training propelled one client's business to grow from approximately $8 million annually to almost $100 million in just under six years.Scott's Life Purpose is: To Inspire and Empower others to serve humanity through living their life's purpose in Spirit, Love and Joy!Quote:   Being off course is okay. You will be off course more often than not. Strive to be off course less often, less far, use course correction - Scott SchillingKnowledge Nuggets and Take-Aways:When you are looking to hire a coach ask them how they differentiate themselves from other coachesA great leader was at one time a great follower - Good observerFailure is a learning opportunity unless you quitScott will be remembered as a person who really cared and used it all for the good for himself, his family and the worldLeadership, is observation, sharing and giving everything that you have gotHere is a link to this episode on our website:   https://timetoshinetoday.com/podcast/scottschilling/Recommended Resources: Visit Scott Schilling Speaks SitePick Up Scott's Book: That Sucks, Now WhatScott's Linked INScott's YouTubeScott's FacebookScott's Twitter Scott's InstagramHost Your Podcast for Free with Buzz Sprout Our Show Sponsor Sutter and Nugent Real Estate - Real Estate Excellence Music Courtesy of: fight by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/58696 Ft: Stefan Kartenberg, Kara Square

Preble Hall
Forgetting the Maritime Strategy: The Naval Career of Peter M. Swartz, Part 4

Preble Hall

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 62:05


What happened to strategic planning in the Navy after the end of the Cold War? Associate Professor Marcus O. Jones  and Dr. Tyler Pitrof (US Naval Academy) interview Captain Peter M. Swartz, USN (Ret.) on his unusual career and unique insight into strategic planning in the US Navy in the late- and immediate post-Cold War periods. This is a continuation of episode 140.

The Toby Gribben Show
Dr Paula Fellingham

The Toby Gribben Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 9:20


Dr Paula Fellingham is the recipient of a Doctorate of Education Degree in Human Relations (Ed.D.). Dr Fellingham is the recipient of the “Points of Light Award” given by U. S. President George W. Bush. She also received the “President's Service Award” given by U.S. Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump (see their remarks below). Additionally, her global work was commended by former Secretary of State, Colin Powell.Paula is the author of eight books, including the internationally popular Believe It! Become It! How to Hurdle Barriers and Excel Like Never Before.Paula was honoured as Washington State Young Mother of the Year and Utah State Woman of the Year.Dr Fellingham was the Founder of the Women's Information Network (WIN), an educational and social network for women: www.WomensInformationNetwork.com. The WIN hosted the largest gathering of women in history for the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day: 377 live events in 152 countries. Paula is currently the Founder/CEO of WIN-WIN Women - www.WinWinWomen.com. WIN-WIN Women is an international community of women and a global multi-disciplined media enterprise that combines today's best platforms: television shows, radio, social media, a website, an app, live and virtual events, an online university, and local groups gathering in “Circles” – all for the purpose and intention of helping 3.9 billion women and girls achieve a level of excellence in every area of their lives, in an environment created by women, for women, and about women. Paula is the Founder of Women Celebrating Life, Inc., Solutions for Families (.com) and the non-profit Global Prosperity and Peace Initiative: www.ProsperityandPeace.org & www.WomenofExcellenceWomenofFaith.org. Dr Fellingham is also the Founder of the International Youth Parliament: www.InternationalYouthParliament.com and the Women of the Middle East Network: www.WomenOfTheMiddleEast.org, launched in Israel.Paula's comprehensive “Total Life Excellence” curriculum is taught globally to strengthen people mentally, physically, emotionally, socially, spiritually, financially, and in their relationships. Paula has given presentations at the United Nations, for the World Movement of Mothers in Paris, and at conferences worldwide including the World Congress on Families in Geneva, and the World Movement of Mothers Conference at NATO Headquarters. Former radio personality, for years Paula hosted a daily two-hour show called “Solutions for Families.” Paula has written articles for Times Business News, People Magazine, International Business Times, Boston Globe, ABC 11, Worth Magazine, Family Living, Executive Excellence, and many more.Producer of The Fellingham Family musical group. Paula's eight-member family band performed across America and internationally for twelve summers. During their final season, they presented 273 shows. Paula received her Bachelor of Arts in 1971, and her Doctorate in 2004. Dr Gilbert Fellingham (University Professor of Statistics) and Paula are the parents of 8 children, and the grandparents of 24 grandchildren. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Marketing Secrets Show
My Day With Dan Kennedy...

The Marketing Secrets Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 22:54


Some of my biggest insights after spending a day at Dan Kennedy's house. Hit me up on IG! @russellbrunson Text Me! 208-231-3797 Join my newsletter at marketingsecrets.com ClubHouseWithRussell.com Magnetic Marketing ---Transcript--- What's up everybody? This is Russell Brunson. Welcome back to the Marketing Secrets Podcast. Today I want to tell you guys about my experience with Dan Kennedy. I hired him for a private consult day, and I want to tell you behind the scenes. What happened, what was cool, what was... Anyway, just all the things. So that's the goal of this episode. All right, everybody. As I told you guys in the intro, I had a chance this week to fly out and hang out with Dan Kennedy, which was really, really cool. And I want to tell you guys a story, because there's a couple things behind it. I remember back when I first got into this business, people were always talking about how Dan released private consult days, it was $18,800. That was the price then. And I remember thinking, "I can't believe someone's paying him $18,000 to go to his house, to talk to him for a day." It didn't make any sense to me at the time, right? And I always thought, "Someday, when I'm rich, I'm going to do that." And for some reason I never did. It's interesting. For years, probably a decade or so, I always thought about that, "Oh, it'd be so cool to go to Dan's house and ask him my questions." I always wanted to, but again, I just never did it. And I still remember to this day when I was in my penthouse writing the Traffic Secrets book, when I got a call from one of my friends telling me that Dan was about to pass away. And some of you guys know the story, a couple years ago he almost died, and then he didn't. But I remember one of the feelings I had when I got that call. It was like, "Oh, I'll never be able to do that." I had a shot, I could have done it, and I never did it. I was just kind of just bummed out I never did it. And then fast forward, he didn't die. Fast forward a couple years later, we ended up buying this company. In my contract, I was like, again, all things I want to do. I want to co-author a book with you. I want to blah, blah, blah. And one of the big ones was I want to come in and do a consult day, every single year just to like... and so that's part of my contract now. So once a year I get to go out to his house and hang out for a day. And so that was kind of the backstory. So you've been planning it and talking about it and finally, it happened. And it's funny because I'm not the best scheduler or planner. It's not my strong suit. Anyway, we were kind of planning it all and I was going to fly out there and everything was happening. And then I realized that the weekend I was supposed to go out there... Actually let me step back. So Dan messaged me ahead of time and said, "Hey, if you want," he's like, I was supposed to be there on a Monday. He was like, "If you want, Sunday's open, you come out Sunday. And if you want to buy two consult days, you can do that." And I was like, "Oh my gosh, that'd be amazing." So I said yes, and we bought it. And then those of you who know, I'm Mormon and in the Mormon church, we have a thing called general conference. Happens twice a year, and it's basically a church on TV all day, Saturday and Sunday. And for us, it's the coolest thing. We get to spend time with our family and our kids. And we watch it together and we eat donuts and it's this special moment. And I didn't realize that until I told my wife. I'm like, "Kim, I'm going to be flying out to Dan's house on Friday," or excuse me, on Saturday. I'll be there all day Sunday and Monday working with him." And then she was like, "You realize this is general conference that weekend." I'm like, "Oh no, I can't. I can't miss that." And so anyway, I ended up sending Dan usher on my team to go fly out. And in Sunday, he went and filmed with Dan for a whole day. Just like capturing stuff that we can use for promotional videos and Dan telling his story and just a bunch of really cool things. And so then I had to figure how to get there. And there's no private flights to Cleveland, Ohio from Boise, Idaho, Sunday night after conference is done. So we had to book a private plane. It was really expensive. It took the consult day from $18,800, which is what he charged, he still charges to this day, actually. It ended up adding, I think, $52,000 to the flight. So hopefully someday my kids will watch this and like, "Man, your dad loves you. He spent actually $52,000 so he wouldn't miss general conference with you." But anyways, so it was cool. So we ended up flying that night at nine o'clock at night, but it's going to Cleveland. I think it's East Coast time, right? So it's like already 11 o'clock by the time I leave, and landing in Cleveland, and then we had to drive almost an hour to my hotel. Long story short, I ended up getting to bed about 5:00 AM and the consult started next morning. So 5:00 AM I'm going to bed, and eight o'clock the alarm rings. I'm like, "Oh, three hours of sleep. Let's go." It's funny because every time people talk about going to Dan's house... We stayed at the LaQuinta, which is just the worst hotel ever. And sure enough, we got there and it was the worst hotel I've ever stayed at. It was funny because I think normally I would've been annoyed by that, but part of it was the romance of going to Kennedy and you stay in this nasty hotel and you do the things. As I got in the hotel at 5:00 in the morning, the little awning above the hotel is falling in, and then you go in there. It was just thing after thing. I was like, "This is literally the worst hotel I've ever been in." Dan was true to his word. But because it was so cool, I was just smiling the whole time like, "This is so cool." I think the worst experience would've been, the better that would've made the experience for me, just because that's what I was banking on. In fact, I told my assistant, Jenny, she was booking it. She's like, "You don't want to stay there. You should stay over here." I'm like, "No, we have to stay at the LaQuinta. That's where everybody stays when they go see Dan. It's part of the experience. I have to have it." So we did that. Anyway, three hours later, I wake up and we drive down to Dan's thing. Anyway, it was just really cool because it was hanging out with Dan Kennedy. And we go to his house, we went down the basement, and the basement in his house, it's like an office, right? I don't think his wife goes down there. I think it's like, this is Dan's area, and this is our house, it's above it. We go down there and there's a conference room with a mastermind table with chairs all around it and there's dozens and dozens of bookshelves. It was really, really cool. And so we started the tour and he showed me the books. You guys know I'm a book nerd. Those who are watching the video version, this is... I'm in the Napoleon Hill room right now. All my book collections. I am obsessed with books. In fact, let me Google, there's a disorder for people who are obsessed with books. I think it's called biblio... something. See if I can figure it out. Bibliomania. Bibliomania is a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder, which involves the collecting or even hoarding of books to the point where social relations... I got to read the rest of this. Yeah. Where social relations or health can be damaged. So apparently I have bibliomania, and Dan did too, so I feel like I'm in good spot. We're both obsessed with books and we collect them all. So it was fun to see them all. I literally took pictures of every bookshelf. I'm like, "I have about half these books, half of them I don't. I need to remember the name and the author." So I'm on eBay and trying to find the first editions of all these things. So that was really fun. We sat down and we get down to... Okay, we sit in little tables, had to do my consult. And he's like, "Well, how can I be helpful? What do you want to talk about?" And I look around and sure enough, I forgot my notebook. I didn't bring my notebook to Cleveland, Ohio. And I had nothing to take notes on. I'm like, "Can I borrow a notepad?" He had his notepad and he ripped out all his notes and gave me this. For those watching the video, this is Dan Kennedy's notepad. I took my notes on my consult day with him, which is so cool. So I can never throw this away. I can never wash my hands because this is Dan notepad where I mapped out my plans with Dan while I was with him. It was cool. Initially it was just cool because we just talked about business. I had some questions I want to ask him, but from 9:00 AM until 1:00, it was just him talking and going on things. It was just fascinating. Again, it was just like you could share things and talk about history and then this, and how this worked and I'd be like, "Oh, well how'd that work?" That first half of the day was just him going on in these tangents and me asking questions to figure things out. And then we had lunch and then afterwards he's like, "So did you have specific things you want to talk about?" I'm like, "Oh, yes. I do." So I had my questions. So the questions I asked him, this is tough. What would you ask Dan Kennedy, right? You see me as, since I've done the consults with Tony Robbins twice. I've actually another one next month, which is cool. They're always like, "Ask Tony any one question you have." That's like the hardest thing. What question would you ask him? So when you guys had a moment with Dan Kenny, what question would you ask him? So my questions were basically like, number ones. If you own ClickFunnels, what would you do with it? Tell me, your Dan Kennedy, let me know, which is really cool. Another one's like, "Hey, I obviously... The front ends of my business are books. I'm going to continue to write books. I love books. What are other ways that you would market books?" I'm like, "Obviously, we drive a lot of traffic from Facebook and Instagram, then YouTube and Google. So the four major platforms is 90% of our book sales come from those. What are other things you would do to sell more books?" And then I can't remember the question. Those are the two core questions. Then I had to ask some questions about big Peter Little events to success events. If I was to go and launch at a front end event company, what would it look like? How would it work? And so those are some of the questions, but it was cool. And then he just went... "Oh, hold on, let me show you something," goes over his filing cabinets and pulls out like, "Here's how we did this," this campaign, this campaign, "And here's how this worked."It was really, really cool. One thing that was really fascinating is... It's interesting. I learned this initially, I think I've learned it from Jay Abraham. Jay Abraham was really good at taking concepts from other industries and bringing them to yours, and Dan does the same thing. So what was cool is I'm like, "Okay, we have, obviously, ClickFunnels and we have the books and things. We're trying to figure how do we get into businesses and get them to give us... The Vietnam become members," and stuff like that. And he's shown us this campaign that I think it's Jay Geier who does it. It was interesting because what Jay Geier does is he helps people fix... The chiropractor, the dentist, who you call on for an appointment and the person picks up the phone and that person who's supposed to be the receptionist, who's supposed to do the sale and convert the person, instead, becomes the person who's blocking the sale, right? They do these campaigns where basically they call the dentist. They call them four or five times over two week period of time. They record all these phone calls and they create this package. It's like, "Hey, we called your office. Do you want to hear what it sounded like?" And then there's a CD where you listen to, you're like, "Oh my gosh, my front desk are morons. They're doing this all wrong. There's no scripting." And they come in like, "Hey, if you want, we can help train your person, give them the script," blah, blah, blah. Implement it all. Do it all for you. I think it's like, I can't remember. I think there's a different package, like $3,000, $5,000, and $15,000 or something. And they built a, I think he said like a 50 million year business off of this thing. Literally cold calling the receptionist, recording it, sending this direct mail piece out and that was it. And he was like, "You could do something similar with their website." Instead of "Hey, we called your receptionist." Like, "Hey, we went to your website and here's what we found. Here's where you're losing money. Here's," do website reviews for people. There's a million different cool things. But he's just showing me, for example, here's how it's working over here in this industry. Here's how you could do something similar. And I'm like, "Oh." Gets the wheels in your head spinning of tons of different ideas. The book marketing was interesting too. For me, again, we focus so much on the online stuff and he was just like, "Well, your books specifically work for different industries." He's like, "If I was you, I would go find the industry magazines," or industry... Not magazines, they're call newsletters. And he's like, "Every industry has one." There's one for dentists, for chiropractors, for restaurant owners for blah, blah. Every single one's got one. He's like, "You got that." Create a campaign or an ad to these things which is like, "Hey, your website sucks. You need a funnel." Hey, real estate agent, hey, whatever the industry thing is. It's not like you're going to get the volume you're getting out of everything but it gives you a chance to penetrate through all of these other submarkets. You get deep into them, which was really fascinating. We talked about radio a lot. He said that radio's different back in the day when Limbaugh was the biggest ones. He's like, "That would be huge." He was the A player. That if you got on Limbaugh, it was game over. And he's like, nowadays, there's not an A player. Basically, conservative radio is the best places to sell books and things like that. He said there's no A players. There's no Limbaugh anymore, but there's a whole bunch of B and C players. And he's like, "I would go and I'd start on C players and run ads." Those are way cheaper. You can test things out. And if you get work, you then move up to the B players and start running the ads there. And I was like, "Well, how do you run ads nowadays?" Do you run them to a call? A phone center? Do you run them to a website? We went back and forth on that. I think what was interesting is... I told him I've seen a bunch of campaigns recently. That supplement companies are doing more... The call to action is like, "Hey, text this number and we'll send you a link to whatever." It's like a text to website URL. And what's cool about that is you text them and you're able to send them back URL. It hits them on their phone. They have it. It's also not like they have to remember, "Okay, trafficseekers.com, trafficseekers.com." Like I'm going to go to the page, I'm going to go to it and they write it down and they forget about it, right? They just have to text you real quick. Boom, you shoot the link and then the link's there in their phone all the time. You get people who... Even they don't convert right then, they convert later. But then also you have a text list. Now you can send text follow ups and urgency scarcity. All the things we do you in marketing. That got me thinking like... There's just so many opportunities. An ad works, you click to go to website. It's one thing. But when you're not, think about radio, even podcasts. People listen to podcasts when they're driving. Billboards. There's a million things where going to website URL is not that efficient as opposed to texting. Text blah, blah, blah, to blah, blah, blah. And then we'll send you a link to your free book. They do that and all of sudden, now you got them on a list. And I was like, "Oh." Anyway, I think one of my big takeaways I want to build out a really good friend end texting campaign that I can start running now in all these different platforms and different alternative medias that we're not doing right now. Oh, so many cool things. He talked about the old Peter Low events, how they used to run those. The format was interesting. They spend about a million dollars per event to get 20,000 people into a stadium. And then they'd have a couple different people there. They always have someone who's a world leader. So they had Trump, or excuse me, not Trump. They did have Trump for a while, but they would have like George Bush or Colin Powell or something like that. They'd try to get a business person, an entertainment person, and then a sports person. The sports person, usually local celebrities. So they're in Boise, Idaho, they'd find who's the quarterback of Boise state that we can get, or the old quarterback. Or if they're in Chicago, it's like who's the Chicago Bulls, the Chicago Bears guy. Whoever they know that we can bring. All these speakers were like the draw to get people to come to these big events and then they would have a famous person speak. Dude come in and speak to cell. The famous person speaks, speak to cell. That was the whole model. They said that they would do an event, cost a million dollars, do the event, they clear 1.5 million from the event, but there was no real back into that business ever. So for me, "I'm like, man, I wonder if I could create something," because we've got such a good back with ClickFunnels. We create something like that. Anyway, I have a desire to do it. I don't know if I'm going to, but I do have a desire to try to do a big, huge mega event on the front end where they come in. And again, you get... I was even thinking like, what if... You guys know, at Funnel Hacking Live a couple years ago, Lindsay Sterling came and performed. It was this concert. Imagine teaming up with someone who's a band, right? And doing success event or whatever the events are, and having the band be the thing at the end, everyone stays towards, right? Then you work the band, they got the cost they got to do anyway to fill the event. Now, you piggyback off of them and they're... That might be horrible I did. But it might be amazing, I'm not sure. Anyway, I have this thing in my head where I'm trying to figure out how to do a big front end event like that. Especially with... I'm working on our success brand, our success business where it could be twofold. When it comes to the event, like first half's like success. We sell success stuff. And then the second half is contribution and then boom, we sell the business stuff and then we have a big concert at the end. We hit all the major cities and it'd be crazy. But I didn't realize the Peter Low events... I thought it was something maybe once a month they did it but they were doing like two or three a week. Kennedy even was on the road, it was like, boom, boom, boom. Place to place, place, place. So he was hanging out with George Bush Sr., and Barbara Bush. He told all these stories about them, it was funny. Two, three times a week, they were in a different city. Meetings, speaking, hanging out. And that was kind of how the whole tour worked and how they all made money back then, which was was crazy. And then basically said that during Peter Low event days, they used to hit four bad events in a row happened. Because one was 9/11 hit, and then something else hit in like four, five events in a row. It just bankrupt the company. Because, again, they had no backend. All the money was happening at the events. So when they have four events in a row that you don't get your million bucks back, it falls apart. But anyways, it's fascinating. Oh! One principle we talked about that was really cool. If you guys ever studied Renegade Millionaire, the course and the events, everything that Dan did with Renegade Millionaire, he talks a lot about these two things. He mentioned, again, he's like, "There's the future," like "There's a current bank and there's the future bank." The current bank is the money you're getting today and then the future bank is the equity you're putting in to your list, to your customers, to make money in the future. Most companies focus on the current bank. Here's I'm making money today. And he's like, "The best businesses, they make deposits in the current bank," that's the money you make today, right? And then they're also putting deposits in the future bank, which is the relationship with your customers and the people. So they keep coming back over and over and over and over again. Simple concept, but just the way he explained it, I was just like, "Oh." I wrote that down. My future bank is the long term equity in your company and then the current bank. You have to bring people in current bank and then you're making deposits into this future bank. What else? What else? Oh, there's so many cool things. Oh, okay. I got something cool for you. This will be kind of the last thing. I'll probably wrap on this. So this is the most interesting. So we're in Dan Kennedy's basement. We're down there. He's got the computers, I probably saw the fax machine. I got a picture by the fax machine. All kinds of stuff. But I asked him... Well, not asked him. He could volunteer but he's just like, "Hey, there's no internet access down here." I'm like, "What?" He's like, "Yeah. I'm not connected with the internet." And I know if you guys heard me tell stories about Dan, he faxes, he doesn't have an email address, things like that. But not only does he not have an email address, he does not have internet access. Literally no internet. He couldn't check email if he wanted to because there's no... He types. His computers are typewriters basically. Types, prints it out, walks to the fax, and he faxes it to somebody. His wife has internet but he doesn't use it. Then the basement there's no... None of his computers are hooked to the internet. Is this crazy? I was like, "Well, how do you research for your books?" And he kind of points around all the books. He's like, "This is my research here." And he looked to me, he's like, "How do you research for your books?" He's like, "When you're on the internet, don't you feel like you're standing in the middle of a strip club? How are you able to focus?" I was like, "That's a good point." In fact, so much so that now I came back and... I told you guys earlier, I'm in the Napoleon Hill room. My plan is every day, I'm spending the first half day here where there's no internet access. I mean, there is internet, but I'm not connected. There's no people to talk to. I'm just here writing and working and trying to get stuff done because I'm sure I'm like you, I get distracted all over the place. So I have to literally... My team knows, I'll be in the office after lunch, but before lunch, I'm here in a spot where there's no internet so I can record podcasts. I can write, I can plan. I can all the things that I need to do. Anyway, it made me excited to also figure how do I... I need to disconnect more. Disconnect from social, disconnect from internet. Disconnect more so I can get more stuff done. So anyway, I get a lot of stuff done but I want to get more, just like you guys. So anyway, there's some of the highlights from my time with Dan. Oh, for those in network marketing, he showed the two things that blew Herbalife up. Number one was the pin like, "Want to lose weight? Ask me how. Ask me how I did it." And he's like that initiated conversations. That got people that asked the Herbalife distributors because they couldn't get them to go out there and to like, "Hey, do you want to lose weight?" Or "Hey, do you want..." Having something like that was number one and number two, this was fascinating. There's a lesson here for somebody. Is that they would have on TV a late night infomercial but it was more like an opportunity meeting. It was interesting because they didn't make money from the opportunity meeting, right? It wasn't like a direct response infomercial where they're making money directly. Instead what it was... It was an opportunity. So people at home around the world would get their friends and family and say, "Hey, Sunday night, we're doing this thing, come over house and watch it together." They'd come together, turn on the TV, they'd watch it. And then the infomercial was the opportunity meeting and they'd sign up their friends there in the house. And that was their model. That's so cool! I think there's something there. If I own a network marketing company, I would definitely exploit that and do it where... Do a Facebook live every Saturday night or Sunday night. That's literally just the opportunity meeting and have the entire company bring people to that meeting over and over again. I may try to do something similar for affiliates or for our new funnel builders, which is the new thing coming up I can't tell you about, or I don't know. I haven't figured out how to leverage that yet but I thought that was really, really cool. That Herbalife did that for a decade or so. That's how they grew. So much fun. So many fun things. So I hope that helps you guys. Hopefully, you got a glimpse of some of the cool things I learned about with Dan Kennedy. It was everything I hope for and more. You'll be able to see the production, the what happens afterwards coming back in this year and the near future side of our companies. Appreciate you guys all for listening. If you enjoy this, let us know. And if you're not subscribed to the No B.S Newsletter, you must make money, that's the only logical explanation. Go to nobsletter.com, go get subscribed. You hear from me and Dan twice a month so that's all I got. Thank you, guys. Appreciate you and we'll see you soon. Bye.

Little Box of Quotes
Ego ~ Colin Powell

Little Box of Quotes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 0:19


Would you like to receive a daily, random quote by email from my Little Box of Quotes?https://constantine.name/lboqA long long time ago I began collecting inspirational quotes and aphorisms. I kept them on the first version of my web site, where they were displayed randomly. But as time went on, I realized I wanted them where I would see them. Eventually I copied the fledgeling collection onto 3×5 cards and put them in a small box. As I find new ones, I add cards. Today, there are nearly 1,000 quotes and the collection continues to grow.My mission is creating better conversations to spread understanding and compassion. This podcast is a small part of what I do. Drop by https://constantine.name for my weekly email, podcasts, writing and more.

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper
Colin Powell's Chief of Staff on Ukraine

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 47:38


Click here for the the full episode, including an extended interview with Larry Wilkerson on why the FBI is tailing him and why others don't stand up to the machine. Larry Wilkerson, former US Army Colonel and high-ranking member of Bush's White House as Colin Powell's chief of staff, has spent his post-government career criticizing our war-mongering policies. Wilkerson discusses the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the US response from an inside-the-government perspective: He's worked with Biden and understands his motives. He knows the US oligarchs whose wallets will be hurt if Russian oligarchs are hit. He's been through the army and Washington and understands why the current strategy isn't designed to help anyone but the US. So we think he's a good person to listen to. We also think that may be why the FBI is suddenly following him around. And, it seems that Wilkerson's advice on drone strike information doubles as a pretty good characterization of some of the politicians in power today: “Your intelligence is never as good as you think it is.” Plus, Dems are ripping up the shelters of the unhoused while Republicans are having cocaine orgies. Oh yeah, and @usefulidiotpod is now #truthing on Truth Social. It's all this, and more, on this week's episode of Useful Idiots. Check it out. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Tommy Show
Nationals Launch Cherry Blossoms Theme Apparel, Local Chef Heads to Poland, RGB In The Smithsonian

The Tommy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 24:45


Earthling! Falls Church Man Breaks Space Record Falls Church native Mark Vande Hei is back on Earth after a record breaking 355 days at the International Space Station. He hitched a ride back with two Russian Cosmonauts. Wonder want that convo on the ride back was like? Bayou Bakery Chef Guas In Poland Helping Refugees As humanitarian efforts from around the world are sending money and support to refugees fleeing Ukraine Arlington's Chef David Guas hopped on a plane to prepare meals just miles from the border in Poland.  If you're married you'll totally relate to how he ended up in Europe. Baseball, Blossoms and Horses Nationals Park Nationals Park hosted a launch party for fans to view and purchase the highly anticipated cherry blossom-themed City Connect line on Wednesday.  WIN DC Central Kitchen #CapFoodFight Tickets We'e one week away from the DC Central Kitchen Capital Food Fight.  You can wine a pair of tickets and $100 in Alto rideshare credit on Tommy's Instagram and Kelly's Instagram. Awarding RBG and Bono Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's children donated items of her life and career to the Smithsonian American History Museum The Museum also presented RBG (posthumously) with the “Great American Medal” past recipients include  Madeleine Albright, Gen. Colin Powell, Tom Brokaw, Cal Ripken Jr., Billie Jean King, Paul Simon and Dr. Fauci.  Bono of U2, ONE, RED, and all the other things Fame is in DC too. Yesterday he roamed the halls of the Capitol making a point to stop and chat with Capitol Police.  Tonight he'll receive the William Fulbright Prize for International Understanding because well, he's Bono and does all kinds of good things for the world.

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Gen. Smedley Butler, The Gangsters of Capitalism, and... ZOMBIES!? w/ Jonathan M. Katz/Madeline Albright & the Post-Cold War Order w/ Liza Featherstone

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 106:17


On this edition of Parallax Views, journalist Jonathan M. Katz joins us to discuss his fascinating new book Gangsters of Capitalism: Smedley Butler, The Marines, and the Making and Breaking of America's Empire. For the uninitiated, Maj. Gen. Smedley Darlington Butler is one of only a few men to receive a Medal of Honor twice for his service in the military. Later on in life he became a voice for disenfranchised veterans and a prominent antiwar figure who claimed that in his years prior he had served as a "gangster of capitalism". Butler wrote the famous antiwar short book War is a Racket to expound on the antiwar views that dominated the latter portion of his life. Katz discusses all of this as well as Butler's dark legacy in Haiti, the ways in which Butler couldn't be neatly categorized politically as anything other than a patriotic defender of troops and veterans (and how the Communist Party's Earl Browder summed that up), his contempt for the Italian fascist Mussolini, PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) and moral injury, the Business Plot, the Bonus Marches and Butler's support for them (vs. Gen. Patton), and zombies. Yes, zombies. How does that factor into the story. Well, you'll have to find out by listening to the conversation but the mention of Butler and his time in Haiti should give you a clue! In the second half of the program, journalist Liza Featherstone, author of such books as Diving Desire: Focus Groups and the Culture of Consultation and False Choices: The Faux Feminism of Hillary Rodham Clinton, joins us to discuss her Jacobin obituary of the recently passed diplomat Madeline Albright. Although Albright has been well-remembered in many obituaries since her passing on Mar 23, 2022, Featherstone took a more critical view of Albright and her career which included time as the 20th United States Ambassador to the United Nations and 64th United States Secretary of State. Albright infamously said that sanctions against Iraq, which harmed many innocent Iraqi civilians (including children), was worth it in a 60 Minutes interview. She also held to a foreign policy that conflicted greatly with Colin Powell and his Powell Doctrine, instead believing that U.S. military might should not go to waste. We cover all of this as well as Albright's consulting group and its relation to the pandemic and vaccine apartheid, the hagiography around Albright since her passing, girl boss feminism and its discontents, and much, much more!

Naimah Northstar: Plug into The Wonderful You
Have a vision. Be demanding! Colin Powell

Naimah Northstar: Plug into The Wonderful You

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 118:59


You have the power to create experiences that bring joy. But you must have a vision! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/asknaimah/message

PRIMO NUTMEG
#263: Col. Lawrence Wilkerson

PRIMO NUTMEG

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 60:33


Lawrence Wilkerson is a retired United States Army Colonel as well as the former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell. On the show, Wilkerson breaks down US propaganda regarding the war in Ukraine. Wilkerson discusses how NATO expansion , the bombing of Belgrade in 1999, and arming the Azov Battalion invited this conflict. Wilkerson also shares his thoughts on corruption in Ukraine, the Pentagon's involvement in Ukrainian biolabs, accusations that Russia will launch a "false flag" chemical weapons attack, and the prospects of nuclear war. Wilkerson also takes patron questions on related topics.Join the conversation! Submit questions to guests by becoming a PRIMO RADICAL patron for only $1 a month on Patreon: https://patreon.com/primoradicalSubscribe to PRIMO RADICAL on Rokfin, Rumble, Odysee, Spotify, and iTunes!https://primoradical.com/ https://rokfin.com/primoradical/https://rumble.com/primoradical/https://odysee.com/@primoradicalhttps://t.me/primoradicalshowhttps://minds.com/primoradical/https://facebook.com/primoradical/ https://twitter.com/primoradical/ https://instagram.com/primoradical/https://minds.com/primoradical/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/primonutmeg)

Preble Hall
From OP-60 to Colin Powell: The Naval Career of Peter M. Swartz, Part 3

Preble Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 62:02


What was it like to be at NATO headquarters during the collapse of the Eastern Bloc? Associate Professor Marcus O. Jones  and Dr. Tyler Pitrof (US Naval Academy) interview Captain Peter M. Swartz, USN (Ret.) on his unusual career and unique insight into strategic planning in the US Navy in the late- and immediate post-Cold War periods. This is a continuation of the story begun in episode 124.

Frank Morano
Lawrence Wilkerson, retired United States Army Colonel | 3-18-22

Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 29:10


 Lawrence Wilkerson, retired United States Army Colonel and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell gives his perspective on the Russia-Ukraine war.  and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell gives his perspective on the Russia-Ukraine war.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano
Curd Mentality | 3-18-22

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 216:54


On this edition of The Other Side of Midnight: Frank Morano is muenster on the mic. He answers anything and anything that comes to our listeners minds in Ask Frank Anything. Lawrence Wilkerson, retired United States Army Colonel and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell gives his perspective on the Russia-Ukraine war. Denunciations dig deep this week Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SpyTalk
Nuclear Risks and Putin's Quest for Glory

SpyTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 43:43


Former CIA officer and former head of Department of Energy intelligence Rolf Mowatt-Larssen assesses the risks in Vladimir Putin's takeover of Ukraine's nuclear power stations in a conversation with Jeanne Meserve. And Lawrence Wilkerson, retired US Army Colonel and former chief of staff to General Colin Powell, tells Jeff Stein that this brutal war is Putin's attempt to secure a revered place in Russian history. Guests: Rolf Mowatt-Larssen: https://www.belfercenter.org/person/rolf-mowatt-larssen Lawrence Wilkerson https://www.belfercenter.org/person/rolf-mowatt-larssen Take our listener survey: http://survey.podtrac.com/start-survey.aspx?pubid=BffJOlI7qQcF&ver=short   Subscribe to SpyTalk on Substack https://www.spytalk.co/ Follow Jeanne Meserve on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JeanneMeserve https://www.jeannemeserve.com/ Follow Jeff Stein on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpyTalker Follow SpyTalk on Twitter: https://twitter.com/talk_spy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Media Roots Radio
W Fakes Taking the Smallpox Vax & Project Bioshield on the Eve of War Pt 4

Media Roots Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 273:51


[ UNLOCKED Patreon exclusive episode ] Part 4 of the Media Roots Radio Smallpox Bioterror Hoax miniseries starts just 4 months before the launch of the Iraq war. In this episode Robbie lays out a litany of exclusively pulled TV archive clips, official US documents and official statements in late 2002 and early 2003 which make a strong case for the ‘pre-event' Smallpox vaccination program playing a crucial (but memory-holed) role in the propaganda talking points deployed by the Bush administration for the war. Colin Powell mentions smallpox in his infamous UN speech about Iraq's alleged ‘mobile biological weapons labs' and the fear became so intense domestically that 40% of Americans polled at the time believed that a smallpox bioterrorism attack was ‘likely'. Part 1 of this miniseries is also unlocked but if you'd like to hear the entire miniseries (Part 2, 3, 5 & more) become a Media Roots Radio subscriber @ https://www.patreon.com/mediarootsradio for as little as $5 to gain access. Extra Materials: Smallpox News Clips Video 1999 - 2006 https://bit.ly/3Ig2inN the Smallpox Cache [ documents compiled by Robbie Martin relevant to the smallpox story ] https://bit.ly/3KRwqYw. 2002 CDC Smallpox Vaccination Plan [ the entire series of documents including revisions to the CDC's smallpox bioterror response plan for state governments ] https://bit.ly/3iel7NF . Part 1: the Wheel of Winter's Darkness & Smallpox Bioterror Scares [UNLOCKED] https://bit.ly/3q8nw0E . Part 2: the Smallpox Doomsday Failsafe Scenario, 100s of Tons of Virus 'Missing' Part 3: the Smallpox Vaccination Rollout Begins, J. Hauer's Biodefense Ploy, Iraq 'May Have the Virus'. Part 4: W Fakes Taking the Smallpox Vax & Project Bioshield on the Eve of War [UNLOCKED]. Part 5: Did NBC Reporter David Bloom Die From the Smallpox Vax? Scooter's Japanese Spank Bank [COMING SOON]. https://www.patreon.com/mediarootsradio

Made You Think
72: The Masculine Psyche: King, Warrior, Magician, Lover

Made You Think

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 114:34


“It can be said that life's perhaps most fundamental dynamic is the attempt to move from a lower form of experience and consciousness to a higher (or deeper) level of consciousness.” In this episode of Made You Think, Nat and Neil discuss their key takeaways from King, Warrior, Magician, Lover by Robert Moore and Douglas Gillette. This book presents the 4 archetypes of manhood, and explores what undeveloped masculinity looks like in the form of the archetype Shadows. In this episode of Made You Think, we cover a wide range of topics including: The differences in Male vs. Female adulthood initiation King and Tyrant energy in politicians The rise in adult male virginity in the past decade The Shadows of each of the 4 archetypes Underdeveloped masculinity (Otherwise known as Boy psychology) And much more. Please enjoy, and make sure to follow Nat and Neil on Twitter and share your thoughts on the episode.   Links from the Episode: Mentioned in the Show: Maasai Ritual (15:59) The Business of Being Born (30:53) Tonic Masculinity - Dr. Cam Sepah (42:03) Manager vs. Leader (47:15) Warrior Genes (59:18) Adult male virginity stats (1:08:40) Filtering by height on Bumble (1:09:21) FDA tweet on national cereal day(1:14:21) Colin Powell's 40-70 rule (1:40:53) OKCupid blog archive (1:47:14) SolPay (1:50:15) Books Mentioned: King, Warrior, Magician, Lover The Way of the Superior Man (1:07) (Nat's Book Notes) 12 Rules for Life (1:57) (Book Episode) (Nat's Book Notes) The Laws of Human Nature (2:10) (Book Episode)  Man and His Symbols (2:14) The Fourth Turning (11:09) The Power of Myth (15:10) (Book Episode) (Nat's Book Notes) Escape from Freedom (22:13) (Book Episode) (Nat's Book Notes) The Dictator's Handbook (57:01) (Book Episode) (Nat's Book Notes) Mate (1:06:06) (Nat's Book Notes) Models (1:06:08) (Nat's Book Notes) What Got You Here Won't Get You There (1:17:08) Extreme Ownership (1:23:48) (Nat's Book Notes) The Alchemy of Finance (1:39:20) Flow (1:43:43) Thinking, Fast and Slow (1:44:23) Layered Money (1:53:46)   People Mentioned: David Deida (1:09) Joseph Campbell (2:01) Robert Greene (2:07) Carl Jung (2:14) Paul Millerd (2:34) Robert Moore (5:17) Douglas Gillette (5:17) Tucker Max (31:00) Dr. Cam Sepah (42:01)  Jordan Peterson (52:44) NLE Choppa (1:05:49) Mark Manson (1:06:08)  James Altucher (1:28:05) Tony Robbins (1:29:47)   Show Topics: 0:30 In today's episode, Nat and Neil cover the book King, Warrior, Magician, Lover by Robert Moore and Douglas Gillette. This is the first book episode since Episode 66 with just Nat and Neil (featuring pop-ins from Pepper and Baby Eliason!). 5:12 King, Warrior, Magician, Lover provides a blend of psychology and ancient tradition. Moore and Gillette define four male archetypes that stand out through history, as well as the shadow forms of each of the archetypes. 7:52 Masculinity doesn't mean these ideas are just for men; it's a spectrum. It's just as beneficial for women to know and understand these archetypes and their shadows, too. 10:15 Knowing all forms of these archetypes, including the shadow form, can allow you to better adapt as an adult. The book's definition of patriarchy: "In our view, patriarchy is not the expression of deep and rooted masculinity, for truly deep and rooted masculinity is not abusive. Patriarchy is the expression of the immature masculine. It is the expression of Boy psychology, and, in part, the shadow—or crazy—side of masculinity. It expresses the stunted masculine, fixated at immature levels." 14:12 Boy psychology. A lot of what may be considered toxic masculinity today is what the book would call underdeveloped masculinity, or Boy psychology. Today, there seems to be a lack of societal rituals or clear transitions that take you from your boy stage to your man stage. In essence, your Boy ego has to die for your Adult ego to be created, it's not clear where that happens. 18:57 During your teenage years, you're somewhat psychologically competent to be an adult, but with so many restrictions on schooling, parenting, etc. it doesn't allow a lot of freedom to explore independence. It also creates a household struggle because there's not much externally to struggle against. If you're not being psychologically stimulated and challenged outside of the home, you may create that challenge in the form of conflict within your home. For many, the desire for challenge and quest is met through sports or other extra curricular activities. 22:04 School doesn't solve this desire for challenge, it may arguably make it worse. The struggle teens face with school isn't a struggle that is meaningful or fulfilling. In school, your work is mainly about following a rubric or certain criteria, which limits creativity and fits students into a box. It's not until college where young adults are given more autonomy and responsibility. Even then, many students still fit themselves into the box that they think they're supposed to be in. 27:51 The difference between male adulthood initiation and female adulthood initiation. There are completely different experiences between men and women who become first-time parents, because women are the ones carrying the baby and experiencing all that comes with it. 30:30 It can be argued that in some ways, modernity is destroying the womanhood initiation ritual around giving birth. The birthing industry in hospitals isn't designed around creating the best experience for the mother or retaining the sacredness of the experience. 36:38 Being more aware of environmental factors, diet, sunlight risks, etc. once you're a parent. 40:22 "They are all boys pretending to be men. They got that way honestly, because nobody showed them what a mature man is like. Their kind of “manhood” is a pretense to manhood that goes largely undetected as such by most of us. We are continually mistaking this man's controlling, threatening, and hostile behaviors for strength. In reality, he is showing an underlying extreme vulnerability and weakness, the vulnerability of the wounded boy." This quote gives insight on the wounded boy mentality, similar to what Nat and Neil reference a high-chair tyrant. 42:44 Nat and Neil introduce the 4 archetypes: King, Warrior, Magician and Lover.  King energy in many ways is father energy. Being a good King isn't about being a ruler, it's about being a good leader and being able to provide strength and security. Kids want a noble father figure to look up to in order to see a sense of security and leadership. When they don't have that, they don't feel as secure within the family unit.  47:49 King energy is feeling present, centered, and in control. The inverse of King is similar to a Tyrant, who is never satisfied. The Tyrant is always looking for more material things, more work, and worries nonstop. 51:48 We all have King energy in us, and when you don't think you can rely on your own King energy, you form a dependency on someone else for that security instead. As a child, your father should be the source of the King energy, and manhood is when you begin develop your own King energy internally. 54:01 King energy in politics. On some level, the sense of hopelessness as civilians may come from a lack of King energy in politicians. Not many leaders are strong in their sense of King energy, but many give the Tyrant energy. King energy in political leaders fosters a sense of security and hope. 58:25 Warrior energy. Warrior instinct is a part of us in our psychology. You need to embrace your Warrior energy so the shadow side isn't manifested. Nat and Neil talk about warrior genes. How to channel your Warrior energy for good uses.  1:02:08 How do you measure if you're the best you can be? It's hard to test that. There's physical combat, physical challenges, intellectual challenges, but there's not much else to accurately measure this. If you have weak Warrior energy, everything is happening to you and you feel like nothing ever goes right. With positive Warrior energy, you're in control and choosing your fate. "The warrior is always alert. He is always awake. He is never sleeping through life. He knows how to focus his mind and his body. He is what the samurai called “mindful.” He is a “hunter” in the Native American tradition." 1:06:05 The choice of letting a situation or environment rule you can evoke the shadow version of these archetypes. Inversely, if you maintain control of your situation, you can harness the proactive and positive versions of these personalities. Sometimes you have to do what's hard to live a fuller life, and not settle for the easier choices that end up being unhealthy for you. 1:08:32 The rise in male virginity, especially since 2008. Is it due to dating apps and advance in technology? 1:15:04 Shadow Warrior energy can appear similar to an obsessive-compulsive personality. This is where  you overcommit and take on too many challenges. The compulsive personality digs in and works harder rather than taking a step back when faced with danger signs. The healthy Warrior knows what to destroy in order to create. 1:20:16 Magician archetype: There's a duality in the Magician and Warrior archetypes because the Warrior is the one who acts and implements while the Magician is the thinker and the planner. It pays to have a healthy balance of both archetypes. 1:23:45 A good leader is able to step back and observe so the best decisions can be made. If you're too high on Warrior energy without the Magician energy, you may be doing too much action with little to no thought. And vice versa.  1:27:02 Using access to special knowledge for selfish purposes or for power, similar to negative gurus with overpriced content.  1:34:25 The Manipulator is the shadow side of the Magician. They always seek to control their experience and how others perceive them. “Whenever we are detached, unrelated, and withholding what we know could help others, whenever we use our knowledge as a weapon to belittle and control others or to bolster our status or wealth at others' expense, we are identified with the Shadow Magician as Manipulator. We are doing black magic, damaging ourselves as well as those who could benefit from our wisdom.” 1:37:29 Lover archetype, perhaps the most spiritual one. The Lover is very creative, and is in touch with their premonitions or intuitions about people, situations, or their future. 1:40:53 A lot of people want to have 100% of the information before making a decision, but it can take too long to have all of the information. If you have 40-70% of the information needed to make a decision you should make the decision. Any less than that, you may not make a good choice. 1:44:48 The Addict is the inverse to the Lover. The Addict rides on the ultimate and continuous high, adventure to adventure. Addictive behavior. 1:48:21 Thanks for listening! If you want to read ahead before our next episode, make sure to pick up a copy of The Fourth Turning by William Strauss and Neil Howe. If you enjoyed this episode, let us know by leaving a review on iTunes and tell a friend. As always, let us know if you have any book recommendations! You can say hi to us on Twitter @TheRealNeilS and @nateliason and share your thoughts on this episode. You can now support Made You Think using the Value-for-Value feature of Podcasting 2.0. This means you can directly tip the co-hosts in BTC with minimal transaction fees. To get started, simply download a podcast app (like Fountain or Breez) that supports Value-for-Value and send some BTC to your in-app wallet. You can then use that to support shows who have opted-in, including Made You Think! We'll be going with this direct support model moving forward, rather than ads. Thanks for listening. See you next time!

Channeling History
Episode 76: Channeling History - 22.03.13 - Colin Powell

Channeling History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 58:45


In this episode of Channeling History, the spirit of Colin Powell discusses his life and gives his opinions of what is taking place in our current world.  He discusses at length the war in Europe and what he feels will happen in the future.

CODEPINK Radio
Episode 134: No War in Ukraine!

CODEPINK Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 55:00


Massachusetts Peace Action for the third radio show in our SPECIAL SERIES ON FOREIGN POLICY, focused on the war in Ukraine. This event is also co-sponsored by the Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security. Featured Guests: Col. Lawrence Wilkerson is an adjunct professor of government and public policy at the College of William and Mary and the former Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell (2002 to 2005). He is a critic of U.S. foreign policy surrounding the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars, Iran, and the new Cold Wars with China and Russia, and asserts that the U.S. is not a democracy but a war state that forces its will on the global community. In 2020, Wilkerson worked on bipartisan projects to prepare for the possibility that a defeated Donald Trump would refuse to leave office. Reiner Braun is the executive director of the International Peace Bureau, the founder of the No to NATO Network, and is active with the International Network of Engineers and Scientists for Global Responsibility (INES) and the International Association of Lawyers Against Nuclear Arms (IALANA). He is also the author of several books, including “Einstein and Peace” and a biography about the Peace Nobel Laureate Joseph Rotblat.

Inclusive Life with Nicole Lee
S2EP1: The Russian-Ukrainian Conflict from an Antiracist, Progressive Perspective: a Conversation with Dr. Clarence Lusane

Inclusive Life with Nicole Lee

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 33:37


For many people alarmed at the very visible anti-Black racism at the outset of the Russian invasion of Ukraine two weeks ago, it's important to understand more about the history of Afro Ukrainians and Africans in Ukraine. This conversation between Dr. Clarence Lusane and Nicole Lee sheds some light. We'll learn that it is not a new history.   Dr. Lusane, who has traveled and taught in Ukraine and all over the world, shared that after Ghana became independent from British colonial rule in 1957, and in 1960 when 17 other African countries gained their independence from colonial rule, thousands of students arrived in both Russia and Ukraine to study from countries all over Africa, including South Africa, Morocco and Tanzania. Thousands.   African students over the years have been drawn to Ukraine for studies including in STEM and medicine because it was relatively welcoming, inexpensive and easy to study there.   In 2014, after Russia invaded Crimea, pro-Russian, fascist, nationalistic militias rose up in eastern Ukraine, taking over the Donetsk and Luhansk republics. It was here in the east that African students were kidnapped and violently abused by these pro-right insurgents.    Now, in addition to these Africans having arrived to study 60-65 years ago, there are second and third generation Afro-Ukrainians in Ukraine, as well as other diasporic Africans.   When Putin refers to neo-Nazism in Ukraine he is, not surprisingly, twisting facts and history. As is true most everywhere in the world, there are neo-Nazis in Ukraine, even serving in the Ukrainian government. Despite that, neo-Nazism does not drive Ukrainian public policy.   This conversation gets to the important nuance missed in reporting and social media.    There is an important challenge toward the end responding to the question “What is the way forward for progressives?”    We hope you'll listen in.   About Dr. Clarence Lusane:   Dr. Clarence Lusane is a full Professor and former Chairman of Howard University's Department of Political Science.  He is an author, activist, scholar, lecturer, and journalist.    He has been in the fight for national and international human rights and justice for well over 40 years. He is a pioneer in anti-racism politics. He has written about and been active in U.S. foreign policy, democracy building, and social justice issues such as education, criminal justice, and drug policy.  His research focuses on the intersection of race and politics in the US and globally ranging from human rights and social equity to social movements and public policy.   As a scholar, researcher, policy-advocate, and activist, he has traveled to over 70 nations. He has lectured on U.S. race relations and human rights in Brazil, Colombia, China, Cuba, Germany, Guyana, Guadeloupe, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Pakistan, Panama, Rwanda, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey, and Ukraine among others.  He has taught and been on the faculty at Medgar Evers College, Columbia University and American University, and been a visiting professor and lecturer in the UK, Ukraine, France, Russia, South Korea, New Zealand and Japan.   In addition to his forthcoming book,Twenty Dollars and Change: Harriet Tubman vs. Andrew Jackson, and the Future of American Democracy, he is also the author of The Black History of the White House, Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice: Foreign Policy, Race, and the New American Century; Hitler's Black Victims: The Experiences of Afro-Germans, Africans, Afro-Europeans and African Americans During the Nazi Era; Race in the Global Era: African Americans at the Millennium; and Pipe Dream Blues:  Racism and the War on Drugs among others.

Frederick Faith Debate
Faith Debate - Niceness Opened the Door to Critical Race Theory - 2/27

Frederick Faith Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 28, 2022 24:54


  This Faith Debate opens a dialog which connects a vast array of dots. Cultural Marxism (Ethnic Gnosticism) is related to how the culture responds to things such as: Statements about “Good on both sides” in Charlottesville. The way people respond to celebrity deaths (such as Colin Powell and Kobe Bryant). “Cancel Culture” attacking college campus speeches and Christopher Columbus statues. This is episode one in a four-part series, with all four recorded while live streaming. The full video is available on Rumble at the Household of Faith in Christ channel: https://rumble.com/c/c-458137 The panel: Troy Skinner. Pastor of Household of Faith in Christ. www.HouseholdOfFaithInChrist.com David Forsee. Pastor of The Church That Meets at David's House. Imran “Raz” Razvi. Pastor and Founder of Conquered By Love Ministries. www.ConqueredByLove.org Daniel Razvi. Pastor serving The Church That Meets at Imran's House. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WBAI News with Paul DeRienzo
Ret. Col. Larry Wilkerson Former Deputy to Colin Powell

WBAI News with Paul DeRienzo

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 33:02


Retired United States Army Colonel and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell. Since the end of his military career, Wilkerson has criticized many aspects of the Iraq War, including his own preparation of Powell's presentation to the UN, as well as other aspects of American policy in the Middle East.

WisPolitics.com
Session ends with Assembly approval of Lincoln Hills replacement, Bowen talks Black History Month

WisPolitics.com

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 7:29


In today's Midday podcast, the Assembly unanimously approved a bill that would replace Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake, the state's troubled youth prisons, with a $42 million facility in Milwaukee County. Also on the floor Black Caucus members talked about their resolution to honor 33 Black Americans and former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell. See the resolution: 

WisPolitics Midday
Session ends with Assembly approval of Lincoln Hills replacement, Bowen talks Black History Month

WisPolitics Midday

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 7:29


In today's Midday podcast, the Assembly unanimously approved a bill that would replace Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake, the state's troubled youth prisons, with a $42 million facility in Milwaukee County. Also on the floor Black Caucus members talked about their resolution to honor 33 Black Americans and former U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell. See the resolution: www.wispolitics.com/wp-content/uplo…yResolution.pdf

Documentary of the Week
Remembering "The Automat"

Documentary of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 2:05


"The Automat" tells a lively history of the restaurant chain Horn & Hardart through the memories of famous customers like Mel Brooks, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Colin Powell. Filmmaker Lisa Hurwitz explores the changing demographics of urban culture that caused the Automat's fortunes to rise and fall.  

The Ted Broer Show - MP3 Edition

Vaccinated account for 4/5 deaths, what? Is trench warfare upon us? Is Genesis 6 upon us? Are Homo sapiens soon to be extinct? What's up with Vermont? Rittenhouse suing Hellywood stars? Ted wanted to support his friend Colin Powell for president. Rules for thee but not for me. This is a thought provoking must listen show.

WBAI News with Paul DeRienzo
020122 Rumors of War in the East, What Would Colin Powell have done, turning the corner on COVID

WBAI News with Paul DeRienzo

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2022 22:43


Russian President Putin announces he's prepared for more talks.. to turn down the heat concerning Ukraine…. But some American conservatives seem to be pushing for war.. we hear from Colin Powell's former Chief of Staff.. and Governor Hochul says the state is turning the corner on COVID.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Sustainable Leadership with Eddy Badrina

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 52:14


Eddy Badrina is the CEO of Eden Green Technology,  he was previously the President and founder of BuzzShift. Eddy shares some amazing entrepreneurial insights and leadership hacks including: How to adapt in a changing world, during and post pandemic? What does sustainability means for leaders? How he keeps innovating in a world that's already innovating at light speed. Why we should treat our teams generously to evolve a great culture. Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com   Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA   Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   Find out more about Eddy below: Eddy on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eddybadrina/ Eddy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/eddybadrina Eden Green Website: https://www.edengreen.com Eddy Personal Site: https://www.badrina.com   Full Transcript Below   Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach, or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Joining me on today's show is Eddy Badrina. He's a CEO of Eden Green Technology and AgTech company, which is changing the way people grow food and people. He was previously the president and founder of BuzzShift, digital strategy agency. But before we get a chance to speak with Eddy, you got it. It's The Leadership Hacker News The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: With the great resignation, still looming. Employee engagement is key for any successful organization. So, employee engagement is based on trust, integrity, two-way communication, commitment between the organization and its team members. And you will know, as I. Great engagement leads to increase productivity, performance, wellbeing, and can be measured in a number of different ways. And organizations have taken to a number of different methodologies to measure employee engagement. As a leader, and as an employee, what does employee engagement really mean? For me, it's about getting up in the morning, thinking, great, I'm going to work. I'm going to make a difference. And I'm going to make a change. Employee engagement is about understanding individually what that means for each person that works with you and be really clear and sight and energized where that fits into the whole organization and aligning it to its purpose and objectives. And alignment to that core purpose. and objectives is really important in fulfilling the organization's longer-term goals and purpose and objectives too. It's about being inclusive, fully inclusive and included as a team member with clear goals, trusted and empowered, receiving regular and constructive feedback and feed forward support in your development and innovation and opportunity. So as leaders, how aware and how engaged are you in unlocking your employee engagement? Are you regularly and restlessly, always looking to draw out deeper commitment from your team, finding new ways of working, drawing on their experiences and their backgrounds for innovative ideas, are you helping them make parallels to the organization's purpose by connecting the dots to their own purpose and experiences? And it's sometimes helpful to think of employee engagement about what it's not. Employee engagement cannot be achieved by a mechanistic approach, which tries to extract discretionary an effort by manipulating employees and commitments and their emotions. It's not about the number you get once a quarter, once every six months on a scorecard around a load of measures. And it's not something that you tactically do. Our employees are hardwired to spot that kind of behavior and when they do spot it such attempts will fall quickly and become vain and create cynical and disillusion behavior across your workforce. So, the leadership hack here. Allow employee engagement to be a behavior, not something that you do. Provide the opportunity for development, inclusion, and innovation, aligned with super leadership years. Your teams will be engaged. That's been The Leadership Hacker News. Please get in touch with us if you want us to feature anything on our show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Our special guest on today's show is Eddy Badrina. He's a successful entrepreneur. And now at the CEO of Eden Green Technology, a leading vertical farming business and AgTech company, Eddy, welcome to The Leadership Hacker podcast. Eddy Badrina: Hey, thanks so much. I'm happy to be here. Steve Rush: We delighted your here and I'm really intrigued to get underneath how the business is growing and, in more ways, than one, excuse the pun, but also, we'd love to find out a little bit about the background of our guests before we get into that. So perhaps you can tell us where it all started for you? Eddy Badrina: So, I was born here in the states to Philipino immigrants. And so, I think that's important to note, because I think it really developed my work ethic. My parents started from scratch here in the United States. So, I had a very, very high work ethic, resourcefulness and just this sense that there was no safety net, if you will that others had to rely on. And I tell that to entrepreneurs and folks that, you know, just ask me, like where does the drive come from? And I tell them that, you know, the risk to jumping out on your own or the risk to do something big here in the United States is actually not that risky at all. If you think about, you know, what's the worst that can happen? And I'll ask folks who are jumping out on their own or starting up businesses, what the worst that can happen? And they say, well, you know, I'd lose my house. I would have to go back; I'd probably have to move in with my parents, right? You think about that, like, oh, man, that sounds devastating. I said, well, stop there because most of the world already does that. That's just their normality, right? Steve Rush: Right. Eddy Badrina: And so, when you can put it in that context, and I have family in the Philippines that four generations under one roof. And when you look at it like that, then you understand the the risk that we have and the safety net that we have is actually normal in everyday life for everyone else in the world. So, it puts the element of risk into context. And so, it just gives me confidence, like, hey, what's the worst that can happen? Right. So, that's important to note. Just my background of how I grew up. And then, you know, spent a couple of years in DC. I got my undergrad and masters, and then went up to Washington DC. I was an analyst at the State Department for about four years, both pre and post 9/11. So really got to experience what it was like to work. I didn't know it, but I was right in the middle of history. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: And work under extreme pressure on some really high-profile subjects when I was, you know, at the old age of 24. So that really helped me cut my teeth on what it means to work under pressure. I think a lot of folks think they're pressure, but contextually, it's not that much pressure compared to what other folks around the world are doing in industries and in topics that, you know, one, I think all consuming from a world point of view, but also two, the stakes are just so much higher. Steve Rush: Very similar to the whole principle, isn't it? That you talked around with regards to risk. Eddy Badrina: Yes. Steve Rush: People's context and perspectives are sometimes skewed by comfort, right? Eddy Badrina: Yes, absolutely. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: I think it's also important thing to do from a leadership perspective is to always gain more context about the world that we're living in. And look at other people doing other remarkable, you know, things in high pressure situations, because it does give you context for the work that you're doing. And in a lot of senses, it gives you a little bit of relief, like, okay, this isn't world crushing what I'm doing here. I can work a full day and go home at night and sleep well knowing that I gave it my all for the day and then wake up tomorrow and start all over again. And nothing's going to fall apart if I don't get that last email done. Steve Rush: Right. Eddy Badrina: Right. So, there's a lot of benefits to having that context. So, you know, worked again, four years in the State Department then actually got to work at the White House. I was President Bush Asian American spokesman for about two years. And that was a really, really wonderful time in my career. I couldn't have imagined doing that. And I was 28 at the time. So, I couldn't have imagined that in my wildest dreams coming out of college. Those six years in DC from a leadership perspective really showed me instances of great leadership and instances of bad leadership. And because of all the pressure that was in there working at the highest levels of government. Your strengths and your weaknesses are very amplified in that setting. So, I got to see some leaders that because of the pressure just came out to me, at least in my eyes, came out golden. And really my respect raised for folks like Colin Powell, who I was able to work under for a bit, Condoleezza Rice, and then both Presidents Bush, senior and W. The things that I learned just the viewing them from a very near point of view, I think have shaped my leadership acumen up until this point, for sure. Steve Rush: And it's interesting, because most people can only ever really see the exterior perspective of how they operate. And those of you have the opportunity to work very closely, get to see a different dynamic I suspect. Eddy Badrina: We do. I think for the good leaders it's very cliche and again, you can usually only read this in books or hear it on interviews, but the great leaders are separated from the good leaders in that. They always remember the personal side of things. They look at the people around them, the team around them, and they remember that they're humans. And that they have lives, they've got families, they've got their own things that they're going through on a very personal level. And they take that into context when they're making decisions. Those great leaders are ones that ask about how your family's doing, and they want to know how your family's doing because it helps them as they interact with you, and it helps them coach you and mentor you. And that's what great leaders do, right? So, I think that was probably the key takeaway from my time there, noticing what made great leaders different from just good leaders. It was that personal attention to the humanity of the folks working around them. Steve Rush: And I remember from the last time that you and I met, that's still really cool for your leadership style today, isn't it? That's something you carried forward and there's still a real core tenant of how you do things. Eddy Badrina: Yeah, I do. I really try to do that and not just do that on a personal level. I try to do that honestly, on a company level and it's a part of how I've built my companies. As much as I can advocating for the person. I follow this creed of redemptive framework for building companies. Leaders are sacrificial. It's where employees are not just treated fairly, they're treated generously and it's where culture and society around the company are not just advanced, but they're actually redeemed and restored. And I had a, you know, an audience member asked just, hey, how, how practically do you apply some of that redemptive framework? And I said, well, when it comes to employees, treating them fairly is giving them, you know, and this is a real practical application. Treating them fairly is looking around at the market and saying, okay, what does maternity leave look like? You know, maybe it's eight weeks, maybe it's, you know, even 12 weeks. Okay, so how do you treat that generously? Right. How do you think about that generously? Not just treat them fairly in relation to the rest of the marketplace. Well, generously would be saying, okay. I know personally that I've got three kids and that my wife was able to bond with them. Three months was really the minimum time. And she could have gone back to work, but man, if she had only just had that extra two weeks it really made a difference. And I don't know what that three-month mark is, but it just is. And so, to treat employees generously, then my response is, well, gosh, what would it cost the company to give four months of maternity leave, right. Is it really all that much? Is it a difference between 12 and 16 weeks really all that much? And the answer is it is, but it isn't, right? Can we do that and can that scale? Steve Rush: And it's also investment, isn't it? Eddy Badrina: It absolutely is an investment. Steve Rush: It's an investment in people. Eddy Badrina: That's what we do. We give people 16 weeks of maternity leave and then we think broader, like, okay, I value adoption and I value my friends that do foster care, okay. So can we provide adoption, same as pregnancy, right. Can we give 16 weeks for leave for adoption? Can we give an amount of time for foster care? Can we give paternity leave? That's more generous? Right. There are just practical things that I don't think a lot of folks, you know, care to think about and expand just a little bit that make a world of difference to the employee, a world of difference to my teammates. And so that practically is how I take the personal care of my employees to a corporate level. And does it, you know, affect margins in operating margins? Yeah, it does. But is it totally defensible to, you know, the world outside, whether it be investors or capital partners? Absolutely. Steve Rush: And also, I remember in the conversation, you and I had last, that was a real key pivotal moment for you when you once sold BuzzShift, the successful marketing agency that you created and founded, but then bought it back for the same reasons. Eddy Badrina: Yes, and that's a, you know, that's a really remarkable chapter in my life of taking a company from scratch, bootstrapping it with my business partner and then getting it up to the size that we were able to sell it. It's about six years later. So, we started it in 2010 and then sold it in 2016. And when we sold it, I think everyone was on the same page, the acquiring company and us about vision and mission. But I think really quickly as with a lot of M&As, actually the vast majority of M&As, I think the visions just get sidelined by practical realities. And so, we had one party I would say that was focused on using the agency as Bizdev and the other party, including us, were focused on seeing it as a business unit, a profitable business unit. And so, when those two diverged at a point in time, I think everyone looked around and said, man, this is not working the way we intended it to, and maybe it would be better if you guys just bought the company back. And so, we did and, you know, I'll just say we sold high and bought low, so that was really good. But the main reason that we bought it back was because we saw our team just kind of falling apart and really going through some painful just merger type scenarios. And I think on both ends, we were just like, this is not the best for the teammates that are in here. And would it be better to go our separate ways and to rebuild these business units. And so that's what we did and, you know, that was the driving force for me, was the relationships and those people in there that I just didn't want to leave high and dry. And then two years later, we were able to sell it again actually for a second time. And I told my team on the last day, the CEO who's, my business partner stayed on, and I left. Actually, I had been gone. I had taken a step back to run Eden Green, but on the last day, just as an owner I was able to talk to the staff and I just said, hey, here's the reason that I feel confident about the sale the second time is that the whole time that I've been running BuzzShift for the last, you know, call it 10 years or been an owner for 10 years, the point of it was to be a good steward of that, which God had given to me, it wasn't really my company to begin with. I was just tasked to be a good steward of it. And when I could find someone who could steward it as well or better than I could, then it made sense for me to let that go. And so, I just told them, I think, you know, this acquiring company who is fantastic by the way that they can be a better steward than I can. And so that why I'm selling my portion of the company and, you know, I think it was well received because one, it was authentic. It was actually true. And two, because they knew my stance was consistent with what I was saying at the very end. I think everyone knew from the very beginning that man, I just wanted to grow a company, but do it in such a way that my identity is not tied up in it and more importantly do it in such a way that they can thrive those employees and those teammates can thrive because it's growing. Steve Rush: And therefore, it becomes a sustainable business that you can confidently leave behind in good order knowing that that's going to continue in that spirit too. Eddy Badrina: Yeah, absolutely. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: Yeah, absolutely. And they've done a fantastic job of stewarding it and helping it grow. Steve Rush: And you're now on a new journey with Eden Green and Eden Green technology for those that aren't familiar are leading the way really of this whole kind of farming ecosystem that you've managed to create. Tell us a bit about the journey so far. Eddy Badrina: Absolutely. So, to two years ago I became CEO of Eden Green, and we'll call it greenhouse's infrastructure, but it's a vertical farming inside of a greenhouse, which is remarkable in and of itself and it's a platform that allows us to grow really efficient efficiently and really profitably a large quantity of greens that is safe. It's season agnostic and it's really quite accessible to the consumer. And we're able to do that because of my COO who invented the technology back in 2011. And they have a remarkable personal story as well. That was really the Genesis of Eden Green. They were engineers and they were handing out food and actually candy in South Africa where they were born and raised. And a kid came up and stuffed his pockets. Five-year-old boy came up and stuffed his pockets and they asked like, hey, why is he stuffing his pockets? Like there's enough food to go around. And the response was that, well, it's actually for his three-year-old sister at home. It's not his day to eat, it's hers. And so, he's bringing the candy back to her and for them that really struck a chord. And both of them said, man, this is not right. Like, we've got to find a way to fix this problem and, you know, kudos to them. They were engineers, construction engineers, and they just turned their minds. Both of them turned their minds to figuring out a way to grow greens really efficiently in an economic and an environmental scenario that is South Africa. And so, it was very resourceful. They invented it out of their garage actually, and it was very resourceful. And after about six or seven years, they took it to the United States for expansion of capital and commercialization. So probably, you know, a couple years after they took it over, took it here to the states is when I came on board as CEO. And I was just tasked with providing vision. The mission remained the same, which was to change the way that we're farming food and change the way that we're feeding people, but the vision of what it could become and then taking it to market and providing product market fit and taking it to market was something I was tasked with. So, I came on four months before the pandemic hit. Steve Rush: Exactly, yeah. Timing's everything, isn't it? Eddy Badrina: Yeah, timings everything, right. And so, a lot of teams and organizations have suffered because of the pandemic. And I think because of the flexibility and the adaptability and the grit of our team. We were able to not just survive it, but really thrive in it. The pandemic hit and we realized, man while capital drying up for now, we can really focus on what we do best, which is the technology. Can we use this time? And obviously with patient investors, can we use this time to up our yields per plant spot, which is kind of the going metric in our industry. It's how much produce can you yield in a year from a square foot? So can we use that time to work on our tech? Work on our operations to get that yield per square foot, to a point where it was not just competitive with organic, but it was actually competitive with conventional produce. And we're just about there. And so that's really exciting for us. Someone once asked me like, hey, what's the best piece of business advice you learned? And really, the biggest competition that you have is who you were yesterday. And so I tasked my team to say, hey, every day, I just want us to get better than we were yesterday, whether that's the yield going up 0.1, you know, 0.1 pounds or operational efficiency going from a 96% cleanliness rate, is rated by you know, third parties to a 97% or from sales and marketing, let's go from 24 leads a month to 25 leads a month, right, whatever that is, if we can just be better than we were yesterday it really sets the tone for a company, even in the pandemic where we looking for positive improvement day to day. And I think as we added that up over, you know, the past two years, I think what that's resulted in is the team is very confident about our product. We're very confident about the numbers and the quantitative data that we're putting out to back up what we're saying. And more importantly, we're very confident about the team itself because we're all on the same page and we're all working towards incremental improvement. Steve Rush: Yeah Eddy Badrina: So, that's what the pandemic did for us. And, you know, again, I would be nothing without my team. I just had a good team that responded to the call of self-competition every day. And I think it's proven to be just a winning recipe for Eden Green. Steve Rush: One of the other things I loved about the mission of Eden Green is, it's not just around sustainability from a produce perspective as well as its great eco centricity that comes with it, but also the sustainability about the communities that you're in. So, I know one of the core tenants you have is making sure that if you're going to build a business or a location you do so by employing the neighbors, tell us a little bit about that, how that's disrupting the marketplace you're in? Eddy Badrina: Yeah, you know, from a broad point of view, the parameters that you set on a business are really the values that you instill in the business. And so, if you say, hey we're going to try to make this as profitable as possible. That takes a business to its logical end. And that logical end is just, eking out every bit of margin that you can out of the business. I'm not going to say whether that's a good or bad thing or healthy or unhealthy, but I'm saying that's not where we're at. One of the parameters that we put in is we want to employ as many people as we can while maintaining a good margin, positive economic margin, because if a business is not profitable, it's not a business, it's a hobby, right? So that's one of the parameters that we put in and it is really a core value of saying, hey, how can we care for the community around us? Well in practical terms, what that means is, hey, we've got to make the rest of our operations so efficient. The rest of our greenhouse is so efficient that we don't have to rely on robotics. We definitely use AI to assist our growing methods, our nutrient mixes all the way that we handle air and water and the environments inside the greenhouse. But when it comes to planting and monitoring and harvesting. We love the fact that human hands are touching that and are monitoring it and are looking at it. We never want to take the humanity out of the feeding other people. Steve Rush: Right. Eddy Badrina: So, because we have that core value and I'll even call it a parameter in place then we had to work. If that's just a part of our margin is up to 30 full-time people in one of our greenhouses, then what do we have to do on a technological and operational end to make sure that fits in healthy business margins. And so that's what we did. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: We're proud to say, hey, we actually want to be in the urban areas. We want to be in and around the communities that we're feeding. One, because it's just smart business. The geography of underdeveloped and under-resourced economic areas are the best and the cheapest places to put these greenhouses. But then also once you put them in there, we have the ability to hire our neighbors. And so, our neighbors can work in these greenhouses. They're no longer migrant workers. It's full time with benefits living days' wage for these workers in these greenhouses. So, they're able to provide for their families consistently. They're able to partake of the harvests that are coming out of them. So, they're really changing their dietary and health lifestyle, not just for them, but they're or families. And then finally, they're in an industry that's on the cutting, it's one of the top 10 industries of, you know, technological growth for the next, you know, 10 to 20 years. And these folks are right at the base of it. And it's not a dead-end job for them. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: It's actually a career platform. So, because of that core value, all of those benefits can result, but it's only when you have that core value and you stick to it that you have to find ways to make, you know, the company profitable while sticking to that core value. And that's super, super important to me. Steve Rush: Yeah, and sustainability is just that one keeps echoing in my minds. I'm listening to you speak Eddie around. It's not just about the sustainability of the produce, but the whole ecosystem of that organization and how it fuels itself by getting that core value, right? Eddy Badrina: Yes. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: You know, when we talk about sustainability, we talk about economic and environmental sustainability because if it's not economically sustainable, then there's no scalability and there's no longevity to the business. So, we're very practical about it. About finding ways to be economically sustainable, but while also adhering to the environmental values that we've set. Steve Rush: And sustainability's got a lot of press of late with COP26 happening, not so long ago with lots of focus on the environment that we're in and what's happening with global warming or not as a case may around the world. And sustainability is quite cliche at the moment, you hear lots of leaders diving into and using the word sustainability in some senses and having now clear ESG measures in their business, et cetera. What does sustainability mean to you personally when you hear that as a, business leader? Eddy Badrina: That's a great question. I think for me, sustainability is, you know, if you break down, I took Latin as a kid. So, if you break down the word sustain, it really means to maintain a consistent level of wherever you're at to sustain energy for a period of time or to sustain success for a period of time, you know, really means to provide for long term presence. And so, when I think about sustainability for Eden Green, sustainability for the environment is how can we endure? How can we thrive for a long term without draining and exploiting the resources around us, right? Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: And so, on an environmental level, how do we run a company? So that the operationally, we're not exploiting the environment around us, but we're actually adding to it, we're additive to it. And then from a company level, how do we continue to exist? How do we grow without exploiting the community and society around us? I think in very basic terms, that's what sustainability means to me. Steve Rush: Good answer. I love it. So, one of the things that I'm keen to explore with you is this whole notion of how you keep innovating? In a world that's already innovating at light speed. Where do you go for that inspiration? Or how does that come about? Eddy Badrina: I think it just comes about from that thing that I mentioned at the very beginning, which is, how do I get better every day? Right. And innovation I think for me, comes from when I start to sort of level out or the incremental gains in my own personal life are starting to become smaller and smaller. I just take a step back and I've afforded myself to take a step back and say, okay, how do I do things differently? If I had to scrap all this. I'm not saying I would, but if I had to scrap all of this, all the structure and the parameters in my life, how would I do things differently? In order to, you know, achieve a better life. And I really think, that's where my personally, my innovation comes from, but then it just goes to goals, right? Before I can say, you know, get a better life. Well define better, right? So, I think from a corporate, but then also from a personal level. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: You really have to know what you want. And I tell on entrepreneurs that all the time and folks who want to be entrepreneurs, but also just leaders in general, in order to be a great leader, you have to know what you want. And it's actually a part of my personal story moving from BuzzShift to Eden Green. BuzzShift was going really well. It was running quite well, so much so that, you know, I had a bit of time on my hands, but I'm not a maintainer. I'm a builder, I'm a creator. And I knew that as much about myself that I just became really impatient. I became, you know, honestly a little bit unhappy because I was just maintaining and incrementally growing this business, which was great. I think from the outside looking in, I had it all, but from the inside I just wasn't happy. And so, the first thing I had to do was, I had to define, and this required a lot of what I call heart work. Not hard work. It is hard work, but it's heart work. And in this heart work, I really had to define what I wanted. That took a lot longer than I thought it would. Steve Rush: What was the reason it took so long? Eddy Badrina: I think it as a type A in engram, I don't know if you're familiar with any engram. I'm a type three which is an achiever. And most of the folks who are really high up in business are achievers, engram achiever status or they maybe, what's called a challenger. We see a goal and we get it, we see a task, we hit it and we just go on to the next one and the next one and the next one, and we get caught up in sort of this task and performance. And at least for me personally, because when I just do that and I feel I have this temporary, like feeling or dopamine hit of success, I sort of lose sight. I can lose sight if I'm not careful of what I'm really about and what I want. And from a day to day to the level, I want to hit those goals, but from a year to year or a legacy type level, that just takes more thought work. Steve Rush: Right. Eddy Badrina: And you have to get off that cycle of success after success, after success, and really take a step back and say, okay, what is this success about? I'm climbing this ladder, but is it leaned up against the wrong wall? Right. I think that's why it took so long is because I was just used to getting the daily and weekly successes. And I lost a little bit of vision, my own personal vision because of that. Back to the defining what I want. After about nine months maybe even closer to a year. Three things emerged, you know, out of that time. One is, I had to define very clearly and succinctly and articulate what I wanted to others, but more importantly to myself, right? And those three things were, I wanted to run a hardware/software business. I had been there and done that gotten the M&A t-shirt for professional services. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: Two, I wanted to have an exponential impact on my level of effort. So, for every one unit of effort that I put out, I wanted to see it a 10 to 20 X return in community and culture around me. And then three is I wanted to run a redemptive type of organization. So, the fact that I'm able to articulate to you, those three things so clearly took a lot of work, but I was able to do that. Once I was able to articulate those three things. Then the second thing I did was I passed it before friends and colleagues and family. And she said, hey, tell me if this is coming from a healthy place, or tell me if this is coming from what the Bible calls a selfish ambition and vain conceit. Steve Rush: Often also known as ego. Eddy Badrina: It's ego, right. Great book by a guy named Ryan Holiday and he studies the Stoics, but he talks about the ego is the enemy, but two, I had to, you know, run it through a filter of friends and family who were going to be brutally honest with me. And that's another thing that most entrepreneurs don't have besides that they can't articulate clearly what they want. And then two, they don't have the courage or the wherewithal, or even the friends around them to say, hey, is this a healthy thing for me? And then for friends, to be honest enough with them and say, yeah, it's healthy, or no, you are being very, very arrogant, and egotistical. You should not pursue that. I articulated it, passed it to friends and family. And then the third piece that did. I let it go, and I knew that if that was supposed to happen and my friends and family approved of it. I just had to let go of striving so hard for it. And I worked towards it, but I also wanted to be diligent and excellent in my work at BuzzShift and to the team there. And so, I just had to release that and be mindful and hopeful that it would come back to me if that what's supposed to happen. And indeed, it did. Steve Rush: And it's often the case, isn't it? When you strive so hard for something you don't necessarily see it or experience it, but when you do let go, you are open to natural occurring, coincidences, opportunity, higher spirit, call it what you will. Eddy Badrina: Yeah. Steve Rush: But that then find you in another way, right? Eddy Badrina: Some people call it serendipity. I call it providence, right? Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: That was probably the biggest thing of it all. I was just talking to my wife the other day about what I've been learning over the past couple of years. And I think the loss of control has been the biggest learning for me, you know, the pandemic obviously heightened it. But really the core issue is one that everyone goes through at some point in their life of you realize even over your own body, you don't have that much control. Steve Rush: That's very true, Eddy Badrina: Right. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: Pandemic prime example, right. You can mask up or you can take the vaccine as much as you can, but the reality is you might still get sick and that's totally out of your control. And it's so frustrating for people. We see it right now. It's so frustrating for people who don't accept that they can't control everything. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: And that comes out in terms of the way it manifests. Mostly it manifests itself in terms of fear, and sort of a protective nature. But when you can understand and except for me, especially when I can stand and accept that I don't have control, it really frees me up. I don't even have control over, like I said, over that, which I articulated and was able to, you know, confirm with my friends and family. Like, this is a really good thing that's on your heart and you need to go after it. Even as I go after it, I realize I don't have a lot of control over the external factors. Steve Rush: Very true. Wise words. I'm going to turn the table to a little bit now, Eddie. Eddy Badrina: Yeah. Steve Rush: And we are going to flip the conversation a little bit to focus on taking all of your learnings, which are in abundance. And we've had bucketloads of hacks already, but I'm going to try and distill them down as best we can to your top three leadership hacks. What would they be? Eddy Badrina: Man, I think you would go back to top leadership hack one, know what you want, know yourself, right? That takes a lot of work. It's not a hack in the sense that you can get to it quickly but knowing yourself self and being brutally honest with yourself about your strength and your weaknesses is number one. Because when you know that you'll immediately hire for your weaknesses, right? Steve Rush: Definitely. Eddy Badrina: And that's a good goal to have, you know, the biggest jump for a lot of leaders and entrepreneurs is hiring that next person. Hiring the first person in your company, because that's a very real equation of I'm going to take profits out of my own pocket as a one-man band, and I'm going to give some of it to someone to short up my weaknesses. That's a crazy equation, but the equation actually works out in your favor if you're willing to do it. I would say the second big hack is have a circle of advisors who can be honest with you. A lot of leaders have yes, men around them and they'll just say yes to whatever. Is this a good idea? Oh yeah, sure it is, go. Find that person that you can say, hey, is this a good idea? And they will say, no, that is a horrible idea. You are off your rocker, right? Or that is not healthy for you. For leaders and just for people in general, I try to get people away from saying right and wrong, and I get people more into the mindset of healthy versus unhealthy. And that changes your posture towards letting other people in, because if you can let other people in and say, hey, is this right or wrong? It's sort of, it can be offensive to you, but if you can say, hey, is this healthy for me? Or is this unhealthy for me? One that connotes that they know a level of health about yourself and two that they're able to say in such a way that is for your benefit. Yeah, that's not really healthy for you. I'd probably go in a different direction. Steve Rush: I love that. Eddy Badrina: And then yeah, I'd say those are the top two and then read a lot, read a ton. Steve Rush: What would be your hack number three? Eddy Badrina: Read, read all the time. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: And allow yourself the time and the space to read. So, I actually have a blog post on my own personal blog. I don't have many blog posts on there, but I have a blog post on there just on books and on how I read, when I read, what I read. And that for a number of folks have gotten back to me and said, man, that was a really, really, really useful framework to go by in terms of reading. Steve Rush: Next part of the show we call Hack to Attack. So, this is typically where something hasn't worked out as planned, and yet you've managed to use it as a force of good. What will be your Hack to Attack? Eddy Badrina: I think the Hack to Attack has actually been the reading piece. I used read a lot of social and then thought I was reading the right types of social media or the right types of blog posts. And I was just doing it really inefficiently. And I think over the course of a number of years, I've really been able to dial in for me at least what has been a good intake of info information, why I take the information in, and then and then really, you know, the modes of intake, and it's helped me to focus more. And it's helped me to be more mindful and thoughtful about how I lead. Steve Rush: Awesome. And it's an interesting notion actually, because many top execs that I liaise with, worth work, coach, one of the core foundations is often just consume knowledge as much knowledge as you can, because knowledge is power. Eddy Badrina: Yeah, but it's also the type of knowledge, right? Steve Rush: Right. Eddy Badrina: Long form books are the result of long form thinking. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: And as a leader, that's what you're tasked to do. You are tasked to think critically. People don't get paid the big bucks or the mediocre bucks in my case to just fire off emails, because anyone can do that. The good leaders, the great leaders are ones who have to think through five emails in a day, right? And think really, really critically before they hit send. And that type of deep thinking is critical to good leadership. And you can't do that unless you're intaking deep knowledge and deep knowledge comes from books. Steve Rush: Wise words. The last thing we wanted on the show, Eddie is to give you a chance of time travel now. So, you're going to be at a bump into you at 21 and give yourself some advice. What do you think it might be? Eddy Badrina: Oh man. I would tell my 21-year-old self, keep your eye on the prize and the prize is relationships. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: I try to think with the end in mind as do most good leaders. And when you think about the end in mind, the end-end for me is when I die and when I die and they're reading my obituary, they're reading the homily, you know, in the church, they're reading my tomb, my tombstone. I think it would be a total failure if they ever mentioned the words, Eden Green or BuzzShift. That would be a failure in my life if the companies actually came up in my obituary. What a waste if your corporate success is the thing that people remember about you, what I want them to remember is, he loved people, he loved his wife well, he loved his kids well, he loved his friends well, he was a good friend and honest and a faithful friend. He loved others, even folks that he didn't know, he was generous. He was winsome. He spoke truth in love. He was bold, right? He was adventurous. That's the stuff I want people to remember me by and more importantly, that's the legacy that I want to leave with my kids and the folk around me. And so, as you think about generational legacy, you think about legacy at the end of your life. None of that involves the names of my businesses necessarily. Those are just means to an end. Steve Rush: Yeah. Eddy Badrina: It all involves the relationships that I pursue all along the way. So, beginning the end in mind, I would tell my 21-year-old self to focus on the relationships. Steve Rush: Great advice too. So, Eddie, how can we make sure our listeners from all over the world are able to tap into your blog and the work you do, and to find that a little bit more about Eden Green Technology? Eddy Badrina: Sure. So edengreen.com is the best way to find out. We've got a treasure trove of information just about hydroponics and about what we do, about the industry, edengreen.com and then on the socials, it's all Eden Green Tech. In terms of my personal it's badrina.com, it's my last name, badrina.com. And either one of those have ways to get ahold of me if they really want to ask me questions. Steve Rush: And we'll also make sure those links are in our show notes. So, folk can head straight over once they finish listening to this. Eddy Badrina: Absolutely. Steve Rush: Eddie, thank you, my friend, it's been a great opportunity to talk to you and have you on the show. And I'm really excited to see the trajectory that Eden Green on and in future. So, congratulations and thank you for being on our community here at The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Eddy Badrina: It's been my pleasure, my pleasure. Such a great way to have a part of my day to talk to you and to be able to share some of this. Eddy Badrina: Thanks, Eddie. Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler there: @leadershiphacker. Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.    

B Dorm Podcast
What Makes A Leader? Kanye West. Dave Chappelle. Jon Gruden. Colin Powell. (PILOT)

B Dorm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 47:15


Welcome to the B Dorm podcast. You ever see an eclectic group of friends and wonder how the hell such diverse people ended up meeting and getting along? Ever wonder what conversations take place behind closed doors, when political correctness isn't a factor and friends can just be real with each other? That's what the BDorm Podcast is about. Hosted by two black men from Queens educated in Western Massachusetts, we dive into a range of topics, from the intellectual to the sophomoric, drawing from our experience with a diverse group of men and women, former roommates and other friends from our not-so-diverse Little Ivy alma mater. Real-talk with real people who have navigated the minefields of divisiveness in society to achieve happiness and success in adult life. We'll catch up with former roommates and other guests from their circles of influence to chat about business, culture, entertainment, and whatever comes to mind. Sometimes we'll get serious, but we'll never take ourselves too seriously. Let's have an unapologetic, dorm room style conversation - sometimes controversial, always entertaining: this is the BDorm Podcast.  In this inaugural episode your hosts Don Elivert and Jehriko Turner dig in on some deep and heavy matter, exploring what it means to be a leader, how we choose our leaders, and what are the responsibilities of the leaders we choose? We've had plenty of characters in the news lately to help us explore the questions deeper. From Kanye West to Jon Gruden to Dave Chapelle to Colin Powell. Whatever your opinion of them, they've all performed at the highest levels of their professions and experienced success and failure at the highest levels. It's going to make you think. It's going to make you feel. It's a deep but fun look that will resonate with you long after you're done listening. Questions, comments or just something to share? Send it to us at info@righteous.us and be sure to visit bdorm.us for videos, B Dorm merch and more great content. We're bringing the power of the Righteous Media 5 I's: Independence, Integrity, Information, Inspiration and impact.  You can also watch a video of this entire episode here. The B Dorm Podcast connects, informs and inspires--and is powered by Righteous Media. On social media @bdormpod or visit www.bdorm.us. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

P1 Reality Check
Serial Entrepreneur to Civil Rights Financier: Hero‘s Hero

P1 Reality Check

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 65:11


In this episode we highlight the life of AG Gaston a hero in Alabama and a person worthy of admiration beyond. We celebrate his accomplishments in business, philanthropy and civil rights. Gaston over his lifetime connected with many great black figures such as Booker T. Washington (someone he idolized), Martin Luther King, Jr, Mary Macloud Bethune, Colin Powell and others.   He was a staple in Alabama particularly in Birmingham and if you wanted to do something progressive or business related in Alabama then you went to visit Gaston. We also discussed the case of Carl Cavalier the Louisiana State trooper who blew the whistle on the conduct of his fellow officers.  As alway we played the game, "Guess what race, guess what gender". 

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
We‘re All In with Major General Robert Mixon

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 41:36


Major General Robert Mixon retired from the army after over three decades of extraordinary leadership success. He's the founder of Level Five Associates, the co-author of Cows in The Living Room and author of the Amazon bestseller, “We're All In”. So many hacks in this show it's hard to highlight them, here's a few: The Big 6 Leadership Principles to building culture How as leaders we can be “All in” Learn about the leadership azimuth and how we work it How to drive successful strategies and sustain them Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services Find out more about Robert below: Robert on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robertmixon/ Level Five Associates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/levelfiveassoc Level Five Associates Website: https://www.levelfiveassociates.com Full Transcript Below ----more---- Introduction Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Today's guest on the show is Major General Robert Mixon. He's a retired officer of the U.S. Army. He's a public speaker, author of a few books, and he's the co-founder of Level Five Associates. But before we get a chance to meet with Robert, it's The Leadership Hacker New. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: In the news today, we explore how many of our leadership characteristics and behaviors have changed since the global pandemic. And it turns out that empathy is the go-to leadership skill of the moment. Yes, it can be learned even if we didn't think that was the case. As a brand new fortune 500 CEO, Kirsten Peck of Zoetis, didn't have all the answers as to how a fast growing pet health company was going to survive the pandemic. She'd only ascended to the corner office in January of 2020. So when COVID 19 hit and revved up in the March of 2020, she was feeling quite nervous and anxious and frankly, little overstretched as to whether nearly 12,000 workers, I would imagine. So in one of her COVID era blogs on the company's intranet, Kristin Peck talked not about typical subjects you'd expect new CEOs to be talking around like earnings or sales projections, but something else entirely. The importance of listening. The first step begins with slowing down and spending a lot of time, listening to the challenges people are facing personally and professionally she wrote. Later in a LinkedIn post, she shared her own personal story of raising a child with special medical needs to show it was okay for employees to talk about the reality of what life can be like outside of a tinted glass work window and ask for help if they needed it. She goes on to say what the pandemic did was make everybody realize that we were all the same and we were all in the same storm, but our boats were quite different. We had to become very clear about the importance of listening to people and understanding their needs and being flexible, practically that meant shifting her entire workforce to a different way of working. Largely working from a home model about 70% of Zoetis global workforce actually started working from home and it meant providing beefed up benefits like health care concierge services for caregivers, a student loan repayment program and improved mental health support food services, like an employee assistance program, and Peck efforts seem to have hit the mark. The company employee engagement metrics are higher than they've ever been. Now at 88% and eclipsing the pre-pandemic levels. And who says being empathic is a soft measure? The hard numbers look like the stock price has done very well indeed; from the pandemic to November 8th, Zoetis stock price grew by 38% and it's currently bumping around at all-time highs. She's been recently quoted the saying, if anyone pretended they had all the answers, no one had believed it any way. Despite the crisis and the upheaval, Zoetis is an example of empathy being a core strong foundation and a real metric. And the leadership hack here is dead simple; it starts with just listening. Listen, to understand, not to que your next question. That's been The Leadership Hacker News, if you'd like to hear any interesting stories, we've got some things to share, as you've always done, please keep in touch with us. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Major General Robert Mixon is our guest on today's show. After being retired from the army, he achieved over three decades of extraordinary leadership success. Not only including the U.S. Army, where he commanded the seventh infantry division and Fort Carson Colorado, and then subsequently he served in an executive leadership position in a number of non-for-profits and for-profit organizations before starting his own organization, Level Five Associates. He's the co-author of Cows in The Living Room: Developing an Effective Strategic Plan and Sustaining it and also of the Amazon bestseller. We're All In: The Journey to World-Class Culture. Rob, welcome to the show. Major General Robert Mixon: Thanks, Steve. It's wonderful to be here with you and your listeners today. Steve Rush: I'm incredibly excited to delve into your very diverse and extensive leadership career. And I thought it would be useful really just to start off where it all began for you? Major General Robert Mixon: Well, it began for me, as growing up the oldest of six children in Georgia and North Carolina, and dreaming about being able to go to college. And as a result of a mediocre level of athletic ability, I was actually recruited to a couple of schools and one of those schools was the army football program at West Point. And I didn't know much about West Point and certainly didn't have any big dreams of being in the army, but I did have dreams of being a college football player. So I know football has different connotations in different audiences here, but I'm talking about the American tackle football. Steve Rush: Sure. Major General Robert Mixon: And I had good enough grades and things worked out where I got a chance to go to West Point and play football for a little while, until I got hurt to the level I couldn't play anymore, but I would entered a world that I'd never dreamed I would enter when I stood out there in the parade field at West Point in the summer of 1970 with about 1400 other young men. And, you know, in about 24 hours, we learned that our lives are going change. If we stayed with this adventure, it would change forever. And so from that experience, four year journey, about 40% of the group, didn't make it through. The 800 plus of us who did graduate in June of 1974, came into a military that was very conflicted. At the end of the Vietnam War, many Americans felt like, you know, the military was to blame for some of the policy decisions that had cause the Vietnam War to end badly. And as a result of the resources behind the military, the draft system went away and we went to a volunteer force, but we were under-resourced. And we struggle for a number of years until we came out of it in the mid-1980s and became truly a world-class military in every respect again, and because we had been before. Steve Rush: Right. Major General Robert Mixon: But I stayed with that journey because I met some men and women who really changed my life because of the leadership role models they represent it, despite the hardships. In fact, I think the hardships bring out the strongest leaders, you know, when things are tough. Steve Rush: Yeah, develops that level of resilience as well, doesn't it? Major General Robert Mixon: Yeah, you know, people who could learn from mistakes, who could underwrite others, who could develop trust and bring it to life. And so I found myself, you know, as a career officer, even though I'd never planned to be, and I was privileged to spend 33 years in uniform and command soldiers, you know, up to a division installation level, which was a wonderful privilege. And then as I realized, you know, it was time for me to open the next chapter. I went into the corporate career in the middle of the depression of 2008/2009, which was another tough learning experience. But again, you know, I was able to learn from others and grow and come out of that and then realized my dream, which was to have my own company, Level Five Associates and help other companies and organizations and leaders. Perhaps not make the same mistakes that I had made. And so that's been my calling now for the last seven years. Steve Rush: Awesome. During your time in the military, you mentioned that there was this time where from the seventies to the mid-eighties, then there was a real shift. What role did the incumbent leadership, if you like in the military play in making that shift happen or was that more of a bottom up change? Major General Robert Mixon: I think it was a two-edged sword Steve, and I say that because there were senior leaders who had to underwrite some of the fundamental changes in our culture. And I think basically in the military, you know, we had a very deeply entrenched culture of compliance, you know, in that mid-seventies timeframe, you know, do what you're told. We're not going to talk about why, you know, we want you to comply. Then with the senior leadership, and I think the junior leadership sort of coming together in a common view of what we should be, we began to develop a culture of commitment where people did what was right, because they wanted to do what was right. And they believed in the leaders that they were with and who they were working for. And that takes years to do, this is not something that happens in a month or, you know, six months, it takes years to do it. But with the senior support and the junior commitment, a level of energy, we were able to move our culture from compliance to commitment. And that was a very significant change in our army. Steve Rush: And how would that manifest itself in today's military? Having evolved from compliance to commitment? Major General Robert Mixon: I think in today's military, as a father of two, in fact, three soldiers. Now one who's on the career path, I have seen that the military culture of commitment is very strong and it's in fact more dependent now on the junior leader level of commitment because the senior leaders now were the ones who were in the transformative junior ranks in the eighties and nineties. And now they're the senior leader. So it's an even stronger movement, I think now towards the importance of why, the importance of commitment, you know, the importance of being an all-in, shameless book promotion. Steve Rush: Yeah, we're going to get into that in the moment actually, because I love the whole philosophy of we're all in, but there is definitely something there isn't there about, if you fundamentally want to shift a culture, you do have to throw your entire self into this, don't you? Major General Robert Mixon: We do, and it has to be from the top down, I think, and the bottom up, it's got to be a two way street where we are all in, because we believe in who we are and what we represent. And we're going to walk the talk and if we're willing to do that, then you can have a level five culture as I call it, where people believe in who we are and what we represent and they bring it every day. They're going to give all they can give to the mission to each other. And there's an element of selflessness here that I think in the military, I learned early on. The mission first, but I think in other organizations, it's not so evident unless the leadership really embodies it and nurtures it among the other leaders in the organization so that it has an enduring quality, you know, culture is never static. It either gets better, it gets worse. And so the culture of commitment is one where you live it every day and then tomorrow we're going to live it again and we're going to keep living it because we know what right looks like. And it's going to be our legacy that we grow leaders who are better leaders than we were at their stage of life. And I think that's a real a real opportunity for us as leaders to do that. Steve Rush: Yeah, it's also a gift, isn't it? Major General Robert Mixon: It's a gift. Steve Rush: In so much as that when you're sharing and partying, encouraging other leaders to be greater leaders, then you're not only sharing your experiences, but you're also guarding their future. Major General Robert Mixon: Yeah, I think so. It's really what I've seen in the companies I've been able to work with in my level five part of the journey now is that many companies and organizations don't have the persistence at the senior leadership to sustain a world-class culture. And it's important that we reinforce each other because this is hard work. Its adult work, one of my leaders used to say. The concept of creating an ecosystem where people want to belong too, takes a lot of effort. And there are sometimes, you know, you get tired. You say, well, shoot, this is too hard. Let me default back to being directive and we'll be compliant. And we'll just, you know, to quote the sort of famous guy, Larry, the cable guy, you know, we'll just get her done, right? And that defaulting back to the directive leadership framework, it causes the culture to erode and the culture can erode very quickly when that happens. Steve Rush: Definitely, so. Now from your corporate career, having left the military and had some senior leadership roles, what was the pivotal moment for you when you thought, right? This is more about me coaching, sharing, and teaching others to come on this journey. What was the moment that made you look to grow your own organization? Major General Robert Mixon: I know it's been so many years of my life working for someone that I had a lot of opportunity to learn from many wonderful people, you know, including General Colin Powell, who's one of the finest leaders I've ever known. And, we all, I think, are deeply saddened by his loss here recently. Steve Rush: That's right, yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: But, you know, I had had the privilege of working with extraordinary men and women who helped shape me as a person and a leader. And I wanted to give back, you know, as I look towards the next chapter in my life, I said, well, where could I make a difference? Where can I give back? And I think the defining moment for me was, you know, once you've had privilege of leading executive level, a number of different organizations, you can take one to two routes in my thinking here. One is, you can sort of, you know, quietly fade away and, you know, turn the mantle over to others and wish them well. And I know a lot of people who do that, and it's a very graceful transition to do that, but I'm wrapped too tightly. And as a result, I couldn't do that easily. I wanted to still be engaged and involved in growing people in organizations. And that's why I went to the level five route, and why I come to work every day looking forward to the opportunity to help other senior leaders grow leaders. Steve Rush: Excellent, I love it. And the fact that you're still doing that today, and this is part of that education and evolution, isn't it? Being on the show, I guess. Major General Robert Mixon: Yeah, that's great. Thanks Steve. Steve Rush: And one of the things that I love about your work is that your writing is really quite innovative. And I love the first book that you co-authored, Cows in The Living Room, and I'm quite a visual. So I have this picture of this huge cow sat in my living room right now. And this is about developing effective strategic plans and sustaining them, tell us a little bit about the concept of where's the Cow in The Living Room Come from? Major General Robert Mixon: Well, you know Steve, we had it, when we wrote the book, we were going to title it, developing effective strategies, sustaining them. And then we shared that idea with our families, you know, spouses, and we got some immediate feedback and the feedback wasn't very good. The feedback was, you got to be kidding me. You know, who's going to read that book, even mom's not going to read that book. And I said, okay, well, what else could we do? And as a result, they gave us great insight about a story about cows in living room. And essentially the story is that there was once a young farmer who wanted to find a wife. So he went to a nearby village and successfully courted a woman, married her and brought her to living home on the farm. As they began their new life together, raising dairy cows and winter began. One day, the wife came in and found that all the cows were the living room. Astonished, she asked why? Her husband replied, well its winter and the barn has no heat. Since we depend on these cows for our living, they need to be inside. Slowly, very slowly, she became more and more accustomed to having the cows indoors. Then after a few months, a neighbor from her village came over to see how she was doing. When she came in the living room, she was shocked to find the dairy cows there calming standing around. What are you doing with council living room she blurted out? To which the wife replied, which cows? And the story here is that most of us have cows in our living room as leaders of organizations, companies, and organizations of all types. And we become used to the cows and we don't see them anymore. So if you don't effectively address your strategic planning process, then basically you're just tolerating the cow's living room. You're not doing anything to heat the bar. And that's really where we got the idea for the title. It wasn't an original thought. In fact, I don't think I've ever had original thought, but in any case, you know, it was catchy and a lot of people have asked about it, and hopefully they liked the book too. Steve Rush: It's a great metaphor, isn't it? Because particularly whether you're visual or auditory, actually in telling the story, it gets people to recognize that we're all creatures of habit actually, and it's dead easy to get used to our environment. And that's when we get comfortable. And when we get too much in control, that's probably when we don't focus on what we need to focus on. Major General Robert Mixon: Well, you know, Steve, 50%, I think of the fortune 500 companies of 30 or 40 years ago no longer exist. And that's because many of them were absorbed in other companies, but also they became complacent and their business model faded and their competition, you know, ate them for breakfast, if you will, because they were more innovative and more driven not to allow their cows in the living room to stay there. Steve Rush: And then your second book, which is not a shameless plug in any way, it's a real, it's an honor to plug it in your behalf. Major General Robert Mixon: Thank you. Steve Rush: We're All In is very much around that connect cultural habits and sustaining in the future. And I just wondered from your perspective, have you ever been party to, or observed an organization successfully lead a culture where they're not all in? Major General Robert Mixon: I have not. I say that because I don't think organizations are truly successful unless they have a world-class culture. They can be successful in a temporal way. They can make a profit for a period of time by just directing the activities or micromanaging the processes, but there's a tipping point. The most successful companies don't allow that directive culture to dominate their way of life. They insist on engaging in involving all the members of the team in the future of the organization. And so I don't know if I addressed the question directly, Steve, but I do believe it takes both heart and mind to create a world-class company, a world-class organization. Steve Rush: Totally buy it. Major General Robert Mixon: And those that I have seen and been part of have had both. Now there are ebbs and flows, but I think that the development of your ecosystem, your culture to a level of where people feel as though they're engaged and they're part of it, they belong. That's where a greatness, the opportunity for greatness resides. Steve Rush: Absolutely, and as part of that developing culture, you pull together what you call your big six leadership principles to develop that culture. And I just thought it'd be great for our listeners to maybe spin through them with you. Major General Robert Mixon: Oh, great. Yeah the six principles again, I learned from basically screwed them up, you know, I have scar tissue from not following these principles. So, now I really believe that we can do better, you know, if we're willing to pay attention and commit to the journey and follow the principles. The first one is set the esbit. A lot of people don't know what an azimuth is. I took it from my military career, but basically the azimuth is the Cardinal direction of your organization. What's your mission? You know, who are we? What do we do? Why do we do it? What's our intent? And then I like intent more than vision because I think vision's kind of fuzzy. Intent is, based on that mission. What's our end state in three to five years? What does success look like?  Then what are the key tasks we have to perform to reach that end state? And then what's our purpose? What's the why? And why are we doing all this? So you have mission and the intent, then you have your values. What do we believe in? And I think you have to define those values as a team because everybody doesn't understand what they are. And then fourth, what is our culture? What are the behaviors that we are going to demonstrate and expect from all of us to bring these values to life? So, setting the esbit is the first of the big six. The second one is listen. And as my mom said, God gave you two ears and one mouth for a reason. Steve Rush: Yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: But I rarely followed that teaching from my mother. My mom's awesome, but I wasn't a good listener and we don't teach leaders to listen very well, you know, Stephen Covey talks about, are you listening with the intent to understand? Or are you listening with the intent to reply? I would say 90% of the leaders that I've met are in the latter category. We don't really listen with the intent to understand because we don't know how, and as a result we don't demonstrate to others the kind of behavior that really represents listing leadership. And so in the workshops that I do, we we've focus a lot on practical tools for your toolbox to bring these principles to life. The third is trusted in power, you know, empowerment is the manifestation of trust, but trust I think is one of the critical factors in creating this culture where we're all in and you've got to commit to it, and you've got to be willing to do things like underwrites of mistakes or empower others. When the tendency, the powerful tendency is to go do it yourself. That's a learned skill, and I think the best leaders are those who can trust and empower very effectively. The fourth principle is do the right thing when no one's looking. And as we said, depending on this brief swell, but it is not easy. It's not simple and it's not easy. It takes a real commitment on the part of the leadership top to bottom that we're going to do the right thing. And whether someone's looking or not. Unfortunately, there are a lot of circumstances in instances over the past several decades, people, and most recent times when leaders in companies have not done the right thing and there've been disastrous results. The fifth principle is when in charge take charge. And that doesn't mean you have to be loud, profane, abusive. That's not what we're talking about. What we're talking about here is when you're in charge of being the calm in the chaos of having the tactical patients to understand that the first report is usually wrong. To develop others as part of that, being in charge, have that presence. And then the six principles balance the personal and professional, which is not about time. Most people think that balance is about time, a time at work, time home, not really, that's not the case. And I think balance is a battery of energy. Balancing the four battery levels we have all of inside us. The physical, the mental, the spiritual, the emotional, and there are tools. There are ways you can do that in yourself and in others to create that sense of balance, which it's a way of being healthy in a framework here, healthy personally and professionally, and really creates the opportunity for people to, as we used to say in the army, be all, they can be. Steve Rush: I love the six principles. They naturally feed each other as well. But the final one ironically feeds through them all and is always consistent, is that balance because without it, you end up either being overworked or stressed or not having the right levels of energy to perform sustainably for the future. And that for me is the one that kind of has the big core all the way through them. So I love the princess. Major General Robert Mixon: Well, thanks Steve. They all are interconnected. In fact when I conduct presentations workshops, I use a gears as the six principles that they're all interconnected, you know, and the whole mechanism of the culture turns as those gears work together with the centerpiece having the right values Steve Rush: And what you've described for most people listening to this would perhaps make loads of sense and be quite academically sensible, but it takes work, doesn't it? It takes real practice and lots of habit forming to make sure that this is part of everybody's routine. How might I start that journey? Major General Robert Mixon: Usually I will go in with the senior leadership and we'll talk about you know, whether they have specific goals in line for a certain, you know, a certain element of the team or whether they want to take the whole organization and move the needle. And most of them want to do the senior leaders upfront, then cascade the big six throughout the organization, as the mechanism to grow their culture to that level five, and I'll be upfront here. I think it takes a couple of years to do this. You know, you can't have it in 30 days. Most of us want everything in 30 days, but you can't have it. You're going to have to develop your culture in a deliberate way. And I use a series of workshops, a small group interaction, and one-on-one executive coaching with senior executives and high potential leaders to help get all these gears in place and move them forward. And specifically we use a strategic planning process to set that three to five-year goal that we want to move the organization toward. So there's an interrelated set of tools that we bring to a team or organization to help them succeed in this journey. Steve Rush: And I suspect the reason it takes some time is that of all of those six cogs moving at different times, we've all probably got some of them moving at different speeds and cadences than the others, right? Major General Robert Mixon: Yes, we do. Steve Rush: Yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: And typically, Steve, but saying yes upfront on, some people will push back a little bit say, well, I don't have time to the esbit. Well, I don't think you have time not to set the azimuth. So we've got to get through that part and, you know, establish our mission and values culture. Then I think the next hard part of the process here is developing listening leaders who really do listen to the intent to understand. Steve Rush: Yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: And we bring some practical tools for them to help do this. One of my favorites that I'll share with you, Steve is the back brief. Steve Rush: Tell us how that works? Yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: There's and old saying about, I don't know what I told you, until you tell me what you heard. Quite oftentimes, I have made this mistake. I get a group of soldiers together, or team members in my corporate life together and say, all right, here's what we've got to get done. But you know, everybody should know what you have to do to make that happen. All right, everybody got it? And they all say, oh yeah, we got it. And they head out and do something completely different. Well, usually you find out that they did something completely different because they didn't hear what you thought you said. And the back brief is a way where they back brief you on what they think they heard before you go out and try and accomplish great things. I think that's a way of confirming that what was said was heard and that's where communication lives, sharing information, email, texts, that's not communication, that's just sharing information. You don't get confirmation what they read was what they thought you wrote. Same with what you said and heard. So I really liked the back brief or confirmation brief as a tool for your toolbox that gives people more clarity across the team as to what are we doing and why are we doing it. Steve Rush: And saves huge amounts of time, retrospectively having to undo stuff that people have set off in the wrong trajectory. Major General Robert Mixon: Yeah. You know, manufacturing companies, I hear that saying over and over, we didn't have time to do it right the first time, but we always have time to go back and do it again. Steve Rush: That's true, very true indeed, yeah. So, given your experience of diverse leadership and teams, what can we really learn from the last couple of years, having gone through quite a lot of crisis, and that would be varied for different people in different organizations that will really help us be more all in. Major General Robert Mixon: I think what the change in our world over the last couple of years has taught us is that we need to have strong fundamentals in order to endure and succeed in crisis. You know, many leaders that I've worked with have come back to me and said, Robert, we went back to the big six when things really got off the rails. We said, okay, wait a minute, let's have a tactical balls here. Let's go back to the big six and let's check our esbit as our esbit intact. Do we have people in the right seat, in the right bus, as Jim Collins said, good, good to great, you know, let's revert back to those big six principles and reaffirm them across our team and organization. And those that did said they were absolutely game-changing and enabling them to keep their team intact, to work through the anxieties and the stress to build bore inclusivity in their teams, despite the fact that they were in many cases in a hybrid world that was all virtual than it went to somewhat virtual. And now, some people are back to being in person, but I don't think we'll ever go back to the way it was in terms of the overall environment. We're going to have to lead through change. We cannot prevent the changes from occurring. You know, our world has changed and it is what it is. It's up to us to effectively adapt to it. And I wrote an eBook here about a year or so ago called Who Saw This Coming? Now, What Do We Do? And you can get it on, on my website, but there I talked about what the crisis was doing to us and how the big six could be our bedrock, our touchstone to get us through it and grow and learn beyond it. Steve Rush: And I guess the esbit for every organization will be different now than it was two years ago, because lots of things that are impacting on all of that purpose behaviors, culture, values. Major General Robert Mixon: You have to check you're esbit on a regular basis and you have to be willing to adapt it. You know, it's I was guilty as a young officer. You know, if I wrote a plan, then we were going to execute the plan. And if the truth changed, so, you know, I'm still not changing the plan. That kind of stubbornness was not healthy. My organizations did perform well when I stuck to the plan and I didn't adapt the plan to the reality that the enemy was out there and had a vote and the environment was changing and had a vote. And the characteristics of my team were changing and had a vote. And I had to be able to adapt to that framework. I was kind of stubborn, I was good at that. Steve Rush: Great lessons. So I get the honor now to hack into your leadership mind, having had all of these leadership experiences and many, many different environments that you've gathered insights and experience from, I'm going to try and get you to get them down to your top three. So what would be your top three leadership hacks? Robert. Major General Robert Mixon: I would say the first would be willing to listen to the ideas of others, try and dispense with your preconceived notions and do a lot more listening than talking. That would be my first one. And it's very difficult to do when you grow up in a world where the leader is expected to be transmitting all the time and not receiving. And I think the opposite is actually true. My second one is develop a perspective where you can have others take more ownership of the decision making. The idea here, trust and. I really had to learn to delegate, but I saw a huge return on investment when I delegated to others. One of the tools I use is called a decision tree. I write out the decisions that I must make in my position, and I tell my leadership team, then you've got the rest of them. So don't come in here and ask me to make decisions that are yours to make. I may challenge you on some of the decisions you make, but you made them. And my job is to help educate you and support you so that you have the tools at your toolbox to make good decisions. So delegation would be my second hack and the first two I've talked about were not easy for me. So I'm not saying this is something you get, you know, in a week or two. I've learned over my journey about them. And the third one I'd say is that, you know, caring leadership has huge second and third order effects in our organization. There's an old saying about, I don't care how much you know, until I know how much you care and that, you know, empathetic leadership is not necessarily sympathetic. There's a big difference between empathy and sympathy. Steve Rush: Huge, yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: And I talk about that in the work I do with teams on emotional intelligence, it really was important for me to develop an appreciation for the value of caring leadership. So those would be my top three leadership hacks Steve. Steve Rush: Great lessons. Thank you for sharing them. Next part of the show we call Hack to Attack. So this is where something in your life or work hasn't worked out as you'd planned, but as a result of the experience, you've now learned from it, and it's now force of good for you. So what would be your Hack to Attack? Major General Robert Mixon: I would say that my Hack to Attack is that I really was not a patient leader for many parts of my life. And I made a lot of mistakes because I acted too much on impulse and instinct, and I didn't do enough of making an assessment of what decision would be the best for the organization at this point in time. Or in my lack of patience I think I sometimes failed to be as vulnerable as I should have been. You know, people need to know when you make a mistake and you need to step up and say that, admit it. It's not weakness. You know, vulnerability is not weakness. Vulnerability is being authentic. And that's what's the essence of Level Five Leadership is. It's being authentic. Steve Rush: Very powerful stuff. So the last thing we do today is give you a chance to do some time travel. So you get to go and bump into Robert at 21 and you get to toe to toe, give him some advice. What do you reckon it might be? Major General Robert Mixon: Ooh, oh boy. Talk about a challenge Steve. This is really awesome here. Robert at 21 was a very driven young man. I don't know where necessarily I got it from, but you know, I was wrapped pretty tightly and I think what advice I would give myself at age 21 is think before you act. Use that, you know, two second pause or ten second pause to say, hey, before I jump off of my tank and go running off into the woods here. Do I really need to get off the tank right now? Or do we all need to, you know, as everybody needs to just be moving, is all forward movement progress, no it's not. All forward moves is not progress. And I'd say, Robert, you got to, you know, mentally slow down sometimes and take a step back and say, okay, what are we doing? What's our esbit here? You know, what's our mission, what's our intent? Don't just, you know, everything has to be in motion all the time, and it's hard. It'd be hard for Robert at 21 to take that because he was a guy in motion and he felt like leadership was, you know, motion, direction, guidance. You know, I was in that seventies culture of being directive. And I thought that's what right looked like because that's what many of my leaders demonstrate it. Steve Rush: Yeah. Major General Robert Mixon: So that's the advice I would give me, hopefully I would listen. Steve Rush: Yeah, it's a really interesting one, isn't it? Because time and culture play out so differently based on historic events and you look at how the military has evolved. It has probably been the biggest evolution in the last 25 years that the military have ever had up until that point. It was pretty much kind of command and control, wasn't it? Major General Robert Mixon: Well, yeah, the command and control discussion is interesting. Steve, because control is the allocation of resources and time and space. And many of us believe that that's what leadership is. It's really not. That's sort of bandaging in my view. Command is presence. It's establishing an environment where people can be effective because they trust you and they believe in each other. Sometimes you have to have some control. I'm not downplaying that, but you've got to figure out where the balance is to go back to the big six of command and control. And I would say the more command and less control the better, but sometimes you've got to work very hard to get to that level of commanding and control. Steve Rush: Yeah, I have this mantra, which is, only control, only the things that you can control and everybody else has got their own. Major General Robert Mixon: That's good advice. That's very good advice Steve. Steve Rush: So Robert, how can we make sure our listeners can hook into the work that you do, maybe get a copy of the books, find out a little bit more about Level five associates. Steve Rush: Yeah, great. Our website is you know, HTTPS www.levelfiveassociatess spell out the five levelfiveassociates.com. I certainly invite any of our listeners to you know, come to the site and you'll learn more about me and the work that we do. And you can contact me by, through website or my email address is robert@levelfiveassociates.com. And you know, we'll circle back with you. If I don't circle back with you, you know, something seriously wrong with me, Steve Rush: We'll make sure that we put some of those links in our show notes as well, Robert. Major General Robert Mixon: Oh, thanks, Steve. It was wonderful speaking with you. Steve Rush: And it's been a real honor having you on the show Robert. I love that the six principles, I think there are really great philosophy for leading teams and culture. So we'll do our best to help share this message with our global audience. Major General Robert Mixon: Well, thanks, Steven. I wish you continued success with The Leadership Hacker program and the good work you've been doing. Steve Rush: Thanks very much Robert. Major General Robert Mixon: All right, take care. Closing   Steve Rush: I genuinely want to say heartfelt thanks for taking time out of your day to listen in too. We do this in the service of helping others, and spreading the word of leadership. Without you listening in, there would be no show. So please subscribe now if you have not done so already. Share this podcast with your communities, network, and help us develop a community and a tribe of leadership hackers.   Finally, if you would like me to work with your senior team, your leadership community, keynote an event, or you would like to sponsor an episode. Please connect with us, by our social media. And you can do that by following and liking our pages on Twitter and Facebook our handler there: @leadershiphacker, Instagram you can find us there @the_leadership_hacker and at YouTube, we are just Leadership Hacker, so that is me signing off. I am Steve Rush and I have been the leadership hacker.  

Too Many Lawyers
93 - Is the High Court About to Say, "You Don't Need No Stinking Concealed Weapon Permit"?

Too Many Lawyers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 48:09


The Supreme Court may be on the brink of ruling that the Second Amendment not only protects the right to have a gun at home, it lets you carry concealed weapons in public! We seize on Donald Trump's reaction to Colin Powell's death to put the ex-president on the couch – and we have a formal psychiatric diagnosis! 

Illuminati Exposed Radio
COLIN POWELL-FURNRAL-DANCING QUEENS BY ABBA

Illuminati Exposed Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 14:47


A --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/illuminatiexposed/message

Empire Has No Clothes
On Colin Powell

Empire Has No Clothes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 36:49


Co-hosts Curt Mills and William Ruger discuss Colin Powell's death, envoy to Afghanistan Zalmay Khalilzad's exodus from government and the modern history of Republican foreign policy factions in government. 

Left or Right Podcast
Joe Manchin Leaving the Democrat Party??

Left or Right Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 22:39


In this episode we talk about the very sad death of Colin Powell, Trump getting talked out of announcing his campaign for president, Biden breaking the Washington DC mask mandate, rumors about Joe Manchin leaving the Democrat party, Trump's new social media platform, and Condolezza Rice opinion on Jan. 6

The Palestine Pod
The Revolution Will Not Be Livestreamed

The Palestine Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 48:53


This week Lara and Michael discuss Instagram censoring our profile by announcing that as of October 25, 2021 we would no longer have access to the link button on @thepalestinepod account for purported violations of community guidelines. Lara queries what threshold Instagram is applying to make this decision to deprive users of critical features since @thepalestinepod account has only ever had one post removed from its account (which in any event did not violate Community Guidelines). Several other Palestinian content creators have received the alert that they too would lose access to the link button with the application providing no recourse to challenge this decision. This unfortunate move appears to be a coordinated effort to continue to crackdown on free speech on the platform especially as it concerns Palestinian human rights. This is all the more so since Instagram's decision to deprive certain users of the link feature comes only a week after a Human Rights Watch report detailing censorship of posts and accounts by Instagram including with specific reference to posts unjustly removed from Lara's account @gazangirl. Instead of heeding the call by Human Rights Watch to carry out an independent investigation into the censorship of Palestinian content, Instagram has doubled down by unjustly depriving Palestinian content creators of their right to link to further sources through their profiles. Lara and Michael also cover the recent meeting of the UN Security Council where the US envoy to the UN made some ludicrous statements condemning Hamas for allegedly holding two Israelis prisoners while nearly five thousand Palestinian men, women, and children languish inside Israeli political prisons. Lara provides an update on the Burnat brothers, and sadly Muhammad Burnat, the younger brother remains imprisoned by the Apartheid State without charge with a so-called court date that continues to be postponed. The Palestine Pod also discusses the pivotal role Colin Powell played in getting the United States on the course to invade Iraq, something the Israeli lobby took credit for. Michael covers an article in Jewish Currents that exposes American Jewish businessmen who are funding the Palestinian activist blacklist, Canary Mission.

The World This Week
EU-Poland tensions, Belarus migration, Covid surge in Europe, Colin Powell's legacy

The World This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 39:40


EU leaders have been holding a two-day summit in Brussels at which a spat with Poland over its rejection of the EU's legal order was high on the agenda. This after the Constitutional Court in Warsaw ruled earlier this month that EU law applies only in specific, limited areas and that Polish law prevails in all other circumstances. Before the summit started, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel both held one-on-one talks with the Polish prime minister. 

Crashing the War Party
Anatol Lieven, from Russia with Love

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 35:13


This week, Quincy Institute scholar, author and journalist Anatol Lieven talks to us from Sochi, Russia, where he was a speaker this week at the 18th annual meeting of the Valdai Discussion Club. We talk about the mixed messages the administration is giving out on NATO, and the persisting tensions between Washington and Moscow, and hopes for some semblance of cooperation over Ukraine and nuclear missile agreements. In the first segment, Dan and Kelley wrestle with the legacy of Colin Powell, who died this week at the age of 84.More by Anatol Lieven:Ending the Threat of War in Ukraine: A Negotiated Solution to the Donbas Conflict and the Crimean Dispute -- June 2021 paper for the Quincy Institute. Vindicating Realist Internationalism -- September 16 -- Survival magazine Has neo-Orientalism killed our ability to sense the limits of Western influence? -- September 28 -- Responsible StatecraftMost Recent from Daniel Larison: Note to Blinken: Israel’s ‘military option’ shouldn’t be on our table - October 15Most Recent from Kelley Vlahos:  Remembering Powell’s revealing exchange with Madeleine Albright -- October 18 Subscribe at crashingthewarparty.substack.com

Total Power Move
BEST FRIENDZ with Darryl Kemper

Total Power Move

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:47


Hangin' with my best bud, Darryl. We dive into our gripes with social media identity disorder (no idea if that's a thing but I'm coining it if it's not) and Colin Powell. And other weird things. It's all over the place but 8/10 fun. 

Unapologetically Living With Trese
Episode 3: Instagram vs. Reality

Unapologetically Living With Trese

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:41


In her most vulnerable episode yet, Trese discusses all the details of what's been going on in her life. On hot topics, she is discussing Dave Chapelle, Colin Powell, and Kyrie Irving. The tea is piping hot and unapologetic! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unapologeticallyliving/support

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly
Colin Powell: Not a Presidential Candidate

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:59


Colin Powell died October 18, 2021, from complications from COVID ... His career included Secretary of State, Chairman of the Joints Chiefs of Staff, and, as National Security Adviser..... But it was one thing that he didn't do -- run for president -- that's the focus of this episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast
2433: Karen Consultant

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 125:40


Rod and Karen discuss the Death of Colin Powell, Coronavirus News, LGBTQ News, Jussie Smollet Case heading for trial, Car Garage Karen, Jesy Nelson, Issa Rae was advised to put white people in her shows, Subway worker goes viral, woman left kids in U-Haul while eating at Waffle House (we ejected on this story), drugs sold in business, woman kills man for not kissing her in front of his girlfriend and sword ratchetness. Twitter: @rodimusprime @SayDatAgain @TBGWT @bbnaturalsuk Instagram: @TheBlackGuyWhoTips Email: theblackguywhotips@gmail.com Blog: www.theblackguywhotips.com Sponsor: bournbeautifulnaturals.uk Code: TBGWT Voice Mail: 704-557-0186

StocktonAfterClass
General Colin Powell. Some Reflections and Thoughts

StocktonAfterClass

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 18:52


General Powell was one of the great men of his age.  He could have been President. He made one serious mistake in his career and it tarnished his reputation.  Every single comment on his life will mention it. These are my thoughts. Note:  Factual error. Sorry about that.   It was 1996 that General Powell announced that he would not be a candidate.  He had appeared ready to declare but then he backed off.  He would have been running against Bill Clinton who was trying for his second term.    Apart from Alma's doubts, there is no clear explanation for his decision.  

Amanpour
Amanpour: Jack Straw, Robert Draper, John Emshwiller, Rebecca Smith, Vaitea Cowan, Christiana Figueres and Ramsey Green

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 55:26


Jack Straw, Former British Foreign Secretary, reflects on the passing of Colin Powell, the former U.S. Secretary of State and four star general. Journalist Robert Draper talks about Powell's legacy as a giant of American military and politics. John Emshwiller and Rebecca Smith, co-hosts of the "Bad Bets" podcast, discuss the fall of Texas energy giant Enron and the ensuing scandal, 20 years on. Christiana Figueres, member of The Earthshot Prize Council, and Vaitea Cowan, co-founder of Enapter and one of the winners of the Earthshot Prize, talk about finding solutions to combat the climate crisis. Walter Isaacson talks with Ramsey Green, New Orleans' Chief of Infrastructure, about how he's re-defining the way cities respond to extreme weather.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Inside Politics
Gen. Colin Powell Dead At 84 Of COVID Complications

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:30


An in-depth look at the remarkable trailblazer, who was the first African-American to serve as National Security Adviser, then the first African-American Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, and then the first African-American Secretary of State. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Dewey Show
I'M BACK! BILL GATES WEIRD BEHAVIOR,COLIN POWELL, INSURRECTION, AND MORE!

Dewey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 14:32


I AM BACK! I HAVE MISSED YOU SO MUCH! TODAY, I TALK ABOUT BILL GATES, THE DEATH OF COLIN POWELL, THE DRIEST YEAR IN CALIFORNIA IN A CENTURY, AND MORE! THANK YOU TO ADAMMALE.COM FOR SPONSORING TODAY'S SHOW! ADAMMALE.COM (USE OFFER CODE DEWEY AT CHECK OUT!) says the best part of staying at home is playing at home.choose almost any one item at 50% off When you do…you'll also get FREE SHIPPING delivered discreetly right to your door! Just remember to use offer code DEWEY at checkout. they have THOUSANDS OF PRODUCTS to make you glad you are staying at home. Sex toys make being at home SO enjoyable. You read this far down? Ok. 18+ ONLY: onlyfans.com/robedude

Amanpour
Amanpour: Roya Rahmani, Lawrence Wilkerson and Joseph Pfeifer

Amanpour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 55:32


20 years after the 9/11 attacks, Christiane Amanpour speaks with Roya Rahmani, the former Afghan ambassador to the U.S., about what it means to have the Taliban in charge again two decades later. Then, reflecting on her reporting at the time, Christiane talks about the attacks and how we got to where we are. Lawrence Wilkerson, the former Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell, discusses America's place in the world today. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Joseph Pfeifer, a retired New York fire department chief, about his extraordinary personal story of that day.  To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy